mvc display pdf in browser : Extract text from pdf image software SDK cloud windows wpf azure class final-esi-protocol1-part2046

of “maintained by the source.”  The goals are to retain the ESI’s integrity, to allow for
reasonable usability, and to reasonably limit costs.
3
d.
Proprietary or legacy data.  Special consideration should be given to data stored in
proprietary or legacy systems, for example, video surveillance recordings in an
uncommon format, proprietary databases, or software that is no longer supported by
the vendor.  The parties should discuss whether a suitable generic output format or
report is available.  If a generic output is not available, the parties should discuss the
specific requirements necessary to access the data in its original format.
e.
Attorney-client, work product, and protected information issues.   The parties should
4
discuss whether there is privileged, work product, or other protected information in
third-party ESI or their own discoverable ESI and proposed methods and procedures for
segregating such information and resolving any disputes.
5
f.
Confidential and personal information.  The parties should identify and discuss the
types of confidential or personal information present in the ESI discovery, appropriate
security for that information, and the need for any protective orders or redactions.  See
also, section 5(p) below.
g.
Incarcerated defendant.  If the defendant is incarcerated and the court or correctional
institution has authorized discovery access in the custodial setting, the parties should
consider what institutional requirements or limitations may affect the defendant’s
access to ESI discovery, such as limitations on hardware or software use.
6
h.
ESI discovery volume.  To assist in estimating the receiving party’s discovery costs and
to the extent that the producing party knows the volume of discovery materials it
intends to produce immediately or in the future, the producing party may provide such
information if such disclosure would not compromise the producing party’s interests. 
For example, when the producing party processes ESI to apply Bates numbers, load it into litigation
3
software, create TIFF images, etc., the ESI is slightly modified and no longer in its original state.  Similarly,
some modification of the ESI may be necessary and proper in order to allow the parties to protect
privileged information, and the processing and production of ESI in certain formats may result in the loss
or alteration of some metadata that is not significant in the circumstances of the particular case.
Attorney-client and work product (see, e.g., F.R.Crim.P. 16(a)(2) and (b)(2)) issues arising from the
4
parties’ own case preparation are beyond the scope of these Recommendations, and they need not be
part of the meet and confer discussion.
If third party records are subject to an agreement or court order involving a selective waiver of
5
attorney-client or work product privileges (see F.R.E. 502), then the parties should discuss how to handle
those materials.
Because pretrial detainees often are held in local jails (for space, protective custody, cost, or other
6
reasons) that have varying resources and security needs, there are no uniform practices or rules for
pretrial detainees’ access to ESI discovery.  Resolution of the issues associated with such access is
beyond the scope of the Recommendations and Strategies.
Strategies, Page 3
Extract text from pdf image - Select, copy, paste PDF images in C#.net, ASP.NET, MVC, Ajax, WinForms, WPF
Support PDF Image Extraction from a Page, a Region on a Page, and PDF Document
extract images pdf; extract jpg pdf
Extract text from pdf image - VB.NET PDF Image Extract Library: Select, copy, paste PDF images in vb.net, ASP.NET, MVC, Ajax, WinForms, WPF
Support PDF Image Extraction from a Page, a Region on a Page, and PDF Document
pdf extract images; how to extract images from pdf
Examples of volume include the number of pages of electronic images of paper-based
discovery, the volume (e.g., gigabytes) of ESI, the number and aggregate length of any
audio or video recordings, and the number and volume of digital devices.  Disclosures
concerning expected volume are not intended to be so detailed as to require a party to
disclose what they intend to produce as discovery before they have a legal obligation to
produce the particular discovery material (e.g., Jencks material).  Similarly, the parties’
estimates are not binding and may not serve as the basis for allegations of misconduct
or claims for relief.
i.
Naming conventions and logistics.  The parties should, from the outset of a case,
employ naming conventions that would make the production of discovery more
efficient.  For example, in a Title III wire tap case generally it is preferable that the
naming conventions for the audio files, the monitoring logs, and the call transcripts be
consistent so that it is easy to cross-reference the audio calls with the corresponding
monitoring logs and transcripts.  If at the outset of discovery production a naming
convention has not yet been established, the parties should discuss a naming
convention before the discovery is produced.  The parties should discuss logistics and
the sharing of costs or tasks that will enhance ESI production.
j.
Paper materials.  For options and particularized guidance on paper materials see
paragraphs 6(a) and(e), below. 
k.
Any software and hardware limitations.  As technology continues to evolve, the parties
may have software and hardware constraints on how they can review ESI.  Any
limitations should be addressed during the meet and confer.
l.
ESI from seized or searched third-party ESI digital devices.  When a party produces ESI
from a seized or searched third-party digital device (e.g., computer, cell phone, hard
drive, thumb drive, CD, DVD, cloud computing, or file share), the producing party should
identify the digital device that held the ESI, and, to the extent that the producing party
already knows, provide some indication of the device’s probable owner or custodian and
the location where the device was seized or searched.  Where the producing party only
has limited authority to search the digital device (e.g., limits set by a search warrant’s
terms), the parties should discuss the need for protective orders or other mechanisms to
regulate the receiving party’s access to or inspection of the device.
m.
Inspection of hard drives and/or forensic (mirror) images.  Any forensic examination of
a hard drive, whether it is an examination of a hard drive itself or an examination of a
forensic image of a hard drive, requires specialized software and expertise.  A simple
copy of the forensic image may not be sufficient to access the information stored, as
specialized software may be needed.  The parties should consider how to manage
inspection of a hard drive and/or production of a forensic image of a hard drive and
what software and expertise will be needed to access the information.
n.
Metadata in third party ESI.  If a producing party has already extracted metadata from
third party ESI, the parties should discuss whether the producing party should produce
the extracted metadata together with an industry-standard load file, or, alternatively,
Strategies, Page 4
C# PDF Text Extract Library: extract text content from PDF file in
Ability to extract highlighted text out of PDF document. Supports text extraction from scanned PDF by using XDoc.PDF for .NET Pro. Image text extraction control
some pdf image extract; how to extract images from pdf files
VB.NET PDF Text Extract Library: extract text content from PDF
Extract highlighted text out of PDF document. Image text extraction control provides text extraction from PDF images and image files.
pdf image extractor online; extract text from image pdf file
produce the files as received by the producing party from the third party.   Neither party
7
need undertake additional processing beyond its own case preparation, and both parties
are entitled to protect their work product and privileged or other protected information. 
Because the term “metadata” can encompass different categories of information, the
parties should clearly describe what categories of metadata are being discussed, what
the producing party has agreed to produce, and any known problems or gaps in the
metadata received from third parties.
o.
A reasonable schedule for producing and reviewing ESI.  Because ESI involves complex
technical issues, two stages should be addressed.  First, the producing party should
transmit its ESI in sufficient time to permit reasonable management and review. 
Second, the receiving party should be pro-active about testing the accessibility of the ESI
production when it is received.  Thus, a schedule should include a date for the receiving
party to notify the producing party of any production issues or problems that are
impeding use of the ESI discovery.
p.
ESI security.  During the first meet and confer, the parties should discuss ESI discovery
security and, if necessary, the need for protective orders to prevent unauthorized access
to or disclosure of ESI discovery that any party intends to share with team members via
the internet or similar system, including:
i.
what discovery material will be produced that is confidential, private, or
sensitive, including, but not limited to, grand jury material, witness identifying
information, information about informants, a defendant’s or co-defendant’s
personal or business information, information subject to court protective
orders, confidential personal or business information, or privileged information;
ii.
whether encryption or other security measures during transmission of ESI
discovery are warranted;
8
iii.
what steps will be taken to ensure that only authorized persons have access to
the electronically stored or disseminated discovery materials;
iv.
what steps will be taken to ensure the security of any website or other
electronic repository against unauthorized access;
v.
what steps will be taken at the conclusion of the case to remove discovery
materials from the a website or similar repository; and
vi.
what steps will be taken at the conclusion of the case to remove or return ESI
discovery materials from the recipient’s information system(s), or to securely
archive them to prevent unauthorized access.
The producing party is, of course, limited to what it received from the third party. The third party’s
7
processing of the information can affect or limit what metadata is available.
The parties should consult their litigation support personnel concerning encryption or other security
8
options.
Strategies, Page 5
C# PDF insert image Library: insert images into PDF in C#.net, ASP
Free PDF image processing SDK library for Visual Studio .NET program. Powerful .NET PDF image edit control, enable users to insert vector images to PDF file.
extract image from pdf; extract color image from pdf in c#
VB.NET PDF insert image library: insert images into PDF in vb.net
VB.NET code to add an image to the inputFilePath As String = Program.RootPath + "\\" 1.pdf" Dim doc New PDFDocument(inputFilePath) ' Get a text manager from
pdf image extractor; extract pdf images
Note:  Because all parties want to ensure that ESI discovery is secure, the Department of
Justice, Federal Defender Offices, and CJA counsel are compiling an evolving list of
security concerns and recommended best practices for appropriately securing discovery. 
Prosecutors and defense counsel with security concerns should direct inquiries to their
respective ESI liaisons  who, in turn, will work with their counterparts to develop best
9
practice guidance.
q.
Other issues.  The parties should address other issues they can anticipate, such as
protective orders, “claw-back” agreements  between the government and criminal
10
defendant(s), or any issues related to the preservation or collection of ESI discovery.
r.
Memorializing agreements.  The parties should memorialize any agreements reached to
help forestall later disputes.
s.
Notice to court.
i.
Preparing for the meet and confer: A defendant who anticipates the need for
technical assistance to conduct the meet and confer should give the court
adequate advance notice if it will be filing an ex parte funds request for technical
assistance. 
ii.
Following the meet and confer: The parties should notify the court of ESI
discovery production issues or problems that they anticipate will significantly
affect when ESI discovery will be produced to the receiving party, when the
receiving party will complete its accessibility assessment of the ESI discovery
received,   whether the receiving party will need to make a request for
11
supplemental funds to manage ESI discovery, or the scheduling of pretrial
motions or trial.
6.
Production of ESI Discovery
a.
Paper Materials.  Materials received in paper form may be produced in that form,
12
made available for inspection, or, if they have already been converted to digital format,
Federal Defender Organizations and CJA panel attorneys should contact Sean Broderick (National
9
Litigation Support Administrator) or Kelly Scribner (Assistant National Litigation Support Administrator)
at 510-637-3500, or by email: sean_broderick@fd.org, kelly_scribner@fd.org.  Prosecutors should
contact Andrew Goldsmith (National Criminal Discovery Coordinator) at Andrew.Goldsmith@usdoj.gov
or John Haried (Assistant National Criminal Discovery Coordinator) at John.Haried@usdoj.gov.
A “claw back” agreement outlines procedures to be followed to protect against waiver of privilege or
10
work product protection due to inadvertent production of documents or data.
See paragraph 5(o) of the Strategies, above.
11
The decision whether to scan paper documents requires striking a balance between resources
12
(including personnel and cost) and efficiency.  The parties should make that determination on a case-by-
case basis.
Strategies, Page 6
C# Create PDF from images Library to convert Jpeg, png images to
If you want to turn PDF file into image file format in C# application, then RasterEdge XDoc.PDF for .NET can also help with this.
extract photos from pdf; extract photo from pdf
C# PDF insert text Library: insert text into PDF content in C#.net
Text to PDF. C#.NET PDF SDK - Insert Text to PDF Document in C#.NET. Providing C# Demo Code for Adding and Inserting Text to PDF File Page with .NET PDF Library.
extract images pdf acrobat; online pdf image extractor
produced as electronic files that can be viewed and searched.  Methods are described
below in paragraph 6(b).
b.
Electronic production of paper documents.  Three possible methodologies:
i.
Single-page TIFFs.  Production in TIFF and OCR format consists of the following
three elements:
(1)
Paper documents are scanned to a picture or image that produces one
file per page.  Documents should be unitized.  Each electronic image
should be stamped with a unique page label or Bates number.
(2)
Text from that original document is generated by OCR and stored in
separate text files without formatting in a generic format using the same
file naming convention and organization as image file.
(3)
Load files that tie together the images and text.
ii.
Multi-page TIFFS.  Production in TIFF and OCR format consists of the following
two elements:
(1)
Paper documents are scanned to a picture or image that produces one
file per document.  Each file may have multiple pages.  Each page of the
electronic image should be stamped with a unique page label or Bates
number.
(2)
Text from that original document is generated by OCR and stored in
separate text files without formatting in a generic format using the same
file naming convention and organization as the image file.
iii.
PDF.  Production in multi-page, searchable PDF format consists of the following
one element:
(1)
Paper documents scanned to a PDF file with text generated by OCR
included in the same file.  This produces one file per document. 
Documents should be unitized.  Each page of the PDF should be
stamped with a unique Bates number.
iv.
Note re: color documents.  Paper documents should not be scanned in color
unless the color content of an individual document is particularly significant to
the case.
13
c.
ESI production.  Three possible methodologies:
Color scanning substantially slows the scanning process and creates huge electronic files which
13
consume storage space, making the storage and transmission of information difficult.  An original
signature, handwritten marginalia in blue or red ink, and colored text highlights are examples of color
content that may be particularly significant to the case.
Strategies, Page 7
C# PDF Page Extract Library: copy, paste, cut PDF pages in C#.net
Page: Extract, Copy and Paste PDF Pages. Easy to Use C# Code to Extract PDF Pages, Copy Pages from One PDF File and Paste into Others in C#.NET Program.
pdf image extractor c#; extract image from pdf java
VB.NET PDF Form Data Read library: extract form data from PDF in
featured PDF software, it should have functions for processing text, image as well how to read or retrieve field data from PDF and how to extract and get
how to extract text from pdf image file; extract images from pdf file
i.
Native files as received.  Production in a native file format without any
processing consists of a copy of ESI files in the same condition as they were
received.
ii.
ESI converted to electronic image.  Production of ESI in a TIFF or PDF and
extracted text format consists of the following four elements:
(1)
Electronic documents converted from their native format into a picture
/ image.  The electronic image files should be computer generated, as
opposed to printed and then imaged.  Each electronic image should be
stamped with a unique Bates number.
(2)
Text from that original document is extracted or pulled out and stored
without formatting in a generic format.
(3)
Metadata (i.e., information about that electronic document), depending
upon the type of file converted and the tools or methodology used, that
has been extracted and stored in an industry standard format.  The
metadata must include information about structural relationships
between documents, e.g., parent-child relationships.
(4)
Load files that tie together the images, text, and metadata.
iii.
Native files with metadata.  Production of ESI in a processed native file format
consists of the following four elements:
(1)
The native files.
(2)
Text from that original document is extracted or pulled out and stored
without formatting in a generic format.
(3)
Metadata (i.e., information about that electronic document), depending
upon the type of file converted and the tools or methodology used, that
has been extracted and stored in an industry standard format.  The
metadata must include information about structural relationships
between documents, e.g., parent-child relationships.
(4)
Load files that tie together the native file, text, and metadata.
d.
Forensic images of digital media.  Forensic images of digital media should be produced
in an industry-standard forensic format, accompanied by notice of the format used.
e.
Printing ESI to paper.  The producing party should not print ESI (including TIFF images or
PDF files) to paper as a substitute for production of the ESI unless agreed to by the
parties.
f.
Preservation of ESI materials received from third parties.  A party receiving potentially
discoverable ESI from a third party should, to the extent practicable, retain a copy of the
Strategies, Page 8
ESI as it was originally produced in case it is subsequently needed to perform quality
control or verification of what was produced.
g.
Production of ESI from third parties.  ESI from third parties may have been received in a
variety of formats, for example, in its original format (native, such as Excel or Word), as
an image (TIFF or PDF), as an image with searchable text (TIFF or PDF with OCR text), or
as a combination of any of these.  The third party’s format can affect or limit the
available options for production as well as what associated information (metadata)
might be available.  ESI received from third parties should be produced in the format(s)
it was received or in a reasonably usable format(s).  ESI received from a party’s own
business records should be produced in the format(s) in which it was maintained or in a
reasonably usable form(s).  The parties should explore what formats of production  are
14
possible and appropriate, and discuss what formats can be generated.  Any format
selected for producing discovery should, if possible and appropriate, conform to
industry standards for the format.
h.
ESI generated by the government or defense.  Paragraphs 6(f) and 6(g) do not apply to
discoverable materials generated by the government or defense during the course of
their investigations (e.g., demonstrative exhibits, investigative reports and witness
interviews - see subparagraph i, below, etc.) because the parties’ legal discovery
obligations and practices vary according to the nature of the material, the applicable
law, evolving legal standards, and the parties’ evolving technological capabilities.  Thus,
such materials may be produced differently from third party ESI.  However, to the extent
practicable, this material should be produced in a searchable and reasonably usable
format.  Parties should consult with their investigators in advance of preparing discovery
to ascertain the investigators’ ESI capabilities and limitations.
i.
Investigative reports and witness interviews.  Investigative reports and witness
interviews may be produced in paper form if they were received in paper form or if the
final version is in paper form.  Alternatively, they may be produced as electronic images
(TIFF images or PDF files), particularly when needed to accommodate any necessary
redactions.  Absent particular issues such as redactions or substantial costs or burdens
of additional processing, electronic versions of investigative reports and witness
interviews should be produced in a searchable text format (such as ASCII text, OCR text,
or plain text (.txt)) in order to avoid the expense of reprocessing the files.  To the extent
possible, the electronic image files of investigative reports and witness interviews should
be computer-generated (as opposed to printed to paper and then imaged) in order to
produce a higher-quality searchable text which will enable the files to be more easily
searched and cost-effectively utilized.
15
An example of “format of production” might be TIFF images, OCR text files, and load files created for a
14
specific software application.  Another “format of production” would be native file production, which
would accommodate files with unique issues, such as spreadsheets with formulas and databases.
For guidance on making computer generated version of investigative reports and witness interview
15
reports, see the description of production of TIFF, PDF, and extracted text format in paragraphs 
6(b)(ii)(1) and (ii).
Strategies, Page 9
j.
Redactions.  ESI and/or images produced should identify the extent of redacted material
and its location within the document.
k.
Photographs and video and audio recordings.  A party producing photographs or video
or audio recordings that either were originally created using digital devices or have
previously been digitized should disclose the digital copies of the images or recordings if
they are in the producing party’s possession, custody or control.  When technically
feasible and cost-efficient, photographs and video and audio recordings that are not
already in a digital format should be digitized into an industry standard format if and
when they are duplicated.  The producing party is not required to convert materials
obtained in analog format to digital format for discovery.
l.
Test runs.  Before producing ESI discovery a party should consider providing samples of
the production format for a test run, and once a format is agreed upon, produce all ESI
discovery in that format.
m.
Access to originals.  If the producing party has converted paper materials to digital files,
converted materials with color content to black and white images, or processed audio,
video, or other materials for investigation or discovery, it should provide reasonable
access to the originals for inspection and/or reprocessing.
7.
Transmitting ESI Discovery
a.
ESI discovery should be transmitted on electronic media of sufficient size to hold the
entire production, for example, a CD, DVD, or thumb drive.   If the size of the
16
production warrants a large capacity hard drive, then the producing party may require
the receiving party to bear the cost of the hard drive and to satisfy requirements for the
hard drive that are necessary to protect the producing party’s IT system from viruses or
other harm.
b.
The media should be clearly labeled with the case name and number, the producing
party, a unique identifier for the media, and a production date.
c.
A cover letter should accompany each transmission of ESI discovery providing basic
information including the number of media, the unique identifiers of the media, a brief
description of the contents including a table of contents if created, any applicable bates
ranges or other unique production identifers, and any necessary passwords to access
the content.  Passwords should not be in the cover letter accompanying the data, but in
a separate communication.
d.
The producing party should retain a write-protected copy of all transmitted ESI as a
preserved record to resolve any subsequent disputes.
e.
Email Transmission.  When considering transmission of ESI discovery by email, the
parties’ obligation varies according to the sensitivity of the material, the risk of harm
Rolling productions may, of course, use multiple media.  The producing party should avoid using
16
multiple media when a single media will facilitate the receiving party’s use of the material.
Strategies, Page 10
from unauthorized disclosure, and the relative security of email versus alternative
transmission.  The parties should consider three categories of security:
i.
Not appropriate for email transmission: Certain categories of ESI discovery are
never appropriate for email transmission, including, but not limited to, certain
grand jury materials; materials affecting witness safety; materials containing
classified, national security, homeland security, tax return, or trade secret
information; or similar items.
ii.
Encrypted email transmission: Certain categories of ESI discovery warrant
encryption or other secure transmission due to their sensitive nature.  The
parties should discuss and identify those categories in their case.  This would
ordinarily include, but not be limited to, information about informants,
confidential business or personal information, and information subject to court
protective orders.
iii.
Unencrypted email transmission: Other categories of ESI discovery not
addressed above may be appropriate for email transmission, but the parties
always need to be mindful of their ethical obligations.
17
8.
Coordinating Discovery Attorney
Coordinating Discovery Attorneys (CDA) are AOUSC contracted attorneys who have
technological knowledge and experience, resources, and staff to effectively manage complex ESI in
multiple defendant cases.  The CDAs may be appointed by the court to provide additional in-depth and
significant hands-on assistance to CJA panel attorneys and FDO staff in selected multiple-defendant
cases that require technology and document management assistance.  They can serve as a primary point
of contact for the US Attorneys Office to discuss ESI production issues for all defendants, resulting in
lower overall case costs for the parties. If you have any questions regarding the services of a CDA, please
contact either Sean Broderick (National Litigation Support Administrator) or Kelly Scribner (Assistant
National Litigation Support Administrator) at 510-637-3500, or by email: sean_broderick@fd.org,
kelly_scribner@fd.org.
9.
Informal Resolution of ESI Discovery Matters
No additional commentary.
10.
Security: Protecting Sensitive ESI Discovery from Unauthorized Access or Disclosure
See sections 5(f) - Confidential and personal information, 5(p) - ESI security, and 7(e) - Email
Transmission of the Strategies for additional guidance.
Illustrative of the security issues in the attorney-client context are ABA Op. 11-459 (Duty to Protect the
17
Confidentiality of E-mail Communications with One’s Client ) and ABA Op. 99-413 (Protecting the
Confidentiality of Unencrypted E-Mail).
Strategies, Page 11
11.
Definitions
To clearly communicate about ESI, it is important that the parties use ESI terms in the same way. 
Below are common ESI terms used when discussing ESI discovery:
a.
Cloud computing.  With cloud computing, the user accesses a remote computer hosted
by a cloud service provider over the Internet or an intranet to access software programs
or create, save, or retrieve data, for example, to send messages or create documents,
spreadsheets, or databases.  Examples of cloud computing include Gmail, Hotmail,
Yahoo! Mail, Facebook, and on-line banking.
b.
Coordinating Discovery Attorney (CDA).  An AOUSC contracted attorney who has
technological knowledge and experience, resources, and staff to effectively manage
complex ESI in multiple-defendant cases, and who may be appointed by a court in
selected multiple-defendant cases to assist CJA panel attorneys and/or FDO staff with
discovery management.
c.
Document unitization.  Document unitization is the process of determining where a
document begins (its first page) and ends (its last page), with the goal of accurately
describing what was a “unit” as it was received by the party or was kept in the ordinary
course of business by the document’s custodian.  A “unit” includes attachments, for
example, an email with an attached spreadsheet.  Physical unitization utilizes actual
objects such as staples, paper clips and folders to determine pages that belong together
as documents.  Logical unitization is the process of human review of each individual
page in an image collection using logical cues to determine pages that belong together
as documents.  Such cues can be consecutive page numbering, report titles, similar
headers and footers, and other logical cues.
d.
ESI (Electronically Stored Information).  Any information created, stored, or utilized
with digital technology. Examples include, but are not limited to, word-processing files,
e-mail and text messages (including attachments); voicemail; information accessed via
the Internet, including social networking sites; information stored on cell phones;
information stored on computers, computer systems, thumb drives, flash drives, CDs,
tapes, and other digital media.
e.
Extracted text.  The text of a native file extracted during ESI processing of the native file,
most commonly when native files are converted to TIFF format.  Extracted text is more
accurate than text created by the OCR processing of document images that were
created by scanning  and will therefore provide higher quality search results.
f.
Forensic image (mirror image) of a hard drive or other storage device.  A process that
preserves the entire contents of a hard drive or other storage device by creating a
bit-by-bit copy of the original data without altering the original media.  A forensic
examination or analysis of an imaged hard drive requires specialized software and
expertise to both create and read the image.  User created files, such as email and other
electronic documents, can be extracted, and a more complete analysis of the hard drive
can be performed to find deleted files and/or access information.  A forensic or mirror
image is not a physical duplicate of the original drive or device; instead it is a file or set
of files that contains all of the data bits from the source device. Thus a forensic or mirror
Strategies, Page 12
Documents you may be interested
Documents you may be interested