how to view pdf file in asp.net c# : How to select all text in pdf file Library application class asp.net html web page ajax R%20dummies39-part1001

Your result should look like Figure 16-11.
Figure 16-11: Creating side-by-side plots.
Use 
mfrow
to fill the plot grid by rows, and 
mfcol
to fill the plot grid by
columns. The Help page 
?par
, explains these option in detail, and also points
you alternative layout mechanisms (like 
layout()
or 
split.screen()
).
Saving Graphics to Image Files
Much of the time, you may simply use R graphics in an interactive way to
explore your data. But if you want to publish your results, you have to save your
plot to a file and then import this graphics file into another document.
To save a plot to an image file, you have to do three things in sequence:
1. Open a graphics device.
The default graphics device in R is your computer screen. To save a plot to an
image file, you need to tell R to open a new type of device — in this case, a
graphics file of a specific type, such as PNG, PDF, or JPG.
The R function to create a PNG device is 
png()
. Similarly, you create a PDF
device with 
pdf()
and a JPG device with 
jpg()
.
2. Create the plot.
3. Close the graphics device.
You do this with the 
dev.off()
function.
Put this in action by saving a plot of 
faithful
to the home folder on your
computer. First set your working directory to your home folder (or to any other
folder you prefer). If you use Linux, you’ll be familiar with using “
~/
” as the shortcut
to your home folder, but this also works on Windows and Mac:
> setwd(“~/”)
How to select all text in pdf file - search text inside PDF file in C#.net, ASP.NET, MVC, Ajax, WinForms, WPF
Learn how to search text in PDF document and obtain text content and location information
how to select text in pdf and copy; convert pdf to searchable text online
How to select all text in pdf file - VB.NET PDF Text Search Library: search text inside PDF file in vb.net, ASP.NET, MVC, Ajax, WinForms, WPF
Learn How to Search Text in PDF Document and Obtain Text Content and Location Information in VB.NET application
how to make a pdf file text searchable; text searchable pdf
> getwd()
[1] “C:/Users/Andrie”
Next, write the three lines of code to save a plot to file:
> png(filename=”faithful.png”)
> plot(faithful)
> dev.off()
Now you can check your file system to see whether the file 
faithful.png
exists. (It should!) The result is a graphics file of type PNG that you can insert into
a presentation, document, or website.
C# PDF Image Extract Library: Select, copy, paste PDF images in C#
Extract various types of image from PDF file, like XObject Image, XObject Form, Inline Image, etc. C#: Select All Images from One PDF Page.
select text in pdf reader; converting pdf to searchable text format
VB.NET PDF Image Extract Library: Select, copy, paste PDF images
Dim allImages = PDFImageHandler.ExtractImages(doc) ' Extract all images in page 2. Dim page As PDFPage = doc VB.NET : Select An Image from PDF Page by
search pdf for text in multiple files; how to search text in pdf document
Chapter 17
Creating Faceted Graphics with Lattice
In This Chapter
Getting to know the benefits of faceted graphics
Using the 
lattice
package to create faceted plots
Changing the colors and other parameters of lattice plots
Understanding the differences between base graphics and lattice graphics
Creating subsets of data and plotting each subset allows you to see whether
there are patterns between different subsets of the data. For example, a sales
manager may want to see a sales report for different regions in the form of a
graphic. A biologist may want to investigate different species of butterflies and
compare the differences on a plot.
A single graphic that provides this kind of simultaneous view of different slices
through the data is called a faceted graphic. Figure 17-1 shows a faceted plot of
fuel economy and performance of motor cars. The important thing to notice is that
the plot contains three panels, one each for cars with four, six, and eight cylinders.
R has a special package that allows you to easily create this kind of graphic.
The package is called 
lattice
and in this chapter you get to draw 
lattice
charts.
Later in this chapter, you create a 
lattice
plot that should be identical to Figure
17-1.
In this chapter, we give the briefest of introductions to the extensive
functionality in 
lattice
. An entire book could be written about 
lattice
graphics — and, in fact, such a book already exists. The author of the 
lattice
package, Deepayan Sarkar, also wrote a book called Lattice: Multivariate Data
Visualization with R (Springer). You can find the figures and code from that
book at
http://lmdvr.r-forge.r-project.org/figures/figures.html
.
Figure 17-1: Faceted graphics, like this one, provide simultaneous views of different
slices of data.
VB.NET PDF Text Redact Library: select, redact text content from
coding example shows you how to redact PDF text content Dim outputFilePath As String = Program.RootPath + "\\" output.pdf" ' open document All Rights Reserved
find text in pdf image; pdf select text
C# PDF Text Redact Library: select, redact text content from PDF
C# coding example describes how to redact PDF text content. String outputFilePath = Program.RootPath + "\\" output.pdf"; // open document All Rights Reserved
convert pdf to searchable text; search a pdf file for text
Creating a Lattice Plot
To explore 
lattice
graphics, first take a look at the built-in dataset 
mtcars
.
This dataset contains 32 observations of motor cars and information about the
engine, such as number of cylinders, automatic versus manual gearbox, and engine
power.
All the built-in datasets of R also have good help information that you can
access through the Help mechanism — for example, by typing ?mtcars into
the R console.
> str(mtcars)
‘data.frame’: 32 obs. of  11 variables:
$ mpg : num  21 21 22.8 21.4 18.7 18.1 14.3 24.4 22.8 19.2 ...
$ cyl : num  6 6 4 6 8 6 8 4 4 6 ...
$ disp: num  160 160 108 258 360 ...
$ hp  : num  110 110 93 110 175 105 245 62 95 123 ...
$ drat: num  3.9 3.9 3.85 3.08 3.15 2.76 3.21 3.69 3.92 3.92 ...
$ wt  : num  2.62 2.88 2.32 3.21 3.44 ...
$ qsec: num  16.5 17 18.6 19.4 17 ...
$ vs  : num  0 0 1 1 0 1 0 1 1 1 ...
$ am  : num  1 1 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 ...
$ gear: num  4 4 4 3 3 3 3 4 4 4 ...
$ carb: num  4 4 1 1 2 1 4 2 2 4 ..
Say you want to explore the relationship between fuel economy and engine
power. The 
mtcars
dataset has two elements with this information:
mpg
: Fuel economy measured in miles per gallon (mpg)
hp
: Engine power measured in horsepower (hp)
In this section, you create different plots of 
mpg
against 
hp
.
C# HTML5 PDF Viewer SDK to view PDF document online in C#.NET
Compatible with all Windows systems and supports .NET Framework 2.0 & above Able to select PDF document scaling. Easy to search PDF text in whole PDF document.
search text in pdf using java; how to select all text in pdf
VB.NET PDF- View PDF Online with VB.NET HTML5 PDF Viewer
Compatible with all Windows systems and supports .NET Framework 2.0 & above Able to select PDF document scaling. Easy to search PDF text in whole PDF document.
how to search a pdf document for text; search pdf files for text programmatically
Loading the lattice package
Although the 
lattice
package forms part of the R distribution, you have to
tell R that you plan to use the code in this package. You do this with the
library()
function. Remember that you need to do this at the start of each
clean R session in which you want to use 
lattice
:
> library(“lattice”)
Making a lattice scatterplot
The 
lattice
package has a number of different functions to create different
types of plot. For example, to create a scatterplot, use the 
xyplot()
function.
Notice that this is different from base graphics, where the 
plot()
function creates a
variety of different plot types (because of the method dispatch mechanism).
Besides 
xyplot()
, we briefly discuss the other 
lattice
functions later in this
chapter.
To make a 
lattice
plot, you need to specify at least two arguments:
formula
: This is a formula typically of the form 
y ~ x | z
. It means to create a
plot of 
y
against 
x
, conditional on 
z
. In other words, create a plot for every
unique value of 
z
. Each of the variables in the 
formula
has to be a column in the
data frame that you specify in the 
data
argument.
data
: A data frame that contains all the columns that you specify in the 
formula
argument.
This example should make it clear:
> xyplot(mpg ~ hp | factor(cyl), data=mtcars)
You can see that:
The variables 
mpg
hp
, and 
cyl
are columns in the data frame 
mtcars
.
VB.NET PDF - View PDF with WPF PDF Viewer for VB.NET
13. Cancel. Unhighlight all search results on PDF. 14. Whole word. Select to search all text content filled in. 15. Ignore case.
cannot select text in pdf file; how to make pdf text searchable
C# WPF PDF Viewer SDK to view PDF document in C#.NET
13. Cancel. Unhighlight all search results on PDF. 14. Whole word. Select to search all text content filled in. 15. Ignore case.
how to select text in a pdf; make pdf text searchable
Although 
cyl
is a numeric vector, the number of cylinders in a car can be only
whole numbers (or discrete variables, in statistical jargon). By using
factor(cyl)
in your code, you tell R that 
cyl
is, in fact, a discrete variable. If
you forget to do this, R will still create a graphic, but the labels of the strips at
the top of each panel will be displayed differently.
Your code should produce a graphic that looks like Figure 17-2. Because each
of the cars in the data frame has four, six, or eight cylinders, the chart has three
panes. You can see that the cars with larger engines tend to have more power (
hp
)
and poorer fuel consumption (
mpg
).
Figure 17-2: A 
lattice
scatterplot of the data in 
mtcars
.
Adding trend lines
In Chapter 15, we show you how to create trend lines, or regression lines
through data.
When you tell 
lattice
to calculate a line of best fit, it does so for each panel
in the plot. This is straightforward using 
xyplot()
, because it’s as simple as adding
type
argument. In particular, you want to specify that the type is both points
(
type=”p”
) and regression (
type=”r”
). You can combine different types with the
c()
function, like this:
> xyplot(mpg ~ hp | factor(cyl), data=mtcars,
+     type=c(“p”, “r”))
Your graphic should look like Figure 17-3.
Figure 17-3: Lattice 
xyplot
with regression lines added.
VB.NET PDF Page Extract Library: copy, paste, cut PDF pages in vb.
example that you can use it to extract all images from Dim page As PDFPage = doc.GetPage(3) ' Select image by you how to copy pages from a PDF file and paste
search text in pdf image; pdf editor with search and replace text
C# WPF PDF Viewer SDK to annotate PDF document in C#.NET
PDF annotating tool, which is compatible with all Windows systems Click to select drawing annotation with default properties Click to add a text box to specific
pdf find text; how to make a pdf document text searchable
Base, grid, and lattice graphics
Perhaps confusingly, the standard distribution of R actually contains three
different graphics packages:
Base graphics is the graphics system that was originally developed for
R. The workhorse function of base graphics is a 
plot()
(see Chapter 16). The
code for base graphics is in the 
graphics
package, which is loaded by default
when you start R.
Grid graphics is an alternative graphics system that was later added to
R. The big difference between grid and the original base graphics system is
that grid allows for the creation of multiple regions, called viewports, on a
single graphics page. Grid is a framework of code and doesn’t, by itself,
create complete charts. The author of grid, Paul Murrell, describes some of
the ideas behind grid graphics on his website at
www.stat.auckland.ac.nz/~paul/grid/doc/grid.pdf
. Note: The 
grid
package needs to be loaded before you can use it.
Lattice is a graphics system that specifically implements the idea of
Trellis graphics (or faceted graphics), which was originally developed for the
languages S and S-Plus at Bell Labs. Lattice graphics in R make use of grid
graphics. This means that the functions for creating graphics and changing
options in base and 
lattice
are mostly incompatible with one another. The
lattice
package needs to be loaded before use.
Strictly speaking, 
type
is not an argument to 
xyplot()
, but an argument to
panel.xyplot()
. You can control the panels of 
lattice
graphics with a panel
function. The function 
xyplot()
calls this panel function internally, using the
type
argument you specified. The default panel function for 
xyplot()
is
panel.xyplot()
. Similarly, the panel function for 
barchart()
— which we cover
later in this chapter — is 
panel.barchart()
. The panel function allows you to
take fine control over many aspects of your chart. You can find out more in the
excellent Help for these functions — for example, by typing ?panel.xyplot
into your R console.
Changing Plot Options
R has a very good reputation for being able to create publication-quality
graphics. If you want to use your 
lattice
graphics in reports or documents, you’ll
probably want to change the plot options.
The 
lattice
package makes use of the grid graphics engine, which is
completely different from the base graphics in Chapter 16. Because of this,
none of the mechanisms for changing plot options covered in Chapter 16 are
applicable to 
lattice
graphics.
Adding titles and labels
To add a main title and axis labels to a 
lattice
plot, you can specify the
following arguments:
main
: Main title
xlab
: x-axis label
ylab
: y-axis label
> xyplot(mpg ~ hp | factor(cyl), data=mtcars,
+     type=c(“p”, “r”),
+     main=”Fuel economy vs. Performance”,
+     xlab=”Performance (horse power)”,
+     ylab=”Fuel economy (miles per gallon)”,
+ )
Your output should now be similar to Figure 17-4.
Figure 17-4: A 
lattice
graphic with titles.
Changing the font size of titles and labels
You probably think that the title and label text in Figure 17-4 are
disproportionately large compared to the rest of the graphic.
To change the size of your labels, you need to modify your arguments to be
lists. Similar to base graphics, you specify a 
cex
argument in 
lattice
graphics
to modify the character expansion ratio. For example, to reduce the main title
and axis label text to 75 percent of standard size, specify 
cex=0.75
as an
element in the list argument to 
main
xlab
, and 
ylab
.
To keep it simple, build up the formatting of your plot step by step. Start by
changing the size of your main title to 
cex=0.75
:
> xyplot(mpg ~ hp | factor(cyl), data=mtcars,
+     type=c(“p”, “r”),
+     main=list(
+         label=”Fuel economy vs. Performance given Number of Cylinders”,
+         cex=0.75)
+ )
Do you see what happened? Your argument to 
main
now contains a list with
two elements: 
label
and 
cex
.
You construct the arguments for 
xlab
and 
ylab
in exactly the same way. Each
argument is a list that contains the label and any other formatting options you
want to set. Expand your code to modify the axis labels:
> xyplot(mpg ~ hp | factor(cyl), data=mtcars,
+     type=c(“p”, “r”),
+     main=list(
+         label=”Fuel economy vs. Performance given Number of Cylinders”,
+         cex=0.75),
+     xlab=list(
+         label=”Performance (horse power)”,
+         cex=0.75),
+     ylab=list(
+         label=”Fuel economy (miles per gallon)”,
+         cex=0.75),
+     scales=list(cex=0.5)
+ )
If you look carefully, you’ll see that the code includes an argument to modify
the size of the scales text to 50 percent of standard (
scales=list(cex=0.5)
). Your
results should look like Figure 17-5.
Figure 17-5: Changing the font size of 
lattice
graphics labels and text.
Using themes to modify plot options
One neat feature of 
lattice
graphics is that you can create themes to change
the plot options of your charts. To do this, you need to use the 
par.settings
argument. In Chapter 16, you use the 
par()
function to update graphics
parameters of base graphics. The 
par.settings
argument in 
lattice
is similar.
The easiest way to use the 
par.settings
argument is to use it in conjunction
with the 
simpleTheme()
function. With 
simpleTheme()
, you can specify the
arguments for the following:
col
col.points
col.line
: Control the colors of symbols, points, lines, and other
graphics elements such as polygons
Documents you may be interested
Documents you may be interested