how to view pdf file in asp.net using c# : Extract image from pdf using SDK software service wpf winforms windows dnn code_reading29-part1144

[ Team LiB ]
8.4 Additional Documentation Sources
When looking for source code documentation, consider nontraditional sources such as comments, standards, publications, test cases, 
mailing lists, newsgroups, revision logs, issue-tracking databases, marketing material, and the source code itself. When investigating a 
large body of code, it is natural to miss documentation embedded in comments in the quest for more formal sources such as requirements 
and design documents. Yet source code comments are often better maintained than the corresponding formal documents and often hide 
gems of information, sometimes even including elaborate ASCII diagrams. As an example, the diagrams in Figure 8.3
and the formal 
mathematical proof in Figure 8.4
[44]
are all excerpts from actual source code comments. The ASCII diagrams depict the block structure of 
an audio interface hardware
[45]
(top left), the logical channel reshuffling procedure in X.25 networking code
[46]
(top right), the m4 macro 
processor stack-based data structure
[47]
(bottom left), and the page format employed in the hashed db database implementation
[48]
(bottom right). However, keep in mind that elaborate diagrams such as these are rarely kept up-to-date when the code changes.
[44]
netbsdsrc/sys/kern/kern_synch.c:102–13 5
[45]
netbsdsrc/sys/dev/ic/cs4231reg.h:44–7 5
[46]
netbsdsrc/sys/netccitt/pk_subr.c:567–59 1
[47]
netbsdsrc/usr.bin/m4/mdef.h:155–17 4
[48]
netbsdsrc/lib/libc/db/hash/page.h:48–5 9
Figure 8.3. 
ASCII
drawings in source code comments.
Extract image from pdf using - Select, copy, paste PDF images in C#.net, ASP.NET, MVC, Ajax, WinForms, WPF
Support PDF Image Extraction from a Page, a Region on a Page, and PDF Document
how to extract pictures from pdf files; extract image from pdf file
Extract image from pdf using - VB.NET PDF Image Extract Library: Select, copy, paste PDF images in vb.net, ASP.NET, MVC, Ajax, WinForms, WPF
Support PDF Image Extraction from a Page, a Region on a Page, and PDF Document
extract image from pdf; extract image from pdf using
Always view documentation with a critical mind. Since documentation is never executed and rarely tested or formally reviewed to the 
extent code is, it can often be misleading or outright wrong. As an example, consider some of the problems
[49]
of the comment in Figure 
8.4
.
[49]
Contributed by Guy Steele.
It inexplicably uses the symbol ~= the first three times to indicate "approximately equal to" and thereafter uses=~ .
It uses both loadavg and loadav to refer to the same quantity. The surrounding code, not shown in the figure, uses  and a 
structure field named ldavg!
The approximations are very sloppy and there is no justification that they are close enough. For example, the result of the 
division 5/2.3 is approximated as 2. This has the effect of replacing the constant .1 in the original equation with 0.08, a 20% 
error. The comment does not justify the correctness of this approximation.
Figure 8.4 A mathematical proof in a source code comment.
* We wish to prove that the system's computation of decay
* will always fulfill the equation:
*  decay ** (5 * loadavg) ~= .1
*
* If we compute b as:
*  b = 2 * loadavg
* then
*  decay = b / (b + 1)
*
* We now need to prove two things:
* 1) Given factor ** (5 * loadavg) ~= .1, prove factor == b/(b+1)
* 2) Given b/(b+1) ** power ~= .1, prove power == (5 * loadavg)
*
* Facts:
*         For x close to zero, exp(x) =~ 1+ x, since
*              exp(x) = 0! + x**1/1! + x**2/2! + ... .
*              therefore exp(-1/b) =~ 1 - (1/b) = (b-1)/b.
*         For x close to zero, ln(1+x) =~ x, since
*              ln(1+x) = x - x**2/2 + x**3/3 - ... -1<x<1
*              therefore ln(b/(b+1)) = ln(1 - 1/(b+1)) =~ -1/(b+1).
*         ln(.1) =~ -2.30
*
* Proof of (1):
*    Solve (factor)**(power) =~ .1given power (5*loadav):
* solving for factor,
*      ln(factor) =~ (-2.30/5*loadav), or
*      factor =~ exp(-1/((5/2.30)*loadav)) =~ exp(-1/(2*loadav)) =
*          exp(-1/b) =~ (b-1)/b =~ b/(b+1).                     QED
*
* Proof of (2):
*    Solve (factor)**(power) =~ .1given factor == (b/(b+1)):
* solving for power,
*      power*ln(b/(b+1)) =~ -2.30, or
*      power =~ 2.3 * (b + 1) = 4.6*loadav + 2.3 =~ 5*loadav.  QED
The approximations used for exp(x) and ln(1+x) depend on x being "close to zero," but there is no explanation of how close is 
close enough and no evidence or explanation provided to justify the assumption that x will indeed be close enough to zero in 
the actual application at hand. (A little analysis shows that for x to be "close to zero," loadavg needs to be "large," but there is 
VB.NET PDF Text Extract Library: extract text content from PDF
Extract highlighted text out of PDF document. Image text extraction control provides text extraction from PDF images and image files.
pdf extract images; extract images from pdf
C# PDF Text Extract Library: extract text content from PDF file in
Ability to extract highlighted text out of PDF document. Supports text extraction from scanned PDF by using XDoc.PDF for .NET Pro. Image text extraction control
extract color image from pdf in c#; pdf image text extractor
no discussion of this, either.)
Before the proofs, the comment methodically lays out two useful "facts" about approximations on which the proofs rely. This is 
good. But the proofs also rely on a third fact about approximations that is not laid out ahead of time: (b-1)/b=~b/(b+1) if b is 
"large enough." The QED line of the first proof simply pulls a fast one.
Finally, the comment is actually much more verbose than it needs to be because the two proofs are redundant! They prove 
essentially the same mathematical fact from two different directions.
A nontraditional documentation element, intimately bound to the source code, is the revision control system. This repository contains a 
detailed history of the source code's evolution and, often, comments justifying each change. In Section 6.5
we examine how you can 
benefit from using such a system when reading code. Associated with a revision control system is also often an issue-tracking database. 
There you will find details of bug reports, change requests, and other maintenance documentation. When these originate from inside the 
development organization, they may provide background on design and implementation issues related to the code you are reading.
The tautology may appear to be an oxymoron, but the source code can sometimes be its own documentation. Apart from the obvious case 
of self-documenting code, sometimes you can read code between the lines as a specification, even if the actual code does not implement 
the underlying intention of what the code should actually do. Consider the following (trivial) shell-script excerpt.
[50]
[50]
netbsdsrc/usr.bin/lorder/lorder.sh:82
for file in $* ; do echo $file":" ; done
The code will display each one of the space-separated arguments appearing in the $* list on a separate line. It is obvious, however, from 
the loop structure that the intention of the code is to display each file name in the $* list on a separate line. Although the file variable should 
more appropriately have been named filename, and the code will not work correctly when file names contain whitespace, you can still read 
the code as the specification of what it should do, rather than what it actually claims it does.
Finally, you can often find additional documentation on the periphery or outside the development organization. Standards documents can 
be treated as the functional specification for software that implements a specific standard (for example, an MP3 player).Similarly, you can 
often find a description of a given design, system, algorithm, or implementation in journal or conference publications. If verification and 
validation are handled by a separate test group, you can use their test cases as a substitute or a supplement of a functional specification. 
When desperate, even marketing material can provide you with an (inflated) list of a system's features. And you can always search the 
Web for discussions, unofficial information, FAQ pages, and user experiences; archived newsgroups and mailing lists may sometimes 
reveal the rationale behind the design of the code you are reading. When the code is open-source, a particularly effective search strategy 
is to use three or four nonword identifiers from the code part you are reading (for example, bbp, indouble, addch) as search terms in a 
major search engine. Open-source code also provides you with the option to contact the code's original author. Try not to abuse this 
privilege, and be sure to give something back to the community for any help you receive in this way. Remember: most open-source 
projects are developed and maintained by (typically overworked) volunteers.
Exercise 8.13 Create an annotated list of documentation sources for the apache Web server or Perl. Categorize the sources based on the 
type of information they provide. Strive for wide coverage of areas (for example, specifications, design, user documentation) rather than 
completeness.
[ Team LiB ]
C# PDF insert image Library: insert images into PDF in C#.net, ASP
C#.NET PDF SDK - Add Image to PDF Page in C#.NET. How to Insert & Add Image, Picture or Logo on PDF Page Using C#.NET. Add Image to PDF Page Using C#.NET.
extract photo from pdf; online pdf image extractor
VB.NET PDF insert image library: insert images into PDF in vb.net
Insert Image to PDF Page Using VB. Add necessary references: RasterEdge.Imaging. Basic.dll. RasterEdge.Imaging.Basic.Codec.dll. RasterEdge.Imaging.Drawing.dll.
pdf image extractor c#; how to extract images from pdf file
[ Team LiB ]
8.5 Common Open-Source Documentation Formats
You will encounter documentation in two different flavors: binary files generated and read using a proprietary product such as Microsoft 
Word or Adobe FrameMaker, and text files containing structure and formatting commands in the form of a markup language. The most 
common documentation formats you will encounter when dealing with open-source software are the following.
troff
The troff document formatting system is typically used in conjunction with the traditionamanl  or the new BSD mdoc macros to create Unix 
manual pages. Other descriptive parts of the Unix manuals are also typeset in troff. Document formatting commands appear either at the 
beginning of a line starting with a dot (.) or are preceded with a backslash. You can see a part of a Unix manual page formatted using the 
mdoc macros in Figure 8.5
[51]
and the most common troff commands and man and mdoc macros in Table 8.2
.
[51]
netbsdsrc/usr.bin/cut/cut.1:1–6 6
Texinfo
The Texinfo macros are processed by the TeX document formatting system. They are used to create on-line and printed documentation 
for many projects implemented under the GNU effort. Texinfo commands start with an @ character and can have arguments inside 
braces or following on the same line. You can see a sample Texinfo file in Figure 8.6
[52]
and the most common Texinfo commands in 
Table 8.3
.
[52]
netbsdsrc/usr.sbin/amd/doc/am-utils.texi:383–39 5
Figure 8.5 Documentation in mdoc format.
.\"    $NetBSD: cut.1,v 1.7.2.1 1997/11/04 22:25:05 mellon Exp $        
<-- a
.Dd June 6, 1993        
<-- b
.Dt CUT 1        
<-- c
.Os        
<-- d
.Sh NAME        
<-- e
.Nm cut        
<-- f
.Nd select portions of each line of a file        
<-- g
[...]
<-- h
.Sh DESCRIPTION
The
.Nm
C# PDF Page Extract Library: copy, paste, cut PDF pages in C#.net
Able to extract single or multiple pages from adobe portable document format, known as PDF document, is a documents even though they are using different types
extract text from image pdf file; extract images from pdf acrobat
C# Create PDF from images Library to convert Jpeg, png images to
Free library is access to downloading and using in .NET framework. If you want to turn PDF file into image file format in C# application, then RasterEdge XDoc
extract images pdf acrobat; how to extract images from pdf in acrobat
utility selects portions of each line (as specified by
.Ar list)
from each
.Ar file
(or the standard input by default), and writes them to the
standard output.
(a) Comment
(b) Command date
(c) Document title and section
(d) Operating system statement
(e) Section heading
(f) Command name
(g) Description
(h) Text with embedded macros
DocBook
DocBook is an XML/SGML application adopted, among other uses, in the Free BSD documentation project. As you would expect, 
DocBook tags are denoted by <tag> sequences; their names are typically self-explanatory.
C# PDF - Extract Text from Scanned PDF Using OCR SDK
VB.NET Write: Add Image to PDF; VB.NET Protect: Add Password to PDF; VB.NET Form: extract value from VB.NET Annotate: PDF Markup & Drawing. XDoc.Word for C#;
extract jpg pdf; extract pdf images
C# PDF Form Data Read Library: extract form data from PDF in C#.
PDF software, it should have functions for processing text, image as well as C#.NET Project DLLs: Read and Extract Field Data in C#. using RasterEdge.XDoc.PDF;
extract image from pdf c#; extract pictures pdf
javadoc
The javadoc application will process Java source code suitably annotated with specially marked comments to generate documentation in 
a number of different formats. javadoc comments start with a /** sequence and can contain tags marked with an @ sign. Tags that are 
embedded in text appear inside braces. You can see a summary of the javadoc commands in Table 8.4
and Java code with embedded 
javadoc comments in Figure 6.15
on page 215.
Doxygen
Doxygen
[53]
is a documentation system for source code written in C++, JavaI, DL, and C. It can generate an on-line documentation 
browser (in HTML) and an off-line reference manual (in LaTeX) from a set of suitably annotated source code files. It can also generate 
output in RTF, Postscript, hyperlinked PDF, and Unix man pages.
[53]
http://www.stack.nl/
dimitri/doxygen/
Table 8.2. Common troff Commands and Man and mdoc Line Macros
Macro
Function
troff
.\"
Comment.
.br
Line break.
man
.B
Typeset in boldface.
.BI
Alternate bold and italic fonts.
.BR
Alternate bold and roman fonts.
.I
Set in italic font.
.IP
Start indented paragraph.
Macro
Function
.IR
Alternate italic and roman fonts.
.RB
Alternate roman and bold fonts.
.SH
Section heading.
.TH
Title section.
mdoc
.Ar
Command-line argument.
.Bl
Begin list.
.Dd
Specify document date as month, day, year.
.Dt
Specify document title, section, volume.
.Dv
Defined variable.
.Ic
Interactive command.
.It
List item.
.Nm
Command name.
.Op
Option.
.Os
Specify operating system, version, release.
.Pa
Path or file name.
Macro
Function
.Sh
Section heading.
.Xr
Manual page cross-reference.
Figure 8.6 Documentation in Texinfo format.
@node Filesystems and Volumes, Volume Naming, Fundamentals, Overview        
<-- a
@comment node-name, next, previous, up        
<-- b
@section Filesystems and Volumes        
<-- c
<-- d
@cindex Filesystem
@cindex Volume
@cindex Fileserver
@cindex sublink
<-- e
@i{Amd}views the world as a set of fileservers, each containing one or
more filesystems where each filesystem contains one or more
@dfn{volumes}. Here the term @dfn{volume}is used to refer to a
coherent set of files such as a user's home directory or a @TeX{}
distribution.@refill
(a) Node definition
(b) Comment
(c) New section
(d) Concept index terms
(e) Text marked with Texinfo commands
Table 8.3. Common Texinfo Commands
Command
Function
@c
The rest of the line is a comment.
@cindex
Add an entry to the index of concepts.
@code {sample}
Sample is a program element.
@emph {text}
Text appears emphasized.
@end environment
Set the end of an environment.
@example
Begin a (code) example.
@file {name}
Mark a file or directory name.
@item
Begin an itemized or enumerated paragraph.
@node name, next, prev, up
Define a hypertext node.
@pxref {node name}, @xref
Create a cross-reference.
@samp {text}
Text is a code fragment.
@section title
Start a new section.
@strong {text}
Text appears emphasized (bold).
@var {name}
Name is a metasyntactic variable.
Table 8.4. The javadoc  Tags
Command
Function
@author
Used to indicate authors.
{@docRoot}
Relative path to generated document from root.
@deprecated
Add comment indicating a deprecated feature.
@exception or @throws
Indicate exceptions a method throws.
{@link}
Add a link to another Java element.
@param
Specify a method's parameter.
@return
Specify return type.
@see
Add a link in the "see also" heading.
@serial
Indicate a default serializable field.
@serialData
Specify type and order of serial data.
@serialField
Document field as serializable.
@since
Indicate first release supporting a feature.
@version
Version of software supporting a class or member.
Documentation based on markup languages such as TeX, troff, or XML is typically more tightly integrated with the source code since it is 
often maintained using a revision control system, automatically manipulated or generated using text-processing tools, and fully integrated 
into the product build process. An even tighter level of integration with the source code is achieved when the documentation is part of the 
source, as is the case in the CWEB system and the javadoc comments often used in Java source code.
Table 8.5. Unix Reference Manual Sections
Section
Contents
1
General commands (tools and utilities)
2
Operating system calls
3
C and other language libraries
4
Special files and hardware support
5
File formats
6
On-line games
7
Miscellaneous information pages
8
System maintenance and operation commands
9
Kernel internals
When reading documentation for a large system, familiarize yourself with the documentation's overall structure and conventions. For 
example, you may have noticed that the Java platform API documentation is organized around packages and a flat list of classes or that 
the Unix manual pages are typically structured around the numbered sections appearing in Table 8.5
.
Documents you may be interested
Documents you may be interested