fit <- lm(waiting~eruptions, data=faithful)
The result is an object of class 
lm
. You use the function 
fitted()
to extract the
fitted values from a regression model (see Chapter 15). This is useful, because you
can then plot the fitted values on a plot. You do this next.
To add this regression line to the existing plot, you simply use the function
lines()
. You also can specify the line color with the 
col
argument:
> plot(faithful)
> lines(faithful$eruptions, fitted(fit), col=”blue”)
Another useful function is 
abline()
. This allows you to draw horizontal,
vertical, or sloped lines. To draw a vertical line at position 
eruptions==3
in the
color purple, use the following:
> abline(v=3, col=”purple”)
Your resulting graphic should look like Figure 16-4, with a vertical purple line
at 
eruptions==3
and a blue regression line.
To create a horizontal line, you also use 
abline()
, but this time you specify
the 
h
argument. For example, create a horizontal line at the mean waiting time:
> abline(h=mean(faithful$waiting))
Figure 16-4: Adding lines to a plot.
Pdf find and replace text - search text inside PDF file in C#.net, ASP.NET, MVC, Ajax, WinForms, WPF
Learn how to search text in PDF document and obtain text content and location information
pdf text search; pdf search and replace text
Pdf find and replace text - VB.NET PDF Text Search Library: search text inside PDF file in vb.net, ASP.NET, MVC, Ajax, WinForms, WPF
Learn How to Search Text in PDF Document and Obtain Text Content and Location Information in VB.NET application
cannot select text in pdf; search pdf documents for text
You also can use the function 
abline()
to create a sloped line through your
plot. In fact, by specifying the arguments 
a
and 
b
, you can draw a line that fits
the mathematical equation 
y = a + b*x
. In other words, if you specify the
coefficients of your regression model as the arguments 
a
and 
b
, you get a line
through the data that is identical to your prediction line:
> abline(a=coef(fit)[1], b=coef(fit)[2])
Even better, you can simply pass the 
lm
object to 
abline()
to draw the line
directly. (This works because there is a method 
abline.lm()
.) This makes your
code very easy:
> abline(fit, col = “red”)
Different plot types
The plot function has a 
type
argument that controls the type of plot that gets
drawn. For example, to create a plot with lines between data points, use 
type=”l”
;
to plot only the points, use 
type=”p”
; and to draw both lines and points, use
type=”b”
:
> plot(LakeHuron, type=”l”, main=’type=”l”’)
> plot(LakeHuron, type=”p”, main=’type=p”’)
> plot(LakeHuron, type=”b”, main=’type=”b”’)
Your resulting graphics should look similar to the three plots in Figure 16-5.
The plot with lines only is on the left, the plot with points is in the middle, and the
plot with both lines and points is on the right.
Using R functions to create more types of plot
Aside from 
plot()
, which gives you tremendous flexibility in creating your
own plots, R also provides a variety of functions to make specific types of
plots. (You use some of these in Chapters 14 and 15). Here are a few to
explore:
Scatterplot: If you pass two numeric vectors as arguments to 
plot()
,
the result is a scatterplot. Try:
> with(mtcars, plot(mpg, disp))
VB.NET PDF replace text library: replace text in PDF content in vb
and ASP.NET webpage. Find and replace text in PDF file in preview without adobe PDF reader component installed. Able to pull text
search pdf files for text; pdf text searchable
VB.NET PDF File Merge Library: Merge, append PDF files in vb.net
When you have downloaded the RasterEdge Image SDK for .NET, you can unzip the package to find the RasterEdge.Imaging.PDF.dll in the bin folder under the root
how to select text in pdf; can't select text in pdf file
Box-and-whisker plot: Use the 
boxplot()
function:
> with(mtcars, boxplot(disp, mpg))
Histogram: A histogram plots the frequency of observations. Use the
hist()
function:
> with(mtcars, hist(mpg))
Matrix of scatterplots: The 
pairs()
function is useful in data
exploration, because it plots a matrix of scatterplots. Each variable gets
plotted against another, as you saw in Chapter 14:
> pairs(iris)
Figure 16-5: Specifying the plot type argument.
The Help page for 
plot()
has a list of all the different types that you can use
with the 
type
argument:
“p”
: Points
“l”
: Lines
“b”
: Both
“c”
: The lines part alone of 
“b”
“o”
: Both “overplotted”
“h”
: Histogram like (or high-density) vertical lines
“n”
: No plotting
VB.NET PDF File & Page Process Library SDK for vb.net, ASP.NET
document. If you find certain page in your PDF document is unnecessary, you may want to delete this page directly. Moreover, when
how to select text on pdf; pdf text select tool
VB.NET Create PDF Library SDK to convert PDF from other file
Create writable PDF file from text (.txt) file in VB.NET project. you can download the RasterEdge .NET Image SDK and find the PDF processing component DLL
search multiple pdf files for text; convert pdf to word searchable text
It seems odd to use a plot function and then tell R not to plot it. But this
can be very useful when you need to create just the titles and axes, and plot
the data later using 
points()
lines()
, or any of the other graphical functions.
This flexibility may be useful if you want to build a plot step by step (for
example, for presentations or documents). Here’s an example:
> x <- seq(0.5, 1.5, 0.25)
> y <- rep(1, length(x))
> plot(x, y, type=”n”)
> points(x, y)
In the next section, you take full control over the plot options and arguments,
such as adding titles and labels or changing the font type of your plot.
Controlling Plot Options and Arguments
To really convey the message of your graphic, you may want to add titles and
labels. You also can modify other elements of the graphic (for example, the type of
box around the plot area or the font size of axis labels).
Base graphics allows you to take fine control over many plot options.
Adding titles and axis labels
You add the main title and axis labels with arguments to the 
plot()
function:
main
: Main plot title
xlab
: x-axis label
ylab
: y-axis label
To add a title and axis labels to your plot of 
faithful
, try the following:
> plot(faithful,
+     main = “Eruptions of Old Faithful”,
C# HTML5 PDF Viewer SDK deployment on Visual Studio .NET
Unzip the download package and you can find a project XDoc.PDF.HTML5 Viewer Demo or XDoc.PDF.HTML5 Editor Once done debugging with x86 dlls, replace the x86
pdf make text searchable; how to select text in pdf image
VB.NET PDF - Deploy VB.NET HTML5 PDF Viewer on Visual Studio.NET
to How to Build Online VB.NET PDF Viewer in Unzip the download package and you can find a project named XDoc Once done debugging with x86 dlls, replace the x86
convert a scanned pdf to searchable text; find text in pdf files
+     xlab = “Eruption time (min)”,
+     ylab = “Waiting time to next eruption (min)”)
Your graphic should look like Figure 16-6.
Changing plot options
You can change the look and feel of plots with a large number of options.
You can find all the documentation for changing the look and feel of base
graphics in the Help page 
?par()
. This function allows you to set (or query)
the graphical parameters or options.
Notice that 
par()
takes an extensive list of arguments. In this section, we
describe a few of the most commonly used options.
The axes label style
To change the axes label style, use the graphics option 
las
(label style). This
changes the orientation angle of the labels:
0
: The default, parallel to the axis
1
: Always horizontal
2
: Perpendicular to the axis
3
: Always vertical
For example, to change the axis style to have all the axes text horizontal, use
las=1
as an argument to 
plot
:
> plot(faithful, las=1)
You can see what this looks like in Figure 16-7.
C# PDF File Permission Library: add, remove, update PDF file
Text: Replace Text in PDF. Image: Insert Image to PDF. Image: Remove Image from using RasterEdge.XDoc.PDF; In the following code table, you will find a piece of
pdf searchable text converter; pdf text search tool
VB.NET PDF File Permission Library: add, remove, update PDF file
to PDF. Text: Delete Text from PDF. Text: Replace Text in PDF. In the following code table, you will find a VB NET code sample for how to set PDF file permissions
search pdf for text; find and replace text in pdf file
Figure 16-6: Adding main title, x-axis label, and y-axis label.
Working with axes and legends
R allows you to also take control of other elements of a plot, such as axes,
legends, and text:
Axes: If you need to take full control of plot axes, use 
axis()
. This
function allows you to specify tickmark positions, labels, fonts, line types,
and a variety of other options.
Legends: You can use the 
legend()
function to add legends, or keys, to
plots.
Text: In addition to legends, you can use the 
text()
function to add
text elements at any position on the plot.
The Help pages of the respective functions give you more information, and
the examples contained in the Help pages show you how much you can do
with these functions.
Figure 16-7: Changing the label style.
The box type
To change the type of box round the plot area, use the option 
bty
(box type):
“o”
: The default value draws a complete rectangle around the plot.
“n”
: Draws nothing around the plot.
“l”
“7”
“c”
“u”
, or 
“]”
: Draws a shape around the plot area that resembles
the uppercase letter of the option. So, the option 
bty=”l”
draws a line to the left
and bottom of the plot.
To make a plot with no box around the plot area, use 
bty=”n”
as an argument
to 
plot
:
> plot(faithful, bty=”n”)
Your graphic should look like Figure 16-8.
Figure 16-8: Changing the box type.
More than one option
To change more than one graphics option in a single plot, simply add an
additional argument for each plot option you want to set. For example, to change
the label style, the box type, the color, and the plot character, try the following:
> plot(faithful, las=1, bty=”l”, col=”red”, pch=19)
The resulting plot is the plot in Figure 16-9.
Font size of text and axes
To change the font size of text elements, use 
cex
(short for character
expansion ratio). The default value is 
1
. To reduce the text size, use a 
cex
value of
less than 
1
; to increase the text size, use a 
cex
value greater than 
1
.
> x <- seq(0.5, 1.5, 0.25)
> y <- rep(1, length(x))
> plot(x, y, main=”Effect of cex on text size”)
> text(x, y+0.1, labels=x, cex=x)
Your plot should look like Figure 16-10 (left).
To change the size of other plot parameters, use the following:
cex.main
: Size of main title
cex.lab
: Size of axis labels (the text describing the axis)
cex.axis
: Size of axis text (the values that indicate the axis tick labels)
> plot(x, y, main=”Effect of cex.main, cex.lab and cex.axis”,
+    cex.main=1.25, cex.lab=1.5, cex.axis=0.75)
Your results should look like Figure 16-10 (right). Carefully compare the font
size of the main title and the axes labels with the left side of Figure 16-10, and
note how the main title font is larger while the axes fonts are smaller.
Putting multiple plots on a single page
To put multiple plots on the same graphics pages, you can use the graphics
parameter 
mfrow
or 
mfcol
. To use this parameter, you need to supply a vector
argument with two elements: the number of rows and the number of columns.
For example, to create two side-by-side plots, use 
mfrow=c(1, 2)
:
> old.par <- par(mfrow=c(1, 2))
> plot(faithful, main=”Faithful eruptions”)
> plot(large.islands, main=”Islands”, ylab=”Area”)
> par(old.par)
When your plot is complete, you need to reset your 
par
options. Otherwise,
all your subsequent plots will appear side by side (until you close the active
graphics device, or window, and start plotting in a new graphics device). We
use a neat little trick to do this: When you make a call to 
par()
, R sets your
new options, but the return value from 
par()
contains your old options. In the
previous example, we save the old options to an object called 
old.par
, and
then reset the options after plotting using 
par(old.par)
.
Figure 16-9: Changing the label style, box type, color, and plot character.
Figure 16-10: Changing the font size of labels (left) and title and axis labels (right).
Documents you may be interested
Documents you may be interested