mvc display pdf in browser : Some pdf image extract control software platform web page winforms windows web browser 2007-07-vitale-digital_image_file_formats1-part248

<tjvitale@ix.netcom.com>
510-594-8277 
Tim Vitale © 2006 use by permission only
11
Film Noise 
From a 50 um-square sample of Tri-X film (similar in size of the RMS Granularity 
measurement), density measurements are made on 100 pixels, 5-um each.  The 
density data from each of the 100 pixels (scanned at 4800 ppi) are plotted below.     
There are 16 density steps between 0.91 D to 1.08 D, the extremes of the data set.  
Thus, there are 16 gray one-hundredth-density values from a 1.0 D patch of gray film.  
That is 16 density levels for one hundred samples, in an area (50 um
2
) that should be 
one uniform density, or only one value.  Note that RMS Granularity applies a single 
(mean) value to such an area, which is about 5 times smaller than the vision acuity of 
an average human. 
The point-to-point noise in this sample is 6.25:1 (100/16 = 6.25) well below the average 
peak-to-peak noise of 10:1 given for film.  The SNR of this patch of this 1984 well-
processed (SEM Lab at NMNH, Smithsonian) Tri-X film is fairly bad.    
The distribution of the data shows a standard bell-shaped curve, which is also indicative 
of the distribution of noise in an analog system.  The trifurcated peak at the top of the 
curve is due to the precision of the measurement.  
Digital Noise 
The picture element in a digital sensor is a pixel.  It has a finite size and is uniform 
within its 5x5 um, square.  There is no noise within a pixel, its uniform.   
Groups of pixels (an image) have a signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) based on electron, 
sensor and circuit properties.  There are several types of digital noise.  The major ones 
are depicted in the graph below: Dark Random, Dark Pattern and Shot Noise.  Other 
forms of electronic noise are minor in comparison to Dark and Shot noise. Shot noise is 
“noise” within the signal (image) current.  Dark noise is present whether there is image 
signal, or not. 
For modest capture speeds, about ISO 100-200, the SNR of a digital sensor system is 
approximately 100:1.  At high ISO 400-1000, the SNR could be as low as 6:1, similar to 
the Tri-X film above.  With very high light levels, the SNR for a CCD sensor system can 
drop to 500-1000:1, as the one below.  Cleary digital technology is capable of much 
lower noise than film.   
Some pdf image extract - Select, copy, paste PDF images in C#.net, ASP.NET, MVC, Ajax, WinForms, WPF
Support PDF Image Extraction from a Page, a Region on a Page, and PDF Document
how to extract a picture from a pdf; how to extract text from pdf image file
Some pdf image extract - VB.NET PDF Image Extract Library: Select, copy, paste PDF images in vb.net, ASP.NET, MVC, Ajax, WinForms, WPF
Support PDF Image Extraction from a Page, a Region on a Page, and PDF Document
pdf image extractor c#; extract text from pdf image
<tjvitale@ix.netcom.com>
510-594-8277 
Tim Vitale © 2006 use by permission only
12
Noise in an image can also be introduced by JPEG compression and sloppy image 
processing in both the camera software and imaging processing software.  Thus, a 
good image can have “noise” introduced by the image format and processing.  Using 8-
bit capture for dense images produces induced-noise artifacts in the darks.  The noise 
would not be present in a 14-bit or 16-bit raw capture of the same material; it is induced 
of the low bit level used in capture.  
Dynamic Range – Tonal Range 
The response of the CCD/CMOS sensor to light is dynamic range, or tonal range.   
The common units are Density, D.  Density increases in a logarithmic manner compared 
to Reflectance, which is linear, on a non-log scale.  An f-stop is familiar to many film 
and camera users.  It is equal to 0.3 D units.  One density unit (1.0 D) equals 3.1 f-
stops.  Kodachrome 25 film has about 7.6 f-stops tonal range, in response to light: 0 - 
2.3D density range.  Fuji Velvia, RVP100F, has a 12.3 f-stop response to light.   
Digital images are captured at Gamma 1.0.  This is known as “raw” from the CCD and 
AD converter combination.  If a Gamma 1.0 image is viewed, it will look flat due to the 
nature of the computer monitor.  Thus, the image file is usually converted to Gamma 2.2 
for viewing and processing based on what is seen on the monitor.  Converting to 
Gamma 2.2 shifts the slope of the response curve (from Gamma 1.0 to 2.2) such that 
the image has higher contrast and there are more RGB steps available in the darks.   
The critical point is the number of steps available in the darks.  This is important 
because it limits the ability of the specific "bit depth" to capture the actual or full tonal 
range of the negative, transparency or print.  The image can only be captured in 
Gamma 1.0 raw.  You may never see the Gamma 1.0 data because in most cases it is 
VB.NET PDF Password Library: add, remove, edit PDF file password
RasterEdge XDoc.PDF SDK provides some PDF security settings about password to help protect your PDF document in VB.NET project.
extract image from pdf in; pdf image extractor online
C# HTML5 PDF Viewer SDK to view, annotate, create and convert PDF
Here explains some usages about HTML5 PDF Viewer annotation functionalities. C#.NET: Create PDF Online in ASP.NET. C#.NET: Edit PDF Image in ASP.NET.
online pdf image extractor; extract vector image from pdf
<tjvitale@ix.netcom.com>
510-594-8277 
Tim Vitale © 2006 use by permission only
13
converted to Gamma 2.2 in the image capture software, such as scanners.  Other 
Gamma's can be specified, but today’s monitors are set for best display at Gamma 2.2. 
The bit-depth capabilities of a "digital sensors and A-D converter system" have their 
own limitations.  A sensor’s response is limited by the number of RGB values an 
image’s "electron count" can be divided into by the analog to digital converter at 
Gamma 1.0.   
Table 1: Bit Depth with Dynamic Range Equivalent with f-stop Range 
Bit-Depth    
f-stop Range                 Density Range
8 bits 
0 - 1.5 D (G 1.0) 
12 bits 
0 - 2.7 D (G 1.0) 
14 bits 
11 
0 - 3.3 D (G 1.0) 
16 bits 
13 
0 - 3.9 D (G 1.0) 
I define the limiting point of a particular “bit-depth” as the point where there are less than 
two RGB values for each “one-tenth-density” (0.1 D) increment, at Gamma 1.0.   
Does 8-bit Capture Extend Out to 2.4 Dmax? 
Some will argue that “8 bit-depth” extends out to 2.4 D, rather than 1.59 D noted above.  
The last RGB value (0) is assigned to 2.4 D; no more RGB value exists past 2.4 D.  In 
8-bit digital space the following is fact:   
•  Between 0 to 1.59 D, each “one-tenth-density increment” has multiple RGB values for each 
•  Steps 1.6 D, 1.7 D, 1.8 D and 1.9 D have only one RGB value for each one-tenth-D step 
•  Density data from 1.91- 2.09 D is lumped into RGB = 3, a 0.2 density step for 1 RGB value 
•  Density data from 2.1 - 2.39 D is lumped into RGB = 2, a 0.3 density step for 1 RGB step 
•  Density data from 2.4 - 3.7 D (Fuji Velvia) is lumped into RGB = 1, a full 1.6 D in one step 
The reality may be that one cannot see these steps in the image "information" on the 
screen or in a print, but the image data in there never the less.  The data in the file is 
much more powerful than what can be printed or seen on the monitor.   
If you go through the effort of making a good scan, why would you settle for just an 
8/24-bit image?  Can this be seen on a 2-5 year old CRT with a 35:1 contrast ratio (2.2 
Dmax)?  Probably not.  Could this be seen on a modern (late 2004 or better) 300-
500:1 contrast ratio LCD display (2.95 Dmax)?  Possibly.  Capture at 8-bits will   
misrepresent the actual numerical image data.  The numerical image data behind each 
pixel is one of the significant features that separate digital from film. 
Color Depth 
In a digital file, each pixel has a bit-depth based on the number of steps into which the 
image information is assigned.  The magnitude of color information in equivalent 
icture element is thousands of times greater in digital realm, than in film of any type.   
p
Table 2: Bit Depth with Equivalent RGB Steps 
Bit-Depth 
Steps 
Color/B&W 
8 bits 
256 
B&W 
12 bits 
4096 
B&W 
14 bits 
16384 
B&W 
16 bits 
65536 
B&W 
24 bits   
16.7xM 
8-bit color 
36 bits 
68.7xG 
12-bit color 
42 bits 
4.4xT 
14-bit color 
48 bits 
281xT 
16-bit color 
C# PDF Password Library: add, remove, edit PDF file password in C#
Able to change password on adobe PDF document in C#.NET. To help protect your PDF document in C# project, XDoc.PDF provides some PDF security settings.
pdf image text extractor; extract image from pdf
C# Create PDF Library SDK to convert PDF from other file formats
Load PDF from existing documents and image in SQL server. creating toolkit, if you need to add some text and draw some graphics on created PDF document file
extract text from image pdf file; extract images pdf acrobat
<tjvitale@ix.netcom.com>
510-594-8277 
Tim Vitale © 2006 use by permission only
14
Film has about 3, to possibly 90, color values for a given density (per 10 um
2
, square) 
depending on how one defines color in film.  In contrast, 8-bit color has an over 16.7 
million possible color for each pixel.  
Calculate 8-bit depth by multiplying 2 by itself 8 times, creating 256 steps.  Eight-bit 
color has 256 levels of color for each of the three R (red), G (green) and B (blue) pixels 
on the sensor, or 256x246x256=16.7 M.  Oddly, 8-bit color is also 24-bit color because 
there are three channels of 8-bit information.   
Color Fidelity 
In a digital image, each pixel will contain numeric values for the three RGB color 
components.  These three primary colors roughly correspond to peak sensitivities of 
the human retina, where the brain interprets them as color.  The fidelity of the 
response, compared to the actual response of the human eye, determines a system’s 
color response capabilities.   
If the peaks match identically, the color match will be perfect.  However, the CCD 
manufacturers, such as Kodak, still coat the rows or squares of pixels with red, green 
or blue dyes that do not match the response of the eye.  Correct dyes exist but they 
are not being used, yet.  Because of this mismatch, a color correction has to be 
applied.  In the BetterLight software, the correction is applied in the software, to each 
image independently, but in most other devices this is done by the manufacturer and 
coded into the file at output.   
Film and silicon have roughly the same color fidelity because they both use three 
spectral peaks.  The red peak is usually shifted towards “more red.”  Note the red 
peaks in the films (seen below) are at 640-650 nm.  In digital cameras the red is 
usually at 610-630 nm.  
In a Kodak CCD tri-liner array, such as the one depicted above (on the right) from a 
BetterLight scanning back, the center of the red peak is at 620 nm.  It can, however, be 
shifted towards “more green” by varying the thickness of the IR filtration over the view 
camera lens.   With an IR filter thickness of 3 mm, the center of the red peak is at 620 
nm, much closer to human vision (580 nm) than film at 650 nm.  Increasing the IR filter 
thickness to 5-mm shifts the peak towards “more green,” to about 605-610 nm.    
VB.NET PDF Annotate Library: Draw, edit PDF annotation, markups in
mark the source PDF file by adding some comments, notes on, which integrates advanced VB.NET PDF editing functions and VB.NET image annotating features
extract image from pdf c#; pdf image extractor
VB.NET Image: How to Process & Edit Image Using VB.NET Image
Besides, if you want to apply some popular image effects to target image file, like image sharpening, image vintage effect creating, image color adjusting and
pdf extract images; extract text from pdf image
<tjvitale@ix.netcom.com>
510-594-8277 
Tim Vitale © 2006 use by permission only
15
Only the BetterLight, ViewFinder software, has the ability to adjust the sensitivity of the 
red peak, or any of the three peaks in the preview mode before the capture is made.  
Any combination of the three peak heights can be amplified or attenuated to more-
closely match human vision.  In the plot of the Kodak CCD with a 5 mm IR filter below, 
note that the red peak is shifted further to the green, 605 nm, but that the red peak 
eight is decreased in the process.   
h
Images from this configuration will have potentially truer reds and yellows, but will need 
red peak amplification and green peak attenuation to achieve that end.  Note that the 
area under the red peak, in the both the 3 & 5 mm IR filtered versions of the Kodak 
rilinear array, is not the same as in the human eye response, on the previous page. 
t
On the right is an example of the visible light spectrum overlaid with the response peaks 
of a generic CCD sensor.  Ignoring the odd shape of the blue and green peaks, the 
shape of red peak on the right is created by red band pass filter (red line) and the IR 
filter (black line).  The IR filter passes light between 350 and 720 nm, cutting infrared 
light.  Silicon sensors are 5 times more sensitive to infrared light.  The shape of both the 
(1) red band pass and (2) IR filters define the final red response of the CCD device.  
The red band pass filter (red line) allows all light to pass above 500 nm, through about 
950 nm, the end of visible light and into the infrared. The blue band pass filter allows 
light between 350-500 nm.  The green band pass allows light between 480-590 nm. 
C# PDF: C# Code to Process PDF Document Page Using C#.NET PDF
and manage those PDF files, especially when they are processing some PDF document files C# PDF: Add Image to PDF Page Using C#.NET, C# PDF: Extract Page(s
pdf image text extractor; extract image from pdf using
C# Create PDF from images Library to convert Jpeg, png images to
It enables you to build a PDF file with one or Various image forms are supported which include Png, Jpeg, Bmp Some C# programming demos are illustrated below.
extract photos pdf; how to extract a picture from a pdf
<tjvitale@ix.netcom.com>
510-594-8277 
Tim Vitale © 2006 use by permission only
16
Image Resolution 
Film has a native digital equivalent “resolution” up to 5080 ppi for the best color films 
and up to 8636 ppi for Kodak Technical Pan B&W, film.  See the data tables on the next 
pages 16-17 and 22-24 for details.  It is true that most digital sensors don’t exceed the 
resolution of the film-data-sheet-values for the best films, but most films do not 
approach their native resolution; see the system resolution data table on page 27.   
Digital sensors have resolution up to 3600-4800 ppi, depending on equipment and size 
of image.  DSLRs have a resolution of 2000-3500 ppi.  BetterLight scanning backs have 
a resolution up to 3600 ppi for their 2.83” x 3.83” image size.  Flatbed scanners have 
resolution ranging up to 4800 - 8000 ppi.  Drum scanners have resolution from 1000 to 
8000 ppi.   
Film-camera systems will fall short of ideal when a lens is used and the film processed.  
If the lens, image plane and film are not perfectly aligned, the highest possible 
resolution will not be achieved.  No SLR lenses will meet or exceed the 170-lp/mm 
capabilities of Kodak Technical Pan B&W film (8636 ppi).  The best 35 mm format 
lenses have a 120-140 lp/mm maximum resolution, at 30% contrast difference between 
white and black lines, starting with 100% contrast.   Most 35 mm lenses can achieve 80-
100 lp/mm at best.  Few large format lenses exceed 60 lp/mm.  Do not expect 4x5 
transparencies to have resolution equal to 35 mm or medium format images, whose 
lenses have smaller “image circles” to manage. 
Using the Kodak VR 100 color negative film (5080 ppi native), through a lens of mythical 
resolution of 200 lp/mm, the resolution of the system is just two-thirds that of direct 
contact MTF curve value, 3390 ppi; see page 23 & 27.   
Using the best lenses known to me, 140 lp/mm, the VR 100, 5080 ppi, native resolution 
is degraded by 42%, to 2970 ppi, after the film is exposed and processed.  While color 
negative films (Kodak VR 100) can have higher resolution than color positives (Fuji 
Velvia RVP100F, 80 lp/mm, 4064 ppi) the negative must go through a second lens 
when printed.  Thus, the VR 100, 2970 ppi (at its best) resolution is only valid when the 
negative is scanned.  Kodak and Fuji have equations for calculating the effects of 
lenses and processing in their handbooks; see EQ2 on page 22.   
High-end digital devices, such as the best DSLRs, exceed highend film in most cases.  
Many professional photographers agreed that the Canon 1Ds (2704x4064) was superior 
to film, Popular Photography, Feb. 2003.  In 1999, the widely known Bay Area 
photographer, Stephen Johnson, showed that digital scanning backs (6000x8000) are 
superior to large format film (4x5) at the EMG/AIC meeting in St Louis in June 1999.   
Better 35 mm DSLR cameras can exceed most films.  In the two columns on the far 
right of the data table on the next page, the actual resolution data from three specific 
Canon DSLRs are listed.  In a film camera system with a 100 lp/mm lens, Fuji Velvia will 
have a resolution of 2235 ppi, a 45% loss from the native MTF curve data on pages 27.  
The canon EOS 1D Mk II (2336 ppi native resolution at 30% contrast) has an actual 
performance of 2540 ppi, at 50% contrast (a tougher standard).   
The list below compares film class averages and specific high-resolution films with 
digital cameras and scanners.  The lens resolution data at the bottom helps define 
system limitations.  Dedicated lenses in scanners can be superior to interchangeable 
lenses, because they are optimized to a specific system.  Avoid extensive cleaning of 
scanner lens systems.  Cleaning could disrupt critical alignment, and alignment is one of 
several critical lens quality issues. 
How to C#: Basic SDK Concept of XImage.Raster
VB.NET How-to, VB.NET PDF, VB.NET Word classes to convert, process, edit, and annotate image from local can load convert and save define some specified options
extract image from pdf online; extract images from pdf file
C#: How to Add HTML5 Document Viewer Control to Your Web Page
Note: some versions of Visual Studio use addCommand(new CommandAnnotation("image", new AnnoStyle _userCmdDemoPdf = new UserCommand("pdf"); _userCmdDemoPdf.addCSS
extract color image from pdf in c#; extract images pdf acrobat
<tjvitale@ix.netcom.com>
510-594-8277 
Tim Vitale © 2006 use by permission only
17
Table 3: Relative Resolution of Film and Digital Imaging Media, with Typical Lens Resolution Data 
Direct
Direct      thru 80
lp/mm
thru 80
lp/mm
lens 
in ppi 
in lp/mm         lens in ppi  ppi from USAF 
Film Type* -- Averages 
MTF @ 30   MTF @ 30%    MTF @ 30%       1951 Chart 
Color Negative Film       
3240   
64*   
2170 (43%)ß 
Color Transparency Film   
2684    
53*   
1620 (40%)ß 
B&W (all eras)   
4282   
84*   
2080 (49%)ß 
B&W 1940 data only    
2900 
57*   
1700 (41%)ß 
B&W 1970 data only     
4525 
89*   
2144 (53%)ß 
B&W Modern only 
6400 
126*   
2485 (61%)ß 
Specific Modern Films  
Ektachrome 100 
2285        45**   
1465 (36%)ß 
Kodachrome 25  
2700   
53**   
1620 (40%)ß 
Ektachrome 100GX   
3050   
60**   
1740 (42%)ß 
Fuji Velvia 50   
3454   
68**   
1870 (46%)ß 
Fuji Velvia 100F RVP   
4064 
80**   
2032 (50%)ß 
Kodak VR 100 (color neg) 
5080 
100**   
2260 (56%)ß 
Kodak T-Max 100 
7112 
140**   
2585 (64%)ß 
Fuji Neopan 100***   
8130 
160***   
2710 (67%)ß 
Koda
k Technical Pan   
8636 
170**   
2605 (65%)ß 
DSLR (digital single lens reflex 35 mm) 
Canon EOS 1Ds MkII   
3328 
66+  
Canon EOS 1Ds  
2704 
53+ 
2032§ 
2800Φ 
Canon EOS 1D Mk II   
2336 
46+ 
2540§ 
2800Φ 
Nikon D2x 
2848 
56+ 
Kodak DCS 
3205 
63+ 
Canon EOS 20D 
2344 
46+ 
2185§Ψ 
3150ΦΨ 
N
ikon D70 
2000 
39+ 
Scanning Backs (4x5 view camera body) 
BetterLight 4000E-HS (3750x5000)  1323 
26 
BetterLight 6000E-HS (6000x8000)  2120 
42 
BetterLight 8K-HS (12000x16000)  2822 
56 
etterLight 10K-HS (15000x20000)  3598 
71 
B
Flatbed Scanners 
Epson 10000XL, tabloid 
2400 
47 
Aztek Plateau, tabloid  
4000 
79 
Creo iQsmart2, tabloid 
4300 
87 
Epson 4990, 8x10 
4800 
94 
Creo iQsmart3, tabloid 
5500 
108 
FlexTight 646, sheet film 
6300 
124 
lexTight 949, sheet film 
8000 
157 
F
Drum Scanners 
Howtek 4500   
4500 
89 
Fuji 
k Premier   
8000 
157 
Celsis 6250  
8000 
157 
Azte
CG 380  
12000 
236 
I
Resolution Limitations imposed by Lens -- 30% contrast of black and white line pairs 
Old Large Format Lens 
1016 
20 
Average Large Format (LF) Lens  2032 
40 
Good LF or Average SLR Lens 
3036 
60 
Excellent LF or Very Good SLR  
4048 
80 
Excellent SLR Lens   
5060 
100 
Superior SLR Lens   
6096 
120 
Theoretically Perfect Lens at f-16  3300 
65Ω 
Theoretically Perfect Lens at f-11  4318 
85Θ  
Theoretically Perfect Lens at f-8 
6096 
120ω 
Theoretically Perfect Lens at f-5.6  9144 
180Σ 
Theoretically Perfect Lens at f-4.0  17800 
350Π 
*  Pulled from data table on pp 16-17. 
** Pulled from film manufactures data sheet found on the web or in official publications. 
*** Resolution is based on the vastly inferior “1000:1” resolution target, it is probably inflated by 25-40%, over 30% MTF. 
ß Resolution figure is based on the System Resolving Power EQ2, seen on page 20 (data table p23); percent loss in parentheses. 
+ No contrast information on digital pixels, such as the “30% of full scale” for film, pulled from MTF curves. 
§ Actual resolution delivered http://www.wlcastleman.com/equip/reviews/film_ccd/index.htm
using Koren process at 50% Contrast. 
Φ Measured using the 1951 USAF Resolution Test Pattern from Edmund Scientific found on the <wlcastleman> website above. 
Ψ The 1000 ppi difference is actual data pulled from the <wlcastleman> website. 
Ω Theoretical resolution limit of a perfect lens at f-16 aperture, at 1% contrast a maximum of 100 lp/mm. 
Θ
Theoretical resolution limit of a perfect lens at f-11 aperture, at 1% contrast a maximum of 150 lp/mm. 
ω Theoretical resolution limit of a perfect lens at f-8 aperture, at 1% contrast a maximum of 200 lp/mm. 
Σ Theoretical resolution limit of a perfect lens at f-5.6 aperture, at 1% contrast a maximum of 280 lp/mm. 
Π Theoretical resolution limit of a perfect lens at f-4.0 aperture, at 1% contrast a maximum of 400 lp/mm. 
<tjvitale@ix.netcom.com>
510-594-8277 
Tim Vitale © 2006 use by permission only
18
Resolution of Modern Film: Film Data (1940-2004) 
This section on modern-era film resolution provides information on the resolution of 
specific films, and then film averages within specific class, such as  
•  B&W 
•  Color transparency 
• 
Color negative
f
rom historic eras, such as  
•  1940 (historic) 
•  1940-1970 (old)  
•  1970-2004 (modern)  
The resolution data listed below is based on direct contact printing of the film resolution 
target onto the film.  Exposing film through a lens will decrease a film’s resolution from 
40% to 50%, up to 80%.  See the column on the near right for resolution through a good 
lens with good processing, and on the far right, for exposure through a typical large 
rmat lens. 
fo
•  40% - all film, good lens and good processing 
•  60% - large format films with equivalent lens and good processing 
All film through 1970 should have their resolution reduced a minimum of 40% for 
exposure through a (modern) lens.  Film exposed through older lenses or large format 
lenses should have the resolution reduced by 40%.  Large format film from 1890-1940 
should have their resolution lower by 60% to account for poor lens quality, film handling 
issues and questionable processing.  Resolution reduction for 1890-1920 film/plates 
with all possible faults combined could be reduced as much as 80%.  
T
able 4: Resolution of Selected Modern and Historic Films -- with averages by Film Class and Era 
Optical  
Digital 
40% loss 
60% loss 
Film Resolution  Equivalent     from system  from system  
lp/mm, MTF@30%   ppi                 thru lens 
thru lens 
Color Negative Film 
Kodak Vericolor 5072 (neg-pos)   
60            
3050  
Kodak VR 1000 (neg film) 
45 
2290 
Kodak VR 400 (neg film) 
50 
2540 
Kodak VR 100 (neg film) 
100   
5080 
verage             
64          
3240 
1944   
1300 
A
Color Transparency Film 
Kodachrome 25 (discontinued 2003) 
53            
2692  
Kodachrome 64                
50            
2540  
Kodachrome 200 
50   
2540 
Ektachrome EDUPE              
60            
3050 
Ektachrome 5071 (dup)                          50            
2540 
Ektachrome 50                
40            
2030  
Ektachrome 64                
40            
2030  
Ektachrome 100               
45            
2290  
Ektachrome 100GX                                 60            
3050  
Ektachrome 100plus EPP    
45            
2290  
Ektachrome 160               
35            
1780  
Fuji Velvia 50 RVP (2002)                      68            
3454  
Fuji Velvia 100 RVP100F (2004)              80            
4064  
Fuji Provia 100F RPD          
55            
2800  
Fuji Astra 100 RAP           
45            
2290  
Fuji Astra 100F RAP100F                        65            
3300  
Fujichrome EI 100            
45            
2290  
Average (excluding Velvia 100F)  
48          
2440  
1464   
975 
Average                                        
53          
2692  
2013   
1610 
B&W Film                              lp/mm, MTF 30% 
ppi 
<tjvitale@ix.netcom.com>
510-594-8277 
Tim Vitale © 2006 use by permission only
19
Kodak T-Max 100 (2005) 
140   
7112 
Kodak T-Max 100 (1987) 
110   
5600 
Kodak T-Max 400 (2005) 
138   
7010 
Kodak T-Max 400 (1987) 
60   
3048 
Kodak T-Max 3200 (2005) 
134   
6807 
Kodak Technical Pan Technidol (D’04) 200   
10160 
Kodak Technical Pan (Avg: 2004)  
170   
8636 
Kodak Technical Pan HC100 (Dis’04)  135   
6860 
Kodak Technical Pan (1984) 
85   
4320 
Kodak BW400CN, RGB dye B&W (‘06)  80   
4064 
Kodak Plus-X 125 (1976) 
100   
5080 
Kodak Plus-X 125, 2147/4147 (2004)    80   
4064 
Kodak Plus-X 125 5062 (2004)       110   
5600 
Kodak Panatomic-X (1976) 
140   
7112 
Kodak Royal-X (1976)   
65   
3150 
Kodak Tri-X 400 (1976)  
50   
2540 
Kodak Tri-X 400 (2005)  
65   
3300 
Agfa Pan 25 (old ≈ 1935-45) 
80   
4064 
Agfa APX 25 (old ≈ 1935-45) 
 160                  8128   
Kodak Verichrome (1940)* 
40‡  
2030 
Kodak Panatomic-X (1940)* 
55‡  
2795 
Kodak Super-XX (1940) * 
45‡  
2286 
Eastman Panatomic-X (1940)**   
55‡  
2795 
Eastman Super-XX (1940)** 
45‡  
2285 
Eastman Portrait Pan (1940)** 
40   
2030   
Eastman Tri-X (1940)**  
40‡   
2030 
Kodak Plus-X Pan (1940)* 
50‡  
2540 
Kodak Micro-Fine (1940 microfilm)*  135‡  
6860 
4116 
2744 
Kodak Safety Positive (1940)**   
50‡  
2540 
Kodak High Contrast Positive (1940)**  70‡  
3555 
2134 
1422 
B&W Average 1940, excl Micro-Fine  49          
2590 
1555 
1035 
B&W Average all 1940  
57          
2900 
1740 
1160 
B&W Average all “old”   
70          
3530 
2120 
1412 
B&W Average all 1970s film 
89          
4525 
2715 
1810 
B&W Average (all) 
85        
4435  
2580 
1775 
B
&W Average modern (only)   
126        
6400  
3840 
2460 
*
Nitrate base film  
**
Safety Film, acetate base film;  
‡ Film resolution protocol based on Kodak’s 1940-56 resolution procedure: “30:1 contrast” target, between the black 
and white line pairs; printed as l/mm, but is actually lp/mm.  
ß Based on Kodak’s “1000:1 contrast” resolution target, inferior to MTF data by 25-40%.   
Data From: “Kodak Films,” Eastman Kodak 1939; “Kodak Films” Kodak Data Books, Eastman Kodak 4th ed 1947; 
"Kodak Films & Papers for Professionals" (1978 &1986); Kodak Professional Products website at URL: 
<http://www.kodak.com/global/en/professional/products/colorReversalIndex.jhtml?id=0.3.10.8&lc=en
> and the Fuji 
Professional Products website, for film data sheets, URL: <http://home.fujifilm.com/products/datasheet/>
.   
Predicting Resolution of Historic Film – Based on Rate of Technological Change 
In the list above, a B&W film from the 1940s has an average resolution of about 2900 
ppi, digital equivalent.  B&W film from 2005 has an average resolution of 6400 ppi, 
digital equivalent.   
B&W film increased in its average resolution 2.2 times, between 1940 and 2005, a 
period of 65 years.  The rate for resolution doubled every 29 years.  Using "Moore's 
Law" of digital technology development as a model, and modifying it for film technology 
(based on the "29-year doubling"), it would seem reasonable to assume that film from 
1915 would have a resolution decrease of about one-29-year period, to 2130 ppi, from 
the average 1945 film.  The average film from 1900 would have about half-the-
decrease, produced by one 29-year cycle, starting from film in 1915 to 1915.  Thus, the 
average film from 1900 would have native resolution of about 1780-ppi digital 
equivalent.   
<tjvitale@ix.netcom.com>
510-594-8277 
Tim Vitale © 2006 use by permission only
20
Using known resolution averages from 2005, 1975 and 1940, the average resolution of 
film in 1900 has been predicted in the chart below.  The plot uses averages for B&W 
film of specific ages in the 
“Resolution of Selected Modern and Historic Films
” table 
above. 
Unfortunately there is little MTF data for film earlier than about 1970s.  Therefore 
resolution data for film between 1970/80 and 1940 is projected from 1000:1 high-
contrast resolution targets.  Prior to 1940 (even 1960-80 photo literature), only words 
were used to describe resolution, making evaluation almost pointless.  In addition, film 
grain was confused with film resolution in popular photographic literature through, even, 
the 1990s.  Film grain that is seen by humans is now known to be a “perceived 
roperty,” because silver particles (0.2 - 2.0 um) can't be seen by humans.   
p
The actual resolution on the film or glass plate must be diminished from “target” data by 
•  quality of lens used for the exposure 
•  goodness of focus 
•  trueness of lens and film axis 
•  processing variables and faults of the era 
T
he "Direct Resolution" data (second column in data table just above) is based on direct 
contact printing of the resolution target onto the film.  Exposing film through a lens 
(normal photography) will decrease a film's resolution from 25% to 40%, up to 80%.  
ee the five columns on the right of the data table above for resolution of  
S
•  25% - modern 35-mm & 2¼” film through an excellent lens with good processing  
•  40% - modern large format film exposed through a typical large format lens 
•  50% - all film through an average (40 lp/mm) or poor lens (20 lp/mm or less) 
•  60% - large format film (including early roll film) from 1890-1930 
•  80% - large format with all faults 1890-1920 
Documents you may be interested
Documents you may be interested