how to view pdf in c# : Extract image from pdf online SDK software service wpf windows html dnn code_reading6-part1168

now see a picture emerging: after the loop terminates, i will contain the decimal value of the numeric 
string pointed to by cp at the beginning of the loop.
Armed with the knowledge of what i stands for (the integer value of a tab-stop specification), we can now examine the lines that verify the 
specification. The expression that verifies i for reasonable values is straightforward. It is a Boolean expression based on the logical R (||
of two other expressions. Although this particular expression reads naturally as English text (print an error message if i is either less than 
or equal to zero, or greater than 255), it is sometimes useful to transform Boolean expressions to a more readable form. If, for example, 
we wanted to translate the expression into the range membership expression we used above, we would need to substitute the logical 
OR with a logical AND (&&). This can easily be accomplished by using De Morgan's rules.
[32]
[32]
We use the operator <=> to denote that two expressions are equivalent. This is not a C/C++/C#/Java operator.
!(a || b) <=> !a && !b
!(a && b) <=> !a || !b
We can thus transform the testing code as follows:
i <= 0 || i > 256 <=>
!(!(i <= 0) && !(i > 256)) <=>
!(i > 0 && i <= 256) <=>
!(0 < i && i <= 256) <=>
¬(0 < i 
256)+
In our example we find both the initial and final expressions equally readable; in other cases you may find that De Morgan's rules provide 
you a quick and easy way to disentangle a complicated logical expression.
When reading Boolean expressions, keep in mind that in many modern languages Boolean expressions are evaluated only to the extent 
needed. In a sequence of expressions joined with the && operator (a conjunction), the first expression to evaluate to false will terminate 
the evaluation of the whole expression yielding a false result. Similarly, in a sequence of expressions joined with the || operator (a 
disjunction), the first expression to evaluate to true will terminate the evaluation of the whole expression yielding a true result. Many 
expressions are written based on this short-circuit evaluation property and should be read in the same way. When reading a conjunction, 
you can always assume that the expressions on the left of the expression you are examining are true; when reading a disjunction, you 
can similarly assume that the expressions on the left of the expression you are examining are false. As an example, the expression in 
the following if statement will become true only when all its constituent elements are true, andt->type   will be evaluated only when t is not 
NULL.
[33]
[33]
netbsdsrc/bin/ksh/main.c:606–60 7
if (t != NULL && t->type != TEOF && interactive && really–exit )
really–exit = 0 ;
Conversely, in the following example argv[1] will be checked for being NULL only if argv is not NULL .
[34]
[34]
netbsdsrc/lib/libedit/term.c:1212–121 3
if (argv == NULL || argv[1] == NULL || argv[2] == NULL)
return -1;
In both cases, the first check guards against the subsequent dereference of a NULL pointer. Our getstops
function also uses short-circuit evaluation when checking that a delimiter specified (i) is larger than the 
previous one (tabstops[nstops-1]) (Figure 2.5:4
). This test will be performed only if at least one additional 
delimiter specification has been processed (nstops > 0). You can depend on the short-circuit evaluation 
property in most C-derived languages such as C++, Perl, and Java; on the other hand, Fortran, Pascal, 
and most Basic dialects will always evaluate all elements of a Boolean expression.
Exercise 2.20 Locate expressions containing questionable assumptions about character code values in the book's CD-ROM. Read about 
Extract image from pdf online - Select, copy, paste PDF images in C#.net, ASP.NET, MVC, Ajax, WinForms, WPF
Support PDF Image Extraction from a Page, a Region on a Page, and PDF Document
extract image from pdf in; how to extract pictures from pdf files
Extract image from pdf online - VB.NET PDF Image Extract Library: Select, copy, paste PDF images in vb.net, ASP.NET, MVC, Ajax, WinForms, WPF
Support PDF Image Extraction from a Page, a Region on a Page, and PDF Document
extract jpeg from pdf; extract image from pdf acrobat
the Java Character class test and conversion methods such as isUpper and toLowerCase  or the corresponding ctype family of C functions 
(isuppertolower , and so on). Propose changes to make the code less dependent on the target architecture character set.
Exercise 2.21 Find, simplify, and reason about five nontrivial Boolean expressions in the source code base. Do not spend time on
understanding what the expression elements mean; concentrate on the conditions that will make the expression become true or false. 
Where possible, identify and use the properties of short-circuit evaluation.
Exercise 2.22 Locate and reason about five nontrivial integer or character expressions in the source code base. Try to minimize the
amount of code you need to comprehend in order to reason about each expression.
Figure 2.6 The 
goto
statement used for a common error handler.
static int
gen_init(void)
{
[...]
if ((sigaction(SIGXCPU, &n_hand, &o_hand) < 0) &&
(o_hand.sa_handler == SIG_IGN) &&
(sigaction(SIGXCPU, &o_hand, &o_hand) < 0))
goto out;
n_hand.sa_handler = SIG_IGN;
if ((sigaction(SIGPIPE, &n_hand, &o_hand) < 0) ||
(sigaction(SIGXFSZ, &n_hand, &o_hand) < 0))
goto out;
return(0);
out:
syswarn(1, errno, "Unable to set up signal handler");
return(-1);
}
Failure; exit with an error
Failure; exit with an error
Normal function exit (success)
VB.NET PDF Text Extract Library: extract text content from PDF
Extract highlighted text out of PDF document. control provides text extraction from PDF images and image files. Best VB.NET PDF text extraction SDK library and
extract color image from pdf in c#; extract pdf pages to jpg
C# PDF Text Extract Library: extract text content from PDF file in
Ability to extract highlighted text out of PDF document. from scanned PDF by using XDoc.PDF for .NET Image text extraction control provides text extraction from
extract jpg pdf; extract image from pdf
Common error handling code
[ Team LiB ]
VB.NET PDF insert image library: insert images into PDF in vb.net
NET framework component supports inserting image to PDF in preview without adobe PDF control installed. Access to freeware download and online VB.NET class
extract image from pdf c#; extract text from image pdf file
C# HTML5 PDF Viewer SDK to view PDF document online in C#.NET
Create PDF Online. Convert PDF Online. WPF PDF Viewer. View PDF in WPF. Annotate PDF in WPF. Image: Extract Image from PDF. PDF Write. Text: Insert Text to PDF.
extract images from pdf acrobat; extract images from pdf online
[ Team LiB ]
2.8 
goto
Statements
The code segment that complains about unreasonable tab specifications (Figure 2.5:3
) begins with a 
word followed by a colon. This is a label: the target of a goto instruction. Labels and goto statements 
should immediately raise your defenses when reading code. They can be easily abused to create 
"spaghetti" code: code with a flow of control that is difficult to follow and figure out. Therefore, the 
designers of Java decided not to support the goto statement. Fortunately, most modern programs use 
the goto statement in a small number of specific circumstances that do not adversely affect the program's 
structure.
You will find goto often used to exit a program or a function after performing some actions (such as 
printing an error message or freeing allocated resources). In our example the exit(1) call at the end of the 
block will terminate the program, returning an error code (1) to the system shell. Therefore all goto
statements leading to the bad label are simply a shortcut for terminating the program after printing the 
error message. In a similar manner, the listing in Figure 2.6
[35]
illustrates how a common error handler 
(Figure 2.6:4
) is used as a common exit point in all places where an error is found (Figure 2.6:1
Figure 
2.6:2
). A normal exit route for the function, located before the error handler (Figure 2.6:3
), ensures that 
the handler will not get called when no error occurs.
[35]
netbsdsrc/bin/pax/pax.c:309–41 2
Figure 2.7 The use of 
goto
to reexecute code.
again:
if ((p = fgets(line, BUFSIZ, servf)) == NULL)    
<-- a
return (NULL);
if (*p == '#')    
<-- b
goto again;
cp = strpbrk(p, "#\n");
if (cp == NULL)    
<-- c
goto again;
*cp = '\0';    
<-- d
[...]
return (&serv);
(a) Read a line; return on EOF
(b) Comment? Retry
VB.NET PDF- View PDF Online with VB.NET HTML5 PDF Viewer
PDF Online. Annotate PDF Online. Create PDF Online. Convert PDF Online. WPF PDF Extract Text from PDF. Text: Search Text in PDF. Image: Extract Image from PDF.
extract image from pdf using; pdf image extractor online
C# PDF insert image Library: insert images into PDF in C#.net, ASP
to zoom and crop image and achieve image resizing. Merge several images into PDF. Insert images into PDF form field. Access to freeware download and online C#.NET
extract images pdf acrobat; extract images from pdf files without using copy and paste
(c) Incomplete line? Retry
(d) Complete entry
You will also find the goto statement often used to reexecute a portion of code, presumably after some 
variables have changed value or some processing has been performed. Although such a construct can 
often be coded by using a structured loop statement (for example, for (;;)) together with break and 
continue, in practice the coder's intent is sometimes better communicated by using goto. A single label, 
almost invariably named again or retry, is used as the goto target. The example in Figure 2.7
,
[36]
which 
locates the entry of a specific service in the system's database while ignoring comments and overly large 
lines, is a typical case. (Interestingly, the code example also seems to contain a bug. If a partial line is 
read, it continues by reading the remainder as if it were a fresh line, so that if the tail of a long line 
happened to look like a service definition it would be used. Such oversights are common targets for 
computer security exploits.)
[36]
netbsdsrc/lib/libc/net/getservent.c:65–10 4
Finally, you will find the goto statement used to change the flow of control in nested loop andswitch 
statements instead of using break and continue, which affect only the control flow in the innermost loop. 
Sometimes goto is used even if the nesting level would allow the use of abreak  or continue statement. 
This is used in large, complex loops to clarify where the flow of control will go and to avoid the possibility 
of errors should a nested loop be added around a particular break or continue statement. In the example 
in Figure 2.8
[37]
the statement goto have–ms s g is used instead of break to exit the for loop.
[37]
netbsdsrc/sys/dev/ic/ncr5380sbc.c:1575–165 4
Exercise 2.23 Locate five instances of code that use the goto statement in the code base. Categorize its use (try to locate at least one 
instance for every one of the possible uses we outlined), and argue whether each particular goto could and should be replaced with a 
loop or other statement.
Figure 2.8 Exiting a loop using the 
goto
statement.
<-- a
for (;;) {
[...]
if ((sc->sc_state & NCR_DROP_MSGIN) == 0) {
if (n >= NCR_MAX_MSG_LEN) {
ncr_sched_msgout(sc, SEND_REJECT);
sc->sc_state |= NCR_DROP_MSGIN;
} else {
[...]
if (n == 1 && IS1BYTEMSG(sc->sc_imess[0]))
goto have_msg;
<-- b
[...]
}
}
[...]
}
have_msg:        
<-- c
VB.NET PDF - Convert PDF Online with VB.NET HTML5 PDF Viewer
PDF Online. Annotate PDF Online. Create PDF Online. Convert PDF Online. WPF PDF Extract Text from PDF. Text: Search Text in PDF. Image: Extract Image from PDF.
extract image from pdf file; extract images from pdf
VB.NET PDF - Create PDF Online with VB.NET HTML5 PDF Viewer
PDF Online. Annotate PDF Online. Create PDF Online. Convert PDF Online. WPF PDF Extract Text from PDF. Text: Search Text in PDF. Image: Extract Image from PDF.
extract pictures from pdf; how to extract a picture from a pdf
(a) for loop
(b) Exit the for loop
(c) goto target
Exercise 2.24 The function getstops produces the same error message for a number of different errors. Describe how you could make its 
error reporting more user-friendly while at the same time eliminating the use of the goto statement. Discuss when such source code 
changes are appropriate and when they should be avoided.
[ Team LiB ]
[ Team LiB ]
2.9 Refactoring in the Small
The rest of the getstops code is relatively straightforward. After checking that each tab stop is greater than the previous oneFigure 2.5:4 (
), 
the tab stop offset is stored in the tabstops array. After a single tab stop number has been converted into an integer (Figure 2.5:2
), cp will 
point to the first nondigit character in the string (that is, the loop will process all digits and terminate at the first nondigit). At that point, a 
series of checks specified by if statements control the program's operation. If cp points to the end of the tab stop specification string (the 
character with the value 0, which signifies the end of a C string), then the loop will terminate (Figure 2.5:5
). The last if (Figure 2.5:6
) will 
check for invalid delimiters and terminate the program operation (using the goto bad statement) if one is found.
The body of each one of the if statements will transfer control somewhere else via a goto or break statement. Therefore, we can also read 
the sequence as:
if (*cp == 0)
break;
else if (*cp != ',' && *cp != ' ')
goto bad;
else
cp++;
This change highlights the fact that only one of the three statements will ever get executed and makes 
the code easier to read and reason about. If you have control over a body of code (that is, it is not 
supplied or maintained by an outside vendor or an open-source group), you can profit by reorganizing 
code sections to make them more readable. This improvement of the code's design after it has been 
written is termed refactoring . Start with small changes such as the one we outlined—you can find mor e
than 70 types of refactoring changes described in the relevant literature. Modest changes add up and
often expose larger possible improvements.
As a further example, consider the following one-line gem.
[38]
[38]
netbsdsrc/games/worms/worms.c:419
op = &(!x ? (!y ? upleft : (y == bottom ? lowleft : left)) :
(x == last ? (!y ? upright : (y == bottom ? lowright : right)) :
(!y ? upper : (y == bottom ? lower : normal))))[w->orientation];
The code makes excessive use of the conditional operator ?:. Read expressions using the conditional 
operator like if code. As an example, read the expression
[39]
[39]
netbsdsrc/bin/csh/set.c:852
sign ? -n : n
as follows:
"If sign is true, then the value of the expression is -n; otherwise, the value of the expression is n".
Since we read an expression like an if statement, we can also format it like an if statement; one that uses x ? instead of if (x), parentheses 
instead of curly braces, and : instead of else. To reformat the expression, we used the indenting features of our editor in conjunction with 
its ability to show matching parentheses. You can see the result in Figure 2.9
(left).
Reading the conditional expression in its expanded form is certainly easier, but there is still room for improvement. At this point we can 
discern that the x and y variables that control the expression evaluation are tested for three different values:
0 (expressed as !x or !y)
1.
bottom or last
2.
All other values
3.
Figure 2.9. A conditional expression formatted like an 
if
statement (left) and like cascading 
if
else
statements (right).
op = &(
!x ? (
!y ?
upleft
: (
y == bottom ?
lowleft
:
left
)
) : (
x == last ? (
!y ?
upright
: (
y == bottom ?
lowright
:
right
)
) : (
!y ?
upper
: (
y == bottom ?
lower
:
normal
)
)
))[w->orientation];
op = &(
!x ? (
!y ?
upleft
: ( y == bottom ?
lowleft
:
left
)
) : ( x == last ? (
!y ?
upright
: ( y == bottom ?
lowright
:
right
)
) : (
!y ?
upper
: ( y == bottom ?
lower
:
normal
)
)
))[w->orientation];
We can therefore rewrite the expression formatted as a series of cascading if– – else statements (expressed using the ?: operator) to 
demonstrate this fact. You can see the result in Figure 2.9
(right).
The expression's intent now becomes clear: the programmer is selecting one of nine different location values based on the combined 
values of x and y. Both alternative formulations, however, visually emphasize the punctuation at the expense of the semantic content and 
use an inordinate amount of vertical space. Nevertheless, based on our newly acquired insight, we can create a two-dimensional array 
containing these location values and index it using offsets we derive from the x and y values. You can see the new result in Figure 2.10
Notice how in the initialization of the array named locations, we use a two-dimensional textual structure to illustrate the two-dimensional 
nature of the computation being performed. The initializers are laid out two-dimensionally in the program text, the array is indexed in the 
normally unconventional order [y][x], and the mapping is to integers "0, 2, 1" rather than the more obvious "0, 1, 2", so as to make the 
two-dimensional presentation coincide with the semantic meanings of the words upleftupper, and so on.
Figure 2.10 Location detection code replacing the conditional expression.
struct options *locations[3][3] = {
<-- a
{upleft,  upper,  upright},
{left,    normal, right},
{lowleft, lower, lowright},
};
int xlocation, ylocation;      
<-- b
<-- c
if (x == 0)
xlocation = 0;
else if (x == last)
xlocation = 2;
else
xlocation = 1;
<-- d
if (y == 0)
ylocation = 0;
else if (y == bottom)
ylocation = 2;
else
ylocation = 1;
op = &(locations[ylocation][xlocation])[w->orientation];
(a) Location map
(b) To store the x, y map offsets
(c) Determine x offset
(d) Determine y offset
The code, at 20 lines, is longer than the original one-liner but still shorter by 7 lines from the one-liner's readable cascading-else 
representation. In our eyes it appears more readable, self-documenting, and easier to verify. One could argue that the original version 
would execute faster than the new one. This is based on the fallacy that code readability and efficiency are somehow incompatible. 
There is no need to sacrifice code readability for efficiency. While it is true that efficient algorithms and certain optimizations can make 
the code more complicated and therefore more difficult to follow, this does not mean that making the code compact and unreadable will 
make it more efficient. On our system and compiler the initial and final versions of the code execute at exactly the same speed: 0.6 ms. 
Even if there were speed differences, the economics behind software maintenance costs, programmer salaries, and CPU performance 
most of the time favor code readability over efficiency.
However, even the code in Figure 2.10
can be considered a mixed blessing: it achieves its advantages at the expense of two distinct 
disadvantages. First, it separates the code into two chunks that, while shown together in Figure 2.10
, would necessarily be separated in 
real code. Second, it introduces an extra encoding (0, 1, 2), so that understanding what the code is doing requires two mental steps 
rather than one (map "0, last, other" to "0, 2, 1" and then map a pair of "0, 2, 1" values to one of nine items). Could we somehow directly 
introduce the two-dimensional structure of our computation into the conditional code? The following code fragment
[40]
reverts to 
conditional expressions but has them carefully laid out to express the computation's intent.
[40]
Suggested by Guy Steele.
op =
&(        !y ? (!x ?  upleft : x!=last ?  upper :  upright) :
y!=bottom ? (!x ?    left : x!=last ? normal :    right) :
(!x ? lowleft : x!=last ?  lower : lowright)
)[w->orientation];
The above formulation is a prime example on how sometimes creative code layout can be used to improve code readability. Note that the 
nine values are right-justified within their three columns, to make them stand out visually and to exploit the repetition of "left" and "right" in 
their names. Note also that the usual practice of putting spaces around operators is eschewed for the case of !=  in order to reduce the 
test expressions to single visual tokens, making the nine data values stand out more. Finally, the fact that the whole expression fits in five 
lines makes the vertical alignment of the first and last parentheses more effective, making it much easier to see that the basic structure 
of the entire statement is of the form
op = &(  <conditional-mess>  )[w->orientation];
The choice between the two new alternative representations is largely a matter of taste; however, we probably would not have come up 
with the second formulation without expressing the code in the initial, more verbose and explicit form.
The expression we rewrote was extremely large and obviously unreadable. Less extreme cases can also benefit from some rewriting. 
Often you can make an expression more readable by adding whitespace, by breaking it up into smaller parts by means of temporary 
variables, or by using parentheses to amplify the precedence of certain operators.
You do not always need to change the program structure to make it more readable. Often items that do not affect the program's 
operation (such as comments, the use of whitespace, and the choice of variable, function, and class names) can affect the program's 
readability. Consider the work we did to understand the code for the getstops function. A concise comment before the function definition 
would enhance the program's future readability.
/*
* Parse and verify the tab stop specification pointed to by cp
* setting the global variables nstops and tabstops[].
* Exit the program with an error message on bad specifications.
*/
When reading code under your control, make it a habit to add comments as needed.
In Sections 2.2
and 2.3
we explained how names and indentation can provide hints for understanding 
code functionality. Unfortunately, sometimes programmers choose unhelpful names and indent their 
programs inconsistently. You can improve the readability of poorly written code with better indentation 
and wise choice of variable names. These measures are extreme: apply them only when you have full 
responsibility and control over the source code, you are sure that your changes are a lot better than the 
original code, and you can revert to the original code if something goes wrong. Using a version 
management system such as the Revision Control System (RCS), the Source Code Control System 
(SCCS), the Concurrent Versions System (CVS), or Microsoft's Visual SourceSafe can help you control 
the code modifications. The adoption of a specific style for variable names and indentation can appear a 
tedious task. When modifying code that is part of a larger body to make it more readable, try to 
understand and follow the conventions of the rest of the code (see Chapter 7
). Many organizations have 
a specific coding style; learn it and try to follow it. Otherwise, adopt one standard style (such as one of 
those used by the GNU
[41]
or BSD
[42]
groups) and use it consistently. When the code indentation is truly 
inconsistent and cannot be manually salvaged, a number of tools (such as indent) can help you 
automatically reindent it to make it more readable (see Section 10.7
). Use such tools with care: the 
judicious use of whitespace allows programmers to provide visual clues that are beyond the abilities of 
automated formatting tools. Applying indent to the code example in Figure 2.10
would definitely make it 
less readable.
Documents you may be interested
Documents you may be interested