mvc display pdf in browser : How to extract pictures from pdf files control software platform web page winforms windows web browser 2007-07-vitale-digital_image_file_formats0-part247

Digital Image File Formats –  
TIFF, JPEG, JPEG2000, RAW and DNG
July 2007 
Version 20
© 
Tim Vitale 
2007 use by permission only
1 Introduction to Digital File Formats 
2 Brief History of Imaging Technology 
 3 Digital is Superior Imaging Technology 
 Linear Response 
 Noise 
 RMS Granularity 
10 
   Film Noise 
11 
   Digital Noise 
11 
  Dynamic Range 
12 
  Table 1: Bit Depth, Dynamic Range Equivalent &f-stop Range  
13 
 Does 8-bit Capture Extend Out to 2.4 Dmax? 
13 
Color Depth 
13 
Table 2: Bit Depth with Equivalent RGB Steps 
14 
  Color Fidelity 
14  
  Image Resolution 
16 
 Table 3: Relative Resolution of Film, Digital Media, w/Lens Res. Data 17 
   Relative Resolution of Film and Digital Media (list) 
17   
   Resolution of Modern Film    
18 
  Table 4: Resolution of Modern & Historic Films – avg’s by Film & Era 18 
   Predicting Resolution of Historic Film  
19 
Table 5: Film Resolution by Era 
21 
 4 The Lens – Limits Resolution in All Imaging Systems 
21 
  System Resolving Power Equation 
22 
 Lens Issues Effecting Resolution 
22 
 Film Issues Effecting Resolution 
23 
 Evaluation a System: Camera, Lens and Film 
23 
Table 6: Selected Film and Lens Resolution Data 
25 
Table 7: Selected Film and Lens Resolution Data 
27 
  Using an Excellent Lens 
27 
Canon 
27 
   Nikkor 
28 
   Zeiss 
29 
   Leica 
29 
Theoretical Lens Resolution 
30 
  BetterLight Repro 180/5.6 (projected) 
31   
 5 Image File Formats 
31 
  TIFF vs JPEG vs JPEG2000 
31 
  Format Overview 
32 
  Saving DSLR Images in TIFF or RAW 
32 
  TIFF File Format  
33   
  TIFF Lossless Compression Option 
34 
   BigTIFF Format 
34 
  JPEG File Format 
34 
   JPEG Rate of Compression: Example 
36 
  JPEG2000 File Format 
37 
  RAW File Format 
38 
 DNG File Format 
39 
 6 Storage of Digital Image Files 
41 
  Storage Recommendation 
41 
  IT Department 
41 
  Internal and External Hard Drives 
42 
  Longevity of Hard Drives 
43 
  RAID Array Systems 
43 
  CD and DVD Optical Storage 
43 
  Hard Drives Always Live 
44   
  Additional Digital Storage Information 
45 
How to extract pictures from pdf files - Select, copy, paste PDF images in C#.net, ASP.NET, MVC, Ajax, WinForms, WPF
Support PDF Image Extraction from a Page, a Region on a Page, and PDF Document
extract photo from pdf; extract images from pdf acrobat
How to extract pictures from pdf files - VB.NET PDF Image Extract Library: Select, copy, paste PDF images in vb.net, ASP.NET, MVC, Ajax, WinForms, WPF
Support PDF Image Extraction from a Page, a Region on a Page, and PDF Document
extract photos pdf; extract pdf images
1 - Introduction 
Digital imaging is capable of recording spatial and color information well beyond the 
limits of film.  Film-based imaging has thus been superceded by newer technology.  
Digital offers imaging with no intervening technologies such as film dyes, dye couplers, 
processing or film base, all with no physical deterioration. There is a detailed discussion 
f this topic in Section 3: Digital is Superior Imaging Technology, pages 7-21.   
o
Film materials deteriorate over time due to dark (chemical) and light fading of color dyes 
and degradation of the film base, via the vinegar syndrome (cellulose acetate) or nitrate 
deterioration.  Although these processes can be slowed by cold storage and basic 
preservation methodologies, they can never be halted, and unfortunately, cold storage 
affects "access" and use of originals.  Remastering analog images into the digital 
domain preserves the image because it can be captured without loss and there is no 
physical deterioration within the digital domain.  Digitized film or prints that are color-
hifted by deterioration can be corrected using tools in Photoshop.  
s
Digital images need a file format that holds the digital image data securely and 
permanently --TIFF.  See Section 5, Image File Formats, on pages 31-41 for details.  
Storage of image information is crucial for its long-term preservation.  Although digital 
images can be stored indefinitely without deterioration, they can be lost.  A digital file 
can be permanently “lost” if it is stored without regard for basic computer technology or 
n inappropriate storage media.   
o
The recommended storage medium is the hard drive (HD), which is viable for 5-10 
years; see Section 6: Storage of Digital Image Files, pages 41-45 for details.  
Although a HD can fail, it is usually backed up on another HD, or the files are stored in 
an internally redundant RAID array (mode 3 or 5).  Optical media (CDR, DVD-R) fail 
ithout warning (3-25 yrs) and their (disk) readers won’t be available in 15-20 yrs.   
w
Image capture using automated imaging functions can easily compromise digital images 
permanently.  Although the automated functions make digital imaging easier for the 
inexperienced, they remove control from the operator and can alter the fundamental 
image data captured by the CCD/CMOS and analog-to-digital converter (ADC) before 
the file is even written.  Even with a neutral gray target in the frame, the full tonal range 
information can be compromised before the file is saved.  It is always best to store 
age information in the TIFF format (file wrapper) using its uncompressed version. 
im
Compression of an image file diminishes the potential of the numerical image data by 
throwing sections away to save space or improve download speed.  If the original image 
data is not as important as the space it occupies or the speed of download and network 
movement, compression could be used, but preferably not as a default operation.  
Image data alteration occurs even during the use of lossless-type compression, despite 
the unchanged appearance of the image on screen or in print.  Lossy compression is 
more effective at reducing file size and increasing download speed.  The new 
JPEG2000 lossy-type compression is superior to JPEG compression, but JPEG2000 
implementation remains problematic.  JPEG and JPEG2000 encode the original RGB 
image data (to the video standard YCbCr), altering the original numerical digital data 
ermanently.   
p
Digital workflow has put all imaging processes into the hands of one operator.  The film 
workflow, in contrast, utilizes at least three skilled crafts to bring a color image from the 
photo-studio, to processing and then printing.  The differences between digital and film-
ased workflows are revolutionizing how images are captured, used, stored and viewed.  
b
The following discussion will point to the development of imaging technologies, 
providing the reader with the background needed to create and preserve digital images.
VB.NET PDF Convert to Word SDK: Convert PDF to Word library in vb.
be converted to separate Word files within a short time in VB.NET class application. In addition, texts, pictures and font formatting of source PDF file are
extract photos from pdf; extract images from pdf online
VB.NET Image: VB.NET Codes to Load Images from File / Stream in .
When evaluating this VB.NET imaging library with pictures of your own powerful & profession imaging controls, PDF document, image to pdf files and components
extract image from pdf java; some pdf image extractor
<tjvitale@ix.netcom.com>
510-594-8277 
Tim Vitale © 2006 use by permission only
3
2 - Brief History of Imaging Technology 
Digital imaging is the next step is the continual improvement of imaging with light.  A 
newer light-capturing imaging media will follow, some day.  Currently, lenses are the 
limiting factor in the development of digital imaging; see Section 4: Lens – Limits 
esolution in All Imaging Systems, on pages 21-31. 
R
The use of light to "render an image" began with the Camera Obscura around 1550; it 
used a simple lens focused on a wall or a drawing board so the image could be traced.  
That basic technology was used by Niépce in 1816 to form an image on paper, which 
was unfortunately not permanent.  Later, in 1826, Niépce made the first permanent 
hotograph using photosensitive bitumen on a pewter lithography plate.   
p
While many early photographic images were one of a kind such as the Daguerreotype, 
Ferrotype or Ambrotype.  Paper (1939, waxed afterwards) and glass plates (1851) were 
the earliest negatives.  Collodion Wet Plate (cellulose nitrate in ether solvent) 
technology was invented by Frederick Scott Archer in 1851.  Wet Plates (collodion) 
were used through the 1920-30s by prepress because of their controllability and 
dimensional stability. Eventually they were replaced by Kodalith film in 1931.  The 
Gelatin Dry Plate was brought into wide-scale production by Kodak in 1878.  Dry Plates 
remained in use until 1913, through the 1920s, because of their familiarity, resolution 
nd dimensional stability. 
a
Film (around 1885) became the dominant image carrier beginning 1889-91, as amateur 
roll film, then as sheet film in 1913-15, by the professional photographer transitioning 
from glass plates.  Cellulose nitrate still film base was transitioned starting around 1925 
to cellulose acetate film base.  However, cellulose acetate began to be used in amateur 
motion picture film starting in 1908-12 and was required by law for amateur MP 
applications.  The final transition to acetate base was made between 1938 and 1948 
depending on format.  While cellulose acetate is not as volatile as nitrate motion picture 
film, it degrades faster than its nitrate precursor.  Fortunately, the acetate base does not 
destroy the gelatin emulsion, as does the strong nitric acid that evolves from degrading 
nitrate base.  Despite its 60-120 year assured deterioration rate, acetate base is still in 
common use today on 80-90% of all films.  It is said that Estar base (polyester, Mylar) 
is now being used on all Kodak Sheet film, starting in 2000-01.  Oddly, some historic 
nitrate-based film is in better condition today than some acetate-based film.  Fortunately 
the gelatin image (pellicle) can be salvaged from degrade acetate film; while nitrate 
deterioration destroys the gelatin emulsion.  Both film bases will degrade unless in cold 
torage.   
s
Color film technology began in 1915 as a two-color process.  Around 1932-33 the 3-
color process was developed.  Earlier glass based methods (colored starch grains) 
developed by the Lumiere brothers, Autochrome, France 1907 and Thomas Manley 
invents Raydex (Ozobrome) color pigments on carbon paper in 1905, showed the way 
and are still in limited use today for their high permanence.  All color film was released 
on acetate base.  Color photographic dyes will fade in 10-45 years, at a minimum.  Cold 
storage is the only preservation method.  Kodak now estimates 250 years of stability for 
there post-1990 E6 Ektachrome films; on display they have a very short lifetime, less 
han a day of projection.   
t
Film photography rose to a very high technological state before it was eclipsed by 
digital.  Film and lenses were strategic WWII material and became critical in cold war 
espionage.  Film remained the cutting edge of technology through the 1980s, but it is 
now a historical technology practiced by film aficionados or those slow to adopt newer 
technologies.  Kodak still finds that film manufacture to be very profitable, however, 
VB Imaging - VB Code 93 Generator Tutorial
VB developers to create Code 93 on popular image files, including BMP developers to create and write Code 93 linear barcode pictures on PDF documents, multi
extract images from pdf files without using copy and paste; extract pdf pages to jpg
C#: Use OCR SDK Library to Get Image and Document Text
a digital camera, scanned document or image-only PDF using C# color image recognition for scanned documents and pictures in C#. Steps to Extract Text from Image.
how to extract images from pdf files; how to extract images from pdf in acrobat
<tjvitale@ix.netcom.com>
510-594-8277 
Tim Vitale © 2006 use by permission only
4
when movie theaters transition to digital display the end of film while shortly follow for 
conomic reasons.  
e
Lenses reached a penultimate state just before WWII and topped out in the 1970s.  
Computer-aided design help to improve basic prime and zoom lens designs, but 
coatings are the current cutting edge of lens development.   Most lens designs being 
sed today were developed over 80-100 years ago.   
u
The progression of light-based imaging begins with pseudo-lenses made of stone, and 
then…  
Color Code Key 
Lens history; Pre-Photography; B&W Photography; Color photography & Digital Photography 
•  Polished stones were used to magnify and condense light circa 3000 BC, or earlier 
•  Glass was invented in Bronze Age, and then perfected by the Egyptians 3000- 2500 BC 
•  Greek and Chinese scholars describe basic principals of optics and camera, circa 300-400 BC 
•  Aristotle writes of a darkened room [Camera Obscura, Latin: dark room] with a small hole in one 
wall focusing an inverted image on the far wall 330-300 BC 
•  Reading Stone, a glass sphere use to read by magnified letters, around 1000 AD 
•  Ibn el-Haitam Arabic Physicist described the first Lenses and Camera Obscura around 1000 AD 
•  First Camera Obscura with a lens: when Girolamo Cardano (1501-1576) suggested replacing the 
hole with a biconvex lens to improve the image in 1550s 
•  Giovanni Battista della Porta (1538-1615) published what is believed to be the first account of the 
possibilities of Camera Obscura as an aid to drawing in 1558 
•  Galileo made his astrophysical studies using a early telescope in 1610 
•  Newton discovers that white light is composed of colors of light (spectrum) between 1664-66  
•  Johann Heinrich Schulze mixes chalk, nitric acid, and silver, notices darkening on side of flask 
exposed to sunlight, first photo-sensitive compound, silver nitrate, 1727 
•  Thomas Wedgwood, Sun Pictures, leather w/silver nitrate, deteriorate w/more than candle, 1800 
•  Lithography on stone & metal plate, France 1813 
•  Nicéphore Niépce combines Camera Obscura with photosensitive paper, not permanent, 1816 
•  First permanent image light-sensitive "bitumen of Judea" on Pewter, Niépce in 1826 
•  Joseph Jackson Lister reduced chromatic aberrations in lenses by introducing concept of 
several lenses, each with a portion of the full magnification, formerly required of one lens in 1830  
•  Light-sensitive silver iodide on copper, developed with Mercury vapor, Daguerreotype in 1833 
•  Chevalier Achromatic lens, 2 elements cemented, still in today’s point-and-shoot cameras 1835 
•  First paper negatives in 1839  
•  William Fox Talbot, silver chloride paper, Calotype, two exp., produce positive print, 1840-41 
•  Petzval Achromatic Portrait Lens, first “specifically designed photographic lens” in 1941 
•  Niepce de St Victor and Louis-Désiré Blanquart-Evrard experiment w/ albumen plates 1847 
•  Wet Collodion Plates created by Frederick Scott Archer (cellulose nitrate) 1851,  thru 1930’s 
•  Salted Paper Prints 1841-60, followed by wide use of albumen prints 1860 
•  Color Daguerreotypes, first Hillotype (1851) and then Heilochrome (1853), short life in 1850s 
• Louis-Désiré Blanquart-Evrard produces first albumen print (printing-out) in 1850 
•  Ambrotypes and Tintypes (Ferrotypes) positives on glass and metal respectively 1855-57 
•  Crayon Portraits by itinerate photographer, printed-out capture w/crayon design layer 1860-1900 
•  Ernst Abbe joins Zeiss (Jena), develops Abbe sine condition, improving optics significantly 1873  
•  Silver Photographic Print technology developed, both printing-out and developed-out, in 1870 
•  Dry Gelatin Plates glass plate negatives, 1878, used through 1930s by pro-photogs & pressmen 
•  William Wills discovered the Platinum Print in 1873, reached market in 1881 
•  Gelatin emulsion papers developed, gelatin and collodion (cellulose nitrate polymer) in 1885 
•  Baryta layer introduced to prints, increases reflectiveness and expands tonal range, about 1885 
•  Otto Schott joins Abbe & Zeiss, produces glass equal to Abbe’s work, Apochromatic lens, 1886 
•  Silver bromide - gelatin emulsion Printed Out Paper (light) available 1885, glossy in 1890  
•  Kodak paper roll negative, sold in camera only, in 1888 
•  Silver gelatin emulsion on cellulose nitrate film first developed in 1889 
•  Silver bromide -gelatin emulsion Developing Out Paper (chemical bath) in 1895 
•  Carl Zeiss Foundation develops “Anastigmat Lens” with no astigmatism or field curvature, later 
known as Protar camera lens in 1890-94  
C# Imaging - Scan RM4SCC Barcode in C#.NET
& decode RM4SCC barcode from scanned documents and pictures in your Decode RM4SCC from documents (PDF, Word, Excel and PPT) and extract barcode value as
extract images pdf; how to extract images from pdf
C# Imaging - C# Code 93 Generator Tutorial
to write and draw the best Code 93 barcode pictures in png, jpeg, gif, bmp, TIFF, PDF, Word, Excel Code93 barcode and save it to image files/object using
extract images from pdf c#; extract pictures pdf
<tjvitale@ix.netcom.com>
510-594-8277 
Tim Vitale © 2006 use by permission only
5
•  Dr. Rudolph, Zeiss Jena, develops Planar lens w/ 2 symmetrical groups, most copied style 1896 
•  Gabriel Lippman developed first direct color process, Photochrome in 1891 
•  Silver-gelatin prints supplant Albumen prints, 1895 
•  Dr. Schott (Zeiss) develop rare earth glass (Jena glass) in 1901 
•  Dr. Rudolph develops Tessar high resolution & contrast lens with 4 elements in 3 groups 1902 
•  Thomas Manley invents Raydex (Ozobrome) proportional color pigments on carbon paper, 1905 
•  Dufay ruled color screen process on glass in 1905, later on film 
•  Colored starch on glass developed by Lumiere brothers, Autochrome, France 1907 
•  Kodak announces Safety Film base in 1909; opens acetate factory in Australia, 1908 
•  Fredric Ives develops major dye imbibition advance, Trichromatic Plate Pack (3 neg, 1 exp) 1911 
•  Kodachrome 2-color process 1915  
•  F.J. Christenson develops first silver dye bleach process in 1918 
•  Leitz releases the Leica I, 35 mm camera w/ 5-element Elmax or Elmar (4-elmt, 3-gps) lens 1925 
•  Eastman Technicolor 2-color motion picture process 1927 
•  Finlay square dot 3-color screen on film 1929  
•  Zeiss Icon AG releases Contax I, 35 mm camera with Zeiss f1.5 lens (Dr. Bertele, 7-elmt) 1932 
•  Eastman Technicolor 3-color process 1933 
•  Carbro print process, proportion deposit of pigment layer on paper, from Ozobrome, 1930-40 
•  Technicolor movie film process, three B&W negatives were made using color filters, 1932 
•  First viable three layered color positive film color process (Kodachrome) in 1935 
•  Dufaycolor ruled screen process on film 1935  
•  Nikon releases Nikkor 50 mm lens, mounted on Hanza Canon (Canon rangefinder) in 1935 
•  Zeiss develops lens vacuum deposition coatings, reducing internal reflections and flare, 
increasing contrast and resolution in 1935, not available until 1940, only Sweden & Switzerland 
•  Agfacolor, also a tripack color reversal process, 1936 
•  Kodachrome have low dye stability from inception (1935) through 1937, improved in 1937 
•  Kodak Azochrome (1940) silver dye bleach print from Eastman Wash-Off, to Dye-Transfer 1945 
•  First multi-layer Color Negative films developed in 1941 
•  First color print from a color negative film, Kodacolor, (red tone emphasis) in 1942 
•  Kodachrome color reversal film is supplanted by Ektachrome, with blue tone emphasis in 1946 
•  Ektachrome E1, E2 & E3 had poor cyan and yellow dye stability, 1940s through 1976 
•  Nikkor lenses equal Zeiss and Leica multi-coated equivalents in the early 1950s 
•  Carl Zeiss Dresden (East) release first SLR (prototyped before WWII in Jena) in 1949 
•  Carl Zeiss (west) release their SLR, Contaflex, 1953 
•  Carl Zeiss (west) releases Contarex (Cyclops), first SLR with integrated light meter, in 1958 
•  Nikon releases the Nikon F body with metering (more compact and affordable) in 1959 
•  Lens designs with more advanced coatings reach point of penultimate performance in the 1960s 
•  First instant color process, instant dye diffusion Polaroid, Polacolor in 1963 
• Silver dye bleach process refined, positives prints from transparencies, Ilford, Cibachrome, 1963  
•  First viable digital CCD imager by Boyle & Smith at Bell Labs in 1969 
•  Excellent lens designs become cheaper, resolution reaches point of diminishing returns in 1970’s 
•  Ochi’s ground breaking 8x8 pixels CCD sensor in 1972 
•  Ray Kurzweil invents CCD-flatbed scanner for OCR (becomes Xerox Textbridge 1980) 1975   
•  Ektachrome E4 with good dye stability supercedes others in 1977 
•  Schneider begins using multi-coated (flare suppression) lenses, 1977, completes full line by 1978 
•  First viable color digital imager (video still 570x490 pixels) Sony Mavica B&W 0.79 MP in 1981 
•  Pentax demonstrates Nexa, B&W still video camera prototype in 1983 
•  Canon RC-701, 0.40 MP Pro color still video camera & analog transmitter, LA Olympics, 1984 
•  First full Megapixel Camera, Kodak Videk 1320x1335 pixels,1.4 MP 1987 
•  Canon RC-250 XAPSHOT, 0.20 MP consumer level ($499) video still color camera, 1988 
•  Chinon developed video still back for its CP9-AF 35mm SLR camera  640x480 pixel CCD, 1988   
•  JPEG & MPEG file formats developed, using DCT compression technology, 1988 
•  SONY ProMavica MVC-5000 2-chip vid-still, first transmit instant color images over phone, 1989  
•  Ektachrome E6 claims 240-year dark fading stability, 1990 
•  Adobe releases Photoshop 1.0 for Mac only, 1990   
•  Nikon QV-1000C, first DSLR, B&W video still camera, 0.38 MP, F-mount lenses, $20K, 1991 
•  Dycam 1 (gry) & Logitech FotoMan (wht), B&W, first consumer digital (1 MP CCD) camera, 1991 
•  Mike Collette invents the digital scanback on seeing Kodak’s 6K trilinear CCD array, 1991 
C# Imaging - Scan ISBN Barcode in C#.NET
which can be used to track images, pictures and documents in Load an image or a document(PDF, TIFF, Word barcodes from png image files and extract ISBN barcode
extract color image from pdf in c#; extract jpeg from pdf
Save, Print Images in Web Image Viewer| Online Tutorials
of single page printing and multi-page printing for pictures and documents; various file formats like PNG, JPEG, GIF, BMP, TIFF, PDF, MS Word Save Images & Files.
extract images from pdf file; pdf extract images
<tjvitale@ix.netcom.com>
510-594-8277 
Tim Vitale © 2006 use by permission only
6
•  Kodak introduces PhotoCD (heavy compression and YCbCr color space) in 1992 
•  Kodak DSC 100 (1024x1280, 1.3 MP CCD, $30K ) first Pro DSLR, F3 body w/ Extl’ HD, 1991 
•  Crosfield Celsis-130, 3-CCD, 3072x2320 pixels, single-shot studio photography, 1991 
•  Kodak DCS 200, 1.53 MP built-in HD, Nikon N8008 body, $30K, 1992 
•  Canon EOS Prototype DSLR, 1.3 MP, 1993  
•  Mike Collette licenses the 6000x7520 (45/135 MP) digital scanback to Dicomed in 1994 
•  KODAK DCS 420 (1524x1012 pixels) Nikon N90X body, 1
st
storage on PC cards, $11K, 1994 
•  Nikon E2/S (Fuji DS-505, DS-515) 1
st
DSLR to have 35mm full frame (no crop), 1994  
•  Epson 720 dpi Desktop Color Inkjet Printer, MJ-700V2C first “photo quality” printer, 1994 
•  Canon / Kodak EOS DCS 3, Canon EOS-1N body, 1.3 MP CCD (1012x1268) in 1995 
•  Kodak DCS 460, Nikon N90S body, 6 MP (2036 x 3060), 18MB in 12 bits, $28K, 1995 
•  Dicomed Bigshot 4000 1st one-shot lgr than 35mm frame sz (4096x4096) 17 MP $35-55K, 1996 
•  Nikon E2N/s (Fuji 505A, 515A) Nikon F4s body, 2/3-inch 1280x1000 pixel CCD $10K. 1996  
•  BetterLight (Collette) releases 6K (6000x8000) scanback quality superior to sheet film , 1997 
•  Kodak DCS 520 (Canon EOS D2000) EOS 1N body (1.3x) 2MP (1728x1152) $16K, 1998  
•  Kodak DCS-560 (Canon EOS D6000) EOS 1N body (1.3x) 6MP (2008x3040) 12-bit, $30K, 1998 
•  Foveon CCD chip with "depth-based color sensitivity" RGB digital sensor, 1998 
• Kodak uses Estar base for all sheet film beginning in 2000/01, roll film still on acetate base 
•  Canon 1Ds (2704x4064, 11 MP) first DSLR recognized w/ quality superior to 35 mm film, 2003   
•  Kodak announces discontinuation of slide projectors by 2008, in 2004 
•  Kodak discontinues all Eastman Ektachrome Color Reversal motion picture film thru-out 2004 
•  Kodak discontinues producing B&W paper, June 2005 
• BetterLight releases 8K (8000x10600) scanback in 2004 
•  BetterLight releases Super 10K (10600x13600) scanback in 2007 
VB.NET Image: Mark Photo, Image & Document with Polygon Annotation
SDK, which can be used to create the most common 7 types of annotations on various image files. What's more, if coupled with .NET PDF document imaging add-on
extract pictures from pdf; extract image from pdf online
VB.NET Image: Sharpen Images with DocImage SDK for .NET
VB.NET Coding. When you have made certain corrections in your VB.NET project photo or image files, you might want to sharpen your pictures before saving them
extract jpg from pdf; extract jpg pdf
<tjvitale@ix.netcom.com>
510-594-8277 
Tim Vitale © 2006 use by permission only
7
3 - Digital is Superior Imaging Technology  
T
he reasons digital media is superior to film: 
•  Linear response 
•  Low Noise 
•  Dynamic Range 
•  Large Color Depth 
•  Improved Color Fidelity 
•  Equivalent or Greater Resolution 
•  File Format (TIFF) that holds all the Above Data Permanently 
Linear Response  
Film’s response to light is not linear.  Note that in the Characteristic Curve’s below the 
basic curve is not straight and that the individual curves for the red, green and blue dyes 
are different.  This is non-linear behavior.  Note that the plots are log scale on the x-
axis; density (y axis) is log-based value, but plotted on a standard scale.  
Transparency Film                                  B&W Negative Film                          Color negative Film  
0.15 – 3.5 D Range                              0.35 – 2.5 D Avg. Range                         0.3 – 2.3 D Range  
A digital sensor’s response to light is linear.  The response is later modified at some 
point by applying a Gamma “tone curve,” but response remains linear.  In the plot on the 
left, below the linear responses of generic sensors are depicted.  The plot on the right 
shows the application of a Gamma 2.2 tone curve to the raw Gamma 1.0 data. 
<tjvitale@ix.netcom.com>
510-594-8277 
Tim Vitale © 2006 use by permission only
8
The Gamma 2.2 data transform is the most common tone curve applied, because the 
image looks best on computer screens and in the output from inkjet printers.  The 
“Gamma 2.2” tone curve increases the slope (increases contrast) of the data, which 
yields more RGB values in the midtones (0.3-0.9 D) and darks (1.0-4.0 D).  The tone 
curve can often be removed or modified without affecting the underling data using ICC 
Working Spaces.  
Film usually has contrast enhancement that cannot be reversed.  In the Kodachrome 
25 curve below: for a 6.67 f-stop input (2.0 D) of light, there is an output of 1.6 times the 
density, or 10.67 f-stops (3.2 D), in the film.   All transparency films show similar 
enhancement behavior, from 1.3 to 1.9 times.  Color negative films commonly don’t 
have enhancement; for a 2.8 D exposure input, FujiFilm SUPERIA 100, outputs 2.0 D 
on the film. 
Contrast enhancement was intended as a “feature” to facilitate the projection of the 
transparencies on a screen, but it has become a “bug” in a linear digital environment.  
The contrast enhancement cannot be turned off or removed.  Similar features in the 
digital realm can be applied at the will of the operator, or not used at all.  The option to 
use, or not, is at the discretion of the photographer.  In film, it is always present. 
Kodachrome 25 Transparency Film              Fuji SUPERIA 100 (CS) Color Negative Film 
Film has local edge contrast enchantment built-in to its chemistry for over 30 years.  It 
shows up as greater than 100% contrast in a MTF Curve, up to 125%, as observed in 
the Kodachrome 25 plot below, see gray box in the upper part of the plot.  Note that the 
feature is not present in the Ektachrome 100G/GX plot on the right.  This resolution 
enhancement “feature” has become a “bug” in a linear digital world. 
These features allowed the resolution of color film to be advanced in the late 1970s.  
And, these phenomena were the source of the Unsharpening Mask (USM) tool 
developed in Adobe Photoshop, and other imaging processing software.  In digital 
workflow, the use of “edge contrast enhancement” sharpening is controlled by the 
operator, to use or not; edge sharpening and contrast enhancement in film cannot be 
varied or turned off in film.   
<tjvitale@ix.netcom.com>
510-594-8277 
Tim Vitale © 2006 use by permission only
9
The second piece of information seen in the MTF Curve on the right, Ektachrome 
100G/GX has a blue response with higher sharpness than the red and green dye 
clouds.  Non-linear behavior has always been a fault of the analog film-based systems.  
Noise  
Noise in any imaging system is dependent on the speed of capture by the sensor -- 
ISO.  The higher the ISO speed the higher the amplification of the sensor.  Higher 
sensor amplification produces shorter exposure times, and thus, the higher signal-to-
noise ratio (SNR).  The SNR (noise) of film is commonly accepted to be 10:1 while the 
noise in an electronic imaging circuit is commonly accepted to be 100:1. 
Noise in film, is different from noise in a digital capture.  Pixels have a finite size and are 
uniform across the element.  Film is a continuous analog spectrum of “frequency 
domains” (particle sizes) with the basic elements only visible under high magnification, 
and never by unaided human eyes.  Perceived film grain is a “pattern generation” 
phenomenon created from the random distribution of very small silver particles (0.2- 2.0 
um) in B&W film and dye-cloud noise in color films. 
Noise in film varies from 5 to 50 RMS Granularity, based on manufacture data.  All films 
show perceived grain, or regular variations in area of uniform density.  The source of 
perceived grain in B&W and color are different, but look virtually identical.   
A specific square of color transparency film is the composite of three to nine layers of 
overlapping dye clouds.  The dye clouds are made of individual 6-25 um (micron) dye 
clouds; assuming a silver clump size of 2-7 um in the Kodak micrographs below (Kodak 
H1, 1999).  The silver clumps (dark centers) in the dye clouds are made of several silver 
particles agglomerated.  The accumulation of all the individual dye clouds overlapping 
each other, in all layers, is averaged into dye clouds of about 25 um (Peter Krauss, 
2003).   
<tjvitale@ix.netcom.com>
510-594-8277 
Tim Vitale © 2006 use by permission only
10
The image on the left in a representation of regular silver grains found in B&W films, pre-T-grain (1982).  The center is a thinly 
cut layer of cyan dye cloud around a silver grain; on the right are the dye clouds after full development including a competing dye 
coupler, which reduces dye cloud size.  In actual film, dye clouds overlap within layers and there are up to 9 layers of the 3 
colors of dye clouds that overlap.  Each color layer-group has three film speeds: (1) a fine grain “slow” layer, (2) a moderate 
grain “normal” speed layer and (3) a course grain “fast” layer. 
In color film, the unaided eye can resolve no individual grain or dye cloud.  Magnification 
of the thinnest color regions, as in the Kodak micrographs above, pp 23-25 Kodak H-1 
<
http://www.kodak.com/US/en/motion/support/h1/h1_pdfs.shtml
can reveal isolated dye clouds at the 
edges.  The accumulation of numerous dye clouds, through the depth of the emulsion, 
is “observed” as modulation in a seemingly uniform density.  This modulation is “system 
noise,” which is seen as “grain” by the observer.  These variations in noise, or grain, are 
measured by manufacturers using the RMS Granularity protocol.  Perceived grain and 
RMS Granularity are not synonymous.   
Kodachrome 25 (PKM) transparency film has 11 RMS Granularity (Kodak data sheet).  
RMS Granularity is not Perceived Film Grain.  Perceived Film Grain is a human-vision-
based phenomenon, due to the human propensity to resolve patterns in random 
distributions. 
RMS Granularity is defined as the standard deviation of the mean, of a group of 
density measurements, using a 48-micron circle, on film exposed to 1.0 D.  It is a 
measure of film noise.  This clever industry protocol allows noise measurements of all 
film types including color dye clouds and large and small silver particles.  Unfortunately, 
the measurement is only made at the one size domain: 48 um, or 21-lp/mm.   
Measuring RMS Granularity using a 48-micron sample area.   Root Mean Square is the Standard Deviation of the 
Mean of range of density measurements made on film at 1.0 D. Image from Kodak H-1 Publication 1999, p24.   
Documents you may be interested
Documents you may be interested