how to view pdf file in asp.net c# : Make pdf text searchable software control dll winforms web page asp.net web forms R%20dummies35-part997

Now you want to do this for the temperatures during both the active and the
inactive period of the beaver. You can use the 
qqnorm()
function twice to create
both plots. For the inactive periods, you can use the following code:
> qqnorm( beaver2$temp[beaver2$activ==0], main=’Inactive’)
> qqline( beaver2$temp[beaver2$activ==0] )
You can do the same for the active period by changing the value 
0
to 
1
. The
resulting plots you see in Figure 15-3.
Figure 15-3: Comparing samples to the normal distribution with QQ plots.
Testing normality in a formal way
All these graphical methods for checking normality still leave much to your
own interpretation. There’s much discussion in the statistical world about the
meaning of these plots and what can be seen as normal. If you show any of these
plots to ten different statisticians, you can get ten different answers. That’s quite
an achievement when you expect a simple yes or no, but statisticians don’t do
simple answers.
On the contrary, everything in statistics revolves around measuring
uncertainty. This uncertainty is summarized in a probability — often called a p-
value — and to calculate this probability, you need a formal test.
Probably the most widely used test for normality is the Shapiro-Wilks test. The
function to perform this test, conveniently called 
shapiro.test()
, couldn’t be easier
to use. You give the sample as the one and only argument, as in the following
example:
Make pdf text searchable - search text inside PDF file in C#.net, ASP.NET, MVC, Ajax, WinForms, WPF
Learn how to search text in PDF document and obtain text content and location information
pdf search and replace text; how to search a pdf document for text
Make pdf text searchable - VB.NET PDF Text Search Library: search text inside PDF file in vb.net, ASP.NET, MVC, Ajax, WinForms, WPF
Learn How to Search Text in PDF Document and Obtain Text Content and Location Information in VB.NET application
how to select all text in pdf; pdf text search tool
> shapiro.test(beaver2$temp)
Shapiro-Wilks normality test
data:  beaver2$temp
W = 0.9334, p-value = 7.764e-05
This function returns a list object, and the p-value is contained in a element
called 
p.value
. So, for example, you can extract the p-value simply by using
the following code:
> result <- shapiro.test(beaver2$temp)
> result$p.value
[1] 7.763782e-05
This p-value tells you what the chances are that the sample comes from a
normal distribution. The lower this value, the smaller the chance. Statisticians
typically use a value of 0.05 as a cutoff, so when the p-value is lower than 0.05,
you can conclude that the sample deviates from normality. In the preceding
example, the p-value is clearly lower than 0.05 — and that shouldn’t come as a
surprise; the distribution of the temperature shows two separate peaks (refer to
Figure 15-1). This is nothing like the bell curve of a normal distribution.
When you choose a test, you may be more interested in the normality in
each sample. You can test both samples in one line using the 
tapply()
function, like this:
> with(beaver2, tapply(temp, activ, shapiro.test))
This code returns the results of a Shapiro-Wilks test on the temperature for
every group specified by the variable 
activ
.
People often refer to the Kolmogorov-Smirnov test for testing normality.
You carry out the test by using the 
ks.test()
function in base R. But this R
function is not suited to test deviation from normality; you can use it only to
compare different distributions.
C# PDF Convert to Text SDK: Convert PDF to txt files in C#.net
What should be noted here is that our PDF to text converting library Thus, please make sure you have installed VS 2005 or above versions and .NET Framework
pdf text search; can't select text in pdf file
VB.NET Image: Robust OCR Recognition SDK for VB.NET, .NET Image
can be Png, Jpeg, Tiff, image-only PDF or Bmp following sample codes demonstrate how to extract text from bmp of image file formats, so you can make all desired
pdf editor with search and replace text; how to search pdf files for text
Comparing Two Samples
Comparing groups is one of the most basic problems in statistics. If you want
to know if extra vitamins in the diet of cows is increasing their milk production, you
give the normal diet to a control group and extra vitamins to a test group, and then
you compare the milk production in two groups. By comparing the mileage
between cars with automatic gearboxes and those with manual gearboxes, you can
find out which one is the more economical option.
Testing differences
R gives you two standard tests for comparing two groups with numerical data:
the t-test with the 
t.test()
function, and the Wilcoxon test with the 
wilcox.test()
function. If you want to use the 
t.test()
function, you first have to check, among
other things, whether both samples are normally distributed using any of the
methods from the previous section. For the Wilcoxon test, this isn’t necessary.
Carrying out a t-test
Let’s take another look at the data of that beaver. If you want to know if the
average temperature differs between the periods the beaver is active and inactive,
you can do so with a simple command:
> t.test(temp ~ activ, data=beaver2)
Welch Two-Sample t-test
data:  temp by activ
t = -18.5479, df = 80.852, p-value < 2.2e-16
alternative hypothesis: true difference in means is not equal to 0
95 percent confidence interval:
-0.8927106 -0.7197342
sample estimates:
mean in group 0 mean in group 1
37.09684        37.90306
Normally, you can only carry out a t-test on samples for which the variances
are approximately equal. R uses Welch’s variation on the t-test, which corrects
for unequal variances.
You get a whole lot of information here:
VB.NET PDF Convert to Text SDK: Convert PDF to txt files in vb.net
API, users will be able to convert a PDF file or a certain page to text and easily save Before you get started, please make sure that you have installed the
search text in multiple pdf; text searchable pdf file
Online Convert PDF to Text file. Best free online PDF txt
We try to make it as easy as possible to convert your PDF NET solution for Visual C# developers to convert PDF document to editable & searchable text file.
pdf find text; find and replace text in pdf file
The second line gives you the test statistic (
t
for this test), the degrees of
freedom (
df
), and the according p-value. The very small p-value indicates that
the means of both samples differ significantly.
The alternative hypothesis tells you what you can conclude if the p-value is
lower than the limit for significance. Generally, scientists consider the alternative
hypothesis to be true if the p-value is lower than 0.05.
The 95 percent confidence interval is the interval that contains the difference
between the means with 95 percent probability, so in this case the difference
between the means lies probably between 0.72 and 0.89.
The last line gives you the means of both samples.
You read the formula 
temp ~ activ
as “evaluate 
temp
within groups
determined by 
activ
.” Alternatively, you can use two separate vectors for the
samples you want to compare and pass both to the function, as in the
following example:
> activetemp <- beaver2$temp[beaver2$activ==1]
> inactivetemp <- beaver2$temp[beaver2$activ==0]
> t.test(activetemp, inactivetemp)
Dropping assumptions
In some cases, your data deviates significantly from normality and you can’t
use the 
t.test()
function. For those cases, you have the 
wilcox.test()
function,
which you use in exactly the same way, as shown in the following example:
> wilcox.test(temp ~ activ, data=beaver2)
This give you the following output:
Wilcoxon rank-sum test with continuity correction
data:  temp by activ
W = 15, p-value < 2.2e-16
alternative hypothesis: true location shift is not equal to 0
VB.NET Create PDF Library SDK to convert PDF from other file
Create writable PDF file from text (.txt) file in VB.NET project. Creating a PDF document is a good way to share your ideas because you can make sure that
search text in pdf using java; text select tool pdf
OCR Images in Web Image Viewer | Online Tutorials
a document and convert it to a searchable PDF file; page provides detailed information for recognizing text from scanned in Web Document Viewer, make sure that
converting pdf to searchable text format; cannot select text in pdf
Again, you get the value for the test statistic (
W
in this test) and a p-value.
Under that information, you read the alternative hypothesis, and that differs a bit
from the alternative hypothesis of a t-test. The Wilcoxon test looks at whether the
center of your data (the location) differs between both samples.
With this code, you perform the Wilcoxon rank-sum test or Mann-Whitney U
test. Both tests are completely equivalent, so R doesn’t contain a separate
function for Mann-Whitney’s U test.
Testing direction
In both previous examples, you test whether the samples differ without
specifying in which way. Statisticians call this a two-sided test. Imagine you don’t
want to know whether body temperature differs between active and inactive
periods, but whether body temperature is lower during inactive periods.
To do this, you have to specify the argument alternative in either the 
t.test()
or 
wilcox.test()
function. This argument can take three values:
By default, it has the value 
‘two.sided’
, which means you want the standard
two-sided test.
If you want to test whether the mean (or location) of the first group is lower,
you give it the value 
‘less’
.
If you want to test whether that mean is bigger, you specify the value
‘greater’
.
If you use the formula interface for these tests, the groups are ordered in
the same order as the levels of the factor you use. You have to take that into
account to know which group is seen as the first group. If you give the data for
both groups as separate vectors, the first vector is the first group.
Comparing paired data
VB.NET Image: Start with RasterEdge .NET Imaging SDK in Visual
dll: With this dll, users are capable of recognizing text from scanned documents, images or existing PDF documents and creating searchable PDF-OCR in VB.NET.
search pdf files for text; search pdf for text in multiple files
When testing differences between two groups, you can have either paired or
unpaired data. Paired data comes from experiments where two different
treatments were given to the same subjects.
For example, researchers gave ten people two variants of a sleep medicine.
Each time the researchers recorded the difference in hours of sleep with and
without the drugs. Because each person received both variants, the data is paired.
You find the data of this experiment in the dataset 
sleep
, which has three
variables:
A numeric variable 
extra
, which give the extra hours of sleep after the
medication is taken
A factor variable 
group
that tells which variant the person took
A factor variable 
id
that indicates the ten different test persons
Now they want to know whether both variants have a different effect on the
length of the sleep. Both the 
t.test()
and the 
wilcox.test()
functions have an
argument paired that you can set to 
TRUE
in order to carry out a test on paired
data. You can test differences between both variances using the following code:
> t.test(extra ~ group, data=sleep, paired=TRUE)
This gives you the following output:
Paired t-test
data:  extra by group
t = -4.0621, df = 9, p-value = 0.002833
alternative hypothesis: true difference in means is not equal to 0
95 percent confidence interval:
-2.4598858 -0.7001142
sample estimates:
mean of the differences
-1.58
Unlike the unpaired test, you don’t get the means of both groups; instead, you
get a single mean of the differences.
Testing Counts and Proportions
Many research questions revolve around counts instead of continuous
numerical measurements. Counts can be summarized in tables and subsequently
analyzed. In the following section, you use some of the basic tests for counts and
proportions contained in R. Be aware, though, that this is just the tip of the
iceberg; R has a staggering amount of statistical procedures for categorical data
available.
If you need more background on the statistics, check the book Categorical
Data Analysis, 2nd Edition, by Alan Agresti (Wiley-Interscience). In addition,
Jana Thompson wrote a manual with R code to illustrate all the examples in
Agresti’s book; you can download it on her website at 
https://home.
comcast.net/~lthompson221/Splusdiscrete2.pdf
.
Checking out proportions
Let’s look at an example to illustrate the basic tests for proportions.
The following example is based on real research, published by Robert
Rutledge, MD, and his colleagues in the Annals of Surgery (1993).
In a hospital in North Carolina, the doctors registered the patients who were
involved in a car accident and whether they used seat belts. The following matrix
represents the number of survivors and deceased patients in each group:
> survivors <- matrix(c(1781,1443,135,47), ncol=2)
> colnames(survivors) <- c(‘survived’,’died’)
> rownames(survivors) <- c(‘no seat belt’,’seat belt’)
> survivors
survived died
no seat belt     1781  135
seat belt        1443   47
To know whether seat belts made a difference in the chances of surviving, you
can carry out a proportion test. This test tells how probable it is that both
proportions are the same. A low p-value tells you that both proportions probably
differ from each other. To test this in R, you can use the 
prop.test()
function on
the preceding matrix:
> result.prop <- prop.test(survivors)
You also can use the 
prop.test()
function on tables or vectors. If you use it
with vectors, remember that the first vector has to be the number of
successes, and the second number has to be the total number of cases.
The 
prop.test()
function then gives you the following output:
> result.prop
2-sample test for equality of proportions with continuity correction
data:  survivors
X-squared = 24.3328, df = 1, p-value = 8.105e-07
alternative hypothesis: two.sided
95 percent confidence interval:
-0.05400606 -0.02382527
sample estimates:
prop 1    prop 2
0.9295407 0.9684564
This test report is almost identical to the one from 
t.test()
and contains
essentially the same information. At the bottom, R prints for you the proportion of
people who died in each group. The p-value tells you how likely it is that both the
proportions are equal. So, you see that the chance of dying in a hospital after a
crash is lower if you’re wearing a seat belt at the time of the crash. R also reports
the confidence interval of the difference between the proportions.
Analyzing tables
You can use the 
prop.test()
function for matrices and tables. For
prop.test()
, these tables need to have two columns with the number of counts for
the two possible outcomes like the matrix 
survivors
from the previous section.
Testing contingency of tables
Alternatively, you can use the 
chisq.test()
function to analyze tables with a
chi-squared (χ
2
) contingency test. To do this on the matrix with the seat-belt data,
you simply do the following:
> chisq.test(survivors)
This returns the following output:
Pearson’s Chi-squared test with Yates’ continuity correction
data:  survivors
X-squared = 24.3328, df = 1, p-value = 8.105e-07
The values for the statistic (
X-squared
), the degrees of freedom, and the p-
value are exactly the same as with the 
prop.test()
function. That’s to be
expected, because — in this case, at least — both tests are equivalent.
Testing tables with more than two columns
Unlike the 
prop.test()
function, the 
chisq.test()
function can deal with
tables with more than two columns and even with more than two dimensions. To
illustrate this, let’s take a look at the table 
HairEyeColor
. You can see its structure
with the following code:
> str(HairEyeColor)
table [1:4, 1:4, 1:2] 32 53 10 3 11 50 10 30 10 25 ...
- attr(*, “dimnames”)=List of 3
..$ Hair: chr [1:4] “Black” “Brown” “Red” “Blond”
..$ Eye : chr [1:4] “Brown” “Blue” “Hazel” “Green”
..$ Sex : chr [1:2] “Male” “Female”
So, the table 
HairEyeColor
has three dimensions: one for hair color, one for
eye color, and one for sex. The table represents the distribution of these three
features among 592 students.
The dimension names of a table are stored in an attribute called 
dimnames
.
As you can see from the output of the 
str()
function, this is actually a list with
the names for the rows/columns in each dimension. If this list is a named list,
the names are used to label the dimensions. You can use the 
dimnames()
function to extract or change the dimension names. (Go to the Help page 
?
dimnames
for more examples.)
To check whether hair color and eye color are related, you can collapse the
table over the first two dimensions using the 
margin.table()
function to
summarize hair and eye color for both genders. This function sums the values in
some dimensions to give you a summary table with fewer dimensions. For that, you
have to specify which margins you want to keep.
So, to get the table of hair and eye color, you use the following:
> HairEyeMargin <- margin.table(HairEyeColor, margin=c(1,2))
> HairEyeMargin
Eye
Hair    Brown Blue Hazel Green
Black    68   20    15     5
Brown   119   84    54    29
Red      26   17    14    14
Blond     7   94    10    16
Now you can simply check whether hair and eye color are related by testing it
on this table:
> chisq.test(HairEyeMargin)
Pearson’s Chi-squared test
data:  HairEyeMargin
X-squared = 138.2898, df = 9, p-value < 2.2e-16
As expected, the output of this test tells you that some combinations of hair
and eye color are more common than others. Not a big surprise, but you can use
these techniques on other, more interesting research questions.
Extracting test results
Many tests in this chapter return a 
htest
object. That type of object is
basically a list with all the information about the test that has been carried out. All
these 
htest
objects contain at least an element 
statistic
with the value of the
statistic and an element 
p.value 
with the value of the p-value. You can see this
easily if you look at the structure of the returned object. The object returned by
shapiro.test()
in the previous section looks like this:
> str(result)
List of 4
$ statistic: Named num 0.933
..- attr(*, “names”)= chr “W”
$ p.value  : num 7.76e-05
$ method   : chr “Shapiro-Wilk normality test”
$ data.name: chr “beaver2$temp”
- attr(*, “class”)= chr “htest”
Because this 
htest
objects are lists, you can use any of the list subsetting
Documents you may be interested
Documents you may be interested