if (
cur->pid == wpid) {     
<-- d
cur->pid = -1;
if (prev)
prev->next = cur->next;
else
list = list->next;
[...]
delete cur;
break;
}
prev = cur;
cur = cur->next;
} [...]
}
(a) No handler installed?
(b) Set up SIGCHLD signal handler
Might point to an element that will be removed
(c) Signal handler
(d) Is this the terminated process?
Might remove the element pointed by a newly inserted item
Might conflict with other memory pool operations
And this is where the trouble begins. The signal handler traverses the list to locate the terminated 
process by means of its process id wpid. Once the process is found, it is removed from the linked list, and 
the memory that was dynamically allocated for it is freed by means of a delete operation. However, 
Extract images from pdf c# - Select, copy, paste PDF images in C#.net, ASP.NET, MVC, Ajax, WinForms, WPF
Support PDF Image Extraction from a Page, a Region on a Page, and PDF Document
extract images pdf acrobat; some pdf image extractor
Extract images from pdf c# - VB.NET PDF Image Extract Library: Select, copy, paste PDF images in vb.net, ASP.NET, MVC, Ajax, WinForms, WPF
Support PDF Image Extraction from a Page, a Region on a Page, and PDF Document
extract images from pdf online; how to extract text from pdf image file
because the signal handler is invoked asynchronously, it can run just after the statement in Figure 5.16:1
is executed. If the terminated process is the first in the list, the statement in Figure 5.16:2
will attempt to 
remove the process from the list, but because the terminated process is already pointed to by the newly 
inserted element, we will end up with a list containing the details of a process that was already reaped, 
stored in memory space that will be disposed. A second race condition can be triggered by the delete
operation (Figure 5.16:3
). If the signal handler, and consequently the delete operation, is run during the 
time another part of the program executes a new or another delete operation, the two can get intermixed, 
corrupting the program's dynamic memory pool. A multithreaded version of the C++ library might contain 
safeguards against the second race condition, but in an application we know, it was not used since the 
program was not explicitly using threads. As a result, the application worked reliably to create many 
thousands of processes but would crash unexpectedly once the system load increased over a certain 
threshold.Since the crash was triggered by acorrupted memory pool, the crash position was totally 
unrelated to the race condition that caused it. The moral of this example is that you should view with 
extreme suspicion data structure manipulation code and library calls that appear within a signal handler. 
In particular note that the ANSI C standard specifies that implicitly invoked signal handlers may call only 
the functions abort, exit, longjmp , and signal and can assign values only to static objects declared as 
volatile sig_atomic_t; the result of any other operations is undefined.
One often-used approach for handling signals in a clean way involves setting a flag in response to a 
signal to be examined in a convenient context. The code in Figure 5.17
[41]
demonstrates such a setup 
and some additional signal-handling concepts. The function init–signal s, when called to enable signal 
handling, will install the signal handler winch to respond to SIGWINCH (the signal notifying an application 
that the dimensions of its display window have changed). The code in the signal handler is very simple: it 
reenables the handling of the signal (signal handling reverts to the default behavior when a signal is 
received) and sets the sigs flag to contain the signal received. Each iteration of the program's main loop 
checks the sigs flag and performs, if needed, the necessary processing (Figure 5.17:3
). Also interesting is 
the code that disables the signal handlers: the handling of the interrupt signal SIGINT is restored to the 
implementation-defined default behavior (Figure 5.17:1
), while window size change signals are simply 
ignored (Figure 5.17:2
).
[41]
netbsdsrc/distrib/utils/more
Exercise 5.13 Locate three nontrivial signal handlers and reason about the ways they work.
Exercise 5.14 Examine how threads interoperate with signal handlers in your environment.
Figure 5.17 Synchronous handling of signals.
<-- a
init_signals(int on)
{
if (on) {
[...]
(void)signal(SIGWINCH, winch);
<-- b
}else {
[...]
(void)signal(SIGINT, SIG_DFL);
(void)signal(SIGWINCH, SIG_IGN);
}
}
[...]
<-- c
void
winch()
C# PDF Text Extract Library: extract text content from PDF file in
Ability to extract highlighted text out of PDF control provides text extraction from PDF images and image Support extracting OCR text from PDF by working with
extract image from pdf; extract images from pdf files
C# Create PDF from images Library to convert Jpeg, png images to
C#.NET Project DLLs for Conversion from Images to PDF in C#.NET Program. C# Example: Convert More than Two Type Images to PDF in C#.NET Application.
extract image from pdf online; extract vector image from pdf
{
(void)signal(SIGWINCH, winch);
<-- d
sigs |= S_WINCH;
<-- e
[...]
}
[...]
commands()
{
[...]
<-- f
for (;;) {
[...]
if (sigs) {
psignals();
if (quitting)
quit();
}
[...]
(a) Setup signal handling
(b) Install signal handler
Default action on signal
Ignore signal
(c) Signal handler
(d) Restore signal behavior
(e) Set flag to be processed synchronously
C# PDF insert image Library: insert images into PDF in C#.net, ASP
Merge several images into PDF. Insert images into PDF form field. Access to freeware download and online C#.NET class source code.
how to extract a picture from a pdf; extract image from pdf java
C# PDF Page Extract Library: copy, paste, cut PDF pages in C#.net
PDF Pages in C#.NET. Easy to Use C# Code to Extract PDF Pages, Copy Pages from One PDF File and Paste into Others in C#.NET Program.
extract images from pdf c#; extract images from pdf files without using copy and paste
(f) Main command loop
Check for received signals, and respond
Exercise 5.15 ANSI C does not guarantee library functions to be reentrant. Examine signal handlers in the code base for calls to 
nonreentrant functions.
[ Team LiB ]
C# PDF Convert to Jpeg SDK: Convert PDF to JPEG images in C#.net
Output.jpg"); Following demo code will show how to convert all PDF pages to Jpeg images with C# .NET. // Load a PDF file. String
extract image from pdf file; extract image from pdf c#
C# PDF Form Data Read Library: extract form data from PDF in C#.
A best PDF document SDK library enable users abilities to read and extract PDF form data in Visual C#.NET WinForm and ASP.NET WebForm applications.
extract images from pdf file; extract jpg pdf
[ Team LiB ]
5.5 Nonlocal Jumps
The C library setjmp and longjmp  functions allow programs to jump back from a function without having to return from each function in the 
sequence. The functions are typically used to immediately exit from a deeply nested function, often as a response to a signal. The 
functions are designed to be used together. At the point where nested function calls will return, a setjmp is used to store in a buffer 
variable the environment's context. From then onward until the function that called setjmp exits, calls to longjmp , with a pointer to the 
saved environment as an argument, will return execution to the point where setjmp was originally called. To distinguish between the 
original setjmp call and subsequent returns to it via longjmp , setjmp returns 0 in the first case and a nonzero value in the latter one.
Figure 5.18 A nonlocal jump using 
longjmp
.
int
main(int argc, char *argv[])
{
[...]
signal(SIGINT, signal_int);  
<-- a
if ((status = setjmp(env)) != 0) {
fputs("\n?\n", stderr);
sprintf(errmsg, "interrupt");
}else {
init_buffers();
[...]
}
<-- b
for (;;) {
[...]
if (prompt) {
printf("%s", prompt);
fflush(stdout);
}
[...]
<-- c
void
signal_int(int signo)
{
[...]
handle_int(signo);
}
void
handle_int (int signo)  
<-- d
{
[...]
longjmp(env, -1);  
<-- e
}
C# PDF Convert to Tiff SDK: Convert PDF to tiff images in C#.net
Supports for changing image size. Also supports convert PDF files to jpg, jpeg images. C# class source codes and online demos are provided for .NET.
extract images pdf acrobat; extract photo from pdf
C# Create PDF from Tiff Library to convert tif images to PDF in C#
NET component for batch converting tiff images to PDF documents in C# class. Create PDF from Tiff in both .NET WinForms and ASP.NET application.
extract jpeg from pdf; extract vector image from pdf
(a) Set signal handler
Control arrives here by calling longjmp
Control arrives here after the setjmp call
(b) Command processing loop
(c) Signal handler; calls handle_int
(d) Called by the signal handler
(e) Jump back to the top of the command loop
The example in Figure 5.18
[42]
is a typical case. Users of the ed line-oriented text editor can stop lengthy 
operations and return to the command-prompt mode by issuing an interrupt (^C). This is accomplished by 
installing a signal handler for the keyboard interrupt and calling setjmp before the command-processing 
loop. The original call to setjmp will return 0 and the program will perform the normal start-up processing 
(Figure 5.18:2
). When the user presses ^C (to interrupt, for example, a lengthy listing), the signal handler 
signal_int will call handle_int, which will longjmp back to the top of the command loop (Figure 5.18:1
).
[42]
netbsdsrc/bin/ed/main.c:114–141 7
Although at first sight the code appears to be error-free, a number of complications can arise. A signal 
arriving at the wrong moment in conjunction with a longjmp  to the top of the command loop can result in 
resource leakage (for example, leaving a file open or not freeing a temporarily allocated memory block), 
or worse, in data structures left in an inconsistent state. The code we examined uses mutual exclusion 
regions to avoid this problem. The fragments in Figure 5.19
[43]
detail how this is accomplished. Two 
macros, SPL1 and SPL0, are defined to enter and exit critical regions. (The macro names are derived 
from the functions used to set interrupt priority levels in early versions of the Unix kernel.) SPL1 sets the 
mutex variable. The signal handlers examine this variable: if it is set, instead of calling handle_int, they 
simply store the signal number in the sigflags variable. SPL0—called at the end of a critica l
region—decrements  mutex, examines sigflags for any pending signals received while the critical region 
was executing, and calls handle–in t if needed. Using this scheme, responses to signals are simply 
delayed until the exit from a critical region.
[43]
netbsdsrc/bin/ed
Figure 5.19 Setting mutual exclusion regions to protect data structures.
int mutex = 0;            /* if set, signals set "sigflags" */
int sigflags = 0;        /* if set, signals received while mutex set */
#define SPL1() mutex++      
<-- a
<-- b
#define SPL0() \
if (--mutex == 0) {\
if (sigflags & (1 << (SIGHUP - 1))) handle_hup(SIGHUP); \
<-- c
if (sigflags & (1 << (SIGINT - 1))) handle_int(SIGINT); \
}
<-- d
void
signal_int(int signo)
{
if (mutex)
sigflags |= (1 << (signo - 1));
<-- e
else
handle_int(signo);
<-- f
}
<-- g
void
handle_int(int signo)
{
[...]
sigflags &= ~(1 << (signo - 1));
<-- h
longjmp(env, -1);
<-- i
}
void
clear_active_list()
{
SPL1();    
<-- j
<-- k
active_size = active_last = active_ptr = active_ndx = 0;
free(active_list);
active_list = NULL;
SPL0();    
<-- l
}
(a) Enter a critical region; delay signal handling
(b) Exit a critical region
(c) Handle pending signals
(d) Signal handler
(e) In a mutex region; just set the flag for delayed handling
(f) No mutex set; immediately handle the interrupt
(g) Immediate or delayed handling of the interrupt signal
(h) Reset the interrupt flag
(i) Jump back to the command loop
(j) Enter critical region
(k) Critical region
(l) Exit critical region
Exercise 5.16 Explain how, in Figure 5.19
, the definitions of SPL0 and SPL1 allow the nested operation of critical regions.
Exercise 5.17 Locate five calls to longjmp and list the reasons they were used. For extra credit try to locate longjmp calls not associated 
with signals.
Exercise 5.18 How does the longjmp code you located avoid resource leakage and in-consistent data structures?
Exercise 5.19 Propose a way to verify that longjmp is not called after the function containing setjmp has exited. Is this a compile or a 
runtime method?
[ Team LiB ]
[ Team LiB ]
5.6 Macro Substitution
The flexibility of the C preprocessor is often used to define simple functions as macros.
[44]
[44]
netbsdsrc/usr.bin/yacc/defs.h:131–13 3
#define IS_IDENT(c) (isalnum(c) || (c) =='– – '
|| (c) == '.' \'$')
#define    IS_OCTAL(c)    ((c) >= '0' && (c) <= '7')
#define    NUMERIC_VALUE(c)    ((c) -'0')
When reading code that contains macros, keep in mind that macros are neither functions nor statements. 
Careful coding practices need to be employed when macros are defined to avoid some common pitfalls. 
Consider the way c is parenthesized in the definition of the NUMERIC_VALUE macro above. Using c
without parentheses would cause an expression of the type NUMERIC_VALUE(charval = b) to evaluate 
as charval = (b - '0') instead of the intended (charval = b) - '0'. By parenthesizing all macro arguments the 
code avoids precedence problems. A more difficult case concerns the number of times macro arguments 
are evaluated. Writing code of the form
while (IS_IDENT(a = getchar())
putchar(a);
would expand into
while ((isalnum(a = getchar()) || (a = getchar()) =='–' | |
(a = getchar()) == '.' || (a = getchar()) == '$'))
putchar(a);
reading as many as four different characters in every loop iteration, which is certainly not what was 
intended. In general, be very careful when you see macro arguments that have side effects such as 
assignment, pre/post increment/decrement, input/output, and function calls with these effects.
When you see macros used as statements, different problems may result. Consider the definition
[45]
[45]
netbsdsrc/lib/libc/stdlib/malloc.c:130
#define     ASSERT(p)    if (!(p)) botch(–––STRING(p)
)
used in the following context.
if (k > n)
ASSERT(process(n) == 0);
else
ASSERT(process(k) == 0);
Once the macro expands the code will read as
if (k > n)
Documents you may be interested
Documents you may be interested