how to view pdf file in asp.net c# : How to select text on pdf Library SDK component .net wpf web page mvc R%20dummies33-part995

If this concept is unfamiliar to you, don’t worry. Just remember that the
density is proportional to the chance that any value in your data is approximately
equal to that value. In fact, for a histogram, the density is calculated from the
counts, so the only difference between a histogram with frequencies and one with
densities, is the scale of the y-axis. For the rest, they look exactly the same.
Creating a density plot
You can estimate the density function of a variable using the 
density()
function. The output of this function itself doesn’t tell you that much, but you can
easily use it in a plot. For example, you can get the density of the mileage variable
mpg
like this:
> mpgdens <- density(cars$mpg)
The object you get this way is a list containing a lot of information you don’t
really need to look at. But that list makes plotting the density as easy as saying
“plot the density”:
> plot(mpgdens)
You see the result of this command on the left side of Figure 14-2. The plot
looks a bit rough on the edges, but you can polish it with the tricks shown in
Chapter 16. The important thing is to see how your data comes out. The density
object is plotted as a line, with the actual values of your data on the x-axis and the
density on the y-axis.
Figure 14-2: Plotting density lines and combining them with a histogram.
How to select text on pdf - search text inside PDF file in C#.net, ASP.NET, MVC, Ajax, WinForms, WPF
Learn how to search text in PDF document and obtain text content and location information
how to select text in a pdf; can't select text in pdf file
How to select text on pdf - VB.NET PDF Text Search Library: search text inside PDF file in vb.net, ASP.NET, MVC, Ajax, WinForms, WPF
Learn How to Search Text in PDF Document and Obtain Text Content and Location Information in VB.NET application
convert pdf to searchable text online; find text in pdf files
The 
mpgdens
list object contains — among other things — an element called
x
and one called 
y
. These represent the x- and y-coordinates for plotting the
density. When R calculates the density, the 
density()
function splits up your
data in a large number of small intervals and calculates the density for the
midpoint of each interval. Those midpoints are the values for 
x
, and the
calculated densities are the values for 
y
.
Plotting densities in a histogram
Remember that the 
hist()
function returns the counts for each interval. Now
the chance that a value lies within a certain interval is directly proportional to the
counts. The more values you have within a certain interval, the greater the chance
that any value you picked is lying in that interval.
So, instead of plotting the counts in the histogram, you could just as well plot
the densities. R does all the calculations for you — the only thing you need to do is
set the 
freq
argument of 
hist()
to 
FALSE
, like this:
> hist(cars$mpg, col=’grey’, freq=FALSE)
Now the plot will look exactly the same as before; only the values on the y-
axis are different. The scale on the y-axis is set in such a way that you can add the
density plot over the histogram. For that, you use the 
lines()
function with the
density object as the argument. So, you can, for example, fancy up the previous
histogram a bit further by adding the estimated density using the following code
immediately after the previous command:
> lines(mpgdens)
You see the result of these two commands on the right side of Figure 14-2.
You get more information on how the 
lines()
function works in Chapter 16. For
now, just remember that 
lines()
uses the 
x
and 
y
elements from the density
object 
mpgdens
to plot the line.
Describing Multiple Variables
Until now, you looked at a single variable from your dataset each time. All
these statistics and plots tell part of the story, but when you have a dataset with
C# PDF Image Extract Library: Select, copy, paste PDF images in C#
C#: Select All Images from One PDF Page. C# programming sample for extracting all images from a specific PDF page. C#: Select An Image from PDF Page by Position.
search pdf documents for text; search text in multiple pdf
VB.NET PDF Image Extract Library: Select, copy, paste PDF images
VB.NET : Select An Image from PDF Page by Position. Sample for extracting an image from a specific position on PDF in VB.NET program.
converting pdf to searchable text format; how to select all text in pdf file
multiple variables, there’s a lot more of the story to be told. Taking a quick look at
the summary of the complete dataset can warn you already if something went
wrong with the data gathering and manipulation. But what statisticians really go
after is the story told by the relation between the variables. And that story begins
with describing these relations.
Summarizing a complete dataset
If you need a quick overview of your dataset, you can, of course, always use
str()
and look at the structure. But this tells you something only about the classes
of your variables and the number of observations. Also, the function 
head()
gives
you, at best, an idea of the way the data is stored in the dataset.
Getting the output
To get a better idea of the distribution of your variables in the dataset, you
can use the 
summary()
function like this:
> summary(cars)
mpg             cyl             am     gear
Min.   :10.40   Min.   :4.000   auto  :13   3:15
1st Qu.:15.43   1st Qu.:4.000   manual:19   4:12
Median :19.20   Median :6.000               5: 5
Mean   :20.09   Mean   :6.188
3rd Qu.:22.80   3rd Qu.:8.000
Max.   :33.90   Max.   :8.000
The 
summary()
function works best if you just use R interactively at the
command line for scanning your dataset quickly. You shouldn’t try to use it
within a custom function you wrote yourself. In that case, you’d better use the
functions from the first part of this chapter to get the desired statistics.
The output of the 
summary()
function shows you for every variable a set of
descriptive statistics, depending on the type of the variable:
Numerical variables: 
summary()
gives you the range, quartiles, median, and
mean.
VB.NET PDF Text Redact Library: select, redact text content from
Page. PDF Read. Text: Extract Text from PDF. Text: Search Text in PDF. Image: Extract Image from PDF. VB.NET PDF - Redact PDF Text. Help
select text in pdf; select text in pdf reader
C# PDF Text Redact Library: select, redact text content from PDF
Page: Rotate a PDF Page. PDF Read. Text: Extract Text from PDF. Text: Search Text in PDF. C#.NET PDF SDK - Redact PDF Text in C#.NET.
search a pdf file for text; convert pdf to searchable text
Factor variables: 
summary()
gives you a table with frequencies.
Numerical and factor variables: 
summary()
gives you the number of missing
values, if there are any.
Character variables: 
summary()
doesn’t give you any information at all apart
from the length and the class (which is 
‘character’
).
Fixing a problem
Did you see the weird values for the variable 
cyl
? A quick look at the summary
can tell you there’s something fishy going on, as, for example, the minimum and
the first quartile have exactly the same value. In fact, the variable 
cyl
has only
three values and would be better off as a factor. So, let’s put that variable out of its
misery:
> cars$cyl <- as.factor(cars$cyl)
Now you can use it correctly in the remainder of this chapter.
Plotting quantiles for subgroups
Often you want to split up this analysis for different subgroups in order to
compare them. You need to do this if you want to know how the average lip size
compares between male and female kissing gouramis (great fish by the way!) or,
in the case of our example, you want to know whether the number of cylinders in a
car influences the mileage.
Of course you can use 
tapply()
to calculate any of the descriptives for
subgroups defined by a factor variable. In Chapter 13, you do exactly that. But in R
you find some more tools for summarizing descriptives for different subgroups.
One way to quickly compare groups is to construct a box-and-whisker plot
from the data. You could construct this plot by calculating the range, the quartiles,
and the median for each group, but luckily you can just tell R to do all that for you.
For example, if you want to know how the mileage compares between cars with a
different number of cylinders, you simply use the 
boxplot()
function to get the
result shown in Figure 14-3:
C# HTML5 PDF Viewer SDK to view PDF document online in C#.NET
Tools Tab. Item. Name. Description. 1. Select tool. Select text and image on PDF document. 2. Hand tool. Pan around the document. Go To Tab. Item. Name. Description
search text in pdf using java; how to search pdf files for text
VB.NET PDF- View PDF Online with VB.NET HTML5 PDF Viewer
Tools Tab. Item. Name. Description. 1. Select tool. Select text and image on PDF document. 2. Hand tool. Pan around the document. Go To Tab. Item. Name. Description
pdf searchable text converter; pdf make text searchable
> boxplot(mpg ~ cyl, data=cars)
Figure 14-3: Use the 
boxplot()
function to get this result.
You supply a simple formula as the first argument to 
boxplot()
. This formula
reads as “plot boxes for the variable 
mpg
for the groups defined by the variable
cyl
.” You find more information on the formula interface for functions in Chapter
13.
This plot uses quantiles to give you an idea of how the data is spread within
each subgroup. The line in the middle of each box represents the median, and the
edges of the box represent the first and the third quartiles. The whiskers extend to
either the minimum and the maximum of the data or 1.5 times the distance
between the first and the third quartiles, whichever is smaller.
To be completely correct, the edges of the box represent the lower and
upper hinges from the five-number summary, calculated using the 
fivenum()
function. They’re equal to the quartiles only if you have an odd number of
observations in your data. Otherwise, the results of 
fivenum()
and 
quantile()
may differ a bit due to differences in the details of the calculation.
VB.NET PDF - View PDF with WPF PDF Viewer for VB.NET
Tools Tab. Item. Name. Description. Ⅰ. Hand. Pan around the PDF document. Ⅱ. Select. Select text and image to copy and paste using Ctrl+C and Ctrl+V.
search pdf files for text; pdf text search tool
C# WPF PDF Viewer SDK to view PDF document in C#.NET
Tools Tab. Item. Name. Description. Ⅰ. Hand. Pan around the PDF document. Ⅱ. Select. Select text and image to copy and paste using Ctrl+C and Ctrl+V.
text select tool pdf; how to select text on pdf
You can let the whiskers always extend to the minimum and the maximum
by setting the 
range
argument of the 
boxplot()
function to 
0
.
Extracting the data from the plots
The 
hist()
and 
boxplot()
functions have another incredibly nice feature:
You can get access to all the information R uses to plot the histogram or box
plot and use it in further calculations. Getting that information is as easy as
assigning the output of the function to an object. For example, you get the
information on the breaks, counts, and density in a histogram like this:
> mpghist <- hist(cars$mpg)
Your histogram is still plotted, but on top of that you now create an object
that contains a list with — among other things — the elements 
breaks
,
counts
, and 
density
. For a box plot, you can do exactly the same and get an
object that contains a list with — among other things — the elements 
stats
and 
n
, representing the used statistics and the number of cases in each
category. On the Help pages for 
hist()
and 
boxplot()
, you find more
information on the list elements in the “Value” sections.
All that information you could, of course, also get using other functions in R.
It can help, though, to quickly add some extra information to a plot. For
example, you can add the number of cases for each box to a box plot like
this:
> mpgbox <- boxplot(mpg ~ cyl, data=cars)
> n <- nlevels(as.factor(cars$cyl))
> text(1:n, mpgbox$stats[1,], + paste(‘n =’,
mpgbox$n), + pos=1)
With this code, you add a text value under the lower whisker. The x-
coordinates 1 through n coincide with the middle of each box. You get the y-
coordinates from the 
stats
element in the 
mpgbox
object, which tells you
where the lower whisker is. The argument 
pos=1
in the 
text
function places
the text under the coordinates. You can try playing around with it yourself.
While you’re at it, check Chapter 16 for some more tips on manipulating
plots.
Tracking correlations
C# WPF PDF Viewer SDK to annotate PDF document in C#.NET
Click to select drawing annotation with default properties. Other Tab. Item. Name. Description. 17. Text box. Click to add a text box to specific location on PDF
cannot select text in pdf file; search multiple pdf files for text
C# Image: Select Document or Image Source to View in Web Viewer
Supported document formats: TIFF, PDF, Office Word, Excel, PowerPoint, Dicom; Supported Viewer Library enables Visual C# programmers easily to select and load
select text in pdf file; pdf text searchable
Statisticians love it when they can link one variable to another. Sunlight, for
example, is detrimental to skirts: The longer the sun shines, the shorter skirts
become. We say that the number of hours of sunshine correlates with skirt length.
Obviously, there isn’t really a direct causal relationship here — you won’t find short
skirts during the summer in polar regions. But, in many cases, the search for causal
relationships starts with looking at correlations.
To illustrate this, let’s take a look at the famous 
iris
dataset in R. One of the
greatest statisticians of all time, Sir Ronald Fisher, used this dataset to illustrate
how multiple measurements can be used to discriminate between different species.
This dataset contains five variables, as you can see by using the 
names()
function:
> names(iris)
[1] “Sepal.Length” “Sepal.Width”  “Petal.Length”
[4] “Petal.Width”  “Species”
It contains measurements of flower characteristics for three species of iris and
from 50 flowers for each species. Two variables describe the sepals (
Sepal.Length
and 
Sepal.Width
), two other variables describe the petals (
Petal.Length
and
Petal.Width
), and the last variable (
Species
) is a factor indicating from which
species the flower comes.
Looking at relations
Although looks can be deceiving, you want to eyeball your data before digging
deeper into it. In Chapter 16, you create scatterplots for two variables. To plot a
grid of scatterplots for all combinations of two variables in your dataset, you can
simply use the 
plot()
function on your data frame, like this:
> plot(iris[-5])
Because scatterplots are useful only for continuous variables, you can drop
all variables that are not continuous. Too many variables in the plot matrix
makes the plots difficult to see. In the previous code, you drop the variable
Species
, because that’s a factor.
You can see the result of this simple line of code in Figure 14-4. The variable
names appear in the squares on the diagonal, indicating which variables are
plotted along the x-axis and the y-axis. For example, the second plot on the third
row has 
Sepal.Width
on the x-axis and 
Petal.Length
on the y-axis.
When the 
plot()
function notices that you pass a data frame as an
argument, it calls the 
pairs()
function to create the plot matrix. This function
offers you a lot more flexibility. For example, on the Help page 
?pairs
, you
find some code that adds a histogram on the diagonal plots. Check out the
examples on the Help page for some more tricks.
Figure 14-4: Plotting the relations for all variables in a dataset.
Getting the numbers
The amount in which two variables vary together can be described by the
correlation coefficient. You get the correlations between a set of variables in R very
easily by using the 
cor()
function. You simply add the two variables you want to
examine as the arguments. For example, if you want to check how much the petal
width correlates with the petal length, you simply do the following:
> with(iris, cor(Petal.Width, Petal.Length))
[1] 0.9628654
This tells you that the relation between the petal width and the petal length is
almost a perfect line, as you also can see in the fourth plot of the third row in
Figure 14-4.
Calculating correlations for multiple variables
You also can calculate the correlation among multiple variables at once, much
in the same way as you can plot the relations among multiple variables. So, for
example, you can calculate the correlations that correspond with the plot in Figure
14-4 with the following line:
> iris.cor <- cor(iris[-5])
As always, you can save the outcome of this function in an object. This lets
you examine the structure of the function output so you can figure out how you can
use it in the rest of your code. Here’s a look at the structure of the object 
iris.cor
:
> str(iris.cor)
num [1:4, 1:4] 1 -0.118 0.872 0.818 -0.118 ...
- attr(*, “dimnames”)=List of 2
..$ : chr [1:4] “Sepal.Length” “Sepal.Width” “Petal.Length”
“Petal.Width”
..$ : chr [1:4] “Sepal.Length” “Sepal.Width” “Petal.Length”
“Petal.Width”
This output tells you that 
iris.cor
is a matrix with the names of the variables
as both row names and column names. To find the correlation of two variables in
that matrix, you can use the names as indices — for example:
> iris.cor[‘Petal.Width’, ‘Petal.Length’]
[1] 0.9628654
Dealing with missing values
The 
cor()
function can deal with missing values in multiple ways. For that, you
set the argument 
use
to one of the possible text values. The value for the 
use
argument is especially important if you calculate the correlations of the variables in
a data frame. By setting this argument to different values, you can
Use all observations by setting 
use=’everything’
. This means that if there’s
any 
NA
value in one of the variables, the resulting correlation is 
NA
as well. This
is the default.
Exclude all observations that have 
NA
for at least one variable. For this,
you set 
use=’complete.obs’
. Note that this may leave you with only a few
observations if missing values are spread through the complete dataset.
Exclude observations with 
NA
values for every pair of variables you
examine. For that, you set the argument 
use=’pairwise’
. This ensures that you
can calculate the correlation for every pair of variables without losing
information because of missing values in the other variables.
In fact, you can calculate different measures of correlation. By default, R
calculates the standard Pearson correlation coefficient. For data that is not
normally distributed, you can use the 
cor()
function to calculate the Spearman
rank correlation, or Kendall’s tau. For this, you have to set the 
method
argument to the appropriate value. You can find more information about
calculating the different correlation statistics on the Help page 
?cor
. For more
formal testing of correlations, look at the 
cor.test()
function and the related
Help page.
Working with Tables
In the “Describing Categories” section, earlier in this chapter, you use tables to
summarize one categorical variable. But tables can easily describe more variables
at once. You may want to know how many men and women teach in each
department of your university (although that’s not the most traditional criterion for
choosing your major).
Creating a two-way table
A two-way table is a table that describes two categorical variables together. It
contains the number of cases for each combination of the categories in both
variables. The analysis of categorical data always starts with tables, and R gives
you a whole toolset to work with them. But first, you have to create the tables.
Creating a table from two variables
For example, you want to know how many cars have three, four, or five gears,
but split up for cars with automatic gearboxes and cars with manual gearboxes.
You can do this again with using the 
table()
function with two arguments, like
this:
Documents you may be interested
Documents you may be interested