how to view pdf file in asp.net using c# : Some pdf image extract application control tool html azure windows online 10.1186%2Fs13059-014-0442-y0-part114

Trinhetal. GenomeBiology 2014, 15:442
http://genomebiology.com/2014/15/442
SOFTWARE
Open Access
GoIFISH: a system for the quantification of
single cell heterogeneity from IFISH images
Anne Trinh
1†
,Inga H Rye
2,3†
,Vanessa Almendro
4,5
,Åslaug Helland
2,3,6
,Hege G Russnes
2,3,7*
and Florian Markowetz
1*
Abstract
Molecularanalysis has revealed extensive intra-tumor heterogeneity in human cancer samples, but cannot identify
cell-to-cell variations within the tissue microenvironment. In contrast, insitu analysis canidentify genetic aberrations in
phenotypically defined cellsubpopulations while preserving tissue-context specificity. GoIFISH is a widely
applicable, user-friendlysystem tailored forthe objective and semi-automated visualization, detection and
quantification of genomic alterationsand protein expression obtained from fluorescence in situ analysis. In a sample
set of HER2-positive breast cancers GoIFISH is highlyrobust in visualanalysis and its accuracy compares favorably to
other leading image analysismethods. GoIFISH is freelyavailable at www.sourceforge.net/projects/goifish/.
Quantifying cell-to-cellheterogeneityin the tissue
context
Intra-tumor heterogeneity is currently accepted as a hall-
mark of cancer, being present in virtually all tumor traits
[1]. Sensitive molecular techniques developed in the last
few years have allowed a detailed genetic and pheno-
typic deconvolution of intra-tumor heterogeneity. These
include genome-wide analysis of bulk tumor samples to
describe evolutionary trajectories in relapsed tumors and
genomic divergence between primary tumors and metas-
tases [2-4], as well as single-cell genomic profiling [2,5].
However, despite methodological improvements in the
molecular characterization of single cells, the accurate
interpretation of intra-tumor heterogeneity requires the
inference of cell-to-cell variability within a particular tis-
sue context, which can only be directly assessed by in
situ analysis. Microenvironmental constraints within spa-
tially restricted areas of a tumor can exert differential
selective pressures, leading to the manifestation and the
selection of different phenotypes and particular geno-
types. For instance, different oxygen levels, the presence
*Correspondence: Hege.Russnes@rr-research.no;
florian.markowetz@cruk.cam.ac.uk
Equal contributors
2
Department of Genetics, InstituteforCancerResearch, Postboks 4950
Nydalen, 0424Oslo, Norway
1
University ofCambridge, CancerResearch UK CambridgeInstitute, Robinson
Way, CB20RE Cambridge, UK
Full list of author information is available at theend of thearticle
of inflammatory cells, or the physical interaction with
extracellular components in different parts of a tumor
[6-8] can influence cellular phenotypes and contribute
to different trajectories in the evolution of a tumor [2].
Therefore, the accurate interpretation of cellular pheno-
typic and genomic heterogeneity requires tissue-context
specificity [9-11].
IFISH: Immunofluorescence in situ hybridization In
situ fluorescence-based detection of proteins, DNA, and
RNA enables the simultaneous detection of multiple
markers in single cells by epifluorescence, confocal,
or multispectral imaging technology. Combining both
immunofluorescence and fluorescence in situ hybridiza-
tion (IFISH) allows multiplexing to detect both genomic
and phenotypic traits at the single cell level [10]. This
approach captures cell-to-cell variations missed in cell
population analyses while preserving specific microenvi-
ronmental contexts. As an in situ analysis, IFISH allows
thespatial mappingof individualcellstomeasure topolog-
ical heterogeneity. Visualizing topological heterogeneity
can have important implications in predicting treatment
response, as well as tailoring treatment to suit the diverse
cell populations observed within a tumor [10]. However,
these in situ studies requirethe analysis of multiple mark-
ers in thousands of cells, are very time-consuming, and
their reproducibility could be influenced by variability
between users [12]. Therefore, thereis an urgent need for
©2014 Trinhetal.; licensee BioMedCentralLtd. Thisis anOpenAccessarticle distributed under theterms ofthe Creative
Commons AttributionLicense (http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0), whichpermitsunrestricteduse, distribution,and
reproductioninanymedium, provided theoriginalworkisproperly credited. The Creative CommonsPublicDomainDedication
waiver (http://creativecommons.org/publicdomain/zero/1.0/) applies tothedata madeavailable inthis article, unless otherwise
stated.
Some pdf image extract - Select, copy, paste PDF images in C#.net, ASP.NET, MVC, Ajax, WinForms, WPF
Support PDF Image Extraction from a Page, a Region on a Page, and PDF Document
extract jpeg from pdf; how to extract images from pdf
Some pdf image extract - VB.NET PDF Image Extract Library: Select, copy, paste PDF images in vb.net, ASP.NET, MVC, Ajax, WinForms, WPF
Support PDF Image Extraction from a Page, a Region on a Page, and PDF Document
how to extract images from pdf files; extract photo from pdf
Trinhetal. GenomeBiology 2014,15:442
Page 2of15
http://genomebiology.com/2014/15/442
the development of objective analytical tools that mini-
mize scoring subjectivity and facilitate the quantification
of multiple traits in single cells while preserving con-
text specificity. Theimplementation of these tools in both
basic and translational research will advance our under-
standing of tumor biology and will facilitate biomarker
discovery and validation.
GoIFISH: quantifying tumor heterogeneity in IFISH
images For application n to IFISH, , accurate segmenta-
tion at the nuclear, membrane and spot level are critical
for subsequent analysis, which often interrogates clonal
populations or evaluates relationships between protein
and genomic expression. Objective integration of protein
expression and copy number requires not only accurate
segmentation, but also the separation of normal cells
from tumor cells, and appropriate background subtrac-
tion associated with auto-fluorescence. Very few existing
softwares allow manual alterations of small inaccuracies
in cell segmentation and often incorrect cell classifi-
cation results cannot be changed. Visual scoring by a
trained observer (e.g. pathologist) is the gold standard
for detecting cells and automated image analysis systems
developed tocomplement pathologist scoring require user
validation [12].
To address these challenges, we have developed a semi-
automated system which provides users with an auto-
mated starting point in segmentation and can readily
accept user input to improve the segmentation result.
GoIFISH is able to segment nuclei, locate and estimate
spots, detect membranes, measure morphological and
intensity properties and classify cells. GoIFISH is a ver-
satile method that allows researchers to determine and
quantify, for instance, the amplification status of single
locus within cells, together with the detection of pheno-
typic markers present in different subcellular locations.
It preserves the tissue context specificity and provides
coordinates for thetopological mapping ofeach cell. Sim-
ple topology maps can be displayed to illustrate spatial
variations within an image with respect to two given
stains. GoIFISHallowsusers to analyzeFISH,IF orIFISH
imagescontaining a maximum of5 markers,of which one
must be the nuclear marker DAPI. We validated our soft-
ware in a pilot HER2+ breast cancer cohort of 10 samples
and compared its performancewith existing softwares.
Related approaches Several general image processing
methods including CellProfiler [13], Icy [14], OMERO
[15], ImageJ [16], CellTracker [17] and ImageM [18] have
been developed for the quantitative analysis of images,
and the capabilities of each software are described in
Table 1.
OMERO is a platform for the storage and annotation
of microscopy images [15], and Icy and ImageJ have been
developed as general platforms for image analysis [14,16].
All three are dependent on the development of plug-
ins for specific applications from its user-base. OMERO
currently does not have automated algorithms for image
segmentation, and is dependent on user input for the
delineation of cell boundaries or other regions of interest.
ImageJ and Icy have a series of plugins for nuclear seg-
mentation, membrane segmentation and spot detection,
however these three processes are often disjoint and will
require user effort to collate these results. We have used
MATLAB astheplatformfor developingGoIFISH dueto
its wide user-base, strong image analysis capabilities and
comprehensive data analysis features.
Softwares with specific cell segmentation capabilities
include Columbus, CellProfiler [13], ImageM [18] and
CellTracker [17]. CellProfiler and Columbus areprograms
which specialize in the segmentation of cells from the
cytoplasmic and nuclear level, down to the subcellular or
genomic level. These have been developed primarily for
high-throughput analysis of cells in culture, and often are
based on assumptions about the regularity of size and
morphology within the cell population of interest. These
softwares are optimized to have minimal segmentation
errors in cell-culture images, however, maynot bedirectly
applicable toreal tissue.
ImageM [18] is a software developed for detection
and counting of RNA signals using a semi-automated
approach. Users canrefineresults,however,to extract fea-
tures on a per nucleus or cell basis, manual delineation
of regions of interest is required. CellTracker [17] has
beendevelopedprimarilyfor thelive-trackingof cells, and
asemi-automated approach to nuclear and cytoplasmic
segmentation is also applied.
Currently available segmentation softwares are not tai-
lored for the segmentation of IFISH images, due to the
heterogeneous nature of tumor populations and complex
tissue structure. This has motivated the development of
GoIFISH to perform accurate nuclear, membrane and
spot detection, while allowing the user the freedom to
manually edit segmentation outputs (Figure 1). This is
critical as a starting point for the analysis of tumor sub-
populations, and the extraction of biologically relevant
features from the images.
Availabilityof GoIFISH
GoIFISH is freely available at www.sourceforge.net/
projects/goifish/ under the GNU General Public License
version 2.GoIFISHis written in MATLAB and all source
code is provided to allow analysis on both command
line and through the Graphical User Interface (GUI)
(Additional file 1). It is dependent on OMERO Bio-
formats for the conversion of images to the correct file
format for loading [19]. All images used in this study are
available at the given link. The GUI has been created into
VB.NET PDF Password Library: add, remove, edit PDF file password
RasterEdge XDoc.PDF SDK provides some PDF security settings about password to help protect your PDF document in VB.NET project.
extract images from pdf file; extract pictures pdf
C# HTML5 PDF Viewer SDK to view, annotate, create and convert PDF
Here explains some usages about HTML5 PDF Viewer annotation functionalities. C#.NET: Create PDF Online in ASP.NET. C#.NET: Edit PDF Image in ASP.NET.
extract image from pdf; some pdf image extractor
Trinhetal. GenomeBiology 2014, 15:442
Page 3 of15
http://genomebiology.com/2014/15/442
Table 1 Comparisonbetween softwaresavailableforcellsegmentation
Property
GoIFISH
Columbus
CellProfiler
ImageJ
ImageM
CellTracker
Cost
Open-Source
Proprietary
Open-Source
Open-Source
Open-Source
on request
Open-Source
Real-Time Update
Yes
Yes
No
No
No
Yes
BackgroundIntensity
Subtraction
Yes
Tuningbut no
subtraction
CorrectIllumination
Calculate
Flatten
Illumination
No
No
A-Priori knowledge
required(eg. cell size or
segmentation methods)
No
No
Yes
No
No
No
NuclearSegmentation
Yes
Yes
Yes
Yes
Manual
Yes
Membrane Segmentation
Yes
Yes
Yes
Yes
Manual
Yes
Spot Detection
Yes
Yes
Yes
Yes
Yes
No
Batch Processing
CmdLine Only
Yes
Yes
BatchCommand
Plugin
No
No
VisualiseBatch
Segmentation Results
Yes
No
Yes
No
No
No
ManualEditing
Yes
No
No
No
Yes
Yes
CellSpecific Information
Yes
Yes
Yes
Yes
Yes
Yes
Summary Report
Yes
Yes
Yes
Yes
Yes
Yes
Topology orsummary
Maps
Yes
No
Yes
TopitPlugin
No
No
astand-aloneprogram operable onWindows andMacOS
systems following the installation of the appropriate ver-
sion of MATLAB Compiler Runtime (v7.14), provided at
the given link.
The user-guide for the software is included as
Additional file 2. The types of images for optimal use in
GoIFISH are describedin Table 2. Notethat due to mem-
oryconstraints, there aresizelimitations of 12 megapixels
for comfortable use in the GUI however, this limitation
can be overcome using the GoIFISHWrapper in the
MATLAB environment.
The GoIFISH workflow
The following paragraphs give a detailed overview of
the GoIFISH workflow. An overview of the capabilities
of GoIFISH, including the user interface is shown in
Figure 1.
Step 1: Loading and preprocessing data Imagescanbe
loaded as a .mat file containing a cell array or a .tiff file
into the GUI. After successful loading, the first image in
the series will be presented (Figure 1A). These are auto-
matically adjusted to ensure 1% of the image is saturated
at lower and higher intensities, which is more suited for
nuclearorcytoplasmicimagesbut may saturatespots. The
‘RangeScale’ option is recommended in these scenarios.
Brightness and contrast of each image can be adjusted for
auto-fluorescence, to ensure an optimal dynamic range
and to prevent saturation of the image. This is critical for
good segmentation results. Note that the image adjust-
ment will improve the user experience and segmentation
results, however,theintensitiescan bemeasured from the
raw image for comparative quantitation.
GoIFISH allows background intensity adjustment,
both using a single global intensity value, or on a cell spe-
cific level for nuclei. The user draws ‘background’ regions
using the paintbrush tool, from which the mean back-
ground intensity is calculated. This is subtracted from
either raw intensities, which is recommended for com-
parisons between samples, or from an adjusted image. A
per cell nuclear background adjustment is also available,
whereby a background intensity is calculated at a margin
of 2-6 pixels from the edge of each segmented nucleus.
This will be computed automatically for all nuclear
stains, and will account for local variation in background
intensity.
To finalize the preprocessing stage the user will need to
indicate thestain type in eachchannel, of which onemust
be DAPI, and the magnification of theimage.60x, 40x and
20x magnifications are permitted, however higher reso-
lutions are recommended for the accurate detection of
spots. Followingthis, aquick preprocessing step is applied
to assign the stain type to each image. After this,segmen-
tations on either the DAPI channel alone or all channels
using default parameters can be performed (Figure 1B).
Step 2: Nuclear segmentation Theforegroundorcel-
lular portion of the image is automatically detected by
C# PDF Password Library: add, remove, edit PDF file password in C#
Able to change password on adobe PDF document in C#.NET. To help protect your PDF document in C# project, XDoc.PDF provides some PDF security settings.
extract image from pdf using; extract image from pdf acrobat
C# Create PDF Library SDK to convert PDF from other file formats
Load PDF from existing documents and image in SQL server. creating toolkit, if you need to add some text and draw some graphics on created PDF document file
some pdf image extract; how to extract a picture from a pdf
Trinhetal. GenomeBiology 2014,15:442
Page 4of15
http://genomebiology.com/2014/15/442
Figure 1Overviewof GoIFISH, includingcomputational capabilities. (A)TheGoIFISHgraphicaluser interface(B) Outputsfrom GoIFISH
includingnuclear andmembranesegmentation,spot detection,manually editedsegmentation,andtopology maps(C)Cell classification.After
cell segmentation,cellsarelabelledastumor(green)orstromal (yellow)by the user.Cells areautomatically classifiedusingthe markedcellsas
trainingdata.
Otsu thresholding [20] on a combined image of entropy
and intensity, which is used as a mask in cell segmenta-
tion. Nuclei are segmented using an iterative H-minima
transformed watershed [21], where the local intensity
depth of pixels under a given threshold is suppressed,
and a watershed is applied. Fragments attained from each
step are classified as either optimal, undersegmented, or
oversegmented.Cells withoptimalpropertiesareselected,
and the remaining image is subjected to segmentation
at a lower threshold. We have developed an approach to
mitigate oversegmentation by joining neighboring frag-
ments according to their morphological features (see
Material and methods). There is also an option of per-
forming a seeded-watershed [22] for images with a small
VB.NET PDF Annotate Library: Draw, edit PDF annotation, markups in
mark the source PDF file by adding some comments, notes on, which integrates advanced VB.NET PDF editing functions and VB.NET image annotating features
extract text from image pdf file; extract images from pdf files
VB.NET Image: How to Process & Edit Image Using VB.NET Image
Besides, if you want to apply some popular image effects to target image file, like image sharpening, image vintage effect creating, image color adjusting and
extract pdf images; pdf image extractor online
Trinhetal. GenomeBiology 2014, 15:442
Page 5 of15
http://genomebiology.com/2014/15/442
Table2 Optimalpropertiesof images for analysisin GoIFISH
GUI
GoIFISHWrapper(CommandLine)
FileFormat
.mat or.tiff
.tiff.zvi Usebio-formatsto convert otherformats
ImageSize
12 megapixels for comfortableuse
Theoretically unlimited
Numberofstains
Upto 5.Must include DAPI
Unlimitedbut must include DAPI
NumberofCells
Under 1000for comfortableuse
Theoretically unlimited
CellSize(px)
Optimally 60x magnification (2500-10000px),20x and40x magnification
also available (250-3000px)
number of cells or poor contrast at cell boundaries,
whereby the user indicates the cell locations with a series
of spots. A H-minima watershed is thenapplied using this
information.
Following segmentation, the user has the option of nar-
rowing down the population of interest using a minimum
size threshold, or edit the borders manually (see Step 5).
It is recommended that the user checks the output of
thenuclearsegmentation beforeproceeding asmembrane
segmentation and spot detection are dependent on the
nuclear map generated.
Step 3: Membrane segmentation Membranesegmenta-
tion is performed by combining a Voronoi segmentation
of nuclei withtheintensity information oftheimage.High
intensity edges within the image are set as local max-
ima to ensure segmentation occurs along these edges.
Fragments are then merged based on their location with
respect to the nuclear segmentation. This result can be
further refined using active contours, such as Chan-Vese
Segmentation [23] or Localized Segmentation [24].
Step 4: FISH detection For single e spot detection, , a
Laplacian of Gaussian filter is applied to the image to
determine candidate spots. Spots which are also local
maxima in the gradient image are selected. The user has
an option of entering an expected size threshold (Default
minimum spot size of 15 pixels for 60x images), and a
preferred intensity threshold. An optional morphology
classifier(seeMaterial andmethods) canbe appliedtodif-
ferentiate between spots and artefacts in images with low
contrast signal,such as signals from centromere 17.
Step 5: Manually editing segmentations GoIFISH
provides a toolbox to manually edit segmentations if
needed.Manual editing ofthe segmentation output canbe
easilyachievedby drawinga borderbetween cells with the
‘scissors’ tool, oversegmented cells can be ‘glued’ together,
and artefacts can be ‘trashed’. Regions can be ‘painted’ or
‘erased’. All operations are terminated by right clicking,
and pressing the ‘escape’ exits a particular editing mode.
Step 6: Post segmentation processing Segmentsfrom
each channel need to be mapped to the DAPI channel in
order to construct a matrix of features, using the ‘Update’
function. An error will appear if there are inconsistencies
in the segmentation, such as two nuclei mapping to one
membrane. Following successful mapping, the user can
generate heatmaps and topology maps to visualize stain-
ing variations within the image (Figure 1B) and perform
cell classification (Figure1C).
Cells in the image are classified by support vector
machine into 4 possible cell types. The user labels candi-
date cells for each class (for example, to separate fibrob-
lasts from tumor cells), and appliesthe classification. This
classification is based on morphological parameters but
can also include intensity information. The classification
resultcan be manually corrected ifinconsistencies appear.
Step 7: Output from GoIFISH The output t from
GoIFISH can be saved as a series of images and a .csv
file with cell specific measurements. These include
intensity measurements, including raw and background
adjusted intensities, morphologial parameters such as
area, perimeters, axis lengths, the location of thecentroid
of each nuclei, the cell label if classification is performed
and copy numbers in the case of spot detection. Data can
be downloaded into the MATLAB environment, or saved
as aprogress.mat file where processing can beresumedin
another session.
GoIFISHWrapper: Combining Steps 1-4 GoIFISH
provides a wrapper for batch analysis, which is imple-
mented via command line. The user simply provides the
filepath of interest and edits a Parameter File which con-
tains information such as the stains used, the magnifica-
tion of the image and the segmentation parameters. The
resultsare automaticallysaved asprogress.mat fileswhich
can be loaded into the GUI for segmentation editing,
background selection and cell labelling. Other benefits of
running the wrapper include unlimited number of stains
and the analysis of larger images. However, it is recom-
mended that each image does not exceed a resolution of
12 megapixels if the user wishes to edit cells in the GUI.
In this circumstance, it is recommended that the image
C# PDF: C# Code to Process PDF Document Page Using C#.NET PDF
and manage those PDF files, especially when they are processing some PDF document files C# PDF: Add Image to PDF Page Using C#.NET, C# PDF: Extract Page(s
online pdf image extractor; extract images from pdf
C# Create PDF from images Library to convert Jpeg, png images to
It enables you to build a PDF file with one or Various image forms are supported which include Png, Jpeg, Bmp Some C# programming demos are illustrated below.
extract image from pdf java; pdf image extractor
Trinhetal. GenomeBiology 2014,15:442
Page 6of15
http://genomebiology.com/2014/15/442
is sectioned into a number of smaller constituent images
which areanalyzed independently.
GoIFISH performance and benchmarking
The performance of GoIFISH was compared to two
state-of-the-art image analysis systems, the proprietary
Columbus software from Perkin-Elmer, and the open-
sourceCellProfiler fromtheBroad Institute[13]. All three
image analysis softwares can detect nuclei, FISH signals,
cytoplasm staining, and report morphological properties
including size, and intensities. Details of all statistical
analyses including code to reproduce plots are contained
in the Additional file 3.
Comparing GoIFISH to existingautomated methods
Columbus has an intuitive interface, real-time feedback,
automatic detection of approximate cell sizes, with very
little image processing knowledge required to operate the
system (Table 1). On the other hand, CellProfiler has the
benefits of wider functionality as its open-source nature
allows its user base to develop and maintain specialized
functions. However, it requires a-priori knowledge about
the images and different segmentation methods, which
may take the user a long time to develop an optimal
segmentation pipeline. The parameters used to segment
images in these two programs are described in Material
and methods.
GoIFISH was tested in two scenarios. In order to
perform fair benchmarking, images from 10 samples
were run in GoIFISH on the default settings (see
Material and methods). In addition, we tested its capabil-
ities for improvement with user input.
An example of the segmentation output from all three
softwares is shown in Figure 2A. GoIFISH, using its
default segmentation parameters, demonstrated preci-
sion and recall in nuclear and spot detection which are
comparable to both Columbus and CellProfiler (Figure
2B, Additional file 4: Figure S1B, Mean F-Score: 0.68,
N = 10). From visual inspection of the segmentation
output (Figure 2A), Columbus does not perform nuclear
segmentation when the borders are not well defined.
CellProfiler applies edges to ensure segments are within
the defined range of cell diameters, resulting in seg-
mentation inaccuracies. GoIFISH with default parame-
ters outperformed existing softwares in membrane detec-
tion (Figure 2B, Mean F-Score 0.86, N=10) with results
very similar to the manually edited GoIFISH result. All
methods demonstrated high precision as membranes are
detected around nuclei, but varying degrees of recall
Figure 2Performance benchmarkingagainst Columbus and CellProfiler. (A) Exampleofnuclear,membrane andspot segmentation using
CellProfiler,Columbus,andGoIFISH manually correctedsegmentations.(B) AverageF-Scoresfornuclearsegmentation,membrane detection,
spotdetection (includingclusters) in 10 sample images. (C)Differencesin perimeter-arearatio ofsegmented nuclei andmembranescomparedto
the gold standard.Values closerto 1indicatesimilarmorphology to the goldstandard.
How to C#: Basic SDK Concept of XImage.Raster
VB.NET How-to, VB.NET PDF, VB.NET Word classes to convert, process, edit, and annotate image from local can load convert and save define some specified options
how to extract images from pdf in acrobat; extract jpg from pdf
C#: How to Add HTML5 Document Viewer Control to Your Web Page
Note: some versions of Visual Studio use addCommand(new CommandAnnotation("image", new AnnoStyle _userCmdDemoPdf = new UserCommand("pdf"); _userCmdDemoPdf.addCSS
extract text from pdf image; extract image from pdf
Trinhetal. GenomeBiology 2014, 15:442
Page 7 of15
http://genomebiology.com/2014/15/442
(Additional file 4: Figure S1B). We observed that Colum-
bus treats membranes with high intensity as cytoplasmic
regions (Figure 2A).
In Cent17 and HER2 detection GoIFISH with default
parameters surpassed the two existing methods (Mean
F-Scores: 0.69, 0.83 for cent17 and HER2 respectively).
Columbus has high recall but poor precision, reflecting
a higher false positive rate. It should be noted that the
manually curated samples had variable F-score, which
may be a subsequent propagation error from nuclear
segmentation.
While precision and recall assess the presence of an
object, they provide no information on how accurate
the morphology of the segmentation is. For instance,
encroachment errors with slight misplacement of cell
boundaries will have no effect on the F-Score. There-
fore, the perimeter-area ratio was measured for each cell
and compared to the gold standard as an assessment of
whether the correct shape was detected. Each individ-
ual spot in Figure 2C represents the average difference
in perimeter-area ratio for one particular image. Points
centred around 1 indicate very little variation in shape
compared tothegold standard. In bothnuclear andmem-
brane segmentation, GoIFISH values were closer to 1
compared to Columbus and CellProfiler, indicating that
the morphology was better represented.
Time-benchmarkingwasperformed betweenGoIFISH
and the newest version of CellProfiler (v2.1.0) (Table 3).
Columbus operates on a server and thus a direct com-
parison was not applicable. Timings were performed on
a2x2.4 GHz Quad-Core Intel Xeon processor with 6GB
RAM, on 5 candidate samples with an increasing number
of cells. GoIFISH performs comparably to CellProfiler
when the image contains well defined cells, but the pro-
cessing time increased with greater image complexity. For
example, processing image 6370 took the longest as it
has a high number of cells with invasive phenotype and
poorly defined cell boundaries. All segmentations can be
conducted within 1.2 minutes,which despite being longer
than CellProfiler, is still sufficiently short for mainstream
use.
Correlating GoIFISH output withvisual interpretation
While precision-recall testing allows reliable assessment
of segmentation accuracy, the obtained data must be
Table3 Timingcomparisons betweenGoIFISH and
CellProfiler
Sample
7461
6361
7435
7619
6370
ApproximateNumberofCells
20
60
80
100
120
CellProfiler Time (s)
26
25
29
30
32
GoIFISH Time(s)
26
27
40
42
73
reflective of the biology to draw valid conclusions. Auto-
mated scoring of protein intensities and spot areas were
compared with visual pathologist scoring on a single-cell
level, with a total of 355 cells scored for ER staining,
membrane HER2 intensity and cent17 and HER2 copy
number.
In a first analysis, we assessed immunofluorescence of
ER and HER2 to determine (1) whether the distribution
of cell intensitieswithin an image is reflective ofthe semi-
quantitative scoring by a trained observerand(2) whether
twocells withthesame scoring in two different images are
directlycomparable.All methods detecting thenuclearER
stain showed a correlation between the semi-quantitative
scoring and intensity measurements, however, samples
were not shown to be directly comparable to each other.
As an example, a ‘positive’ cell in sample 6361 was on sim-
ilar intensity to a ‘moderately’ stained cell in sample 6370
(Figure 3A).
ANOVA in conjunction with Tukey’s range test was
performed on samples with‘negative’ expression todeter-
mine whether the baseline means are directly comparable
to each other. Out of the 45 possible pairwise compar-
isons, Columbus had 26 pairwise comparisons, CellPro-
filer had 13 and GoIFISH had only 10 pairwise compar-
isons which showed a significant difference in baseline
mean (p < 0.05). Sample 7360 had a negative inten-
sity after background correction using GoIFISH, but in
practice would be assigned a value of 0 which would fur-
ther lower the number of significant differences. Using
a per nucleus specific background subtraction method
in GoIFISH, ‘positive’ samples become comparable to
each other across all images (Figures 3A, Additional file5:
Figure S2A). Figure 3B illustrates the right ordering and
statistical difference between each class, demonstrating
that the method can reproduce quantitatively the visual
scoring (T-test,p < 0.01 between all categories).
The same analysis was applied to HER2 membrane
staining to determine whether the intensity could reca-
pitulate the membrane completeness in cells. HER2 pro-
tein assessment in a clinical setting often uses patterns
of staining to guide subsequent treatment [25]. Cells
are classified as having ‘negative’ membrane staining,
‘complete’ positive staining or ‘incomplete’ positive stain-
ing. Both GoIFISH after background subtraction and
Columbus demonstrated a step-wise increase in intensity
with highest intensity observed in complete membranes
(Figure 3C,D). Combining all cells, a statistical differ-
ence at the correct order of classes was observed in only
the GoIFISH background adjusted and manually edited
samples (Figure 3D, Additional file 5: Figure S2D).
The coefficient of variation was also computed as a
second metric of differentiating between ‘complete’ and
‘incomplete’ membranes. It is expected that ‘complete’
membranes have a lower variation than ‘incomplete’
Trinhetal. GenomeBiology 2014,15:442
Page 8of15
http://genomebiology.com/2014/15/442
Figure 3Correlation between measured intensities and classificationbya pathologist. Comparison ofsemi-quantitative scoringby a
pathologist with CellProfiler, ColumbusandGoIFISH quantitationin (A) ERstaining,(C) HER2membrane completeness usingmean intensities(E)
HER2 membraneintensity usingcoefficient of variance.Combineddistributionsofquantitationsacrossall 10samples for(B) ER positivity,(D) HER2
membranecompletenessusingmean intensitiesand(F)HER2 membrane intensity usingcoefficient ofvariance. Note thatGoIFISHnuclear
adjustedintensities wereusedin (A,B),GoIFISHbackgroundadjusted intensitieswereusedin (C, D) and GoIFISH raw intensitiesusedin (E, F).
Trinhetal. GenomeBiology 2014, 15:442
Page 9 of15
http://genomebiology.com/2014/15/442
membranes. In both GoIFISH and Columbus, an
increased coefficient was observed in the samples with
broken membranes compared to the samples with com-
plete membranes, this was however only statistically sig-
nificant in GoIFISH but not in Columbus (Figure 3E,F,
Additional file 5: Figure S2C,D).
In a second analysis, we assessed how accurately an
automated system can estimate the number of spots
within each cell based on the areameasured. In 9 samples
(Sample 7619 was excluded due to overexposure of the
channel and thus high false positive rate), we assessed the
correlation between manually counted copy number per
cell with the automatically detected spot area (Figure 4).
In samples wherethe distinct number ofcopies cannot be
counted due to amplification, a value of 22 was assigned
(which was one more than the upper observable limit of
21 spots). Most relationships appeared to be linear for
centromere 17, with the exception of measurements by
CellProfiler. The estimatesof HER2 spots by GoIFISH and
Columbus showed a strong linear correlation with man-
ually curated copy numbers, which plateaued at a value
of approximately 400 pixels.Similar gradients were shown
forcentromericand HER2 spots,andin both cases alinear
regression will approximate an area of 20 pixels per spot.
Effects of user variability onGoIFISH outputs
User input may influence background intensity correc-
tion, cell segmentation results and cell classification.
GoIFISH has been developed with a numberof strategies
to minimize the effects of inter-user variation.
To determine the variation in background selection
between users, measurements were made by two trained
observers and one untrained observer who was given
background selection-guidelines (see User Guide in
Additional file 2). All three observers demonstrated 88%
or greater correlation with the gold standard (Figure 5A),
demonstrating that our guidelines are sufficient for an
‘untrainedobserver’ toattain asimilarscoringas a‘trained
observer’.
Toaddresstheissue ofbackgroundheterogeneitywithin
an image, a trained observer selected four different back-
ground regions within each image to compare intensities.
These values are reported as coefficients of variation
(Figure5B), where the size ofeach box proportional to the
mean reported intensity. In most images, a low variation
of 10% or less was observed, with the exception of 6361
and 7916 whichhad highauto-fluorescence andoverexpo-
sure respectively. The greatest variation was observed in
theDAPI channel, whichis ageneral DNA marker used to
assess the quality of the sample. In practice, DAPI inten-
sities are rarely measured for quantitative analysis. The
other stains are more selective and specific for a partic-
ular protein or locus of interest, and have demonstrated
greater stability in background intensities.
Manual editing of segmentation results is also prone
to user subjectivity. To reduce both this effect and man-
ual labor, GoIFISH was designed with a toolbox which
minimizes the amount of clicks or mouse-drawing per-
formed by the user. For example, the merging of cells
requires two clicks of the mouse, and the segmentation
0
5
1015
20
0
200
400
600
800
0
5
1015
20
0
200
400
600
800
0
200
400
600
800
200
400
600
800
0
r=0.31
r=0.59
r=0.47
r=0.61
r=0.64
r=0.81
r=0.77
r=0.76
Manually Curated Copy Number
Spot Area (px)
Centromere 17
ERBB2
CellProfiler
Columbus
GoIFISH
Manually edited GoIFISH
Figure4 Correlatingcopy numberwith spot area at a singlecell level. Correlation between manually countedspotsandautomateddetection
of spot areausingColumbus,CellProfiler andGoIFISH.A linear relationshipbetween copy number andarea isobserveduntil 21spots percell,
afterwhich individual spots areno longer discernableby eye. Darker regions indicateahigherpopulation ofcellswith similarproperties.
Trinhetal. GenomeBiology 2014,15:442
Page 10 of15
http://genomebiology.com/2014/15/442
Figure 5Robustness ofGoIFISHperformance with userinput. (A) Inter-user variation in backgroundintensity selection from threeobservers
(two trained)when comparedto theGoldStandard. (B) Heatmapof coefficient ofvariation ofbackground intensity in allsampleimages.Larger
shapeindicatesa higher mean.(C) Inter-user variation in area ofsegmentedcells(nuclear andmembrane)and(D) corresponding intensity ofHER2
membranesand ER.(E) Permutation testingofaccuracy of classifierusingeitheronly morphological information ormorphologicalandintensity
information formyopepithelial-luminal discrimination (left)andlymphocyte-stromal-tumordiscrimination (right).
of overlapping cells requires one line to be drawn. These
features ensure that the morphology and boundary of
cells are consistent in each image irrespective of the
user.
To determine the effectiveness of these tools, two inde-
pendent scorers manually edited 50 missegmented cells
across the 10 test images. The nuclear and cytoplas-
mic areas were measured, alongside nuclear ER inten-
sity and HER2 membrane intensity. Nuclear segmenta-
tion was consistent between the two scorers (r = 0.86,
Figure 5C), however a number of cells were considered
to be larger by Scorer 1 than Scorer 2. The discrepant
cells were determined to be mitotic, phenotypically char-
acterised by the appearance of two nuclei in the DAPI
channel yet sharing the same membrane in the HER2
channel, and considered as one cell by Scorer 1 but as
two cells by Scorer 2. The cyotplasmic areas had lower
correlation between the two observers (r = 0.79), which
can be attributed to the HER2 status of the cell. In the
absence of a well defined HER2 membrane, the shape is
open to interpretation, accounting for the greater varia-
tionintheHER2- cells than the HER2+ cells (HER2+ only:
r= 0.83).
Despite the differences in morphology of the seg-
mented cells, 99% correlation was observed in the raw
recorded intensities (r = 0.99 for both ER and HER2,
Figure 5D), demonstrating that intensity measurements
are robust to differences in cell segmentation between
users.
Finally, we tested how the performance of the cell clas-
sifier depends on the size of the training set and cellu-
lar features in two different cell classification scenarios:
(1) to differentiate myoepithelial from luminal cells and
(2) to differentiate lymphocytes and stroma from tumor
(Figure 5E). Two images representing these two scenar-
ios were labelled by a trained observer. Training sets of
increasing size (starting from 2 cells) were created by
randomly sampling the number of required cells, and
where possible an equal number of cells from each class
were selected. To determine the 95% confidence interval
for classifier accuracy, 500 permutations of the train-
ing set for each size were used to predict the labels
withinan image. Ourresults demonstrate that using mor-
phological parameters alone, the accuracy approaches
70% for myoepithalial-luminal discrimination, and 80%
for lymphocyte-stromal-tumor discrimination. With the
addition of stain information, the accuracy approached
95% and 100% accuracy respectively. The average accu-
racy of the classifier increases with a larger number of
labelled cells, however, if well-chosen, high classification
accuracy can still be attained with a training set of under
10 cells.
Documents you may be interested
Documents you may be interested