how to view pdf file in asp.net using c# : Extract images from pdf files without using copy and paste software application project winforms html .net UWP code_reading14-part1128

pointer that points to the next list element (Figure 4.8:1
). A permanent (for example, global, static, or heap 
allocated) pointer to a list node will often represent the list head (Figure 4.8:3
). This arrangement is shown 
in Figure 4.9
. When the list head has the value of NULL the list is empty. Linked lists are traversed by using 
a list node pointer that starts from the list head and is advanced using each node's next pointer. A for loop 
is often used to code this sequence, as is the case in Figure 4.8:4
. Note that in the list we defined in Figure 
4.8
it's only possible to traverse its elements in a forward  manner. When looking for a particular element, an 
early exit from the for loop is used when the element is found; if the loop ends normally, the particular 
element wasn't found. New elements are added to a list by using a carefully choreographed yet common 
sequence: after allocating memory for the new node and storing its data, the new node is set to point to the 
node where the old list head was pointing, and the list head is set to point to the new list node (Figure 
4.8:5
). Removing the list's head element is easy: the head is made to point to the list's next element. For 
this reason you will find linked lists also often used for representing a stack.
[44]
[43]
netbsdsrc/usr.bin/rup/rup.c:60–9 7
[44]
netbsdsrc/bin/ksh/lex.c:639–644,84 5
/* push alias expansion */
[...]
s->next = source;
source = s;
[...]
source = s->next;   /* pop source stack */
Figure 4.9. A singly linked list.
Removing an arbitrary element from a list is a more complicated affair because we need a variable to point to the particular element's 
pointer. A pointer to a list pointer is used for this purpose, as in the following example.
[45]
[45]
netbsdsrc/bin/sh/alias.c:120–15 2
STATIC int
unalias(char *name)
{
struct alias *ap, **app;
app = hashalias(name);
for (ap = *app; ap; app = &(ap->next), ap = ap->next) {
if (equal(name, ap->name)) {
[...]
*app = ap->next;
ckfree(ap->name);
ckfree(ap->val);
ckfree(ap);
[...]
return (0);
}
Extract images from pdf files without using copy and paste - Select, copy, paste PDF images in C#.net, ASP.NET, MVC, Ajax, WinForms, WPF
Support PDF Image Extraction from a Page, a Region on a Page, and PDF Document
pdf image extractor; extract images from pdf file
Extract images from pdf files without using copy and paste - VB.NET PDF Image Extract Library: Select, copy, paste PDF images in vb.net, ASP.NET, MVC, Ajax, WinForms, WPF
Support PDF Image Extraction from a Page, a Region on a Page, and PDF Document
some pdf image extractor; extract image from pdf
}
return (1);
}
Here app initially points to the linked list head. The variable ap is used to traverse through the linked list, while app always points to the 
location where the current element's pointer is stored. Thus, when the element to be deleted is found, *app is set to point to its next 
element, effectively removing the found element from the list chain.
Note that in the previous example, after an element is deleted, ap could not have been used to advance to 
the next element because its contents (including ap->next) have been freed. Accessing the next member of 
deleted linked list elements is a common mistake.
[46]
[46]
netbsdsrc/usr.bin/rdist/docmd.c:206–21 3
for (; ihead != NULL; ihead = ihead->nextp) {
free(ihead);
if ((opts & IGNLNKS) || ihead->count == 0)
continue;
if (lfp)
log(lfp, "%s: Warning: missing links\n",
ihead->pathname);
}
In the above example, ihead->nextp and ihead->count are accessed after freeing ihead. While this code may work in some architectures 
and C library implementations, it works only by accident since the contents of a freed memory block are not available for further access. 
The mistake is particularly common when deleting a complete linked list. The correct way to delete such elements involves either using a 
temporary variable for storing the address of each next element
[47]
[47]
netbsdsrc/bin/ksh/jobs.c:1050–105 4
for (j = job–list; j; j = tmp)  {
tmp = j->next;
if (j->flags & JF–REMOVE )
remove_job(j, "notify");
}
or storing in a temporary variable the address of the element to be freed before advancing the list pointer.
[48]
[48]
netbsdsrc/bin/sh/alias.c:164–17 7
struct alias *ap, *tmp;
[...]
while (ap) {
ckfree(ap->name);
ckfree(ap->val);
tmp = ap;
ap = ap->next;
ckfree(tmp);
}
Linked lists come in a number of different flavors; the single linked list we outlined above is by far the most commonly used. One variation 
involves linking each list element both with its predecessor and its successor. Such a list is called a doubly linked list (Figure 4.10
). The 
telltale sign of a doubly linked list is an element pointer titled prev.
[49]
[49]
netbsdsrc/sys/arch/arm32/arm32/stubs.c:82–8 4
struct queue {
C# PDF File Merge Library: Merge, append PDF files in C#.net, ASP.
Combine scanned images to PDF, such as tiff functions can be implemented independently, without using any Adobe to easily merge and append PDF files with mature
online pdf image extractor; extract image from pdf java
C# PDF Convert to Images SDK: Convert PDF to png, gif images in C#
Turn multipage PDF file into single image files respectively in .NET framework. Description: Convert all the PDF pages to target format images and output
how to extract images from pdf files; pdf image extractor c#
struct queue *q–next, *q–prev ;
};
Figure 4.10. A doubly linked list.
Two advantages of a doubly linked list are (1) the ability to insert and remove elements at arbitrary list positions without any additional 
context beyond a pointer to the element where the insertion or removal will take place, and (2) the possibility of traversing the list in a 
backward direction. Doubly linked lists are often used to implement a double-ended queue, also known as a deque: a queue in which 
elements can be added or removed on both ends.
Traversing a doubly linked list in the backward direction is typically performed using a for loop.
[50]
[50]
netbsdsrc/bin/csh/parse.c:170
for (p2 = p2->prev; p2->word[0] != ')'; p2 = p2->prev)
The operations for adding and removing elements from a doubly linked list may appear complicated, but you can easily follow them by 
drawing boxes to represent the elements and arrows to represent the changing pointers. Consider the following code fragment, which adds 
an elem list node after the head node.
[51]
[51]
netbsdsrc/sys/arch/arm32/arm32/stubs.c:96–10 2
register struct queue *next;
next = head->q–next ;
elem->q_next = next;
head->q_next = elem;
elem->q_prev = head;
next->q_prev = elem;
The corresponding steps, illustrated in Figure 4.11
, clearly demonstrate how the datastructure pointers are 
gradually adjusted to link elem  into the list. The above example uses the next temporary variable to simplify 
the pointer expressions. In other cases, adjacent list elements are directly expressed by using the prev and 
next pointers of the anchor element.
[52]
[52]
netbsdsrc/usr.bin/telnet/commands.c:1735–174 7
ep->prev->next = ep->next;
if (ep->next)
ep->next->prev = ep->prev;
Figure 4.11. Adding an element in a doubly linked list.
VB.NET PDF Convert to Jpeg SDK: Convert PDF to JPEG images in vb.
& pages edit, C#.NET PDF pages extract, copy, paste, C#.NET can help developers convert standard PDF file to all the content (including both images and texts
extract pictures pdf; extract image from pdf using
VB.NET PDF File Split Library: Split, seperate PDF into multiple
Divide PDF file into multiple files by outputting PDF file size. Independent component for splitting PDF document in preview without using external PDF
extract images from pdf files without using copy and paste; how to extract images from pdf
Although such code may initially appear daunting, a bit of reasoning with a pencil and paper will quickly unravel its function (the above 
example removes element ep from the doubly linked list).
Sometimes the last element of a list, instead of containing NULL, will point back to the list's first element (Figure 4.12
). Such a list is called a 
circular list and is often used for implementing ring buffers or other structures that exhibit wraparound behavior. A circular list cannot be 
traversed using the for sequences we have seen so far since there is no end element to terminate the loop. Instead, you will see that code 
traversing a circular list, stores in a variable the first element accessed, and loops until that element is reached again.
[53]
[53]
netbsdsrc/bin/csh/lex.c:187–20 2
void
prlex(FILE *fp, struct wordent *sp0)
{
struct wordent *sp = sp0->next;
for (;;) {
(void) fprintf(fp, "%s", vis_str(sp->word));
sp = sp->next;
if (sp == sp0)
break;
if (sp->word[0] != '\n')
(void) fputc(' ', fp);
}
}
Figure 4.12. A circular linked list.
The above example prints the contents of a circular linked list starting from position sp using sp0 as the loop exit marker.
VB.NET PDF File Merge Library: Merge, append PDF files in vb.net
Merge two or several separate PDF files together and into one PDF VB.NET Components to combine various scanned images to PDF Merge PDF without size limitation.
extract jpg from pdf; extract images from pdf
C# PDF Convert to Word SDK: Convert PDF to Word library in C#.net
of target PDF document, keeps the elements (like images, tables and this situation, you need to convert PDF document to some easily editable files like Word
how to extract text from pdf image file; extract text from image pdf file
Linked lists are also used when storing more than one element in a single hash table entry, as illustrated in Figure 4.13
. When looking for 
an element in the map, the hash function efficiently locates which linked list to search for, and a simple list traversal is then used to locate 
the particular element.
[54]
[54]
netbsdsrc/games/battlestar/parse.c:70–8 0
struct wlist *
lookup(char *s)
{
struct wlist *wp;
for (wp = hashtab[hash(s)]; wp != NULL; wp = wp->next)
if (*s == *wp->string && strcmp(s, wp->string) == 0)
return wp;
return NULL;
}
Figure 4.13. A hash table of linked lists.
Such a structure offers efficient access to data elements (identifiers) with a modest implementation cost. You will find it often used for 
constructing symbol tables. (A symbol table is often used in language processors, such as interpreters and compilers, for storing and 
retrieving the details associated with a particular identifier, for example the type of a given variable name.)
Exercise 4.20 Locate five instances of singly and doubly linked lists in the book's CD-ROM and explain the functions they perform.
Exercise 4.21 The following function is called with a pointer to a doubly linked list element.
[55]
[55]
netbsdsrc/sys/arch/arm32/arm32/stubs.c:109–12 1
void
_remque(void *v)
{
VB.NET PDF Convert to Word SDK: Convert PDF to Word library in vb.
PDF pages can be converted to separate Word files within a PDF content by outputting its texts and images to Word In order to convert PDF document to Word file
extract pdf pages to jpg; extract jpeg from pdf
C# Create PDF from Word Library to convert docx, doc to PDF in C#.
Easy to create searchable and scanned PDF files from Word. Free online Word to PDF converter without email. RasterEdge.XDoc.PDF.dll.
extract photos from pdf; extract text from pdf image
register struct queue *elem = v;
register struct queue *next, *prev;
next = elem->q_next;
prev = elem->q_prev;
next->q_prev = prev;
prev->q_next = next;
elem->q_prev = 0;
}
By means of a diagram, explain the operation it performs.
[ Team LiB ]
C# PDF insert image Library: insert images into PDF in C#.net, ASP
Create high resolution PDF file without image quality losing in ASP.NET application. Add multiple images to multipage PDF document in .NET WinForms.
extract vector image from pdf; pdf extract images
C# Create PDF from PowerPoint Library to convert pptx, ppt to PDF
Easy to create searchable and scanned PDF files from PowerPoint. Free online PowerPoint to PDF converter without email. RasterEdge.XDoc.PDF.dll.
extract image from pdf online; extract color image from pdf in c#
[ Team LiB ]
4.8 Trees
A number of algorithms and methods of organizing information rely on trees  as the underlying data structure. The formal definition of a tree 
states that its nodes are joined by edges in a way that there is exactly one path from each node to the tree's root. The way a tree's nodes 
expand at each level is often exploited to efficiently organize and process data. Consider that a binary tree 20 levels deep (20 nodes from 
the lowest level to the root) can hold approximately one million (2
20
) elements. Many searching,
[56]
sorting,
[57]
language processing,
[58]
graphics,
[59]
and compression
[60]
algorithms rely on the tree data structure. In addition, you will find trees used to organize database 
files,
[61]
directories,
[62]
devices,
[63]
memory hierarchies,
[64]
properties (consider the Microsoft Windows registry and the X Window 
System default specifications), network routes,
[65]
document structures,
[66]
and display elements.
[67]
[56]
netbsdsrc/games/gomoku/pickmove.c
[57]
netbsdsrc/usr.bin/ctags/ctags.c
[58]
netbsdsrc/bin/sh/eval.c
[59]
XFree86-3.3/xc/programs/Xserver/mi/mivaltree.c
[60]
netbsdsrc/lib/libz/infblock.c
[61]
netbsdsrc/lib/libc/db/btree
[62]
netbsdsrc/usr.bin/find/find.c
[63]
netbsdsrc/sys/dev/isapnp/isapnpres.c
[64]
XFree86-3.3/xc/programs/Xserver/hw/xfree86/accel/cache/xf86bcache.c
[65]
netbsdsrc/sbin/routed/radix.c
[66]
XFree86-3.3/xc/doc/specs/PEX5/PEX5.1/SI/xref.c
[67]
XFree86-3.3/xc/programs/Xserver/dix/window.c
In languages that support pointers (Pascal, C, C++) or object references (Java, C#), trees are typically implemented by linking a parent 
node with its descendants. This is specified by using a recursive type definition in which a tree is declared to consist of pointers or 
references to other trees. The following excerpt defines a binary tree: each node can have at most two other nodes.
[68]
[68]
netbsdsrc/usr.sbin/named/named/tree.h:34–3 9
typedef struct tree_s{
tree_t      data;
struct tree_s   *left, *right;
short       bal;
}
tree;
You will find binary tree nodes typically named left and right, to denote their positions inside the tree. Binary trees are often used to 
efficiently sort and search through data on which an ordering can be defined. The declaration we examined is used by the Internet name 
server named to organize Internet addresses. The tree is constructed so that nodes with a value greater than the one stored in a given 
parent node will always be on its right and nodes with lower value on its left. We illustrate an example of such a tree in Figure 4.14
.
Figure 4.14. A binary tree of name-server Internet addresses.
The recursive definition of the tree data structure lends itself to manipulation by recursive algorithms. As
these algorithms are more complicated than the one-liners we saw used for processing linked lists (Section 
4.7
), they are typically written in the form of a function that takes as a parameter another function specifying 
the operation to perform on the structure. In languages that support type parameterization, such as Ada, 
C++, and Eiffel, the same effect is more efficiently achieved by using a template argument. In the case of a 
binary tree, this external function specifies the ordering to be used by the tree elements. Thus, in our 
example below, the same tree structure and processing functions are used for binary trees containing IP 
addresses and trees containing host names. In the former case the comparison function pfi_compare
compares the integer representation of the IP addresses; in the latter, it compares strings. The function that 
searches for the element p_user in the tree pointed to by ppr_ tree is coded in our case as follows.
[69]
[69]
netbsdsrc/usr.sbin/named/named/tree.c:98–12 9
tree_t
tree_srch(tree **ppr_tree, int (*pfi_compare)(), tree_tp_user)
{
register int I_comp;
ENTER("tree_srch")
if (*ppr_tree) {
I_comp = (*pfi_compare)(p_user, (**ppr_tree).data);
if (I_comp > 0)
return (tree_srch(&(**ppr_tree).right, pfi_compare, p_user))
if (I_comp <0)
return (tree_srch(&(**ppr_tree).left, pfi_compare, p_user))
/* not higher, not lower... this must be the one.
*/
return ((**ppr_tree).data)
}
/* grounded. NOT found.
*/
return (NULL)
}
All the function does is compare the element with the current tree element and recursively search the left or right nodes of the tree, or 
return the node where the element was found. The first if checks for an empty tree, ensuring that the function will terminate.
Another common operation on a tree involves the systematic visiting of all its elements. This traversal of the tree is also typically coded in a 
recursive fashion and often parameterized by using a function, one that specifies the operation to perform on each node. In the following 
example
[70]
tree_trav calls the function pfi_uar for every tree node. It works by recursively visiting the left node, calling pfi_uar, and then 
recursively visiting the right node. As usual, an early check will immediately exit the function when an empty tree is encountered.
[70]
netbsdsrc/usr.sbin/named/named/tree.c:164–18 1
int
tree_trav(tree **ppr_tree, int (*pfi_uar)())
{
[...]
if (!*ppr_tree)
return (TRUE)
if (!tree_trav(&(**ppr_tree).left, pfi_uar))
return (FALSE)
if (!(*pfi_uar)((**ppr_tree).data))
return (FALSE)
if (!tree_trav(&(**ppr_tree).right, pfi_uar))
return (FALSE)
return (TRUE)
}
We will not provide any code examples for adding and removing elements from a tree because there is 
simply too much variation in current practice. Implementations range from the nonexistent (many trees are 
often only grown and never have elements removed from them), to the trivial, to the baroque (involving 
algorithms that keep trees balanced to preserve algorithm efficiency). Keep in mind that, because trees are 
in most cases built following specific rules based on the ordering of their elements, modifying an element's 
data in-place may render a tree invalid. Algorithms operating on such a tree may return incorrect results or 
further corrupt the tree's order.
A different yet quite common application of trees involves the representation of the syntactic structure of various languages. Many 
information processing tasks are formally specified in terms of a language . This need not be a full-blown general purpose programming 
language. Command-line interfaces, arithmetic expressions, macro languages, configuration files, data interchange standards, and many 
file formats are often specified and processed using the same standard techniques. A set of elements (tokens)is parsed to analyze their 
relationship with each other. This relationship (typically specified by means of a grammar) is then represented in the form of a parse tree.
To avoid the complication of an example based on an obscure language, we will demonstrate how the lint C program verifier stores C 
expressions in the form of a tree. The tree structure defined for the C expressions is our familiar recursive definition.
[71]
[71]
netbsdsrc/usr.bin/xlint/lint1/lint1.h:265–28 0
typedef struct tnode {
op_t   tn_op;      /* operator */
[...]
union {
struct {
struct tnode *_tn_left;    /* (left) operand */
struct tnode *_tn_right;   /* right operand */
}tn_s;
sym_t   *_tn_sym;  /* symbol if op == NAME */
val_t   *_tn_val;  /* value if op == CON */
strg_t  *_tn_strg;  /* string if op == STRING */
} tn_u;
} tnode_t;
Expressions are represented as nodes with the operator stored in tn_op  and the left and right operands stored in _tn_left and _tn_right,
[72]
respectively. Other elements (for example, symbols, constant values, and strings) are pointed to by different tree elements. In contrast to a 
binary tree, tree nodes are arranged not according to a fixed ordering of the operator values but according to the way expressions appear 
in the source code parsed by lint. Thus the expression
[73]
[72]
Note that 
ANSI
C prohibits the use of a leading underscore in user-program identifiers.
[73]
netbsdsrc/bin/stty/key.c:135
kp->flags & F_NEEDARG && !(ip->arg = *++*argvp)
will be represented by the parse tree illustrated in Figure 4.15
. As you might expect, parse trees are also often processed by using 
recursive algorithms. They are also often generated by recursively recognizing parts of the language using a recursive descent parser
[74]
or by means of specialized parser generators
[75]
like yacc.
[74]
netbsdsrc/bin/expr/expr.c
[75]
netbsdsrc/usr.bin/xlint/lint1/cgram.y
Figure 4.15. Parse tree generated by lint for the expression 
kp->flags & F_NEEDARG && !(ip->arg = 
*++*argvp)
Documents you may be interested
Documents you may be interested