how to view pdf file in asp.net c# : How to make pdf text searchable Library SDK component .net wpf web page mvc R%20dummies34-part996

> with(cars, table(am, gear))
3  4  5
auto    0  8  5
manual 15  4  0
The levels of the variable you give as the first argument are the row names,
and the levels of the variable you give as the second argument are the column
names. In the table, you get the counts for every combination. For example,
you can count 15 cars with manual gearboxes and three gears.
Creating tables from a matrix
Researchers also use tables for more serious business, like for finding out
whether a certain behavior (like smoking) has an impact on the risk of getting an
illness (for example, lung cancer). This way you have four possible cases: risk
behavior and sick, risk behavior and healthy, no risk behavior and healthy, or no
risk behavior and sick.
Often the result of such a study consists of the counts for every combination. If
you have the counts for every case, you can very easily create the table yourself,
like this:
> trial <- matrix(c(34,11,9,32), ncol=2)
> colnames(trial) <- c(‘sick’, ‘healthy’)
> rownames(trial) <- c(‘risk’, ‘no_risk’)
> trial.table <- as.table(trial)
With this code, you do the following:
1. Create a matrix with the number of cases for every combination of
sick/healthy and risk/no risk behavior.
2. Add column names to point out which category the counts are for.
3. Convert that matrix to a table.
The result looks like this:
> trial.table
sick healthy
risk      34       9
no_risk   11      32
How to make pdf text searchable - search text inside PDF file in C#.net, ASP.NET, MVC, Ajax, WinForms, WPF
Learn how to search text in PDF document and obtain text content and location information
find text in pdf image; search pdf for text in multiple files
How to make pdf text searchable - VB.NET PDF Text Search Library: search text inside PDF file in vb.net, ASP.NET, MVC, Ajax, WinForms, WPF
Learn How to Search Text in PDF Document and Obtain Text Content and Location Information in VB.NET application
searching pdf files for text; how to select text in pdf image
A table like 
trial.table
can be seen as a summary of two variables. One
variable indicates if the person is sick or healthy, and the other variable indicates
whether the person shows risky behavior.
Extracting the numbers
Although tables and matrices are two different beasts, you can treat a two-
way table like a matrix in most situations. This becomes handy if you want to
extract values from the table. If you want to know how many people were sick and
showed risk behavior, you simply do the following:
> trial.table[‘risk’, ‘sick’]
[1] 34
All the tricks with indices that we cover in Chapters 4 and 7 work on tables,
too. A table of a single variable reacts the same as a vector, and a two-way
table reacts the same as a matrix.
Converting tables to a data frame
The resulting object 
trial.table
looks exactly the same as the matrix 
trial
,
but it really isn’t. The difference becomes clear when you transform these objects
to a data frame. Take a look at the outcome of the following code:
> trial.df <- as.data.frame(trial)
> str(trial.df)
‘data.frame’: 2 obs. of  2 variables:
$ sick   : num  34 11
$ healthy: num  9 32
Here you get a data frame with two variables (
sick
and 
healthy
) with each
two observations. On the other hand, if you convert the table to a data frame, you
get the following result:
> trial.table.df <- as.data.frame(trial.table)
> str(trial.table.df)
‘data.frame’: 4 obs. of  3 variables:
$ Var1: Factor w/ 2 levels “risk”,”no_risk”: 1 2 1 2
C# PDF Convert to Text SDK: Convert PDF to txt files in C#.net
What should be noted here is that our PDF to text converting library Thus, please make sure you have installed VS 2005 or above versions and .NET Framework
how to search a pdf document for text; pdf searchable text
VB.NET Image: Robust OCR Recognition SDK for VB.NET, .NET Image
can be Png, Jpeg, Tiff, image-only PDF or Bmp following sample codes demonstrate how to extract text from bmp of image file formats, so you can make all desired
text searchable pdf; pdf find highlighted text
$ Var2: Factor w/ 2 levels “sick”,”healthy”: 1 1 2 2
$ Freq: num  34 11 9 32
The 
as.data.frame()
function converts a table to a data frame in a format
that you need for regression analysis on count data. If you need to summarize
the counts first, you use 
table()
to create the desired table.
Now you get a data frame with three variables. The first two — 
Var1
and 
Var2
— are factor variables for which the levels are the values of the rows and the
columns of the table, respectively. The third variable — 
Freq
— contains the
frequencies for every combination of the levels in the first two variables.
In fact, you also can create tables in more than two dimensions by adding
more variables as arguments, or by transforming a multidimensional array to a
table using 
as.table()
. You can access the numbers the same way you do for
multidimensional arrays, and the 
as.data.frame()
function creates as many
factor variables as there are dimensions.
Looking at margins and proportions
In categorical data analysis, many techniques use the marginal totals of the
table in the calculations. The marginal totals are the total counts of the cases over
the categories of interest. For example, the marginal totals for behavior would be
the sum over the rows of the table 
trial.table
.
Adding margins to the table
R allows you to extend a table with the marginal totals of the rows and
columns in one simple command. For that, you use the 
addmargins()
function, like
this:
> addmargins(trial.table)
sick healthy Sum
risk      34       9  43
no_risk   11      32  43
Sum       45      41  86
VB.NET PDF Convert to Text SDK: Convert PDF to txt files in vb.net
API, users will be able to convert a PDF file or a certain page to text and easily save Before you get started, please make sure that you have installed the
make pdf text searchable; pdf editor with search and replace text
Online Convert PDF to Text file. Best free online PDF txt
We try to make it as easy as possible to convert your PDF NET solution for Visual C# developers to convert PDF document to editable & searchable text file.
how to select text in pdf reader; convert a scanned pdf to searchable text
You also can add the margins for only one dimension by specifying the 
margin
argument for the 
addmargins()
function. For example, to get only the marginal
counts for the behavior, you do the following:
> addmargins(trial.table,margin=2)
sick healthy Sum
risk      34       9  43
no_risk   11      32  43
The 
margin
argument takes a number or a vector of numbers, but it can be
a bit confusing. The margins are numbered the same way as in the 
apply()
function. So 
1
stands for rows and 
2
for columns. To add the column margin,
you need to set 
margin
to 
2
, but this column margin contains the row totals.
Calculating proportions
You can convert a table with counts to a table with proportions very easily
using the 
prop.table()
function. This also works for multiway tables. If you want
to know the proportions of observations in every cell of the table to the total
number of cases, you simply do the following:
> prop.table(trial.table)
sick   healthy
risk    0.3953488 0.1046512
no_risk 0.1279070 0.3720930
This tells you that, for example, 10.4 percent of the people in the study were
healthy, even when they showed risk behavior.
Calculating proportions over columns and rows
But what if you want to know which fraction of people with risk behavior got
sick? Then you don’t have to calculate the proportions by dividing the counts by the
total number of cases for the whole dataset; instead, you divide the counts by the
marginal totals.
R lets you do this very easily using, again, the 
prop.table()
function, but this
VB.NET Create PDF Library SDK to convert PDF from other file
Create writable PDF file from text (.txt) file in VB.NET project. Creating a PDF document is a good way to share your ideas because you can make sure that
pdf text select tool; pdf select text
OCR Images in Web Image Viewer | Online Tutorials
a document and convert it to a searchable PDF file; page provides detailed information for recognizing text from scanned in Web Document Viewer, make sure that
search pdf files for text programmatically; how to make a pdf document text searchable
time specifying the 
margin
argument.
Take a look at the table again. You want to calculate the proportions over
each row, because each row represents one category of behavior. So, to get the
correct proportions, you specify 
margin=1
like this:
> prop.table(trial.table, margin=1)
sick   healthy
risk    0.7906977 0.2093023
no_risk 0.2558140 0.7441860
In every row, the proportions sum up to 1. Now you can see that 79 percent of
the people showing risk behavior got sick. Well, it isn’t big news that risky behavior
can cause diseases, and the proportions shown in the last result point in that
direction. Yet, scientists believe you only if you can back it up in a more objective
way. That’s the point at which you should consider doing some statistical testing.
We show you how that’s done in the next chapter.
VB.NET Image: Start with RasterEdge .NET Imaging SDK in Visual
dll: With this dll, users are capable of recognizing text from scanned documents, images or existing PDF documents and creating searchable PDF-OCR in VB.NET.
pdf search and replace text; pdf find and replace text
Chapter 15
Testing Differences and Relations
In This Chapter
Evaluating distributions
Comparing two samples
Comparing more than two samples
Testing relations between categorical variables
Working with models
It’s one thing to describe your data and plot a few graphs, but if you want to
draw conclusions from these graphs, people expect a bit more proof. This is where
the data analysts chime in and start pouring p-values generously over reports and
papers. These p-values summarize the conclusions of statistical tests, basically
indicating how likely it is that the result you see is purely due to chance. The story
is a bit more complex — but for that you need to take a look at a statistics
handbook like Statistics For Dummies, 2nd Edition, by Deborah J. Rumsey, PhD
(Wiley).
R really shines when you need some serious statistical number crunching.
Statistics is the alpha and omega of this language, but why have we waited until
Chapter 15 to cover some of that? There are two very good reasons why we wait to
talk about statistics until now:
You can start with the statistics only after you’ve your data in the right format,
so you need to get that down first.
R contains an overwhelming amount of advanced statistical techniques, many of
which come with their own books and manuals.
Luckily, many packages follow the same principles regarding the user
interface. So, instead of trying to cover all of what’s possible, in this chapter we
introduce you to some basic statistical tests and explain the interfaces in more
detail so you get familiar with that.
Taking a Closer Look at Distributions
The normal distribution (also known as the Gaussian distribution or bell curve)
is a key concept in statistics. Much statistical inference is based on the assumption
that, at some point in your calculations, you have values that are distributed
normally. Testing whether the distribution of your data follows this bell curve
closely enough is often one of the first things you do before you choose a test to
test your hypothesis.
If you’re not familiar with the normal distribution, check out Statistics For
Dummies, 2nd Edition, by Deborah J. Rumsey, PhD (Wiley), which devotes a
whole chapter to this concept.
Observing beavers
Let’s take a look at an example. The biologist and statistician Penny Reynolds
observed some beavers for a complete day and measured their body temperature
every ten minutes. She also wrote down whether the beavers were active at that
moment. You find the measurements for one of these animals in the dataset
beavers
, which consists of two data frames; for the examples, we use the second
one, which contains only four variables, as you can see in the following:
> str(beaver2)
‘data.frame’: 100 obs. of  4 variables:
$ day  : num  307 307 307 307 307 ...
$ time : num  930 940 950 1000 1010 ...
$ temp : num  36.6 36.7 ...
$ activ: num  0 0 0 0 0 ...
If you want to know whether there’s a difference between the average body
temperature during periods of activity and periods without, you first have to choose
a test. To know which test is appropriate, you need to find out if the temperature is
distributed normally during both periods. So, let’s take a closer look at the
distributions.
Testing normality graphically
You could, of course, plot a histogram for every sample you want to look at.
You can use the 
histogram()
function pretty easily to plot histograms for different
groups. (This function is part of the 
lattice
package you use in Chapter 17.)
Using the formula interface, you can plot two histograms in Figure 15-1 at
once using the following code:
> library(lattice)
> histogram(~temp | factor(activ), data=beaver2)
Figure 15-1: Plotting histograms for different groups.
You find more information about the formula interface in Chapter 13, but let’s
go over this formula once more. The 
histogram()
function uses a one-sided
formula, so you don’t specify anything at the left side of the tilde (
~
). On the right
side, you specify the following:
Which variable the histogram should be created for: In this case, that’s
the variable 
temp
, containing the body temperature.
After the vertical line (
|
),the factor by which the data should be split: In
this case, that’s the variable 
activ
that has a value 
1
if the beaver was active
and 
0
if it was not. To convert this numeric variable to a factor, you use the
factor()
function.
The vertical line (
|
) in the formula interface can be read as “conditional on.”
It’s used in that context in the formula interfaces of more advanced statistical
functions as well.
Using quantile plots
Still, histograms leave much to the interpretation of the viewer. A better
graphical way to tell whether your data is distributed normally is to look at a so-
called quantile-quantile (QQ) plot.
With this technique, you plot quantiles against each other. If you compare two
samples, for example, you simply compare the quantiles of both samples. Or, to
put it a bit differently, R does the following to construct a QQ plot:
It sorts the data of both samples.
It plots these sorted values against each other.
If both samples don’t contain the same number of values, R calculates extra
values by interpolation for the smallest sample to create two samples of the
same size.
Comparing two samples
Of course, you don’t have to do that all by yourself, you can simply use the
qqplot()
function for that. So, to check whether the temperatures during activity
and during rest are distributed equally, you simply do the following:
> qqplot(beaver2$temp[beaver2$activ==1],
+        beaver2$temp[beaver2$activ==0])
This creates a plot where the ordered values are plotted against each other,
as shown in Figure 15-2. You can use all the tricks from Chapter 16 to change axis
titles, color and appearance of the points, and so on.
Figure 15-2: Plotting a QQ plot of two different samples.
Between the square brackets, you can use a logical vector to select the
cases you want. Here you select all cases where the variable 
activ
equals 
1
for the first sample, and all cases where that variable equals 
0
for the second
sample.
Using a QQ plot to check for normality
In most cases, you don’t want to compare two samples with each other, but
compare a sample with a theoretical sample that comes from a certain distribution
(for example, the normal distribution).
To make a QQ plot this way, R has the special 
qqnorm()
function. As the name
implies, this function plots your sample against a normal distribution. You simply
give the sample you want to plot as a first argument and add any of the graphical
parameters from Chapter 16 you like. R then creates a sample with values coming
from the standard normal distribution, or a normal distribution with a mean of zero
and a standard deviation of one. With this second sample, R creates the QQ plot as
explained before.
R also has a 
qqline()
function, which adds a line to your normal QQ plot.
This line makes it a lot easier to evaluate whether you see a clear deviation
from normality. The closer all points lie to the line, the closer the distribution
of your sample comes to the normal distribution. The 
qqline()
function also
takes the sample as an argument.
Documents you may be interested
Documents you may be interested