mvc display pdf in browser : Extract image from pdf online software control project winforms azure .net UWP format-conversion0-part2049

This guidance relates to:  
Stage 1: Plan for action 
Stage 2: Define your digital continuity requirements 
Stage 3: Assess and manage risks to digital continuity 
Stage 4: Maintain digital continuity 
This guidance has been produced by the Digital Continuity Project and is available from 
www.nationalarchives.gov.uk/dc-guidance
File Format Conversion 
Extract image from pdf online - Select, copy, paste PDF images in C#.net, ASP.NET, MVC, Ajax, WinForms, WPF
Support PDF Image Extraction from a Page, a Region on a Page, and PDF Document
pdf image extractor c#; how to extract text from pdf image file
Extract image from pdf online - VB.NET PDF Image Extract Library: Select, copy, paste PDF images in vb.net, ASP.NET, MVC, Ajax, WinForms, WPF
Support PDF Image Extraction from a Page, a Region on a Page, and PDF Document
how to extract images from pdf files; extract jpg pdf
The National Archives                                                                          File Format Conversion  Version: 1.2 
Page 2 of 29
© Crown copyright 2011 
You may re-use this document (not including logos) free of charge in any format or medium, 
under the terms of the Open Government Licence. To view this licence, visit 
http://www.nationalarchives.gov.uk/doc/open-government-licence/open-government-licence.htm
or write to the Information Policy Team, The National Archives, Kew, Richmond, Surrey, TW9 
4DU; or email: psi@nationalarchives.gsi.gov.uk
Any enquiries regarding the content of this document should be sent to 
digitalcontinuity@nationalarchives.gsi.gov.uk
VB.NET PDF Text Extract Library: extract text content from PDF
Extract highlighted text out of PDF document. control provides text extraction from PDF images and image files. Best VB.NET PDF text extraction SDK library and
extract image from pdf file; extract image from pdf
C# PDF Text Extract Library: extract text content from PDF file in
Ability to extract highlighted text out of PDF document. from scanned PDF by using XDoc.PDF for .NET Image text extraction control provides text extraction from
extract image from pdf using; pdf image text extractor
The National Archives                                                                          File Format Conversion  Version: 1.2 
Page 3 of 29
CONTENTS 
1.  Introduction ....................................................................................................................... 5 
1.1  What is the purpose of this guidance? .......................................................................... 5 
1.2  Who is this guidance for? ............................................................................................. 6 
2.  Why convert file formats? ................................................................................................ 7 
2.1  Replacing a format ....................................................................................................... 7 
2.1.1 
Software support ................................................................................................... 8 
2.1.2 
Standardising your formats .................................................................................... 9 
2.1.3 
Moving from a locked-in format ............................................................................. 9 
2.1.4 
Preserving your information ................................................................................. 11 
2.2  Creating additional versions ....................................................................................... 11 
2.2.1 
Sharing or publishing information ........................................................................ 12 
2.2.2 
Using your information in new contexts ............................................................... 13 
2.2.3 
Aggregating information from different sources ................................................... 13 
3.  When to convert file formats .......................................................................................... 14 
3.1  On-demand conversion .............................................................................................. 14 
3.2  Early and regular conversion ...................................................................................... 15 
3.3  Late conversion .......................................................................................................... 16 
4.  How to convert formats .................................................................................................. 18 
4.1  Assess your information ............................................................................................. 18 
4.2  Assess your environment ........................................................................................... 21 
4.2.1 
Potential naming conflicts .................................................................................... 21 
4.2.2 
Access control issues .......................................................................................... 21 
4.2.3 
External references to files .................................................................................. 21 
4.2.4 
File system metadata dependencies ................................................................... 22 
4.2.5 
Requirements to maintain links with the originals ................................................ 22 
4.3  Select your migration tools ......................................................................................... 23 
4.3.1 
Batch conversion ................................................................................................. 23 
4.3.2 
Conversion settings ............................................................................................. 23 
4.3.3 
Characteristic support ......................................................................................... 24 
4.3.4 
Error logging ....................................................................................................... 24 
4.3.5 
Conversion performance ..................................................................................... 24 
4.3.6 
Test your tools ..................................................................................................... 24 
VB.NET PDF insert image library: insert images into PDF in vb.net
NET framework component supports inserting image to PDF in preview without adobe PDF control installed. Access to freeware download and online VB.NET class
extract photos pdf; extract pdf images
C# HTML5 PDF Viewer SDK to view PDF document online in C#.NET
Create PDF Online. Convert PDF Online. WPF PDF Viewer. View PDF in WPF. Annotate PDF in WPF. Image: Extract Image from PDF. PDF Write. Text: Insert Text to PDF.
how to extract images from pdf in acrobat; pdf extract images
The National Archives                                                                          File Format Conversion  Version: 1.2 
Page 4 of 29
4.3.7 
Dealing with failures ............................................................................................ 24 
4.3.8 
Managing the environment .................................................................................. 24 
4.4  Migrate your files ........................................................................................................ 25 
4.4.1 
Quality assurance ............................................................................................... 25 
4.4.2 
Retention of originals ........................................................................................... 26 
5.  Further information ......................................................................................................... 27 
Appendix: Format conversion checklist ............................................................................... 29 
VB.NET PDF- View PDF Online with VB.NET HTML5 PDF Viewer
PDF Online. Annotate PDF Online. Create PDF Online. Convert PDF Online. WPF PDF Extract Text from PDF. Text: Search Text in PDF. Image: Extract Image from PDF.
extract images from pdf c#; how to extract pictures from pdf files
C# PDF insert image Library: insert images into PDF in C#.net, ASP
to zoom and crop image and achieve image resizing. Merge several images into PDF. Insert images into PDF form field. Access to freeware download and online C#.NET
extract images from pdf online; extract pictures from pdf
The National Archives                                                                          File Format Conversion  Version: 1.2 
Page 5 of 29
1.  Introduction 
Digital continuity is the ability to use your information in the way you need, for as long as 
you need.  
If you do not actively work to ensure digital continuity, your information can easily become 
unusable. You need to manage your information carefully over time and through changes to 
maintain the usability you need. 
Managing digital continuity protects the information you need to do business. This enables you 
to operate accountably, legally, effectively and efficiently. It helps you to protect your reputation, 
make informed decisions, avoid and reduce costs, and deliver better public services. If you lose 
information because you haven't managed your digital continuity properly, the consequences 
can be as serious as those of any other information loss. 
Information is kept in a variety of file formats. Over the life span of your information you may 
need to convert it into different file formats, either as an addition to its original format, or as a 
replacement. While converting file formats can protect information against digital continuity loss, 
the conversion itself brings risks and this process must be carefully planned and carried out to 
maintain the digital continuity of your information.  
1.1  What is the purpose of this guidance? 
This guidance will help you to understand the process of file format conversion, and will help 
you to understand: 
why you should convert file formats 
when to convert file formats 
how to convert file formats. 
This guidance will not go into detail on how to understand your current formats or which new 
formats to convert to. However, a related piece of guidance, Evaluating Your File Formats
1
1
See Evaluating Your File Formats 
suggests a process for assessing which formats you should work with to meet your usability 
needs. While it may seem to be obvious which file formats are in current use, there is often a 
large amount of legacy information encoded in older or non-standard formats. The National 
nationalarchives.gov.uk/documents/information-
management/evaluating-file-formats.pdf
VB.NET PDF - Convert PDF Online with VB.NET HTML5 PDF Viewer
PDF Online. Annotate PDF Online. Create PDF Online. Convert PDF Online. WPF PDF Extract Text from PDF. Text: Search Text in PDF. Image: Extract Image from PDF.
extract image from pdf using; how to extract images from pdf in acrobat
VB.NET PDF - Create PDF Online with VB.NET HTML5 PDF Viewer
PDF Online. Annotate PDF Online. Create PDF Online. Convert PDF Online. WPF PDF Extract Text from PDF. Text: Search Text in PDF. Image: Extract Image from PDF.
extract photo from pdf; extract image from pdf acrobat
The National Archives                                                                          File Format Conversion  Version: 1.2 
Page 6 of 29
Archives has created a freely available file format identification tool, 
DROID
, to help you audit 
your file formats.
2
This guidance will not tell you how to convert specific formats into other specific formats; there 
are too many formats and combinations of formats to allow this. It will give you the steps you 
should go through in performing a file format conversion process, and flag up areas of potential 
risk that you should consider. 
This guidance forms part of a suite of guidance
3
that The National Archives has delivered as 
part of a digital continuity service for government, in consultation with central government 
departments. Assessing and converting your file formats is part of Stage 3 of the four-stage 
process of managing digital continuity.
4
Format conversion may be an action you take to help maintain access and use of your 
information, mitigate risks that arise from technological or economic obsolescence,
5
or to 
facilitate the re-use and greater interoperability of your information. 
1.2  Who is this guidance for? 
This guidance is primarily aimed at information management and IT professionals charged with 
responsibility for assuring access to digital information stored in files. It will also be useful for 
anyone undertaking a file format conversion process.  
See more on the roles and responsibilities that your organisation will require to ensure the 
digital continuity of your information in Managing Digital Continuity.
6
2
Download DROID at 
http://droid.sourceforge.net/
and read How to Use DROID and How to Interpret the 
Results nationalarchives.gov.uk/documents/information-management/droid-how-to-use-it-and-interpret-
results.pdf
3
For more information and guidance, visit nationalarchives.gov.uk/digitalcontinuity
4
See Managing Digital Continuity nationalarchives.gov.uk/documents/information-
management/managing-digital-continuity.pdf
5
Technological obsolescence arises when technology to read or access information in a file format is no 
longer available. Economic obsolescence arises when the cost of maintaining (or re-acquiring) technology 
to access information in a file format is prohibitive.
6
See more on roles and responsibilities in Managing Digital Continuity 
nationalarchives.gov.uk/documents/information-management/managing-digital-continuity.pdf
The National Archives                                                                          File Format Conversion  Version: 1.2 
Page 7 of 29
2.  Why convert file formats? 
The information your organisation needs will be held in a variety of formats. Each individual 
piece of information may itself be held in several formats so that it can meet a number of usage 
requirements. 
When converting file formats you will either:  
1)  need to replace one format with another. For example, this may be due to changes to 
the software tools that are used in your organisation, a move away from legacy formats 
that are at risk of obsolescence, or changes to the standard format your organisation 
uses to publish online. 
2)  need to create an additional version in a different file format to meet your usability 
requirements. For example, a brochure was created in a desktop publishing format, but it 
must be converted into an additional format which can be published online. 
There are a number of different drivers for each type of conversion. You should review your file 
formats periodically to assess whether any of them hold risks to your information. You can also 
pro-actively convert file formats to reduce the risk of digital continuity loss. 
2.1  Replacing a format 
Maintaining the digital continuity of your information means ensuring it is complete, available 
and usable, over time and through change. It means making sure that your business has the 
information it needs, and that the technology enables the information to be used in the way 
business needs it to be. To maintain your digital continuity you may need to convert file formats, 
as file formats naturally age and can become more risky, but also because your business may 
change how it needs to use its information, or because your technology environment changes. 
If you do not pro-actively convert your formats, you may find that you are no longer able to 
access or use your information in the way that you need, or that to do so you are locked in to 
using particular pieces of software. However, when replacing formats you may be planning to 
remove support for the older file formats, and potentially deleting the original files altogether, 
which holds its own risks – so you must make sure your process and testing are 
comprehensive.  
The National Archives                                                                          File Format Conversion  Version: 1.2 
Page 8 of 29
You may want to replace a format because: 
your available software doesn’t support your use requirements, or will not in the future 
(see section 2.1.1
)  
you are standardising formats, or your standard formats are changing (section 2.1.2
you are moving away from locked-in formats (section 2.1.3
you are archiving information for long term preservation (section 2.1.4
). 
2.1.1 
Software support 
As software and formats change over time, information stored in older formats becomes at risk 
of obsolescence. Conversely, newer formats may be unreadable by older software. It is not 
necessarily a good idea to convert file formats every time you change software, as all 
conversions carry risk and cost, but it is vital to convert often enough that you do not lose your 
digital continuity. We address the question of when to convert later in this document, in  
section 3
.    
The technology used to access information in your file formats is constantly changing, either as 
the technology itself changes, or as your organisation changes the components of the technical 
environment.  
Evolving formats: many file formats gradually evolve over time. While each small 
change may not in itself cause a loss of access, over time the accumulation of changes 
can mean that current software can no longer access older information, or vice versa.  
For example, you may find that files saved in older word processing formats no longer 
render correctly in later versions of the software, or cannot be opened at all. 
Upgrading software: when software you are already using is upgraded to a newer 
version, it can default to saving information in a newer file format, which may be 
incompatible with other software which needs to access the information, or with earlier 
versions of the same software. For example, Microsoft Office 2007 defaults to using a 
completely new set of file formats (OOXML) when saving information. When released, 
these formats were entirely unsupported on the Mac platform, and also with most other 
office suites, including earlier versions of Microsoft Office. 
Removal of support: it is not uncommon for software vendors to reduce support or 
entirely remove access to older formats when upgrading their software.  
Changing software: a change of software in your organisation can also require the use 
of entirely new formats, or make information in older formats unreadable, or with some 
The National Archives                                                                          File Format Conversion  Version: 1.2 
Page 9 of 29
loss of fidelity. Even if two pieces of software have support for the same format, 
embedded features or functionality may not actually be transferrable – for example 
media embedded in a document, or macros embedded within a spreadsheet.  
Organisations should not allow the file format of their information to be dictated by the 
software’s selection of default, as the interests of the organisation are not necessarily aligned 
with the interests of the software vendor. Vendors may change a file format for a variety of 
reasons – to enable new functionality, to fix issues with earlier versions, to conform to a newer 
standard, or to create lock-in.  Any change could impact adversely on your own organisation, 
and may introduce more incompatibility, cost and risk, so should be assessed carefully. 
An alternative to conversion is to maintain older software for access to older or archived 
information, although this can be expensive, and you will run the risk of eventual obsolescence 
and complete loss of access to your information. While it is possible to keep older software 
running for some time, eventually it stops working on newer platforms. This can be somewhat 
mitigated by using virtualisation software to run older platforms in virtual machines. However, 
even where it is technically possible to keep running older software, eventually, the vendor will 
cease support, and will stop issuing security updates for it, which may pose other risks to your 
organisation. Finally, the skills in older software become harder to find and the costs of 
maintaining it rise as time goes on. Therefore, you cannot rely on running older software to 
access information in older formats indefinitely. You could combine both strategies, with older 
software available for a defined time, and a conversion policy for information older than this. 
2.1.2 
Standardising your formats 
Over time, organisations will collect information of the same type (e.g. images) in different 
formats. This may be due to changing software, a deliberate policy to use different formats, or a 
lack of control over which formats are created by users. In addition, information may be supplied 
by external bodies or the public in alternative formats. Having information in a variety of different 
formats increases the cost of managing access to that information and the risk of losing access. 
Standardising the formats which you use can help reduce costs and risk, and increase your 
flexibility to use different software in the future. The goal is to periodically converge the formats 
you use to a stable set of formats to which you can guarantee access. 
2.1.3 
Moving from a locked-in format  
Some file formats are heavily tied to the software used to create them. This can increase the 
risk of loss of access to your information, reduce your business flexibility and result in more 
The National Archives                                                                          File Format Conversion  Version: 1.2 
Page 10 of 29
expensive software procurement and licensing. You may need to convert from these formats 
because your organisation is changing the software that you are using, or it may be part of a 
wider objective to move towards more open information standards. 
To better understand locked-in formats, standardisation and interoperability, see Evaluating 
Your File Formats.
7
Locked-in formats can pose a conversion problem, in that it may be hard to convert them into 
different formats. This is not generally due to an absence of available conversion software, but 
rather because locked-in formats tend to have specific features which only the creating software 
can implement fully.  
If you are converting a locked-in format, you must evaluate whether your legacy information 
uses features which are hard to convert, and whether those features can be safely discarded or 
replaced by similar (but not identical) features. For example, some complex formats allow mini 
programming scripts (i.e. “macros”) to be embedded within them. Typically, embedded 
programming languages do not survive conversion processes well, as they rely on specific 
interfaces with the specific technology they are embedded in. 
You may discover that your existing information uses features of the locked-in format which are 
not possible to replace. In this case, you have some difficult choices to make:  
Do you accept the lock-in and not change formats?  
Do you accept the loss of certain features of your existing information?  
Do you preserve the appearance of the information in a read-only format (e.g. converting 
to an image, losing the ability to further edit, change or re-use the information easily)? 
Do you leave your existing information in the locked-in format and continue to maintain 
support for it, but move to the new format for new information?  
Do you preserve access to the legacy information by maintaining separate or different 
versions of software?   
This reduction of choice (or the necessity to make hard decisions), is of course the essential 
feature of lock-in, and in itself is a good reason to avoid it, if possible. 
7
Evaluating Your File Formats nationalarchives.gov.uk/documents/information-management/evaluating-
file-formats.pdf
Documents you may be interested
Documents you may be interested