how to view pdf in c# : Extract pictures from pdf SDK software project wpf winforms windows UWP code_reading47-part1164

[ Team LiB ]
D.10 socket
The source code contained in the socket directory is copyrighted by Gnanasekaran Swaminathan and, unless otherwise noted, is 
distributed under the following license.
Copyright (C) 1992-1996 Gnanasekaran Swaminathan <gs4t@virginia.edu>
Permission is granted to use at your own risk and distribute this software
in source and binary forms provided   the above copyright notice and this
paragraph are preserved on all copies.  This software is provided" as is"
with no express or implied warranty.
[ Team LiB ]
Extract pictures from pdf - Select, copy, paste PDF images in C#.net, ASP.NET, MVC, Ajax, WinForms, WPF
Support PDF Image Extraction from a Page, a Region on a Page, and PDF Document
extract text from pdf image; extract jpeg from pdf
Extract pictures from pdf - VB.NET PDF Image Extract Library: Select, copy, paste PDF images in vb.net, ASP.NET, MVC, Ajax, WinForms, WPF
Support PDF Image Extraction from a Page, a Region on a Page, and PDF Document
extract images from pdf file; online pdf image extractor
[ Team LiB ]
D.11 vcf
The source code contained in the vcf directory is copyrighted by Jim Crafton and, unless otherwise noted, is distributed under the 
following license.
Copyright (c) 2000-2001, Jim Crafton
All rights reserved.
Redistribution and use in source and binary forms, with or without
modification, are permitted provided that the following conditions
are met:
Redistributions of source code must retain the above copyright
notice, this list of conditions and the following disclaimer.
Redistributions in binary form must reproduce the above copyright
notice, this list of conditions and the following disclaimer in
the documentation and/or other materials provided with the distribution.
THIS SOFTWARE IS PROVIDED BY THE COPYRIGHT HOLDERS AND CONTRIBUTORS" AS IS"
AND ANY EXPRESS OR IMPLIED WARRANTIES, INCLUDING, BUT NOT
LIMITED TO, THE IMPLIED WARRANTIES OF MERCHANTABILITY AND FITNESS FOR
A PARTICULAR PURPOSE ARE DISCLAIMED. IN NO EVENT SHALL THE REGENTS
OR CONTRIBUTORS BE LIABLE FOR ANY DIRECT, INDIRECT, INCIDENTAL, SPECIAL,
EXEMPLARY, OR CONSEQUENTIAL DAMAGES (INCLUDING, BUT NOT LIMITED TO,
PROCUREMENT OF SUBSTITUTE GOODS OR SERVICES; LOSS OF USE, DATA, OR
PROFITS; OR BUSINESS INTERRUPTION) HOWEVER CAUSED AND ON ANY THEORY OF
LIABILITY, WHETHER IN CONTRACT, STRICT LIABILITY, OR TORT (INCLUDING
NEGLIGENCE OR OTHERWISE) ARISING IN ANY WAY OUT OF THE USE OF THIS
SOFTWARE, EVEN IF ADVISED OF THE POSSIBILITY OF SUCH DAMAGE.
NB: This software will not save the world.
[ Team LiB ]
VB Imaging - VB Code 93 Generator Tutorial
Visual VB examples here for developers to create and write Code 93 linear barcode pictures on PDF documents, multi-page TIFF, Microsoft Office Word, Excel and
extract images from pdf; pdf image text extractor
VB.NET PDF Convert to Word SDK: Convert PDF to Word library in vb.
application. In addition, texts, pictures and font formatting of source PDF file are accurately retained in converted Word document file.
extract pictures from pdf; extract image from pdf using
[ Team LiB ]
D.12 X Window System
The source code contained in the XFree86-3.3 directory is copyrighted by the X Consortium and, unless otherwise noted, is distributed 
under the following license.
Permission is hereby granted, free of charge, to any person obtaining a copy
of this software and associated documentation files (the" Software"), to deal
in the Software without restriction, including without limitation the rights
to use, copy, modify, merge, publish, distribute, sublicense, and/or sell
copies of the Software, and to permit persons to whom the Software is
furnished to do so, subject to the following conditions:
The above copyright notice and this permission notice shall be included in
all copies or substantial portions of the Software.
THE SOFTWARE IS PROVIDED" AS IS", WITHOUT WARRANTY OF ANY KIND, EXPRESS OR
IMPLIED, INCLUDING BUT NOT LIMITED TO THE WARRANTIES OF MERCHANTABILITY,
FITNESS FOR A PARTICULAR PURPOSE AND NONINFRINGEMENT. IN NO EVENT SHALL THE
X CONSORTIUM BE LIABLE FOR ANY CLAIM, DAMAGES OR OTHER LIABILITY, WHETHER IN
AN ACTION OF CONTRACT, TORT OR OTHERWISE, ARISING FROM, OUT OF OR IN
CONNECTION WITH THE SOFTWARE OR THE USE OR OTHER DEALINGS IN THE SOFTWARE.
Except as contained in this notice, the name of the X Consortium shall not be
used in advertising or otherwise to promote the sale, use or other dealings
in this Software without prior written authorization from the X Consortium.
[ Team LiB ]
C# Imaging - C# Code 93 Generator Tutorial
Visual C# examples here for developers to create and write Code 93 linear barcode pictures on PDF documents, multi-page TIFF, Microsoft Office Word, Excel and
extract images pdf acrobat; extract images from pdf c#
VB.NET Image: VB.NET Codes to Load Images from File / Stream in .
When evaluating this VB.NET imaging library with pictures of your own We are dedicated to provide powerful & profession imaging controls, PDF document, image to
how to extract images from pdf; extract image from pdf file
[ Team LiB ]
Appendix E. Maxims for Reading Code
Hell! there ain't no rules around here! We are tryin' to accomplish somepn'n!
—Thomas Ediso n
[ Team LiB ]
C#: Use OCR SDK Library to Get Image and Document Text
a digital camera, scanned document or image-only PDF using C# color image recognition for scanned documents and pictures in C#. Steps to Extract Text from Image.
pdf extract images; extract text from image pdf file
VB.NET Image: Sharpen Images with DocImage SDK for .NET
VB.NET Coding. When you have made certain corrections in your VB.NET project photo or image files, you might want to sharpen your pictures before saving them
how to extract images from pdf files; how to extract images from pdf file
[ Team LiB ]
Chapter 1
: Introduction
Make it a habit to spend time reading high-quality code that others have written. (p. 3)
1.
Read code selectively and with a goal in your mind. Are you trying to learn new patterns, a coding style, a way to satisfy some 
requirements? (p. 4)
2.
Notice and appreciate the code's particular nonfunctional requirements that might give rise to a specific implementation style. 
(p. 4)
3.
When working on existing code, coordinate your efforts with the authors or maintainers to avoid duplication of work or bad 
feelings. (p. 5)
4.
Consider the benefits you receive from open-source software to be a loan; look for ways to repay it by contributing back to the 
open-source community. (p. 5)
5.
In many cases if you want to know "how'd they do that?" there's no better way than reading the code.p. 5 ( ( )
6.
When looking for a bug, examine the code from the problem manifestation to the problem source. Avoid following unrelated 
paths. (p. 6)
7.
Use the debugger, the compiler's warnings or symbolic code output, a system call tracer, your database's SQL logging 
facility, packet dump tools, and windows message spy programs to locate a bug's location. (p. 6)
8.
You can successfully modify large well-structured systems with only a minimal understanding of their complete functionality. 
(p. 7)
9.
When adding new functionality to a system, your first task is to find the implementation of a similar feature to use as a 
template for the one you will be implementing. (p. 7)
10.
To go from a feature's functional specification to the code implementation, follow the string messages or search the code 
using keywords. (p. 7)
11.
When porting code or modifying interfaces, you can save code-reading effort by directing your attention to the problem areas 
identified by the compiler. (p. 8)
12.
When refactoring, you start with a working system and want to ensure that you will end up with a working one. A suite of 
pertinent test cases will help you satisfy this obligation. (p. 8)
13.
When reading code to search for refactoring opportunities, you can maximize your return on investment by starting from the 
system's architecture and moving downward, looking at increasing levels of detail. (p. 9)
14.
Code reusability is a tempting but elusive concept; limit your expectations and you will not be disappointed. ( ( )
15.
If the code you want to reuse is intractable and difficult to understand and isolate, look at larger granularity packages or 
different code. (p. 9)
16.
While reviewing a software system, keep in mind that it consists of more elements than executable statements. Examine the 
file and directory structure, the build and configuration process, the user interface, and the system's documentation. (p. 10)
17.
Use software reviews as a chance to learn, teach, lend a hand, and receive assistance. (p. 10)
18.
[ Team LiB ]
VB.NET Image: VB.NET Code to Create Watermark on Images in .NET
image one onto it, and whether to burn it to the pictures to make We are dedicated to provide powerful & profession imaging controls, PDF document, tiff files
extract image from pdf; extract image from pdf online
VB.NET Image: Codings for Image Filter Processing with .NET Image
RasterEdge .NET Image SDK provides many different and interesting filters for your pictures / photos with simple and a few Visual Basic .NET programming codings
extract image from pdf c#; extract pdf pages to jpg
[ Team LiB ]
Chapter 2
: Basic Programming Elements
When examining a program for the first time, main can be a good starting point. (p. 20)
19.
Read a cascading if-else if-...-else sequence as a selection of mutually exclusive choices. (p. 23)
20.
Sometimes executing a program can be a more expedient way to understand an aspect of its functionality than reading its 
source code. (p. 25)
21.
When examining a nontrivial program, it is useful to first identify its major constituent parts. (p. 25)
22.
Learn local naming conventions and use them to guess what variables and functions do. (p. 26)
23.
When modifying code based on guesswork, plan the process that will verify your initial hypotheses. This process can involve 
checks by the compiler, the introduction of assertions, or the execution of appropriate test cases. (p. 28)
24.
Understanding one part of the code can help you understand the rest. (p. 28)
25.
Disentangle difficult code by starting with the easy parts. (p. 28)
26.
Make it a habit to read the documentation of library elements you encounter; it will enhance both your code-reading and 
code-writing skills. (p. 28)
27.
Code reading involves many alternative strategies: bottom-up and top-down examination, the use of heuristics, and review of 
comments and external documentation should all be tried as the problem dictates. (p. 34)
28.
Loops of the form for (i = 0; i < n; i++) execute n times; treat all other forms with caution. (p. 34)
29.
Read comparison expressions involving the conjunction of two inequalities with one identical term as a range membership 
test. (p. 39)
30.
You can often understand the meaning of an expression by applying it on sample data. (p. 40)
31.
Simplify complicated logical expressions by using De Morgan's rules. (p. 41)
32.
When reading a conjunction, you can always assume that the expressions on the left of the expression you are examining are 
true; when reading a disjunction, you can similarly assume that the expressions on the left of the expression you are 
examining are false. (p. 42)
33.
Reorganize code you control to make it more readable. (p. 46)
34.
Read expressions using the conditional operator ?: like if code. (p. 46)
35.
There is no need to sacrifice code readability for efficiency. (p. 48)
36.
While it is true that efficient algorithms and certain optimizations can make the code more complicated and therefore more 
difficult to follow, this does not mean that making the code compact and unreadable will make it more efficient. (p. 48)
37.
Creative code layout can be used to improve code readability. (p. 49)
38.
You can improve the readability of expressions using whitespace, temporary variables, and parentheses. (p. 49)
39.
When reading code under your control, make it a habit to add comments as needed. (p. 50)
40.
You can improve the readability of poorly written code with better indentation and appropriate variable names. (p. 50)
41.
When you are examining a program revision history that spans a global reindentation exercise using the diff program, you 
42.
C# Imaging - Scan RM4SCC Barcode in C#.NET
& decode RM4SCC barcode from scanned documents and pictures in your Decode RM4SCC from documents (PDF, Word, Excel and PPT) and extract barcode value as
extract image from pdf acrobat; pdf image extractor online
VB.NET TIFF: How to Draw Picture & Write Text on TIFF Document in
Many users concern about the issue of how to draw pictures or write text We are dedicated to provide powerful & profession imaging controls, PDF document, tiff
extract color image from pdf in c#; extract images from pdf online
can often avoid the noise introduced by the changed indentation levels by specifying the -w option to have diff ignore 
whitespace differences. (p. 51)
The body of a do loop is executed at least once. (p. 51)
43.
When performing arithmetic, read a & b as a % (b + 1) when b + 1 = 2
n
. (p. 53)
44.
Read a << n as a * k, where k = 2
n
. (p. 53)
45.
Read a >> n as a / k, where k = 2
n
. (p. 53)
46.
Examine one control structure at a time, treating its contents as a black box. (p. 54)
47.
Treat the controlling expression of each control structure as an assertion for the code it encloses. ( ( )
48.
The return, goto, break, and continue statements as well as exceptions interfere with the structured flow of execution. Reason 
about their behavior separately since they all typically either terminate or restart the loop being processed. (p. 55)
49.
Reason about complex loops through their variant and invariant properties. (p. 56)
50.
Simplify code reasoning by rearranging code, using meaning-preserving transformations. (p. 58)
51.
[ Team LiB ]
[ Team LiB ]
Chapter 3
: Advanced C Data Types
By recognizing the function served by a particular language construct, you can better understand the code that uses it.p. 61 ( ( )
52.
Recognize and classify the reason behind each use of a pointer. (p. 61)
53.
Pointers are used in C programs to construct linked data structures, to dynamically allocate data structures, to implement call 
by reference, to access and iterate through data elements, when passing arrays as arguments, for referring to functions, as 
an alias for another value, to represent character strings, and for direct access to system memory. (p. 62)
54.
Function arguments passed by reference are used for returning function results or for avoiding the overhead of copying the 
argument. (p. 63)
55.
A pointer to an array element address can be used to access the element at the specific position index.p. 65 ( ( )
56.
Arithmetic on array element pointers has the same semantics as arithmetic on the respective array indices.p. 65 ( ( )
57.
Functions using global or static local variables are in most cases not reentrant. (p. 66)
58.
Character pointers differ from character arrays. (p. 72)
59.
Recognize and classify the reason behind each use of a structure or union. (p. 75)
60.
Structures are used in C programs to group together data elements typically used as a whole, to return multiple data 
elements from a function, to construct linked data structures, to map the organization of data on hardware devices, network 
links, and storage media, to implement abstract data types, and to program in an object-oriented fashion. (p. 75)
61.
Unions are used in C programs to optimize the use of storage, to implement polymorphism, and for accessing different 
internal representations of data. (p. 80)
62.
A pointer initialized to point to storage for N elements can be dereferenced as if it were an array of N elements. (p. 85)
63.
Dynamically allocated memory blocks are freed explicitly or when the program terminates or through use of a garbage 
collector; memory blocks allocated on the stack are freed when the function they were allocated in exits. (p. 87)
64.
C programs use typedef declarations to promote abstraction and enhance the code's readability, to guard against portability 
problems, and to emulate the class declaration behavior of C++ and Java. (p. 91)
65.
You can read typedef declarations as if they were variable definitions: the name of the variable being defined is the type's 
name; the variable's type is the type corresponding to that name. (p. 91)
66.
[ Team LiB ]
[ Team LiB ]
Chapter 4
: C Data Structures
Read explicit data structure operations in terms of the underlying abstract data class. (p. 96)
67.
Vectors are typically realized in C by using the built-in array type without attempting to abstract the properties of the vector 
from the underlying implementation. (p. 96)
68.
An array of N elements is completely processed by the sequence for (i = 0; i <  N ; i++); all other variations should raise your 
defenses. (p. 96)
69.
The expression sizeof(x) always yields the correct number of bytes for processing an arrayx  (not a pointer) with memset or 
memcpy. (p. 97)
70.
Ranges are typically represented by using the first element of the range and the first beyond it. (p. 100)
71.
The number of elements in an asymmetric range equals the difference between the upper and the lower bounds. (p. 100)
72.
When the upper bound of an asymmetric range equals the lower bound, the range is empty. (p. 100)
73.
The lower bound in an asymmetric range represents the first occupied element, the upper bound, the first free one. (p. 100)
74.
Arrays of structures often represent tables consisting of records and fields. (p. 101)
75.
Pointerstostructuresoftenrepresentacursorforaccessingtheunderlyingrecords and fields. (p. 101)
76.
Dynamically allocated matrices are stored as pointers to array columns or as pointers to element pointers; both types are 
accessed as two-dimensional arrays. (p. 103)
77.
Dynamically allocated matrices stored as flat arrays address their elements using custom access functions. (p. 104)
78.
An abstract data type provides a measure of confidence regarding the way the underlying implementation elements will be 
used (or abused). (p. 106)
79.
Arrays are used for organizing lookup tables keyed by sequential integers starting from 0. (p. 111)
80.
Arrays are often used to efficiently encode control structures, thus simplifying a program's logic. (p. 111)
81.
Arrays are used to associate data with code by storing in each position a data element and a pointer to the element's 
processing function. (p. 112)
82.
Arrays can control a program's operation by storing data or code used by abstract or virtual machines implemented within that 
program. (p. 113)
83.
Read the expression sizeof(x)/sizeof(x[0]) as the number of elements of the array x.(p. 113)
84.
A structure with an element titled next pointing to itself typically defines a node of a singly linked list. (p. 118)
85.
A permanent (for example, global, static, or heap allocated) pointer to a list node often represents the list head. (p. 118)
86.
A structure containing next and prev pointers to itself is probably a node of a doubly linked list. (p. 121)
87.
Follow complicated data structure pointer operations by drawing elements as boxes and pointers as arrows. (p. 122)
88.
Recursive data structures are often processed by using recursive algorithms. (p. 126)
89.
Nontrivial data structure manipulation algorithms are typically parameterized using a function or template argument. (p. 126)
90.
Graph nodes are stored sequentially in arrays, linked in lists, or linked through the graph edges. (p. 131)
91.
The edges of a graph are typically represented either implicitly through pointers or explicitly as separate structures.p. 134 ( ( )
92.
Graph edges are often stored as dynamically allocated arrays or linked lists, both anchored at a graph's nodes.p. 137 ( ( )
93.
In a nondirectional graph the data representation should treat both nodes as equal, and processing code should similarly not 
discriminate edges based on their direction. (p. 139)
94.
On nonconnected graphs, traversal code should be coded so as to bridge isolated subgraphs. (p. 139)
95.
When dealing with graphs that contain cycles, traversal code should be coded so as to avoid looping when following a graph 
cycle. (p. 139)
96.
Inside complicated graph structures may hide other, separate structures. (p. 140)
97.
[ Team LiB ]
Documents you may be interested
Documents you may be interested