how to view pdf file in asp.net using c# : Extract text from image pdf file Library control component asp.net web page html mvc code_reading32-part1148

[54]
http://www.gnu.org/software/tar
Exercise 9.6 Use a UML modeling tool to reverse engineer the structure of an object-oriented application from the book's CD-ROM.
Exercise 9.7 Identify how the OSI network layers correspond to the actual implementation of the NetBSD networking code.
Exercise 9.8 Can slicing techniques help you comprehend object-oriented programs? Discuss how the Law of Demeter (see the Further
Reading section) affects the applicability of program slicing.
[ Team LiB ]
Extract text from image pdf file - Select, copy, paste PDF images in C#.net, ASP.NET, MVC, Ajax, WinForms, WPF
Support PDF Image Extraction from a Page, a Region on a Page, and PDF Document
extract images from pdf file; how to extract images from pdf file
Extract text from image pdf file - VB.NET PDF Image Extract Library: Select, copy, paste PDF images in vb.net, ASP.NET, MVC, Ajax, WinForms, WPF
Support PDF Image Extraction from a Page, a Region on a Page, and PDF Document
extract images from pdf c#; extract photos from pdf
[ Team LiB ]
9.2 Control Models
A system's control model describes how its constituent subsystems interact with each other. In common with the system structures we 
examined in the previous section, many systems adopt a simple, centralized, single-threaded call and return control model. In addition, 
some of the system structures we examined are implicitly based on a specific control model: in a data-flow structure subsystems are 
controlled by the flow of data, and in an object-oriented structure control is typically coordinated through method invocations. Other 
common, nontrivial control models can be event-driven, be based on a system manager, or revolve around state transitions.
9.2.1 Event-Driven Systems
In many systems control decisions are made by responding to externally generated events. You will find that systems based on an 
event-driven architecture span the full range of possible software abstractions: from low-level interrupt-driven assembly code handler 
routines and process scheduling to the implementation of high-level GUI structures and relational database triggers. The implementation 
of event-driven systems can take a number of different forms. Events can be broadcast to a set of event listeners
[55]
[55]
jt4/catalina/src/share/org/apache/catalina/core/ContainerBase.java:1330–133 1
for (int i = 0; i < list.length; i++)
((ContainerListener) list[i]).containerEvent(event);
or, as is often the case with hardware interrupts, invoke a single handler routine. In addition, some applications are structured around an 
event loop that polls for events and directs the processing
[56]
[56]
XFree86-3.3/contrib/programs/xfontsel/xfontsel.c:1331
while (XtAppPending(appCtx))
XtAppProcessEvent(appCtx, XtIMAll);
while others may be integrated within a framework where event-processing routines can register to handle specific events, as illustrated in 
Figure 9.10
.
[57]
[58]
[59]
[57]
XFree86-3.3/contrib/programs/xman/Xman.ad:67–7 8
[58]
XFree86-3.3/contrib/programs/xman/main.c:119–22 1
[59]
XFree86-3.3/contrib/programs/xman/handler.c:643–65 2
The fact that an event can be sent to an application without any prior arrangement makes events particularly well suited to modern 
GUI-based environments where events are used to channel the data generated by the different input devices, the window manager, and 
the operating system to the numerous executing applications. Typically such events include those generated by the keyboard, mouse 
movements, receipt of the application focus, menu selections, scrollbar movements, button presses, the power management system, and 
interprocess communication. Explicitly handling these events can render an application's structure quite complicated, as illustrated in 
Figure 9.11
.
[60]
For this reason, a number of GUI application frameworks such as the Microsoft Foundation Classes (MFC), the Java 
Abstract Windowing Toolkit (AWT) and Swing libraries, and the X Window System–based Xt and Motif toolkits provide facilities fo r
registering handlers for specific events. Internally each toolkit contains an event loop that retrieves events from the underlying GUI system 
C# PDF Text Extract Library: extract text content from PDF file in
PDF file. Ability to extract highlighted text out of PDF document. Supports text extraction from scanned PDF by using XDoc.PDF for .NET Pro. Image text extraction
how to extract images from pdf files; pdf image extractor online
VB.NET PDF Text Extract Library: extract text content from PDF
Extract and get partial and all text content from PDF file. Extract highlighted text out of PDF document. Image text extraction control provides text extraction
pdf image extractor c#; extract images from pdf online
and an event pump that distributes events to the registered handlers. As an example, the following methods are automatically invoked for 
the corresponding events by the system's event manager.
[61]
[60]
demogl/CPP/DemoGL/dgl_dllstartupdialog.cpp:86–55 4
[61]
argouml/org/argouml/ui/ProjectBrowser.java:46–16 0
public class TabResults extends TabSpawnable
implements Runnable, MouseListener, ActionListener, ListSelectionListener {
Figure 9.10 Implicit event registration and handling in Xt.
<-- a
*help*Paned.manualPage.translations:#override \
[...]
Ctrl<Key>d: GotoPage(Directory) \n\
Ctrl<Key>m: GotoPage(ManualPage) \n\
Ctrl<Key>v: ShowVersion()
<-- b
XtActionsRec xman_actions[] = {
{"GotoPage",          GotoPage},
{"Quit",              Quit},
[...]
{"SaveFormattedPage", SaveFormattedPage},
{"ShowVersion",       ShowVersion},
};
void
main(int argc, char **argv)
{
XtAppContext app_con;
[...]
<-- c
initial_widget = XtAppInitialize(&app_con, "Xman", xman_options,
XtNumber(xman_options), &argc, argv,
fallback_resources, NULL, ZERO);
[...]
XtAppAddActions(app_con, xman_actions, XtNumber(xman_actions));      
<-- d
[...]
XtAppMainLoop(app_con);      
<-- e
}
<-- f
void
ShowVersion(w, event, params, num_params)
Widget w;
XEvent * event;
String * params;
Cardinal * num_params;
{
ManpageGlobals * man_globals = GetGlobals(w);
ChangeLabel(man_globals->label, XMAN_VERSION);
}
C# PDF insert image Library: insert images into PDF in C#.net, ASP
Create high resolution PDF file without image quality losing in ASP.NET application. Add multiple images to multipage PDF document in .NET WinForms.
how to extract pictures from pdf files; extract pdf pages to jpg
VB.NET PDF File Compress Library: Compress reduce PDF size in vb.
Reduce image resources: Since images are usually or large size, images size reducing can help to reduce PDF file size effectively.
extract jpeg from pdf; extract jpg pdf
(a) Keyboard accelerator definitions (Xman.ad)
(b) Event action table (main.c)
(c) Create application context
(d) Register event actions
(e) Start the event loop
(f) Event action function to show the application's version (handler.c)
[...]
////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////
// MouseListener implementation
public void mousePressed(MouseEvent me) {}
public void mouseReleased(MouseEvent me) {}
public void mouseClicked(MouseEvent me) {
if (me.getClickCount() >= 2) myDoubleClick(me.getSource());
}
Object-oriented systems often add one other interesting twist to the event-handling structure by organizing 
events around classes. Class-based event handling confers two distinct advantages to the application.
Figure 9.11 Explicit handling of Microsoft Windows messages.
BOOL CALLBACK
StartupDlgMsgHandler(
HWND hWnd, UINT iMsg, WPARAM wParam, LPARAM lParam) 
{
[...]
switch (iMsg)
{
<-- a
case WM_INITDIALOG:
{
// Get pointer to startupdat structure
pStartupDat=m_gpDemoDat->GetStartupDat();
[...]
<-- b
return TRUE;
C# PDF File Split Library: Split, seperate PDF into multiple files
Application. Best and professional adobe PDF file splitting SDK for Visual Studio .NET. outputOps); Divide PDF File into Two Using C#.
extract text from pdf image; extract color image from pdf in c#
VB.NET PDF insert image library: insert images into PDF in vb.net
VB.NET code to add an image to the inputFilePath As String = Program.RootPath + "\\" 1.pdf" Dim doc New PDFDocument(inputFilePath) ' Get a text manager from
extract pictures pdf; extract images from pdf c#
}; break;
<-- c
case WM_LBUTTONDOWN:
{       [...]
PostMessage(hWnd,WM_NCLBUTTONDOWN,HTCAPTION,NULL);
return FALSE;
}; break;
<-- d
case WM_HSCROLL:
{       [...]
switch(LOWORD(wParam))
<-- e
{
case SB_THUMBTRACK:
case SB_ENDSCROLL:
case SB_LINELEFT:
case SB_LINERIGHT:
case SB_PAGELEFT:
case SB_PAGERIGHT:
      [...]
}; break;
}
return FALSE;
}; break;
<-- f
case WM_COMMAND:
{       [...]
switch(HIWORD(wParam))
<-- g
{
case EN_SETFOCUS:
[...]
case CBN_SELCHANGE:
[...]
case BN_CLICKED:
{
switch(LOWORD(wParam))
<-- h
{
case IDC_BTNSTART:
[...]
<-- i
case IDC_BTNCANCEL:
case IDCANCEL: [...]
case IDC_BTNABOUT: [...]
case IDC_RDBSNDYES:
case IDC_RDBSNDNO: [...]
}
};break;
}
return TRUE;
}; break;
default: [...]
}
}
C# PDF File Compress Library: Compress reduce PDF size in C#.net
Reduce image resources: Since images are usually or large size, images size reducing can help to reduce PDF file size effectively.
extract images from pdf files; extract photos pdf
VB.NET PDF File Merge Library: Merge, append PDF files in vb.net
When you have downloaded the RasterEdge Image SDK for also provided you with detailed PDF processing demo Imaging.Demo directory with the file name RasterEdge
extract images pdf; extract photos from pdf
Event parameters (typeless)
(a) Initialize dialog box
(b) 263 more lines
(c) Left mouse button pressed
(d) Handle scrollbar event
(e) Handle different scrollbar subevents
(f) Handle commands
(g) Handle command parameters
(h) Handle command button
(i) 86 more lines
Events can carry additional information with them in the form of the object properties, obviating the problem of typeless, generic 
event parameters, for example, as they are found in the Microsoft Windows SDK (Figure 9.11:1
).
1.
Subclassing and inheritance can be used to establish an event hierarchy that can also drive event dispatch policies.
2.
The following code excerpt illustrates a simple use of these concepts.
[62]
[62]
argouml/org/argouml/application/events/ArgoEvent.java:34–4 2
public abstract class ArgoEvent extends EventObject
implements ArgoEventTypes {
protected int _eventType = 0;
public ArgoEvent(int eventType, Object src) {
super(src);
_eventType = eventType;
}
The above ArgoEvent class extends the Java EventObject and is in turn extended by the ArgoModuleEvent
[63]
and ArgoNotationEvent
[64]
classes.
[63]
argouml/org/argouml/application/events/ArgoModuleEvent.java
[64]
argouml/org/argouml/application/events/ArgoNotationEvent.java
9.2.2 System Manager
Systems that require the (pseudo-)concurrent execution of multiple processes often adopt a system managercontrol model. A single 
system component acts as a centralized manager, starting, stopping, and coordinating the execution of other system processes and tasks. 
This is the model used in the BSD Unix kernel for scheduling the swapping of processes. Although normally processes are periodically 
scheduled in a round-robin fashion based on their dynamically adjusted priorities, there are extreme cases where this procedure is not 
sufficient. When a process is completely inactive, the system is running low on memory, or the memory pool is becoming fragmented, the 
system will swap the complete image of a process to the disk. This is the task of the process scheduler, acting as a Unix system's central 
manager (excerpted in Figure 9.12
).
[65]
The system's kernel, after performing all the start-up activities such as the scheduling of the 
event-driven periodic process-control tasks, calls the scheduler, entering its infinite loop.
[66]
[65]
netbsdsrc/sys/vm/vm_glue.c:350–41 9
[66]
netbsdsrc/sys/kern/init_main.c:166–42 4
Figure 9.12 The 
BSD
Unix swap process scheduler.
void
scheduler()
{
loop:
<-- a
pp = NULL;
ppri = INT_MIN;
for (p = allproc.lh_first; p != 0; p = p->p_list.le_next) {
if (p->p_stat == SRUN && (p->p_flag & P_INMEM) == 0) {
pri = p->p_swtime + p->p_slptime
- (p->p_nice - NZERO) * 8;
if (pri > ppri) {
pp = p;
ppri = pri;
}
}
}
<-- b
if ((p = pp) == NULL) {
tsleep((caddr_t)&proc0, PVM, "scheduler", 0);
goto loop;
}
<-- c
if (cnt.v_free_count > atop(USPACE)) {
swapin(p);
goto loop;
}
<-- d
(void) splhigh();
VM_WAIT;
(void) spl0();
goto loop;
}
(a) Find a process to swap-in
(b) Nothing to do Sleep allowing interrupt-driven tasks to run
(c) There is space to bring a process in memory
(d) No space available Wait for the pageout daemon to create space
void
main(void *framep)
{
[...]
/* Kick off timeout driven events by calling first time. */
roundrobin(NULL);
schedcpu(NULL);
[...]
/* The scheduler is an infinite loop. */
scheduler();
/* NOTREACHED */
}
The system we described is actually a hybrid of two control models. An event-driven system coordinates normal process activity, while the 
more robust process manager model we examined above is used as a fail-over mechanism for extreme situations. Many real-world 
systems adopt the best parts of multiple architectures. When dealing with such a system, do not seek in vain for the all-encompassing 
architectural picture; locate, recognize, and appreciate each different architectural style as a separate yet interrelated entity.
9.2.3 State Transition
state transition model manages a system's flow of control by manipulating data: the system's state. The 
state data determines where execution control will be directed, and changes to the state data are used to 
redirect the execution target. Systems (or, more often, subsystems) that adopt the state transition control 
model are typically modeled and structured in the form of a state machine. A state machine is defined by a 
finite set of states it can be in and the rules for performing processing and transitioning from one state to 
another. Two special states, the initial state  and the final state, specify the machine's start point and 
termination condition, respectively. You will find state machines typically implemented as a loop around a 
switch statement. The switch statement branches according to the state of the machine; each case
statement performs processing for a specific state, changes the state, and returns control to the top of the 
state machine. You can see a typical example of a state machine in Figure 9.13
[67]
and its respective UML
state transition diagram in Figure 9.14
. The specific state machine is used for recognizing the names of 
shell variables; these can consist of a single letter (PS_VAR1 state), of letters and digits (PS_IDENT state), 
or entirely of digits (PS_NUMBER state). The PS_SAW_HASH state is used to allow special handling of 
variables starting with a single # character. The variable state is used to hold the machine's state. It starts 
from PS_INITIAL (shown as a filled circle in the UML diagram) and terminates the function when its value 
becomes PS_END (the filled circle surrounded by the unfilled circle in the UML diagram).
[67]
netbsdsrc/bin/ksh/lex.c:1124–119 4
Figure 9.14. 
UML
state transition diagram for a state machine.
You will find state machines used to implement simple reactive systems (user interfaces, thermostat and motor controls, and process 
automation applications), virtual machines, interpreters, regular expression pattern matchers, and lexical analyzers. A state transition 
diagram will often help you untangle a state machine's operation.
Exercise 9.9 Describe how the handling of the Microsoft Windows SDK API messages illustrated in Figure 9.11
could be organized using 
an object-oriented structure.
Figure 9.13 Code for a state machine.
static char *
get_brace_var(XString *wsp, char *wp)
{
enum parse_state {
PS_INITIAL, PS_SAW_HASH, PS_IDENT,  
<-- a
PS_NUMBER, PS_VAR1, PS_END
}
state;       
<-- b
char c;
state = PS_INITIAL;       
<-- c
while (1) {
c = getsc();
/* State machine to figure out where the variable part ends. */
switch (state) {
case PS_INITIAL:
[...]
case PS_SAW_HASH:
<-- d
if (letter(c))
state = PS_IDENT;
else if (digit(c))
state = PS_NUMBER;
else if (ctype(c, C_VAR1))
state = PS_VAR1;
else
state = PS_END;
break; [...]
case PS_VAR1:
state = PS_END;       
<-- e
break;
}
<-- f
if (state == PS_END) {
[...]
break;
}
[...] }
return wp;
}
(a) States
Documents you may be interested
Documents you may be interested