mvc 5 display pdf in view : Extract vector image from pdf control SDK system azure winforms windows console en8-part1832

fall into this category. On some systems, using such a font can cause GIMP to crash. 
Updating to Pango 1.4 will fix this problem and makes symbol fonts available in GIMP. 
A frequent source of confusion occurs on Windows systems, when GIMP encounters a 
malformed font file and generates an error message: this causes a console window to pop 
up so that you can see the message. Do not close that console window. It is harmless, 
and closing it will shut down GIMP. When this happens, it often seems to users that GIMP 
has crashed. It hasn't: closing the console window causes Windows to shut GIMP down. 
Unfortunately, this annoying situation is caused by an interaction between Windows and 
the libraries that GIMP links to: it cannot be fixed within GIMP. All you need to do, though, 
if this happens, is minimize the console window and ignore it. 
GNU Image Manipulation Program
Generated by docbook2odf
Page 81 of 421 
Generated by docbook2odf
Extract vector image from pdf - Select, copy, paste PDF images in C#.net, ASP.NET, MVC, Ajax, WinForms, WPF
Support PDF Image Extraction from a Page, a Region on a Page, and PDF Document
pdf image text extractor; extract images from pdf file
Extract vector image from pdf - VB.NET PDF Image Extract Library: Select, copy, paste PDF images in vb.net, ASP.NET, MVC, Ajax, WinForms, WPF
Support PDF Image Extraction from a Page, a Region on a Page, and PDF Document
extract photos from pdf; how to extract text from pdf image file
Rendering a Grid 
How can you create a grid that is actually part of the image? You can't do this using the 
image grid: that is only an aid, and is only visible on the monitor or in a screenshot. You 
can, however, use the Grid plugin to render a grid very similar to the image grid. 
(Actually, the plugin has substantially more options.) 
See also Grid and Guides. 
GNU Image Manipulation Program
Generated by docbook2odf
Page 82 of 421 
Generated by docbook2odf
VB.NET PDF Convert to SVG SDK: Convert PDF to SVG files in vb.net
NET PDF file & pages edit, C#.NET PDF pages extract, copy, paste use the PDF conversion control to render and convert PDF document to SVG vector image in VB
pdf image extractor; online pdf image extractor
C# PDF remove image library: remove, delete images from PDF in C#.
PDF to text, VB.NET extract PDF pages, VB Support removing vector image, graphic picture, digital photo, scanned Get all image objects and remove multiple or
extract jpeg from pdf; some pdf image extract
A Script-Fu Tutorial 
In this training course, we'll introduce you to the fundamentals of Scheme necessary to 
use Script-Fu, and then build a handy script that you can add to your toolbox of scripts. 
The script prompts the user for some text, then creates a new image sized perfectly to 
the text. We will then enhance the script to allow for a buffer of space around the text. We 
will conclude with a few suggestions for ways to ramp up your knowledge of Script-Fu. 
This section as adapted from a tutorial written for the Gimp 1 User Manual by Mike Terry. 
Getting Acquainted With Scheme 
Let's Start Scheme'ing
The first thing to learn is that: 
Every statement in Scheme is surrounded by parentheses (). 
The second thing you need to know is that: 
The function name/operator is always the first item in the parentheses, and the 
rest of the items are parameters to the function. 
However, not everything enclosed in parentheses is a function -- they can also be items in 
a list -- but we'll get to that later. This notation is referred to as prefix notation, because 
the function prefixes everything else. If you're familiar with postfix notation, or own a 
calculator that uses Reverse Polish Notation (such as most HP calculators), you should 
have no problem adapting to formulating expressions in Scheme. 
The third thing to understand is that: 
Mathematical operators are also considered functions, and thus are listed first 
when writing mathematical expressions. 
This follows logically from the prefix notation that we just mentioned. 
Examples Of Prefix, Infix, And Postfix Notations
Here are some quick examples illustrating the differences between prefix, infix, and 
postfix notations. We'll add a 1 and 3 together: 
• Prefix notation: + 1 3 (the way Scheme will want it) 
• Infix notation: 1 + 3 (the way we "normally" write it) 
• Postfix notation: 1 3 + (the way many HP calculators will want it) 
Practicing In Scheme
Now, let's practice what we have just learned. Start up Gimp, if you have not already 
done so, and choose Xtns Script-Fu Console . This will start up the Script-Fu Console 
window, which allows us to work interactively in Scheme. In a matter of moments, the 
Script-Fu Console will appear: 
The Script-Fu Console Window
At the bottom of this window is an entry-field entitled Current Command. Here, we can 
test out simple Scheme commands interactively. Let's start out easy, and add some 
numbers: 
GNU Image Manipulation Program
Generated by docbook2odf
Page 83 of 421 
Generated by docbook2odf
VB.NET PDF remove image library: remove, delete images from PDF in
edit, C#.NET PDF pages extract, copy, paste Support removing vector image, graphic picture, digital photo, scanned Remove multiple or all image objects from PDF
how to extract a picture from a pdf; extract photos pdf
C# PDF copy, paste image Library: copy, paste, cut PDF images in
copy, paste and cut vector image, graphic picture new PDFDocument(inputFilePath); // Extract all images PDFImageHandler.DeleteImage(doc, image); } // Output the
how to extract pictures from pdf files; how to extract images from pdf
(+ 3 5)
  

Typing this in and hitting Enter yields the expected answer of 8 in the center window. 
Now, what if we wanted to add more than one number? The "+" function can take two or 
more arguments, so this is not a problem: 
(+ 3 5 6)
   

This also yields the expected answer of 14. 
So far, so good -- we type in a Scheme statement and it's executed immediately in the 
Script-Fu Console window. Now for a word of caution.... 
Watch Out For Extra Parens
If you're like me, you're used to being able to use extra parentheses whenever you want 
to -- like when you're typing a complex mathematical equation and you want to separate 
the parts by parentheses to make it clearer when you read it. In Scheme, you have to be 
careful and not insert these extra parentheses incorrectly. For example, say we wanted to 
add 3 to the result of adding 5 and 6 together: 
3 + (5 + 6) + 7= ?
       

Knowing that the + operator can take a list of numbers to add, you might be tempted to 
convert the above to the following: 
(+ 3 (5 6) 7)
    

However, this is incorrect -- remember, every statement in Scheme starts and ends with 
parens, so the Scheme interpreter will think that you're trying to call a function named 
"5" in the second group of parens, rather than summing those numbers before adding 
them to 3. 
The correct way to write the above statement would be: 
(+ 3 (+ 5 6) 7)
     

Make Sure You Have The Proper Spacing, Too
If you are familiar with other programming languages, like C/C++, Perl or Java, you know 
that you don't need white space around mathematical operators to properly form an 
expression: 
3+5, 3 +5, 3+ 5

 
 

These are all accepted by C/C++, Perl and Java compilers. However, the same is not true 
for Scheme. You must have a space after a mathematical operator (or any other function 
name or operator) in Scheme for it to be correctly interpreted by the Scheme interpreter. 
Practice a bit with simple mathematical equations in the Script-Fu Console until you're 
totally comfortable with these initial concepts. 
GNU Image Manipulation Program
Generated by docbook2odf
Page 84 of 421 
Generated by docbook2odf
VB.NET PDF Convert to Images SDK: Convert PDF to png, gif images
In addition, our PDF document conversion library also enables developers to render and convert PDF document to TIFF and vector image SVG.
pdf extract images; extract images from pdf c#
VB.NET PDF copy, paste image library: copy, paste, cut PDF images
to copy, paste and cut vector image, graphic picture New PDFDocument(inputFilePath) ' Extract all images PDFImageHandler.DeleteImage(doc, image) Next ' Output
extract image from pdf java; extract text from pdf image
Variables And Functions 
Now that we know that every Scheme statement is enclosed in parentheses, and that the 
function name/operator is listed first, we need to know how to create and use variables, 
and how to create and use functions. We'll start with the variables. 
Declaring Variables
Although there are a couple of different methods for declaring variables, the preferred 
method is to use the let* construct. If you're familiar with other programming languages, 
this construct is equivalent to defining a list of local variables and a scope in which 
they're active. As an example, to declare two variables, a and b, initialized to 1 and 2, 
respectively, you'd write: 
(let* (


(a 1)
 
(b 2)
 
)

(+ a b)
  
)


or, as one line: 
(let* ( (a 1) (b 2) ) (+ a b) )

         

You'll have to put all of this on one line if you're using the console window. In general, 
however, you'll want to adopt a similar practice of indentation to help make your scripts 
more readable. We'll talk a bit more about this in the section on White Space. 
This declares two local variables, a and b, initializes them, then prints the sum of the two 
variables. 
What Is A Local Variable?
You'll notice that we wrote the summation (+ a b) within the parens of the let* expression, 
not after it. 
This is because the let* statement defines an area in your script in which the declared 
variables are usable; if you type the (+ a b) statement after the (let* ...) statement, you'll 
get an error, because the declared variables are only valid within the context of the let* 
statement; they are what programmers call local variables. 
The General Syntax Of let*
The general form of a let* statement is: 
(let* ( variables ) expressions )

 
 

where variables are declared within parens, e.g., (a 2), and expressions are any valid 
Scheme expressions. Remember that the variables declared here are only valid within the 
let* statement -- they're local variables. 
White Space
Previously, we mentioned the fact that you'll probably want to use indentation to help 
clarify and organize your scripts. This is a good policy to adopt, and is not a problem in 
GNU Image Manipulation Program
Generated by docbook2odf
Page 85 of 421 
Generated by docbook2odf
C# PDF Convert to SVG SDK: Convert PDF to SVG files in C#.net, ASP
it is quite necessary to convert PDF document into SVG image format. Here is a brief introduction to SVG image. SVG, short for scalable vector graphics, is a
extract images from pdf acrobat; extract color image from pdf in c#
C# PDF insert image Library: insert images into PDF in C#.net, ASP
other bitmap images. Powerful .NET PDF image edit control, enable users to insert vector images to PDF file. Import graphic picture
extract image from pdf using; extract images from pdf file
Scheme -- white space is ignored by the Scheme interpreter, and can thus be liberally 
applied to help clarify and organize the code within a script. However, if you're working in 
Script-Fu's Console window, you'll have to enter an entire expression on one line; that is, 
everything between the opening and closing parens of an expression must come on one 
line in the Script-Fu Console window. 
Assigning A New Value To A Variable
Once you've initialized a variable, you might need to change its value later on in the 
script. Use the set! statement to change the variable's value: 
(let* ( (theNum 10) ) (set! theNum (+ theNum \

 
 
 
theNum)) )


Try to guess what the above statement will do, then go ahead and enter it in the Script-Fu 
Console window. 
The "\" indicates that there is no line break. Ignore it (don't type it in your Script-Fu 
console and don't hit Enter), just continue with the next line. 
Functions
Now that you've got the hang of variables, let's get to work with some functions. You 
declare a function with the following syntax: 
(define (name param­list) expressions)


where name is the name assigned to this function, param-list is a space-delimited list of 
parameter names, and expressions is a series of expressions that the function executes 
when it's called. For example: 
(define (AddXY inX inY) (+ inX inY) )

 

AddXY is the function's name and inX and inY are the variables. This function takes its 
two parameters and adds them together. 
If you've programmed in other imperative languages (like C/C++, Java, Pascal, etc.), you 
might notice that a couple of things are absent in this function definition when compared 
to other programming languages. 
• First, notice that the parameters don't have any "types" (that is, we didn't declare 
them as strings, or integers, etc.). Scheme is a type-less language. This is handy and 
allows for quicker script writing. 
• Second, notice that we don't need to worry about how to "return" the result of our 
function -- the last statement is the value "returned" when calling this function. Type 
the function into the console, then try something like: 
(AddXY (AddXY 5 6) 4)

  

Lists, Lists And More Lists 
We've trained you in variables and functions, and now enter the murky swamps of 
Scheme's lists. 
GNU Image Manipulation Program
Generated by docbook2odf
Page 86 of 421 
Generated by docbook2odf
VB.NET PowerPoint: PPTX to SVG Conversion; Render PPT to Vector
is listed to render PPTX to vector image file in converted and rendered into svg image format while powerful & profession imaging controls, PDF document, tiff
extract images from pdf files; extract image from pdf acrobat
Defining A List
Before we talk more about lists, it is necessary that you know the difference between 
atomic values and lists. 
You've already seen atomic values when we initialized variables in the previous lesson. An 
atomic value is a single value. So, for example, we can assign the variable "x" the single 
value of 8 in the following statement: 
(let* ( (x 8) ) x)

    

(We added the expression x at the end to print out the value assigned to x-- normally you 
won't need to do this. Notice how let* operates just like a function: The value of the last 
statement is the value returned.) 
A variable may also refer to a list of values, rather than a single value. To assign the 
variable x the list of values 1, 3, 5, we'd type: 
(let* ( (x '(1 3 5))) x)

  
 

Try typing both statements into the Script-Fu Console and notice how it replies. When you 
type the first statement in, it simply replies with the result: 
8


However, when you type in the other statement, it replies with the following result: 
(1 3 5)
  

When it replies with the value 8 it is informing you that x contains the atomic value 8. 
However, when it replies with (1 3 5), it is then informing you that x contains not a single 
value, but a list of values. Notice that there are no commas in our declaration or 
assignment of the list, nor in the printed result. 
The syntax to define a list is: 
'(a b c)

 

where a, b, and c are literals. We use the apostrophe (') to indicate that what follows in 
the parentheses is a list of literal values, rather than a function or expression. 
An empty list can be defined as such: 
'()


or simply: 
()


Lists can contain atomic values, as well as other lists: 
(let*

GNU Image Manipulation Program
Generated by docbook2odf
Page 87 of 421 
Generated by docbook2odf
(

(x

'("The Gimp" (1 2 3) ("is" ("great" () ) ) )

   
   
)

)

x

)


Notice that after the first apostrophe, you no longer need to use an apostrophe when 
defining the inner lists. Go ahead and copy the statement into the Script-Fu Console and 
see what it returns. 
You should notice that the result returned is not a list of single, atomic values; rather, it is 
a list of a literal ("The Gimp"), the list (1 2 3), etc. 
How To Think Of Lists
It's useful to think of lists as composed of a "head" and a "tail." The head is the first 
element of the list, the tail the rest of the list. You'll see why this is important when we 
discuss how to add to lists and how to access elements in the list. 
Creating Lists Through Concatenation (The Cons Function)
One of the more common functions you'll encounter is the cons function. It takes a value 
and prepends it to its second argument, a list. From the previous section, I suggested that 
you think of a list as being composed of an element (the head) and the remainder of the 
list (the tail). This is exactly how cons functions -- it adds an element to the head of a list. 
Thus, you could create a list as follows: 
(cons 1 '(2 3 4) )

 
  

The result is the list (1 2 3 4). 
You could also create a list with one element: 
(cons 1 () )

  

You can use previously declared variables in place of any literals, as you would expect. 
Defining A List Using The list Function
To define a list composed of literals or previously declared variables, use the list function: 
(list 5 4 3 a b c)

     

This will compose and return a list containing the values held by the variables a, b and c. 
For example: 
(let* (


(a 1)
 
(b 2)
 
(c 3)
 
)

(list 5 4 3 a b c)

     
)


GNU Image Manipulation Program
Generated by docbook2odf
Page 88 of 421 
Generated by docbook2odf
This code creates the list (5 4 3 1 2 3). 
Accessing Values In A List
To access the values in a list, use the functions car and cdr, which return the first element 
of the list and the rest of the list, respectively. These functions break the list down into the 
head::tail construct I mentioned earlier. 
The car Function
car returns the first element of the list (the head of the list). The list needs to be non-null. 
Thus, the following returns the first element of the list: 
(car '("first" 2 "third"))

 

which is: 
"first"


The cdr function
cdr returns the rest of the list after the first element (the tail of the list). If there is only 
one element in the list, it returns an empty list. 
(cdr '("first" 2 "third"))

 

returns: 
(2 "third")
 

whereas the following: 
(cdr '("one and only"))


returns: 
()


Accessing Other Elements In A List
OK, great, we can get the first element in a list, as well as the rest of the list, but how do 
we access the second, third or other elements of a list? There exist several "convenience" 
functions to access, for example, the head of the head of the tail of a list (caadr), the tail 
of the tail of a list (cddr), etc. 
The basic naming convention is easy: The a's and d's represent the heads and tails of 
lists, so 
(car (cdr (car x) ) )

  

GNU Image Manipulation Program
Generated by docbook2odf
Page 89 of 421 
Generated by docbook2odf
could be written as: 
(cadar x)


To view a full list of the list functions, refer to the Appendix, which lists the available 
functions for the version of Scheme used by Script-Fu. 
To get some practice with list-accessing functions, try typing in the following (except all 
on one line if you're using the console); use different variations of car and cdr to access 
the different elements of the list: 
(let* (

(x '( (1 2 (3 4 5) 6) 7 8 (9 10) )
           
)

)

; place your car/cdr code here
 
)


Try accessing the number 3 in the list using only two function calls. If you can do that, 
you're on your way to becoming a Script-Fu Master! 
In Scheme, a semicolon (";") marks a comment. It, and anything that follows it on the 
same line, are ignored by the script interpreter, so you can use this to add comments to 
jog your memory when you look at the script later. 
Your First Script-Fu Script 
Do you not need to stop and catch your breath? No? Well then, let's proceed with your 
fourth lesson -- your first Script-Fu Script. 
Creating A Text Box Script
One of the most common operations I perform in Gimp is creating a box with some text in 
it for a web page, a logo or whatever. However, you never quite know how big to make 
the initial image when you start out. You don't know how much space the text will fill with 
the font and font size you want. 
The Script-Fu Master (and student) will quickly realize that this problem can easily be 
solved and automated with Script-Fu. 
We will, therefore, create a script, called Text Box, which creates an image correctly sized 
to fit snugly around a line of text the user inputs. We'll also let the user choose the font, 
font size and text color. 
Editing And Storing Your Scripts
Up until now, we've been working in the Script-Fu Console. Now, however, we're going to 
switch to editing script text files. 
Where you place your scripts is a matter of preference -- if you have access to Gimp's 
default script directory, you can place your scripts there. However, I prefer keeping my 
personal scripts in my own script directory, to keep them separate from the factory-
installed scripts. 
In the .gimp­2.2 directory that Gimp made off of your home directory, you should find a 
directory called scripts. Gimp will automatically look in your .gimp­2.2 directory for a 
scripts directory, and add the scripts in this directory to the Script-Fu database. You 
should place your personal scripts here. 
GNU Image Manipulation Program
Generated by docbook2odf
Page 90 of 421 
Generated by docbook2odf
Documents you may be interested
Documents you may be interested