how to view pdf file in asp.net c# : Extract image from pdf java Library application component asp.net html azure mvc cips2ed25-part1022

15.3. EDGE DETECTORS AS TEXTURE OPERATORS
229
to nd  as shown in equation (15.3). We can use  as a texture measure
and we will need it to calculate the skewness measure later.
=
p
variance
Levine
(15.3)
Listing 15.1 starts with the subroutine that implements the sigma oper-
ator. This subroutine has the same form as all the operators in this series.
sigma works on a sizexsize area (3x3, 5x5, etc.). Once inside the main loop, it
calculates the mean of the sizexsize area. Next, it runs through the sizexsize
area a second time to sum the square of the dierence between each pixel
and the mean of the area and place this result in the variance variable. The
nal answer, , is the square root of the variance.
Figure 15.6 shows an example of the sigma operator applied to a texture.
Just as in Figures 15.4 and 15.5, the upper right quarter shows the result
of the sigma operator on the upper left quarter. It is hard to see anything
in the sigma result. The sigma is almost the square root of variance, so its
pixel values are much smaller and darker. Histogram equalization, shown in
the lower right quarter, is necessary before attempting segmentation. Sigma
produced two gray levels to represent two textures. The result in the lower
left quarter is the segmentation of the lower right quarter.
The nal \edge detector" type of operator is skewness [15.3]. Equation
(15.4) shows the formula for skewness. Like the variance of equation (15.2),
skewness requires two passes through an area to nd the mean and then the
. After this, calculate skewness using the . The skewness measure looks at
the histogram of the nxn area of the image. Skewness measures the degree
of symmetry in the histogram to see if the out lying points in the histogram
favor one side or the other. If the histogram is symmetrical, skewness returns
alow number. If the histogram favors one side or is \skewed" to one side,
skewness returns a larger number.
skewness =
1
3
1
size of area
X
(centerpixel   mean)
3
(15.4)
Listing 15.1 next shows the subroutine that implements the skewness
operator. skewness runs through the image array working on sizexsize areas.
It makes one pass through the sizexsize area to calculate the mean. The
second pass through the area calculates the variance value of equation (15.2)
and the cube variable (the sum of the cube of the dierence between each
Extract image from pdf java - Select, copy, paste PDF images in C#.net, ASP.NET, MVC, Ajax, WinForms, WPF
Support PDF Image Extraction from a Page, a Region on a Page, and PDF Document
pdf extract images; extract image from pdf acrobat
Extract image from pdf java - VB.NET PDF Image Extract Library: Select, copy, paste PDF images in vb.net, ASP.NET, MVC, Ajax, WinForms, WPF
Support PDF Image Extraction from a Page, a Region on a Page, and PDF Document
extract pictures from pdf; some pdf image extractor
230
CHAPTER 15. BASIC TEXTURES OPERATIONS
Figure 15.6: The Result of Applying the Sigma Edge Detector to a Texture
Java Imaging SDK Library: Document Image Scan, Process, PDF
Using RasterEdge Java Image SDK, developers can easily open, read, edit, convert and such as: Bitmap, Jpeg, Gif, Png, Tiff, Jpeg2000, DICOM, JBIG2, PDF, MS Word
some pdf image extract; how to extract images from pdf files
Generate and draw PDF 417 for Java
Download the Java PDF 417 Generation Package and extract the file. type PDF417 barcode = new PDF417(); //Encode data for PDF 417 barcode image text in Java
extract vector image from pdf; extract pdf pages to jpg
15.4. THE DIFFERENCE OPERATOR
231
pixel and the mean of the area). After the second loop, skewness puts these
values together as prescribed in equation (15.4) to form the skew answer.
Figure 15.7 shows the result of the skewness operator. The left half shows
two synthetic textures. I created the far left texture by setting each pixel to
arandom number from the C rand() function. The right texture is a small
checkerboard pattern. The two sections on the right half are the results of
the skewness operator. The far right result is all zeros. The checkerboard
pattern had a perfectly symmetrical histogram, so skewness returned zero
everywhere. The histogram of the random pattern was also symmetrical,
but skewed enough to return many non zero values. It is easy to segment the
right half of the image.
Figure 15.7: The Result of Applying the Skewness Operator to a Texture
15.4 The Dierence Operator
The dierence operator [15.3] is similar to edge detectors and can be useful in
distinguishing textures. Equation (15.5) shows that the dierence operator
is merely the dierence between a pixel and another pixel a given size away.
It works on textures if the size specied matches the size of the pattern in a
texture. If it matches well, the result is small numbers while other textures
return larger numbers. The dierence operator runs much faster than the
variance, sigma, and skewness operators shown above and is quite eective
on certain images.
Generate and draw UPC-A for Java
Download the Java UPC-A Generation Package and extract the file UPCA barcode = new UPCA(); //Encode data for UPC-A barcode image text in Java Class barcode
extract images from pdf c#; how to extract images from pdf file
Generate and Print 1D and 2D Barcodes in Java
Graphic configuration options allow barcode image background, foreground QR Code, Data Matrix and PDF 417 in and UPC barcode supported by Java Barcode Generator
extract jpg from pdf; extract photo from pdf
232
CHAPTER 15. BASIC TEXTURES OPERATIONS
output = absolutevalue(input[i][j])   input([i + size][j + size])
(15.5)
Listing 15.1 next shows the two subroutines that implement the dierence
operator. The subroutine adierence sets up size parameters while the dif-
ference
array subroutine performs the math. dierence
array loops through
the image array and calculates the dierence as stated in equation (15.5).
Notice how it is easy to vary the size parameter and look for the size of a
texture.
Figure 15.8 shows the result of applying the dierence operator on two
distinct textures. The upper left quarter is the tightly woven texture shown
earlier. The upper right quarter is the loose straw texture from Figure 15.2.
The two lower quarters of the image contain the results of the dierence
operator. The lower left quarter appears brighter because the texture has
greater dierences in it than the straw texture. The dierence operator
distinguished these textures by producing areas with dierent gray levels.
Figure 15.8: The Result of Applying the Dierence Operator to a Texture
Avariation of the dierence operator is its mean operator [15.3]. This
rst applies the dierence operator to an image and then replaces each pixel
by the mean or average of the pixels in a sizexsize area. Equation (15.6)
.NET PDF SDK | Read & Processing PDF files
or grayscale raster images, search & extract text, highlight Advanced document cleanup and image processing options royalty-free .NET Imaging PDF Reader SDK of
pdf image text extractor; online pdf image extractor
DocImage SDK for .NET: HTML Viewer, View, Annotate, Convert, Print
in .NET, including Microsoft Word, Excel, PPT, PDF, Tiff, Dicom of years before I found this .NET Image SDK. NET Document Imaging SDK and Java Document Imaging
extract images from pdf files without using copy and paste; extract image from pdf
15.4. THE DIFFERENCE OPERATOR
233
describes the mean operator. The mean operator smoothes the result of the
dierence operator.
mean
Levine
=
1
size of area
X
(pixels of difference array)
(15.6)
The amean subroutine implements the mean operator and is the next rou-
tine shown in listing 15.1. It calls dierence
array to calculate the dierences
in the input image. amean then smoothes the dierence array by replacing
each pixel with the average of the pixels in the surrounding sizexsize area.
Figure 15.9 shows the result applying the mean operator to the same tex-
tures processed by the dierence operator in Figure 15.8. Note how the lower
left quarter of Figure 15.9 is fuzzier than the corresponding quarter of Figure
15.8. This is to be expected because the mean is a smoothing operation. The
two quarters in the lower half of Figure 15.9 are easily distinguished by their
gray levels.
Figure 15.9: The Result of Applyingthe Mean Operator to the Same Texture
as in Figure 15.8
Zero Footprint AJAX Document Image Viewer| ASP.NET Imaging SDK
Converting Transform, convert and save web document or image file to PDF or TIFF com is professional .NET Document Imaging SDK and Java Document Imaging
how to extract images from pdf; extract image from pdf online
Image Converter | Convert Image, Document Formats
like ASCII, PDF, HTML, MS- Word, PDF/A Most Find image converters to suit your needs in this professional .NET Document Imaging SDK and Java Document Imaging
extract images pdf acrobat; extract image from pdf java
234
CHAPTER 15. BASIC TEXTURES OPERATIONS
15.5 The Hurst Operator
An excellent, but computationally expensive, texture operator is the Hurst
operator [15.1]. The Hurst operator will process a texture area and return a
single gray level. The idea is to look at ranges of pixel values in an area, plot
them, t the plot to a straight line, and use the slope of that line to measure
the texture.
First, lets look at the ranges of pixels in an area. The range operator
discussed earlier produced one range to describe an entire area. The Hurst
operator produces several ranges for an area (n ranges for an nxn area). It
calculates pixel value ranges for pixels that are an equal distance from the
center pixel. Figure 15.10 shows three example size areas (other examples
include 9x9, 11x11, etc.). The 7x7 area at the bottom of Figure 15.10 has
pixel label ’a’ in the center. The pixels labeled ’b’ are all one pixel away from
the center. The pixels labeled ’c’ are the square root of two pixels from the
center, the ’d’ pixels are two pixels from the center, and so on. The Hurst
operator calculates a ’b’ range, a ’c’ range, a ’d’ range, on up to the ’g’ range.
Figures 15.11 and 15.12 illustrate the range calculation. Figure 15.11
shows two 7x7 image sections. Image section 1 is smooth while image section
2is rough. The tables in gure 15.4 show the range calculations. Look at
image section 1 of gure 15.12 and examine the pixels that are one pixel
away from the center. The largest value is 115, the smallest is 110, and this
yields a range of 5. All the range values in the tables were calculated in this
manner.
The nal phase of the Hurst operator is to plot the distance and range
values and nd the slope of the line. Plot the natural logarithm of the dis-
tances on the vertical axis and the natural log of the ranges on the horizontal
axis. This is a Hurst plot. Finally, t these points to a straight line. The
slope of the line is the answer. The notes in gure 15.12 state that Hurst
plot for image section 1 had a slope of 0.99 and image section 2’s slope was
2.0. Multiply these by a scaling factor of 64 to produce two dierent gray
levels that represent two dierent textures.
Listing 15.1 next shows the source code that implements the Hurst oper-
ator. The hurst subroutine will work for the 3x3, 5x5, and 7x7 cases shown
in gure 15.10. The rst section of code sets the x array to the natural log-
arithm of the distances. hurst loops through the image and nds the ranges
of pixel values for each pixel class shown in Figure 15.10. Each section of
code puts the proper pixels into the elements array, sorts this array by calling
C# PowerPoint: Read, Decode & Scan Barcode Image from PowerPoint
C# PowerPoint: Decode PDF-417 Barcode Image, C# decode Intelligent Mail linear barcode image from PowerPoint NET Document Imaging SDK and Java Document Imaging
some pdf image extract; extract text from pdf image
.NET OCR SDK | Optical Character Recognition
Able to extract text fromfacsimiles, photocopies and documents with usability interfaces to convert an image to a to memory, text searchable PDF, PDF/A, Word
extract pictures from pdf; how to extract images from pdf files
15.5. THE HURST OPERATOR
235
3x3 case
c b c
d b a b d
c b c
5x5 case
f e d e f
e c b c e
d b a b d
e c b c e
f e d e f
7x7 case
h g h
f e d e f
h e c b c e h
g d b a b d g
h e c b c e h
f e d e f
h g h
Figure 15.10: Three Size Areas for the Hurst Operator
236
CHAPTER 15. BASIC TEXTURES OPERATIONS
Image Section 1
100 115 105
105 115 105 110 115
105 110 110 115 115 110 100
105 110 110 110 115 105 100
100 110 115 110 110 105 105
110 115 100 110 105
115 100 100
Image Section 2
120 85 85
115 110 90 100 115
130 100 115 100 100 100 120
120 110 95 80 95 95 125
145 120 100 100 100 100 120
130 130 100 100 85
135 135 105
Figure 15.11: Two Example Image Sections
15.5. THE HURST OPERATOR
237
Image Section 1
Pixel Class b
c
d
e
f
g
h
Distance
1
/2 2
/5 /8 3
/10
Brightest
115 115 110 115 115 115 115
Darkest
110 110 100 105 105 100 100
Range
5
5
10 10 10 15 15
Plot ln(range) vs ln(distance), slope = 0.99
Image Section 2
Pixel Class b
c
d
e
f
g
h
Distance
1
/2 2
/5 /8 3
/10
Brightest
100 115 110 130 130 135 145
Darkest
95 100 90 100 85 85 85
Range
5
15 20 30 45 50 60
Plot ln(range) vs ln(distance), slope = 2.0
Figure 15.12: Values Calculated by the Hurst Operator
238
CHAPTER 15. BASIC TEXTURES OPERATIONS
sort
elements, and puts the range in the prange variable. hurst ts the data
to a straight line by calling the t routine. The last step sets the output
image to the slope of the line scaled by 64.
t is a general purpose routine that ts data to a straight line. I took it
from chapter 14 of \Numerical Recipes in C." [15.2]
Figure 15.13 shows the result of applying the Hurst operator to the same
texture used in Figures 15.4, 15.5, and 15.6. The upper left quarter is the
input image and the upper right quarter is the result of the Hurst operator.
The lower right is the result of smoothing the Hurst output with a low pass
lter. Smoothing blurs the result and makes segmentation easier. The lower
left quarter is the nal segmentation result.
Figure 15.13: The Result of Applying the Hurst Operator to a Texture
Figure 15.14 shows an attempt at using the Hurst operator on a house
image. The image in the left half of Figure 15.14 has several distinct textures
such as trees, roof shingles, and bricks. The right half of Figure 15.14 shows
the result of the Hurst operator. This looks like an edge detector and fails
Documents you may be interested
Documents you may be interested