how to view pdf file in asp.net c# : How to extract text from pdf image file software SDK dll winforms wpf web page web forms cips2ed26-part1023

15.6. THE COMPARE OPERATOR
239
miserably as a texture segmentation operator. The compare operator in the
next section oers some hope.
Figure15.14: TheFailed Result of Applyingthe Hurst Operator to theHouse
Image
15.6 The Compare Operator
Anal texture operator uses the common sense approach of comparing one
texture in the image against all textures. Select a small area in an image
that contains one sample texture (such as the brick texture in left half of
Figure 15.14). Move this small texture area through the entire image. At
each pixel, subtract the image from the sample texture and use the average
dierence as the output. If the texture in the image is similar to the sample
texture, the output will be small. If the texture in the image is dierent from
the sample texture, the output will be large.
Listing 15.1ends by showingthe source codethatimplementsthecompare
operator. Therst part ofcompare mallocs thesmall arrayto hold the sample
texture. Next, it copies the part of the input image that contains the sample
texture into the small array. The main loop of compare sums the absolute
value of the dierence between the small array and the input image. The
output is set to the sum (big) divided by the area (size*size).
Figure 15.15 shows an example of the compare operator. The upper left
quarter shows the input image comprising the tightly woven texture next to
the straw texture. The upper right quarter shows the result of taking a 3x3
How to extract text from pdf image file - Select, copy, paste PDF images in C#.net, ASP.NET, MVC, Ajax, WinForms, WPF
Support PDF Image Extraction from a Page, a Region on a Page, and PDF Document
extract images from pdf; pdf image extractor
How to extract text from pdf image file - VB.NET PDF Image Extract Library: Select, copy, paste PDF images in vb.net, ASP.NET, MVC, Ajax, WinForms, WPF
Support PDF Image Extraction from a Page, a Region on a Page, and PDF Document
pdf extract images; extract images from pdf file
240
CHAPTER 15. BASIC TEXTURES OPERATIONS
area of the woven texture and comparing it to the input image. The result
is dark and dicult to see. The lower right quarter shows the outcome of
performing histogram equalization on the dark result. Now wecan clearly see
how the straw area produced a brighter output. This means that the texture
in the straw area is not similar to the sample texture taken from the tightly
woven area. The lower left quarter shows the segmentation result. The
compare operator successfully produced dierent gray levels to distinguish
two textures.
Figure 15.15: The Result of Applying the Compare Operator to a Texture
Figure 15.16 shows another example of the compare operator. This ex-
ample illustrates both the power and the weakness of the compare operator.
The left half of Figure 15.16 shows the house image. The right half shows
the result of taking a 5x5 area of the brick texture and comparing it with the
house image. The areas corresponding bricks are the darkest because their
texture matches the sample brick area. The compare operator did a good
job of separating the bricks from the other textures. Note the weakness of
the compare operator. It lumped all the other textures (roof, trees, windows,
shutters) into one category. The compare operator can only nd one texture
in an image.
C# PDF Text Extract Library: extract text content from PDF file in
PDF file. Ability to extract highlighted text out of PDF document. Supports text extraction from scanned PDF by using XDoc.PDF for .NET Pro. Image text extraction
extract images pdf; pdf image text extractor
VB.NET PDF Text Extract Library: extract text content from PDF
Extract and get partial and all text content from PDF file. Extract highlighted text out of PDF document. Image text extraction control provides text extraction
how to extract images from pdf file; extract image from pdf acrobat
15.7. AN APPLICATION PROGRAM
241
Figure 15.16: The Result of Applying the Compare Operator to the House
Image
15.7 An Application Program
Listing 15.2 shows an application program that uses the texture operators
with entire image les. It has the same form as the other application pro-
grams presented in this text.
15.8 Conclusions
This chapter described textures and several operators that help distinguish
textures. We do not have a good denition of texture and any universally
applicable texture operators. The operators presented here work well in
certain situations. Experiment with them and experiment with the other
pre-processing and post-processing operators from the series.
15.9 References
15.1 \The Image Processing Handbook, Third Edition," John C. Russ, CRC
Press, 1999.
15.2 \Numerical Recipes in C," Press, William H, Brian P. Flannery, Saul
A. Teukolsky, William T. Vetterling, Cambridge University Press, 1988.
15.3 \Vision in Man and Machine," Martin D. Levine, McGraw-Hill, 1985.
C# PDF insert image Library: insert images into PDF in C#.net, ASP
Create high resolution PDF file without image quality losing in ASP.NET application. Add multiple images to multipage PDF document in .NET WinForms.
extract jpeg from pdf; how to extract images from pdf
VB.NET PDF File Compress Library: Compress reduce PDF size in vb.
Reduce image resources: Since images are usually or large size, images size reducing can help to reduce PDF file size effectively.
extract images from pdf files; extract image from pdf
242
CHAPTER 15. BASIC TEXTURES OPERATIONS
VB.NET PDF insert image library: insert images into PDF in vb.net
VB.NET code to add an image to the inputFilePath As String = Program.RootPath + "\\" 1.pdf" Dim doc New PDFDocument(inputFilePath) ' Get a text manager from
extract images from pdf files without using copy and paste; extract pdf pages to jpg
C# PDF File Split Library: Split, seperate PDF into multiple files
Application. Best and professional adobe PDF file splitting SDK for Visual Studio .NET. outputOps); Divide PDF File into Two Using C#.
online pdf image extractor; extract image from pdf file
Chapter 16
Random Dot Stereograms
16.1 Introduction
This chapter describes random dot stereograms and provides the source code
so you can make your own. Stereograms are those strange 3-D pictures
you see on books, calendars, and t-shirts everywhere. You focus past them
and all the dots form what appears to be objects with surprising depth.
Given dierent names by dierent people, these 3-D pictures are all similar
in appearance and construction. Stereograms are a part of image processing
because making a stereogram involves taking processing an existing image it
to give it a new appearance.
16.2 Stereogram Basics
Let’s rst discuss why stereograms look the way they do. An easy way to do
this is with text gures (we’ll move on to dots later). One key to stereograms
is divergent viewing or focusing on a point behind the image. Figure 16.1
shows that when two eyes (RI=right eye, LI=left eye) focus on a point x
behind the picture, they see two dierent things (LI sees a and RI sees b).
The brain mixes these two into a single image. Stereograms use this mixing
to produce depth in the mind.
Figure 16.2 shows another basic concept in stereograms | the repeating
pattern. The pattern 1234567890 runs from left to right and repeats itself for
the width of the image. The repeating pattern has four properties. (1) The
pattern runs horizontally, so orientation must be correct (you cannot turn
243
C# PDF File Compress Library: Compress reduce PDF size in C#.net
Reduce image resources: Since images are usually or large size, images size reducing can help to reduce PDF file size effectively.
how to extract pictures from pdf files; extract photo from pdf
VB.NET PDF File Merge Library: Merge, append PDF files in vb.net
When you have downloaded the RasterEdge Image SDK for also provided you with detailed PDF processing demo Imaging.Demo directory with the file name RasterEdge
extract color image from pdf in c#; extract image from pdf in
244
CHAPTER 16. RANDOM DOT STEREOGRAMS
focus point
x
..
. .
picture
----------a----b--------------
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
LI
RI
Figure 16.1: Divergent Viewing
focus point
x
123456789012345678901234567890
LI
RI
Figure 16.2: The Repeating Pattern
the image sideways). (2) There are a xed set of elements in the pattern.
(3) All the elements in the pattern are the same size (xed font in this case).
(4) The width of the pattern must be less than the distance between your
eyes. Property (4) is critical when making a stereogram’s nal output. Most
people’s eyes are a little more than an inch apart, so one inch is a good width
for a repeating pattern. Display screens show 60-70 dots per inch while laser
printers give 300 dots per inch. These two output devices require dierent
pattern widths.
Figure 16.3 illustrates how a repeating pattern produces depth. The top
part of gure 16.3 shows that a ’1’ was deleted from the pattern. The left
and right eyes, viewing the image divergently, are looking at two dierent
16.2. STEREOGRAM BASICS
245
Deleted a 1 from here
|
|
12345678902345678901234567890
so the brain adapts
1234567890
1
2345678901234567890
LI
RI
Figure 16.3: Deleting an Element from the Pattern
places on the image. The right eye sees the ’1’ in the pattern while the left
eye does not (it was deleted), so the brain adapts. The brain feels that the
’1’ is present for the left eye, so the brain tucks the ’1’ behind the ’2’ on
the left side. This brings the right side of the image closer and creates an
illusion of depth. Shortening the pattern by deleting an element brought the
image closer to the viewer. If you are viewing these images on a screen, use
the viewing software to reduce or increase the size of the images for optimal
viewing.
Figure 16.4 shows how to push the image away from the viewer by insert-
ingan element into the pattern. The top part shows that an ’A’ was inserted.
The right eye sees the ’A’, the left eye does not, so the brain adapts. The
brain reasons that the left eye did not see the ’A’ because the ’A’ was tucked
behind the ’8’. The right side of the image becomes farther away. Length-
ening the pattern by inserting an element pushed the image away from the
viewer.
Figure 16.5 combines deletion and insertion to pop an object out of the
246
CHAPTER 16. RANDOM DOT STEREOGRAMS
Inserted an A here
|
|
123456789012345678A901234567890
so the brain adapts
901234567890
A
123456789012345678
LI
RI
Figure 16.4: Inserting an Element into the Pattern
background. The top part of the gure shows that a ’1’ was deleted and an
’A’ was inserted. The two eyes see dierent things, so the brain adapts by
tucking the ’1’ behind the ’2’ and tucking the ’A’ behind the ’8’. The center
section appears farther away than the ends (the object drops back into the
background).
Shortening and lengthening the pattern by 2, 3, 4, etc. creates other
depth levels (2, 3, 4, etc.). Keep the length of the repeating pattern about
twice as big as the number of depth levels.
Figure16.6 puts theseconceptstogetherintoa characterstereogram using
the repeatingpattern 0123456789. On thefourth linethepattern isshortened
by deleting an ’8’ and then lengthened by inserting an ’A’. When viewed
divergently, you see a rectangle popping out of the center of the image.
Figure 16.7 shows the result of the nal step in a random character stere-
ogram. The viewer again sees a rectangle popping out of the background.
Figure 16.7 is the result of a line by line random character substitution ap-
plied to gure 16.6. For example, take the rst line of gure 6, substitute an
’R’ for each ’0’, an ’E’ for each ’1’, and so on using the substitution values
shown in gure 16.8 to produce the rst line ofgure 16.7. A random number
16.2. STEREOGRAM BASICS
247
Deleted a 1
Inserted an A
|
|
|
|
12345678902345678A901234567890
so the brain adapts
1234567890
901234567890
1
A
2345678
LI
RI
Figure 16.5: Deleting and Inserting to Create an Object
012345678901234567890123456789012345
012345678901234567890123456789012345
012345678901234567890123456789012345
0123456790123456790123456790A1234567
0123456790123456790123456790A1234567
0123456790123456790123456790A1234567
0123456790123456790123456790A1234567
0123456790123456790123456790A1234567
0123456790123456790123456790A1234567
0123456790123456790123456790A1234567
012345678901234567890123456789012345
012345678901234567890123456789012345
012345678901234567890123456789012345
012345678901234567890123456789012345
Figure 16.6: A Character Stereogram
248
CHAPTER 16. RANDOM DOT STEREOGRAMS
REPGGXRPNRREPGGXRPNRREPGGXRPNRREPGGX
BZCNFWLQIJBZCNFWLQIJBZCNFWLQIJBZCNFW
JBBHAWDYDCJBBHAWDYDCJBBHAWDYDCJBBHAW
WSJRXJHGZWSJRXJHGZWSJRXJHGZWYSJRXJHG
AJQKCKLZAAJQKCKLZAAJQKCKLZAAYJQKCKLZ
SSQCTYDTASSQCTYDTASSQCTYDTASMSQCTYDT
EDRWUDXZFEDRWUDXZFEDRWUDXZFEUDRWUDXZ
RIFSUQHCSRIFSUQHCSRIFSUQHCSRKIFSUQHC
HRWTFDUKFHRWTFDUKFHRWTFDUKFHFRWTFDUK
ZPDPYZKZVZPDPYZKZVZPDPYZKZVZBPDPYZKZ
ISFRFQGVPMISFRFQGVPMISFRFQGVPMISFRFQ
KLASOLWJXPKLASOLWJXPKLASOLWJXPKLASOL
WEAAFJEQIOWEAAFJEQIOWEAAFJEQIOWEAAFJ
WXFAIGAYRUWXFAIGAYRUWXFAIGAYRUWXFAIG
Figure 16.7: A Random Character Stereogram
generator created these substitution values. The transition from gure 16.6
to 16.7 used a dierent set of substitution values for each line.
Figure 16.9 shows another example. First is the depth image with 0 being
the background and 2 being closest to the viewer. The bottom is the result
of a line by line random character substitution.
Now we have the basics of stereograms. Start with a depth image choose
an appropriate pattern length (less than the distance between your eyes and
twice as big as the number of depth levels); shorten and lengthen the pattern
length according to changes in depth; and produce a stereogram with line
by line random substitution. We also know that we can make character
stereograms which are easy to e-mail.
Extending these concepts to dots vice characters is simple with the dif-
ference being in the random substitution. Dot stereograms have only two
values (1 and 0 for white and black). If the output of the random number
generator is odd, substitute a 1 and substitute a 0 otherwise. In gure 16.8
the G substitutes for both a 3 and a 4. In dot stereograms, a 1 will substi-
tute for about half the values and a 0 will substitute for the others. Some
stereograms have colored dots. If there are four colors, the random number
is modulused by 4 (producing 0, 1, 2, and 3) with the result substituting for
the four color values in the pattern.
Documents you may be interested
Documents you may be interested