mvc display pdf from byte array : Extract photos pdf Library SDK component .net wpf windows mvc ETOPO11-part1901

ETOPO1 1 A
rc
-M
inuTE
G
lObAl
r
EliEf
M
OdEl
5
3.1.2  Bathymetry
Bathymetric  data  sets  used  in  compiling  the  ETOPO1  Global  Relief  Model  were  obtained  from  the  Japan 
Oceanographic Data Center (JODC), NGDC, the Caspian Environment Programme (CEP), and the Mediterranean 
Science Commission (CIESM; Table 3).
Table 3: Bathymetric data sets used in compiling ETOPO1.
Source
Name
Year
Data Type
Spatial 
Resolution
Original 
Horizontal 
Datum/
Coordinate 
System
URL
JODC
JODC 
Bathymetry
Grid derived from hydrographic 
survey soundings
0.5 km
WGS 84 
geographic
http://www.jodc.go.jp/
data_set/jodc/jegg_intro.
html
NGDC
Gulf of 
California 
Bathymetry
2006
Grid derived from multibeam 
swath sonar bathymetric surveys
7 arc-second
WGS 84 
geographic
CEP
Caspian Sea 
Bathymetry
1999
Digitized depth contours
1 arc-minute
WGS 84 
geographic
http://www.
caspianenvironment.org/
dim/menu5.htm
CIESM
Mediterranean 
Sea Bathymetry
2005
Grid derived from multibeam 
swath sonar bathymetric surveys
0.5 km
WGS 84 
geographic
http://www.ifremer.fr/
drogm_uk/Realisation/
carto/Mediterranee/index.
html
1)  JODC Bathymetry
The JODC data set provides bathymetric data for three areas surrounding Japan:
(1) latitude: N 34 to 46 (degrees), longitude : E 135 to 148 (degrees)
(2) latitude: N 30 to 38 (degrees), longitude : E 128 to 144 (degrees)
(3) latitude: N 24 to 30 (degrees), longitude : E 122 to 132 (degrees)
The  underlying  hydrographic  survey  soundings  were  collected  by  the  Hydrographic  and  Oceanic 
Department of the Japan Coast Guard and various ocean research institutes. The data were then integrated 
and gridded at 500 meter intervals in the WGS 84 geographic coordinates. Since there is a variety of data 
quality and density, JODC smoothed the data to prevent improper steps. In areas void of data or with rapid 
bathymetry changes, such as coastal areas or seamounts, there are instances where the adopted values are 
moderately different from observed values. 
2)  Gulf of California Bathymetry
A 7 arc-second grid of multibeam swath sonar bathymetric surveys in the mouth of the Gulf of California, 
previously created by one of the authors, was used in building ETOPO1. This grid is not currently available 
to the public, although all of the multibeam swath sonar bathymetric data can be obtained from the online 
NGDC multibeam bathymetric database (http://www.ngdc.noaa.gov/mgg/bathymetry/multibeam.html).
Extract photos pdf - Select, copy, paste PDF images in C#.net, ASP.NET, MVC, Ajax, WinForms, WPF
Support PDF Image Extraction from a Page, a Region on a Page, and PDF Document
extract images from pdf files without using copy and paste; extract images pdf
Extract photos pdf - VB.NET PDF Image Extract Library: Select, copy, paste PDF images in vb.net, ASP.NET, MVC, Ajax, WinForms, WPF
Support PDF Image Extraction from a Page, a Region on a Page, and PDF Document
extract color image from pdf in c#; extract pdf pages to jpg
Amante and Eakins, 2009
6
3)  Caspian Sea Bathymetry 
The Caspian Environment Programme provides digitized contour lines of the Caspian Sea ranging from 
zero to 1000 meters in depth, in the WGS 84 geographic coordinate system. The digitized contour lines 
were created from ‘The Navigation Map’ published by the Navigation and Oceanography Department of the 
Defense Ministry of the USSR in 1987 at a scale of 1:1,000,000 in the Mercator projection. NGDC gridded 
the contours with the ArcGIS
‘Topo to Raster’ tool to infill depths between contours (Fig. 5). The contour 
intervals were originally referenced relative to local lake level—approximately 28 meters below mean sea 
level. The grid was shifted 28 m vertically, to be consistent with sea level, before use in gridding ETOPO1.
Figure 5. Color image of Caspian Sea depth contours and bathymetric grid. NGDC used the ArcGIS 
‘Topo to Raster’ tool to create a “hydrologically correct” surface from the contours.
4)  Mediterranean Sea Bathymetry
The Mediterranean Science Commission (CIESM) has produced a morpho-bathymetric map (Fig. 6) of 
the Mediterranean Sea derived from multibeam swath sonar surveys [Medimap Group et al., 2005]. A 1-km 
grid of this data was graciously provided to NGDC by Benoit Loubrieu, Ifremer, which was used in building 
ETOPO1.
Figure 6. Color image of Mediterranean Sea morpho-bathymetric map. [Image from 
CIESM web site.]
VB Imaging - VB ISSN Barcode Generating
help VB.NET developers draw and add standard ISSN barcode on photos, images and BMP image formats, our users can even create ISSN barcode on PDF, TIFF, Excel
pdf extract images; online pdf image extractor
C# Image: How to Add Antique & Vintage Effect to Image, Photo
Among those antique things, old photos, which can be seen everywhere, can are dedicated to provide powerful & profession imaging controls, PDF document, tiff
extract pictures pdf; how to extract a picture from a pdf
ETOPO1 1 A
rc
-M
inuTE
G
lObAl
r
EliEf
M
OdEl
7
3.1.3  Topography
Topographic data sets used in compiling the ETOPO1 Global Relief Model were obtained from NGDC, NASA, 
and the National Snow and Ice Data Center (NSIDC; Table 4). 
Table 4: Topographic data sets used in compiling the ETOPO1 Global Relief Model.
Source
Name
Year
Data Type
Spatial 
Resolution
Original 
Horizontal Datum/
Coordinate System
URL
NASA
SRTM30
2000 
30 arc-second grid derived from 
SRTM radar topography
30 arc-
seconds
WGS 84 
geographic
http://www2.jpl.nasa.gov/
srtm/
NGDC
GLOBE
1999
Grid derived from various data 
sets
30 arc- 
seconds
WGS 84 
geographic
http://www.ngdc.noaa.gov/
mgg/topo/globe.html
NSIDC
Antarctica 
RAMP
2001
Grid derived from satellite 
radar altimetry, airborne radar 
surveys, topographic maps
400 m
WGS 84 polar 
stereographic
http://nsidc.org/data/
nsidc-0082.html
1)  SRTM30 Global Topography
In February 2000, the Space Shuttle Endeavour
flew the ‘Space Shuttle Radar Topography Mission’ 
(SRTM), which obtained nearly complete high-resolution digital topographic coverage of Earth between 56° 
S and 60° N. This data was processed into a 3 arc-second coverage database that is distributed to the public 
through the USGS ‘Seamless Server’. It was subsequently converted into a global topographic data set at 30 
arc-second cell size by incorporating GTOPO30 gridded data into areas without SRTM data. The geodetic 
reference for SRTM30 is the WGS 84 EGM96 geoid. NGDC utilized the SRTM30 data between 56° S and 
60° N—excluding Greenland— while eliminating ocean-surface “zero” values and GTOPO30 data outside 
the original SRTM survey region, though other anomalous data points had to be removed manually (e.g., Fig. 
7).
Figure 7.  A row of bad data, along 2°S, present in the SRTM30 data set. The bad data were manually removed before the gridding of 
ETOPO1.
VB.NET TWAIN: Scanning Multiple Pages into PDF & TIFF File Using
enterprises or institutions, there are often a large number of photos or documents be combined into one convenient multi-page document file, like PDF and TIFF.
extract jpg pdf; some pdf image extract
VB.NET Image: Program for Creating Thumbnail from Documents and
developers to create thumbnail from multiple document and image formats, such as PDF, TIFF, GIF As we all know, photos and graphics take up a lot of server space
extract image from pdf using; extract jpg from pdf
Amante and Eakins, 2009
8
2)  GLOBE Topography
The NGDC GLOBE Topography data sets provides complete 30 arc-second cell-registered coverage of 
global topography [Hastings and Dunbar, 1999]. The data are in WGS 84 geographic coordinates and have 
a sea level vertical datum. GLOBE was created from both global and regional data sources. The underlying 
global data sources used were Digital Terrain Elevation Data (DTED) and Digital Chart of the World (DCW). 
Various regional data sources included DEMs for Australia, Japan, Italy, New Zealand, Greenland, Antarctica, 
and for parts of South America and Asia.
ETOPO1 incorporates GLOBE topographic data north of 60° N 
(Fig. 8)—excluding Greenland—and in a few small areas south of 56° S that have islands not represented in 
the Antarctic RAMP data set.
Figure 8. Coverage of GLOBE topography (blue) that was used in building ETOPO1. GSHHS coastline in gray.
3)  Antarctica RAMP Topography 
The Radarsat Antarctic Mapping Project (RAMP) DEM combines topographic data from a variety of 
sources to provide consistent coverage of all of Antarctica. Version 2 improves upon the original version by 
incorporating new topographic data, error corrections, extended coverage, and other modifications [
Liu et 
al., 2001]. The topographic data sources include satellite radar altimetry, airborne radar surveys, the recently-
updated Antarctic Digital Database (version 2), and large-scale topographic maps from the U.S Geological 
Survey (USGS) and the Australian Antarctic Division. While most of the data has been collected during the 
1980s and 1990s, some of the data originates as far back as the 1940s. The RAMP DEM was created to assist 
in processing RAMP radar data but it does not utilize any RAMP radar data. NGDC utilized the 400-m grid, 
version 2, in building the ETOPO1 Ice Surface Global Relief Model.
VB.NET Image: Image and Doc Windows, Web & Mobile Viewers of
Users can directly browse and process images and photos on your computer. & image files of this mobile viewer are JPEG, PNG, BMP, GIF, TIFF, PDF, Word and DICOM
extract jpeg from pdf; extract photos pdf
VB.NET Image: Barcode Reader SDK, Read Intelligent Mail from Image
and recognize Intelligent Mail barcode from scanned (or not) photos and documents in How to combine PDF Document Processing DLL with Barcode Reading control to
extract image from pdf java; extract image from pdf in
ETOPO1 1 A
rc
-M
inuTE
G
lObAl
r
EliEf
M
OdEl
9
3.1.4  Integrated Bathymetry–Topography
Integrated bathymetric and  topographic  data sets used in compiling  the ETOPO1 Global Relief Model were 
obtained from Scripps Institute of Oceanography (SIO), the Leibniz Institute for Baltic Sea Research (LIBSR), and 
NGDC (Table 5).
Table 5: Integrated bathymetric-topographic data sets used in compiling ETOPO1.
Source
Name
Year
Data Type
Spatial 
Resolution
Original 
Horizontal 
Datum/
Coordinate 
System
URL
SIO
Measured and 
Estimated 
Seafloor 
Topography
2008
Grid derived from satellite 
altimetry and hydrographic survey 
soundings
2 arc-minute
WGS 84 
geographic
http://topex.ucsd.edu/
marine_topo/
LIBSR 
Baltic Sea 
Bathymetry
2001
Grid derived from hydrographic 
survey soundings
0.5 to 2 arc-
minutes 
WGS 84 
geographic
http://www.io-
warnemuende.de/research/
en_iowtopo.html
NGDC
IBCAO 
2008
Grid derived from hydrographic 
survey soundings, digitized 
contours, grids and point 
information
2 km
WGS 84 polar 
stereographic 
http://www.ibcao.org/
NGDC
U.S. Coastal 
Relief Model
1999 
to 
2005
Grid of NOS hydrographic 
soundings and land topography
3 arc-second
WGS 84 
geographic
http://www.ngdc.noaa.gov/
mgg/coastal/coastal.html 
NGDC
Great Lakes 
Bathymetry
1996 
to 
2005
Grid of hydrographic soundings, 
bathymetric contours, and land 
topography
3 arc-second
WGS 84 
geographic
http://www.ngdc.noaa.gov/
mgg/greatlakes/greatlakes.
html
1)  Measured and Estimated Seafloor Topography
The Measured and Estimated Seafloor Topography grid provides a 1 arc-minute gridded representation 
of seafloor topography for all ice-free ocean areas within +/- 80 degrees latitude in Mercator projection [
Smith 
and Sandwell, 1997]. Topographic data are derived from GTOPO30. Bathymetric values are derived from 
known soundings and sea-surface satellite altimetry measurements, which were first used to calculate free-air 
gravity anomaly and then converted to inferred ocean depths using nearby soundings both as constraints and 
to save gravity-bathymetry relationships. Inaccuracies in the estimated seafloor grid were evident in shallow 
water throughout the data set (e.g., Fig. 9). NGDC down-sampled an older version of the estimated seafloor 
grid to 2 arc-minutes for use in building ETOPO1 (D. Sandwell, pers. request).
VB.NET Image: VB Code to Read Linear Identcode Within RasterEdge .
Support reading and scanning Identcode from scanned documents and photos in VB code; and recognize multiple Identcode barcodes form single or multiple PDF page(s
extract image from pdf c#; how to extract images from pdf
VB.NET Image: VB Code to Download and Save Image from Web URL
view and store thousands of their favorite images and photos to Windows We are dedicated to provide powerful & profession imaging controls, PDF document, image
pdf image extractor; extract pdf pages to jpg
Amante and Eakins, 2009
10
Figure 9. 
Anomalous depth values in the Measured and Estimated Seafloor Topography grid in 
shallow coastal waters north of Vancouver Island. Depths in the grid exceed 1000 meters in many 
places in this region, although actual charted depths are typically on the order of a few tens of 
meters.
C# Imaging - Scan RM4SCC Barcode in C#.NET
PDF, Word, Excel and PPT) and extract barcode value Load an image or a document(PDF, TIFF, Word, Excel barcode from (scanned) images, pictures & photos that are
pdf extract images; pdf image extractor c#
VB.NET Image: Image Resizer Control SDK to Resize Picture & Photo
daily life, if you want to send some image files or photos to someone We are dedicated to provide powerful & profession imaging controls, PDF document, image
extract image from pdf acrobat; online pdf image extractor
ETOPO1 1 A
rc
-M
inuTE
G
lObAl
r
EliEf
M
OdEl
11
3)  Baltic Sea Bathymetry 
The Leibniz Institute for Baltic Sea Research’s high resolution spherical grid topography of the Baltic 
Sea, 2
nd
edition, contains two separate grids of the  Baltic Sea [Seifert et al., 2001]. The Baltic Sea grid 
covers the entire Baltic Sea from 9° to 31° E and from 53°30´ to 66° N, with a resolution of 2 arc-minutes of 
longitude and 1 arc-minute of latitude. The Belt Sea grid contains the region of the Belt Sea from 9° to 15°10´ 
E and from 53°30´ to 56°30´ N, with a resolution of 1 arc-minute of longitude and 0.5 arc-minutes of latitude. 
In order to create a more accurate coastline, both grids used land masks derived from global high-resolution 
shorelines,  GSHHS  and  RANGS  (Regionally Accessible  Nested  Global  Shoreline;  http://www2008.io-
warnemuende.de/homepages/rfeistel/rangs.htm). Most of the underlying data sets were sampled from sea 
charts of different scales. Some data sets included digitized soundings, and only Reissmann’s “Bathymetry 
of four deep Baltic basins” data came from ship-borne measurements. Both grids contain topographic data 
from GTOPO30, though only bathymetric values were used in compiling ETOPO1. 
4)  IBCAO Bathymetry
The International Bathymetric Chart of the Arctic Ocean (IBCAO) grid version 2.0 was created from ship 
track data, contours, grids and point information [Fig. 10; Jakobsson et al., 2008]. The majority of the echo 
sounding data was collected from surface vessels extracted from the following four archives: NGDC, the 
U.S. Naval Research Laboratory (NRL), the Canadian Hydrographic Service (CHS), and the Royal Danish 
Administration of Navigation and Hydrography (RDANH). The NGDC database was the primary source 
and the other three sources were used where there was not any NGDC data available. Where the ship track 
database information was limited in the central Arctic Ocean, contour information was derived from Russia’s 
Head Department of Navigation and Oceanography Bottom relief of the Arctic Ocean map. In addition, 
contours were extracted from the GEBCO Digital Atlas in the southern Norwegian-Greenland Seas, in Baffin 
Bay and in some areas of the Canadian Arctic. In the Gulf of Bothnia, the IBCAO grid used bathymetric 
data derived from the Seifert and Kayser digital grid of the Baltic Sea. NGDC extracted IBCAO bathymetric 
data north of 65 degrees latitude and surrounding Greenland to create ETOPO1. IBCAO topographic data 
of Greenland were also used in building ETOPO1. The original IBCAO grid was in polar stereographic 
projection and was converted to WGS 84 geographic coordinates using ArcGIS. 
Figure 10. Color image of the IBCAO v.2 grid of the Arctic.
Amante and Eakins, 2009
12
5)  U.S. Coastal Relief Model 
NGDC’s U.S. Coastal Relief Model (CRM) provides 3 arc-second (~90 m) resolution for the East and 
West Coasts, Gulf of Mexico, Hawaii and Puerto Rico (see Fig. 11). The database extends from the coastal 
state  boundaries to as far as  the National Ocean Service  hydrographic data is available, which in many 
cases reaches out to, and in some places even beyond, the continental slope. The bathymetric data sources 
include  hydrographic  surveys  from  the  U.S.  National  Ocean  Service  (NOS),  Monterey  Bay Aquarium 
Research Institute (MBARI), U.S. Army Corps of Engineers LIDAR (SHOALS), and various other academic 
institutions. In addition, bathymetric contours from the International Bathymetric Chart of the Caribbean Sea 
and Gulf of Mexico were used where applicable. Topographic data are from the USGS National Elevation 
Data set (NED). Only bathymetric values were used in building ETOPO1.
Figure 11. Areas of the U.S. coast covered by NGDC’s Coastal Relief Model.
6)  Great Lakes Bathymetry 
NGDC,  in  cooperation  with  NOAA’s  Great  Lakes  Environmental  Laboratory  and  the  Canadian 
Hydrographic  Service,  has  compiled  detailed  vector  bathymetric  contours  and  3  arc-second  (~90  m) 
bathymetric grids  for  most  of  the  U.S. Great  Lakes.  This  integrated  bathymetric–topographic  grid  was 
extracted at 15 arc-seconds for use in building ETOPO1.
ETOPO1 1 A
rc
-M
inuTE
G
lObAl
r
EliEf
M
OdEl
13
3.1.5  Bedrock
Bedrock data sets depicting the bedrock elevation underneath the Antarctic and Greenland ice sheets were obtained 
from the National Snow and Ice Data Center (NSIDC), European Ice Sheet Modeling Initiative (EISMINT) and the 
Scientific Committee on Antarctic Research (SCAR; Table 6).
Table 6: Bedrock elevation data sets used in compiling the ETOPO1 Bedrock Global Relief Model.
Source
Name
Year
Data Type
Spatial 
Resolution
Original 
Horizontal 
Datum/
Coordinate 
System
URL
NSIDC
Greenland 
Bedrock
2001
Grid derived from satellite 
altimetry, Airbourne 
Topographic  Mapper (ATM), 
photogrammetric digital height, 
ice penetrating Radar, airbourne 
echo sounder
5 km
WGS 84 Polar 
Stereographic
http://nsidc.org/data/
nsidc-0092.html
EISMINT / 
SCAR
Antarctica 
BEDMAP
2000
Grid derived from terrestrial 
methods of measurement, 
primarily radar and seismic 
soundings
5 km
WGS 84 Polar 
Stereographic
http://www.antarctica.
ac.uk//bas_research/data/
access/bedmap/
1)  Greenland NSIDC Bedrock 
The National Snow and Ice Data Center (NSIDC) has built 5-km grids of ice surface, ice thickness and 
bedrock elevation for Greenland in polar stereographic projection [Bamber et al., 2001a, 2001b]. NGDC 
utilized the bedrock grid, resampled to 30 arc-second cell size, in building the ETOPO1 Bedrock grid. NSIDC 
first created an ice-surface DEM from a combination of ERS-1 and Geostat satellite radar altimetry data, 
Airbourne Topographic Mapper  (ATM) data, and photogrammetric  digital height data. The ice-thickness 
grid was derived from approximately 700,000 data points collected from a University of Kansas airborne 
ice penetrating radar (IPR), in addition to nearly 30,000 data points collected in the 1970s from a Technical 
University of Denmark (TUD) airborne echo sounder.  The bedrock-elevation grid was created by subtracting 
the ice-thickness grid from the ice-surface grid. It is in WGS 84 polar stereographic projection, with standard 
parallel of latitude 71° N, projection parallel of 90° N, and 39° W central meridian.
2)  Antarctica BEDMAP Bedrock 
The European Ice Sheet Modeling Initiative  (EISMINT) and  the Scientific Committee on Antarctic 
Research’s (SCAR) created the Antarctica BEDMAP grid, which contains the bedrock elevation data beneath 
the grounded ice sheet of Antarctica [Lythe et al., 2000]. It includes the entire geosphere south of 60° S at 
a nominal grid spacing of 5 km in WGS 84 polar stereographic projection. It was created from terrestrial 
methods of measurement, primarily radar and seismic  soundings. The Antarctica BEDMAP provides an 
improved delineation of the boundary between East and West Antarctica. It also more accurately describes 
the morphology of the contiguous East Antarctica landmass, which is under an average of 2,500 meters of 
ice. 
Amante and Eakins, 2009
14
3.2  Establishing Common Datums
3.2.1  Vertical datum transformations
Data sets used in the compilation and evaluation of ETOPO1 Global Relief Model were all originally referenced 
to sea level with the exception of the Caspian Sea data set. The contour intervals contained in this data set were 
originally referenced relative to local lake level. The grid was shifted 28 m vertically to be consistent with sea level 
before use in gridding ETOPO1. 
3.2.2  Horizontal datum transformations
Data sets used to compile ETOPO1 Global Relief Model were originally referenced to WGS 84 geographic and 
WGS 84 polar stereographic. The relationships and transformational equations between these horizontal datums are 
well established. All data were converted to the WGS 84 geographic horizontal datum using FME software.
3.3  Digital Elevation Model Development
3.3.1  Verifying consistency between data sets
After horizontal and vertical transformations were applied, the resulting ArcGIS
shape  files and rasters were 
checked in ArcMap for consistency between data  sets.  Problems  and errors were  identified and resolved  before 
proceeding with subsequent gridding steps. The evaluated and edited ESRI shape files were then converted to xyz files 
in preparation for gridding. Problems included:
Inconsistencies between IBCAO and the Measured and Estimated Seafloor Topography data sets in coastal 
• 
regions
Row  of  data  errors  in  SRTM30  data  set.  Manual  editing  of  the  data  was  necessary  to minimize  these 
• 
artifacts.
SRMT30 data set contains zero values over the open ocean. These values were removed using 
• 
FME.
3.3.2   Gridding of coastal bathymetry
NGDC created bathymetric pre-surfaces in order to interpolate bathymetric data into coastal regions, which were 
poorly represented in some bathymetric data sets (e.g., Fig. 12). A global bathymetric pre-surface—excluding south 
of 60° S—was created using the Measured and Estimated Seafloor Topography data (between -500 m and 0 m). These 
data were gridded at 1 arc-minute cell size using GMT’s ‘surface’ tool. Points extracted from the GSHHS coastline 
were also included, at -1 m elevation, to force bathymetric interpolation into the coastal zone. The resulting surface, 
created in quadrangles, was clipped to the GSHHS coastline and the -120 m contour. Values between -50 and 0 m 
were then extracted from the clipped quadrangle grids and were used in building ETOPO1 (e.g,. Fig. 13). An Iceland 
bathymetric pre-surface was also created, utilizing the Measured and Estimated Seafloor Topography bathymetric 
values and the GSHHS coastline with points assigned at -5 m elevation, due to the deep fjords surrounding Iceland. 
This bathymetric pre-surface was also utilized in compiling ETOPO1 (see Table 7).
Documents you may be interested
Documents you may be interested