how to view pdf file in asp.net using c# : How to extract a picture from a pdf SDK application project wpf html winforms UWP code_reading18-part1132

Figure 5.9 A code block protected by mutual exclusion locks.
static XrmQuark 
nextUniq = -1;    /* next quark from XrmUniqueQuark */  
<-- a
[...]
XrmQuark XrmUniqueQuark()
{
XrmQuark q;
_XLockMutex(_Xglobal_lock);    
<-- b
<-- c
if (nextUniq == nextQuark)
q = NULLQUARK;
else
q = nextUniq--;
_XUnlockMutex(_Xglobal_lock);    
<-- d
return q;
}
(a) Shared global resource
(b) Lock access
(c) Access shared resources
(d) Unlock access
An important issue when working with multiple threads or processes concerns the handling of shared 
resources. The issue is most prevalent in multithreaded programs because these share all their global 
memory. The function XrmUniqueQuark in Figure 5.9
[20]
returns a unique integer by decrementing the 
global counter nextUniq. However, if one thread assigns to q the current nextUniq value (Figure 5.9:1
), 
and before nextUniq is decremented another thread gains execution control and requests a unique 
integer, then the same nonunique integer will be returned for both requests. This problem is avoided by 
defining a mutual exclusion (also known as mutex) abstraction that is used for assigning exclusive access 
to the resource. At most one thread or process can have access to a mutex at a time. A mutex-locking 
operation tries to gain mutex access; if that mutex is already locked by another task, then the current 
task is blocked until the mutex is unlocked. After a task accesses the shared resource it unlocks the 
How to extract a picture from a pdf - Select, copy, paste PDF images in C#.net, ASP.NET, MVC, Ajax, WinForms, WPF
Support PDF Image Extraction from a Page, a Region on a Page, and PDF Document
extract images pdf; extract text from image pdf file
How to extract a picture from a pdf - VB.NET PDF Image Extract Library: Select, copy, paste PDF images in vb.net, ASP.NET, MVC, Ajax, WinForms, WPF
Support PDF Image Extraction from a Page, a Region on a Page, and PDF Document
extract image from pdf using; extract photo from pdf
mutex to free it for other tasks. Code accessing a shared global resource is therefore enclosed in mutex 
lock/unlock pairs as in Figure 5.9
.
[20]
XFree86-3.3/xc/lib/X11/quarks.c:401–43 3
On single-processor machines, task concurrency is often implemented by the processor switching the execution context in response to 
external events called interrupts. These are used to inform the machine that a slow peripheral needs servicing (for example, a disk block 
has been read or a new network packet has arrived) or that a certain time interval has elapsed and therefore the currently executing task 
can be switched for another. When mutual exclusion operations are not available, code accessing shared resources can control 
concurrency at a lower level. The following fragment
[21]
ensures that no other operations will get executed concurrently with 
Ofw_client_services_handle by disabling interrupts until the function returns.
[21]
netbsdsrc/sys/arch/arm32/ofw/ofw.c:325–32 7
Saved_irq_state = disable_interrupts(I32_bit);
Ofw_result = ofw_client_services_handle(args);
(void)restore_interrupts(saved_irq_state);
Notice the similarity between the code above and the mutex-based code. Both enclose the code 
accessing shared resources within a block defined by statements limiting the access to those resources. 
You can verify a large percentage of shared resource access code by looking for this symmetric 
structure. Although the lack of this structure is not necessarily an error, an entry or exit point (a goto label 
or a return statement) in such a block lacking the appropriate locking statements should raise your 
defenses.
The boss/worker model of parallelism is also used as a way to separate concerns between different parts
of a system. Separate well-defined tasks of the system are handled by different processes, reaping the 
benefits of reuse and isolating the tasks from unwanted interactions between them. This model is 
typically used when two processes communicate with a simple interface and the work delegated is 
nontrivial. Examples include the delivery of mail (handled in Unix systems by invoking the sendmail
process) and the printing of documents. In addition, operations requiring special security privileges are 
often delegated to a process responsible only for that operation to avoid exposing a large body of code to 
the security implications of possessing those privileges. One other case where the boss/worker model is 
used concerns the delegation of a background-running operation (such as committing disk writes to fixed 
storage or periodically indexing an archive) to a low-priority worker process, allowing the boss to 
efficiently handle high-priority requests.
Figure 5.10 Spawning off a separate process to send mail.
/* Fork off a child for sending mail */
pid = fork();      
<-- a
if (pid < 0)
perr("Fork failed");
<-- b
else if (pid == 0) {
if (open(filename, O_RDONLY) != STDIN_FILENO)
<-- c
perr("Cannot reopen output file");
execl(_PATH_SENDMAIL, _PATH_SENDMAIL, mailname;
<-- d
(char *) NULL);
perr("Exec failed");
}
waitpid(pid, (int *) NULL, 0);      
<-- e
C# PDF insert image Library: insert images into PDF in C#.net, ASP
How to Insert & Add Image, Picture or Logo on PDF Page Using C#.NET. Import graphic picture, digital photo, signature and logo into PDF document.
extract pictures from pdf; how to extract images from pdf in acrobat
C# Word - Paragraph Processing in C#.NET
C# users can set paragraph properties and create content such as run, footnote, endnote and picture in a paragraph. Create Picture in Paragraph.
extract images from pdf acrobat; extract pdf images
(a) Split process into parent and child
(b) Child process
(c) Redirect input to filename
(d) Replace process with the sendmail program
(e) Parent process waits for child to terminate
A representative example is the code fragment from the at program in Figure 5.10
.
[22]
When the program 
needs to send a mail message to a user, it uses the fork Unix system call to spawn a separate running 
copy of itself. That child copy redirects its standard input to the file that needs to be sent and replaces its 
instance with the sendmail program and suitable arguments. sendmail will deliver the mail as specified. 
The parent process then waits for the sendmail process to terminate. The procedure we outlined uses a 
widely available program with a standard interface (sendmail) to handle the task of delivering mail. The 
use of sendmail is so widespread that other alternative mail transfer agents that run under Unix such as 
smail or MMDF provide a sendmail-compatible program to handle mail delivery. An alternative approach 
favored in the Microsoft Windows world uses a specific API for delivering mail. This dichotomy exists for 
other services as well: printing and shutting down the system are normally handled by calling separate 
programs in the Unix world (lpr and shutdown) but have a separate API under Windows.
[22]
netbsdsrc/libexec/atrun/atrun.c:228–23 9
When examining code that spawns off separate processes, always verify that the arguments passed to 
each process cannot be manipulated by malicious users to trick the process into performing an 
unintended operation. Consider the code fragments in Figure 5.11
.
[23]
,[24]
The argument passed to the 
shell for execution with the -c option can contain shell metacharacters that will be interpreted before the 
shell executes the command constructed by the snprintf statement. For example, if the user passes as 
the first argument to the program the command rm /etc/passwd enclosed in backquotes, the shell will 
interpret the backquotes by executing the command and replacing the backquotes with its output. If the 
command were executed with superuser privileges, the system's password file would be deleted.
[23]
netbsdsrc/bin/rcp/rcp.c:292–29 7
[24]
netbsdsrc/bin/rcp/util.c:113–12 7
Figure 5.11 Potential security hole created by passing unverified arguments to the shell.
(void)snprintf(
bp, len, "exec %s %s -n %s %s '%s%s%s:%s'",  
<-- a
_PATH_RSH, 
argv[i], cmd, src, tuser ? tuser : "", tuser ? "@" : "",  
<-- b
thost, targ);
VB.NET TIFF: How to Draw Picture & Write Text on TIFF Document in
drawing As RaterEdgeDrawing = New RaterEdgeDrawing() drawing.Picture = "RasterEdge" drawing provide powerful & profession imaging controls, PDF document, tiff
extract images from pdf; how to extract images from pdf file
VB.NET Image: Image Cropping SDK to Cut Out Image, Picture and
first! VB.NET Image & Picture Cropping Application. Do you need to save a copy of certain part of an image file in a programming way?
how to extract images from pdf files; extract photos pdf
(void)susystem(
bp);      
<-- c
[...]
int
susystem(char *s)
{
pid_t pid;
pid = vfork();
switch (pid) {
[...]
case 0:
execl(_PATH_BSHELL, "sh", "-c", 
s, NULL);  
<-- d
(a) The shell command argument is constructed here
(b) A user argument becomes part of the shell command
(c) The shell command is passed to the shell
(d) The command can contain arbitrary shell metacharacters
Figure 5.12 Pipeline to summarize a list of compressed manual page files.
egrep '\.[0].(gz|Z)$' $LIST |      
<-- a
<-- b
while read file
do
gzip -fdc $file |
<-- c
sed -n -f /usr/share/man/makewhatis.sed;
<-- d
done >> $TMP
(a) Locate all compressed formatted manual pages
(b) For each matching page
(c) Decompress
VB.NET Image: Image Resizer Control SDK to Resize Picture & Photo
VB.NET Method to Resize Image & Picture. Here we display the method that We are dedicated to provide powerful & profession imaging controls, PDF document, image
extract image from pdf in; pdf image extractor
VB.NET Image: Image Scaling SDK to Scale Picture / Photo
VB.NET DLLs to Scale Image / Picture. There are two dlls that will be involved in the process of VB.NET image scaling, which are RasterEdge.Imaging.Basic.dll
how to extract images from pdf; extract text from pdf image
(d) Extract summary information
Finally, the pipeline model is often used when tasks process data in a serial manner. Each task receives some input, performs some 
processing on it, and passes the resulting output to the next task for some different processing. Unix filter-based programs are typical 
examples of this technique. The code in Figure 5.12
[25]
is a representative instance. The object of the code is to create a file containing 
summary information for every manual page file. Given a file containing the names of all files located in the manual page directory, egrep
matches from the list only the compressed formatted pages. The next stage of the pipeline consists of a loop that reads file names and 
processes each file using another, separate, pipeline. That pipeline decompresses each file (gzip) and then extracts the summary 
information from the result by using a sed script.
[25]
netbsdsrc/libexec/makewhatis/makewhatis.sh:31–3 4
5.3.3 Thread Implementations
In the thread examples we have examined so far you have probably noticed the multitude of different functions used to achieve similar 
results. The reason behind this phenomenon is that the C and C++ languages do not offer a standard thread and synchronization library. 
As a result, multiple slightly incompatible libraries were created to satisfy the need. Some software implementations (such as the X 
Window System,
[26]
Perl,
[27]
[28]
[29]
[30]
and the apache Web server
[31]
[32]
[33]
) have custom code that implements a higher-level 
interface to provide thread and mutual exclusion functionality in a portable way.
[26]
XFree86-3.3/xc/include/Xthreads.h
[27]
perl/thread.h
[28]
perl/os2/os2thread.h
[29]
perl/win32/win32thread.h
[30]
perl/win32/win32thread.c
[31]
apache/src/os/netware/multithread.c
[32]
apache/src/os/win32/multithread.c
[33]
apache/src/include/multithread.h
Table 5.1
shows how a number of common thread and synchronization primitives are named in three different PIs. One other common 
thread API, the Unix System V, is very similar to the POSIX API but substitutes the thr prefix in place of pthread for the thread functions, 
removes the pthread_ prefix for the mutex and cond functions, and uses mutex_clear instead of pthread_mutex_destroy.
The pthread _create and CreateThread functions start a new thread and begin its execution at the function passed as an argument. The 
Java thread implementation differs: a Thread class is used either as a base class for thread classes derived from it or as a constructor 
taking as an argument classes that implement the runnable interface. In both cases, the class must supply a run method, which is the 
thread's entry point. Java threads begin their execution by calling the class's start method.
[34]
[34]
jt4/jasper/src/share/org/apache/jasper/logging/JasperLogger.java:77–26 0
C# TIFF: How to Insert & Burn Picture/Image into TIFF Document
Support adding image or picture to an existing or new creating blank TIFF are dedicated to provide powerful & profession imaging controls, PDF document, tiff
extract jpeg from pdf; some pdf image extract
VB.NET Image: VB.NET Planet Barcode Generator for Image, Picture &
png, gif, jpeg, bmp and tiff) and a document file (supported files are PDF, Word & Generate Planet Barcode on Picture & Image in VB.NET. In this part, we will
extract pictures pdf; pdf image extractor c#
class LogDaemon extends Thread {[...]
public void run() {
while (true)
Table 5.1. Common 
POSIX
, Win32, and Java Thread and Synchronization Primitives
POSIX
Win32
Java
pthread_create
CreateThread
Thread
pthread_exit
ExitThread
stop
pthread_yield
Sleep(0)
yield
sleep
Sleep
sleep
pthread_self
GetCurrentThreadId
currentThread
pthread_mutex_init
CreateMutex
pthread_mutex_lock
WaitForSingleObject
synchronized
[a]
pthread_mutex_unlock
ReleaseMutex
synchronized
[b]
pthread_mutex_destroy
CloseHandle
pthread_cond_init
CreateEvent
pthread_cond_wait
WaitForSingleObject
wait
pthread_cond_signal
PulseEvent
notify
pthread_cond_destroy
CloseHandle
[a]
Enter method or code block.
[b]
Exit method or code block.
flusher.run();
} [...]
}
public class JasperLogger extends Logger {[...]
private void init() {[...]
LogDaemon logDaemon = new LogDaemon([...]);
logDaemon.start();
} [...]
}
Threads terminate their execution by calling the pthread_exit and ExitThread functions or the object's stop method. Since threads 
execute concurrently, in some situations a thread might need to relinquish control to other threads; this is accomplished by the 
pthread_yield and Sleep(0) functions and the yield method. The various calls to sleep allow a thread to pause its execution for the given 
interval.
Mutual exclusion is handled very differently under the three APIs. Whereas the POSIX and Win32 APIs provide functions for creating, 
locking (waiting), unlocking (releasing), and destroying (closing) mutexes (Win32 also provides a separate family of critical region and 
semaphore functions), the Java language provides the same functionality through the synchronized keyword. Object methods declared 
as synchro_nized will never execute concurrently for the same underlying object. Similarly, class methods declared as  will 
VB.NET Image: Create Code 11 Barcode on Picture & Document Using
Write Code 11 barcode image on single-page or multi-page PDF, TIFF or Word document using VB.NET code. Code 11 Barcode Generation on PDF Using VB.NET Code.
extract image from pdf acrobat; pdf image extractor online
VB.NET Image: How to Save Image & Print Image Using VB.NET
tutorial page will tell you how to save and print image / picture file using Capable of saving and printing multi-page document files, like PDF and Word, in VB
extract jpg from pdf; extract photos from pdf
lock the entire class during their execution, while a synchronized statement will acquire an exclusive lock on its argument before 
executing the statement that follows it.
[35]
[35]
hsqldb/src/org/hsqldb/ServerConnection.java:70–7 2
Figure 5.13 Thread synchronization in Java.
public synchronized void put(Object object) {
vector.addElement(object);    
<-- a
notify();    
<-- b
} [...]
public synchronized Object pull() {
<-- c
while (isEmpty())
try {
wait();
}catch (InterruptedException ex) {
}
return get();
}
(a) Change the isEmpty condition
(b) Notify waiting threads
(c) Loop waiting for condition
synchronized (this) {
mThread = mCurrentThread++;
}
Synchronized methods are also used in Java to arrange for one thread to wait for another. The same 
task is accomplished under POSIX threads by using pthread–cond–wai t and pthread_cond_signal, and 
under Win32 by means of events. In Java two threads achieve the same effect by using synchronized 
methods of the same thread object, with calls to the wait and notify methods, while testing and changing a 
condition, respectively. You can see an illustration of this code idiom in Figure 5.13
,
[36]
where a queue 
pull method will wait in a loop until notified by the queue put method that an element is available.
[36]
jt4/catalina/src/share/org/apache/catalina/util/Queue.java:77–9 3
Exercise 5.8 Outline the types of software and hardware parallelism most prevalent in your environment.
Exercise 5.9 The sharing of resources in processes and threads often depends on the operating system and the software libraries. For
your environment research and tabulate the software abstractions (file descriptors, signals, memory, mutexes) shared between 
processes and threads that have the same ancestor.
Figure 5.14 A signal handler and its installation.
int
main(int argc, char **argv)
{
[...]
(void)signal(SIGINT, intr);  
<-- a
<-- b
/* Now ask the questions. */
for (;;) {
for (cnt = NQUESTS; cnt--;)
if (problem() == EOF)
exit(0);
showstats();
}
}
[...]
<-- c
void
intr(int dummy)
{
showstats();
<-- d
exit(0);
}
(a) Install signal handler
(b) The default operation is an infinite loop
(c) Signal handler
(d) Print score and exit
Exercise 5.10 Locate calls to the tsleep function within the kernel source code.
[37]
Explain how these are used to support concurrency.
[37]
netbsdsrc/sys
Exercise 5.11 Look for code that invokes a subprocess and discuss the security implications of the operation.
Exercise 5.12 Define a rule specifying when Java methods should be declared synchro-nized. Locate code that uses the keyword and 
test your rule against it.
[ Team LiB ]
[ Team LiB ]
5.4 Signals
Application-level C programs receive external asynchronous events in the form of signals. Examples of signals include a user 
interrupting a process (SIGINT), the execution of an illegal instruction or an invalid memory reference (SIGILL, SIGSEGV), a 
floating-point exception (SIGFPE), or the resumption of a stopped process (SIG-CONT). Code responding to signals consists of a signal 
handler: a function specified to be executed when a given signal is received by the application. In Figure 5.14
[38]
the program will enter 
into an infinite loop quizzing the user with arithmetic problems. However, when the user interrupts the application by typing ^C, the signal 
handler intr gets called. The handler prints the quiz statistics and exits the program.
[38]
netbsdsrc/games/arithmetic/arithmetic.c:115–16 8
Figure 5.15 Avoiding nonreentrant code in a signal handler.
<-- a
void
summary()
{
[...]
(void)snprintf(buf, sizeof(buf),
<-- b
"%lu+%lu records in\n%lu+%lu records out\n",
st.in_full, st.in_part, st.out_full, st.out_part);
(void)write(STDERR_FILENO, buf, strlen(buf));
<-- c
[...]
}
<-- d
void
summaryx(int notused)
{
summary();
}
(a) Display progress information
(b) Generate message
(c) Display it without using stdio
(d) Signal handler
Signal handlers are not exclusively used for gracefully terminating applications; they often provide more 
sophisticated functionality. However, because a signal handler can get executed at any time during the 
program's operation, the code it contains has to be very careful about the assumptions it makes. Many 
parts of the C library are nonreentrant, meaning that calling such functions concurrently with other code 
may yield unexpected results. The code in Figure 5.15
[39]
is a signal handler that responds when a user 
asks the program to display informational output (using the ^T key on the BSD-derived versions of Unix). 
To avoid using file-based stdio file routines, which can be nonreentrant, the handler writes the messages 
in a memory buffer and copies that to the program's terminal by using the write system call.
[39]
netbsdsrc/bin/dd/misc.c:61–9 8
When two concurrently executing parts of a program alter common data structures so that the end result 
depends on the order of their execution, this creates a race condition. Race conditions are subtle and 
often have the code leading to them spread over multiple functions or modules; the resultant problems 
are therefore difficult to isolate. Consider the C++ code in Figure 5.16
.
[40]
The ForkProcess constructor 
function is used to create a new process by means of the fork system call. Unix processes that terminate 
must rendezvous with their parent again (get reaped)by means of the wait system call; otherwise they 
remain in a zombie state: terminated and waiting for their parent to collect their exit status and resource 
usage statistics. Our constructor function arranges for this by installing a signal handler for the SIGCHLD 
signal, which is delivered to a process when one of its children terminates (dies). The signal handler is 
installed using the sigaction system call; it functions like the signal system call but offers more options for 
specifying exactly how signals are to be handled. All created processes are inserted into a linked list, 
used by the signal handler to locate the details of the terminated process.
[40]
socket/Fork.C:43–15 9
Figure 5.16 Race conditions introduced by a signal handler.
Fork::ForkProcess::ForkProcess (bool kill, bool give_reason)
: kill_child (kill), reason (give_reason), next (0)
{
if (
list == 0) {     
<-- a
<-- b
struct sigaction sa;
sa.sa_handler = sighnd (&Fork::ForkProcess::reaper_nohang);
sigemptyset (&sa.sa_mask);
sa.sa_flags = SA_RESTART;
sigaction (SIGCHLD, &sa, 0);
}
pid = fork ();
if (pid > 0) {
next = list;
list = this;
} [...]
}
void Fork::ForkProcess::reaper_nohang (int signo)        
<-- c
{ [...]
ForkProcess* prev = 0;
ForkProcess* cur = list;
while (cur) {
Documents you may be interested
Documents you may be interested