mvc display pdf in browser : How to extract images from pdf SDK Library service wpf .net azure dnn 2007-07-vitale-digital_image_file_formats2-part249

<tjvitale@ix.netcom.com>
510-594-8277 
Tim Vitale © 2006 use by permission only
21
Table 5: Film Resolution by Era 
25% loss       40% loss       50% loss      60% loss       80% loss 
Date     Direct Resolution   due to lens   due to lens   due to lens   due to lens   due to lens 
1900 
1780 
1335 
1070 
890 
712 
450 
1915 
2130 
1600 
1280  
1070 
850 
530 
1940 
2900 
2175 
1740 
1450 
1160 
725 
1945 
3100 
2325 
1860 
1550 
1240 
775 
1975 
4525 
3400 
2715 
2260 
1810 
1130 
1990 
5400 
4050 
3222 
2700 
2160 
1350 
2005 
6400 
4800 
3840 
3200 
2560  
1600 
For modern film exposed through an excellent lens with good processing, reduce direct 
resolution by a minimum of 25%.  Film exposed through older lenses or large format 
lenses should have their resolution reduced by 50%.  Large format film from 1890-1925 
should have its projected direct resolution lowered by 60-80%, to account for early lens 
quality, film handling issues and questionable processing.  For very early film (1890-
1930), with all possible lens, alignment, focus and processing faults combined, the 
reduction could be as high as 70% to 80%.  
4 - Lens: Limits the Resolution of All Imaging Systems 
The final factor for determining film resolution is the lens <
http://medfmt.8k.com/mf/lenslpm.html
>.  
Good view camera (LF) lenses have a resolution that range between 40-60 lp/mm, with 
the average around 30-40 lp/mm.  The best will have no more than 80 lp/mm in the 
center, with about 25-50% fall-off at the edges of the lens image circle.  No film can 
actually reach its theoretical maximum resolution when exposed through a large format 
lens.  A minimum of 40% loss of resolution is assumed for large format (LF) systems.    
MTF (modulation transfer function) is critical to evaluating lenses.  It is well explained in 
<
http://www.photozone.de/3Technology/mtf.htm
>.  There is much information on MTF on the web 
Google <MTF lens> and there will be a wealth of information.  Lens evaluation using the 
USAF targets are less valuable, but have value for ranking individual lenses within a 
group of lenses <
http://www.hevanet.com/cperez/testing.html
>.   The table “Relative Resolution of Film 
and Digital Imaging Media,” page 15, has typical resolution data (at 30% Contrast) for 
elected films and lenses; it is useful in evaluating modern and historic films and lenses.  
s
Fuji Velvia (RVP) film probably has a resolution of only 2235 ppi (45% loss due to lens), 
rather than the 4064-ppi native resolution of the film due the many factors that influence 
resolution; see pages 23 & 27.   The factors to consider are: (1) lens quality, out to the 
edge, (2) film-plane to artifact-plane trueness, (3) sharpness of the focus (adjustment) 
and (4) the quality of chemical development.   
If that film was contact printed to the same type of film, some resolution would be lost, 
but not the full 20% predicted because no lens was involved.  If the RVP transparency 
image was then placed in an enlarger and printed onto an Ilfochrome direct positive 
print material, at the same size, the resolution would be about 34 lp/mm (at best) 
depending on the enlarging lens resolution (140 lp/mm).  This calculation use two 
lenses causing approximately 45% (taking) and 25% (enlarging) loss, see EQ1 on p 20. 
Black and White films have higher resolution than color film because they use very fine 
silver particles.  Older B&W films must, by their very era of their manufacture, have less 
resolution than modern B&W film because the technology used to achieve their film 
chemistry was less sophisticated than that used today.  Older nitrate film and glass 
How to extract images from pdf - Select, copy, paste PDF images in C#.net, ASP.NET, MVC, Ajax, WinForms, WPF
Support PDF Image Extraction from a Page, a Region on a Page, and PDF Document
how to extract images from pdf in acrobat; how to extract images from pdf
How to extract images from pdf - VB.NET PDF Image Extract Library: Select, copy, paste PDF images in vb.net, ASP.NET, MVC, Ajax, WinForms, WPF
Support PDF Image Extraction from a Page, a Region on a Page, and PDF Document
extract image from pdf c#; how to extract images from pdf file
<tjvitale@ix.netcom.com>
510-594-8277 
Tim Vitale © 2006 use by permission only
22
plate negatives have the theoretical resolution of the large format lenses use to expose 
the film (not much better than 20-30 lp/mm), on the order of 1000-1400 ppi.   
Modern high-resolution lenses are computer designed; the best large-format-film lenses 
have a resolution in the range of 40-80 lp/mm.  A 200 lp/mm lens is theoretical and 
seldom found, outside of the spy industry.  Older B&W films might have been capable of 
resolving 2400-3600 dots per inch over the 4 x 5 sheet or 8 x 10 glass plate, but the 
lens limited their resolution to between 1450-2150 dpi.   
Assuming Fuji Velvia RVP (80 lp/mm, 4064 ppi) and exposing the film through a very 
high resolution 200 lp/mm lens (mythical: most lenses actually have a 40-120 lp/mm) 
the final system resolution will be about 57 lp/mm, a loss of 27% resolution, to 2900 ppi.  
The exact degree of film resolution loss, from the maximum possible for a particular film, 
is dependent on conditions for each exposure.   
System Resolving Power Equation 
There are many factors rolled onto system resolution equations.  A "system" is the 
whole photography unit, (a) camera [lens to film plane alignment], (b) lens, (c) film and 
d) processing.   
(
In the following equations, one term (1/r) is for the film and other(s) are for the lens(es).  
Adding an enlarging lens, will add a third and possibly a forth term to the equation 
EQ1); lowering the overall image resolution profoundly. 
(
EQ1: 1/R = 1/r 
[film]
+ 1/r 
[camera lens] 
+ 1/r 
[enlarging lens] 
+ 1/r 
[printing paper]
The FujiFilm Resolving Power equation found in the Fuji Data Guide (p102, 1998) is 
EQ2: 
EQ2: 1/R 
[system]
= 1/r 
[film]
+ 1/r 
[lens] 
Where: (1) R = overall resolving power, and (2) r = resolving power of each component 
Kodak uses the following equation, EQ3, in its datasheets and handbooks.  It is more 
complicated, and yields almost the same results.  It is NOT used below. 
EQ3: 1/R
[system]
= 1/r
[film]
+ 1/r
[lens]
Lens Issues Effecting Resolution 
There are at least 7 different types of lens aberrations: 
•  Chromatic aberration 
•  Spherical aberration 
•  Coma (uneven magnification) 
•  Astigmatism (non-flat focus) 
•  Flare (external light scattering) 
•  Dispersion (internal light scattering) 
•  Misaligned lens elements 
The center of the lens is generally the sharpest.  Resolution declines towards the edge 
of the image circle.  Good modern lenses are not capable of more than 80-140 line-
pairs per millimeter (lp/mm) at the center of the lens, and much less, towards the edges.   
Wide apertures compromise image quality dramatically because the light goes through 
most of the glass in the lens.  Low f-stops (f3.5 to f5.6) in large format lenses are only 
capable of 10-20 lp/mm at the edges wide open and chromatic aberrations can be 
extreme - producing a rainbow of colors on large high-contrast features (black line on 
white) near the edges, where the various colors in light focus in different locations.  
VB.NET PDF Text Extract Library: extract text content from PDF
Extract highlighted text out of PDF document. Image text extraction control provides text extraction from PDF images and image files.
pdf image extractor online; online pdf image extractor
C# PDF Text Extract Library: extract text content from PDF file in
Ability to extract highlighted text out of PDF document. Image text extraction control provides text extraction from PDF images and image files.
some pdf image extractor; extract pdf pages to jpg
<tjvitale@ix.netcom.com>
510-594-8277 
Tim Vitale © 2006 use by permission only
23
Film Issues Effecting Resolution 
The problems with film have been described in detail, in online publications.  Achieving 
crisp focus is the principal problem.  However, keeping the film flat in any camera, 
perpendicular to the lens axis in LF cameras, along with, the many hands mixing 
process chemicals introduce significant problems.  The issues forming an image on film 
include:  
•  Goodness of focus 
•  Trueness of lens axis to film axis 
•  Warp of the film in the film holder or film path 
•  Aperture size (f-stop) 
•  Shutter Speed 
•  Vibration in all phases 
•  Dirt and haze on lens (light scatter) 
•  Film developing variables (exhaustion, impure water or impure chemicals) 
•  Heat and humidity in storage, before and after exposure and processing 
•  Time since exposure, and, possible x-rays exposure during airport screening  
The exposure parameters of shutter speed and f-stop effect sharpness markedly.  The 
f-stops above and below the optimal lens iris opening, of f-8, degrade the image 
noticeably.  Slow shutter speeds allow for hand-induced shake during exposure 
decreasing image sharpness.  Fast shutter speeds require longer processing times 
which enlarges film silver particle size, decreasing film resolution.  In addition, a short 
exposure self-selects the more sensitive silver particle, which happens to be the larger 
silver particles.  Mirror travel, followed by an abrupt stop on bumpers, in an SLR, can 
have an affect on camera movement (even while on a tripod) when using faster shutter 
peeds where the early "shake" is a relatively large portion of the exposure duration. 
s
Evaluating a System: Camera, Lens and Film 
Using the photographic system 
Resolving Power Equation
EQ2 (above) from 
FujiFilm 
Professional Data Guide
AF3-141E (2002) p 129; and the film resolution data in Table 6 
elow, the results are reported in Table 5, on the following page. 
b
Table 6: Selected Film and Lens Resolution Data 
Film Resolution in ppi  
Film                            Resolution      1/r 
[film]
No Lens in Path at 30% Contrast 
Kodak Ektachrome 160 
35 lp/mm 
0.0286 
1778 
Fuji Astia RAP 
45 lp/mm 
0.022 
2286 
Fuji Provia 100F RDP 
55 lp/mm 
0.0182 
2794 
Kodak Ektachrome 100GX   
60 lp/mm   
0.0167 
3050 
Kodak Tri-X 400 (2004) 
65 lp/mm   
0.0154 
3302 
Fuji Velvia RVP 
80 lp/mm 
0.0125 
4064 
Kodak Portra 160NC Color Neg  80 lp/mm 
0.0125 
4064 
Kodak Plus-X 125 (2006) 
80 lp/mm 
0.0125 
4064 
Kodak VR100 Color Neg 
100 lp/mm 
0.0100 
5080 
Kodak Technical Pan (2004)   142 lp/mm 
0.007 
7214   
Kodak Pan
atomic-X  
170 lp/mm 
0.0059 
8636 
Lens                             Resolution       1/r 
s]
Lens Cost  
[len
Old lens (1840-1930) & LF lens  20 lp/mm 
0.05 
$50-1500 
Average lens      
40 lp/mm 
0.025 
$150-500 
Very Good LF lens 
60 lp/mm 
0.0167 
$300-800* 
Excellent LF lens 
80 lp/mm 
0.0125 
$1000-3000** 
Superior 35 mm format lens   100 lp/mm 
0.01 
$350-5000*** 
Outstanding 35 mm lens 
120 lp/mm 
0.0083 
$350-1000§ 
Exceptional 35mm lens 
140 lp/mm 
0.0071 
$350-1000Δ 
Best Possible 35mm lens 
200 lp/mm 
0.005            
you won’t find one
Vapor-ware lens 
600 lp/mm 
0.00167 
you’ll hear about it, but can’t find one  
 
chneider 150 APO Symmar f5.6 at f8. 
Many 35 mm, medium format and large format lenses at f8; or better lenses at f11 or f16. 
**  
S
***  
Many second tier lenses at f8. 
§   Nikkor & Canon 50mm & 85mm lenses at f8, on a tripod, superior processing, film only, no prints. 
Δ   Leica or Zeiss 35 mm or medium format lenses. 
VB.NET PDF Page Extract Library: copy, paste, cut PDF pages in vb.
VB.NET: Extract All Images from PDF Document. This is an example that you can use it to extract all images from PDF document. ' Get page 3 from the document.
how to extract pictures from pdf files; extract images from pdf files
C# Create PDF from images Library to convert Jpeg, png images to
C#.NET Project DLLs for Conversion from Images to PDF in C#.NET Program. C# Example: Convert More than Two Type Images to PDF in C#.NET Application.
extract images from pdf; extract image from pdf in
<tjvitale@ix.netcom.com>
510-594-8277 
Tim Vitale © 2006 use by permission only
24
In the film and lens systems described below, the image is dramatically degraded by all 
the parameters described above (pp 13-14).  Loss of image quality ranges from 23-90% 
of native MTF resolution.  Fixed cameras, such as 35 mm rangefinders and SLR bodies, 
and, medium format (MF), 2¼ x 2¼, or 6 x 6 cm and 2¼ x 2¾, or 6 x 7 cm, have fairly 
lat film planes and rigidly fixed lens-to-film axis.   
f
Large format (LF) cameras use film holders that do not have flat film planes.  Large film 
(8 x 10) can sag and the center of all sizes can have a slight warp.  The lens-to-film axis 
in a view camera is never fixed and needs to be aligned at each setup; a Zigalign tool is 
common tool.  In digital cameras the media is never warped or out of plane, unless 
anufactured poorly. 
m
Figure 17 shows the effect of lens quality on specific films found in the Table 6.  
Selected modern films are processed through EQ2 using hypothetical lenses of various 
resolving capabilities:  
•  average (40 lp/mm)  
•  good (60 lp/mm) 
•  very good (80 lp/mm) 
•  excellent (100 lp/mm) 
•  superior (120 lp/mm) 
Figure 17 The graph shows the effects of lens quality on films with increasing native resolution (more 
acute curve).  The data points on the curve are the System Resolution calculation for the 
combination of film and lens; see Table 5 for details. 
Table 5 (page 27) shows the incremental effects of (a) lens issues and (b) film issues on 
the final resolution of a system (camera) using the Fuji Resolving Power Equation [EQ 
].    
2
C# PDF Page Extract Library: copy, paste, cut PDF pages in C#.net
Page: Extract, Copy and Paste PDF Pages. Easy to Use C# Code to Extract PDF Pages, Copy Pages from One PDF File and Paste into Others in C#.NET Program.
how to extract images from pdf files; extract images from pdf acrobat
C# PDF insert image Library: insert images into PDF in C#.net, ASP
Powerful .NET PDF image edit control, enable users to insert vector images to PDF file. Merge several images into PDF. Insert images into PDF form field.
extract jpg from pdf; extract photos from pdf
<tjvitale@ix.netcom.com>
510-594-8277 
Tim Vitale © 2006 use by permission only
25
The modern films listed in Table 4 are processed through EQ2 using lens of increasing 
quality: (1) 40 lp/mm, (2) 60 lp/mm, (3) 80 lp/mm, (4) 100 lp/mm, (5) 120 lp/mm, (6) 140 
/mm), (7) 200 lp/mm and sometimes the mythical (8) 600 lp/mm lens.   
lp
The best 35 mm camera lenses will have a resolution of 60-120 lp/mm.  In most cases 
the lens quality will not be better than 80 lp/mm, and will likely be only about 60 lp/mm; 
especially if a zoom lens is being used.  This is based on MFT lens evaluations posted 
on the PhotoDo website <
http://www.photodo.com/products.html
>, such as the 35 mm, 50 mm 
and 85mm prime lenses made by Canon and Nikon.  Zoom lenses have lower 
resolution, about 60-85% of prime lenses, because of there complexity and numerous 
compromises made to achieve a fast performance over the range of the zoom. 
Large format lens are not inferior in quality, but their overall resolution is lower.  This is 
because more glass is being used to cover the larger film area.  The image circle of a 
35 mm lens is about 43 mm, while a 4 x 5 view camera has an image area of 160 mm; 
almost 4 times larger.  The best LF lenses will range from 40-80 lp/mm with the average 
about 40-60 lp/mm.  Only the rare lens will reach 80 lp/mm; none will reach 100 lp/mm.  
View cameras have the very real problems of achieving focus and aligning the lens axis 
to the film plane. 
Table 7: System Resolving Power Data 
C# PDF Convert to Images SDK: Convert PDF to png, gif images in C#
Professional .NET library and Visual C# source code for creating high resolution images from PDF in C#.NET class. Cut and paste any areas in PDF pages to images.
extract pictures pdf; extract jpeg from pdf
VB.NET Create PDF from images Library to convert Jpeg, png images
VB.NET Guide for Converting Raster Images to PDF File Using VB.NET Sample Code. VB.NET Example of More than Two Images to PDF Conversion. This VB.
extract image from pdf acrobat; extract image from pdf file
<tjvitale@ix.netcom.com>
510-594-8277 
Tim Vitale © 2006 use by permission only
26
Kodak Ektachrome 160 has 1778 ppi (35-lp/mm) native resolution
EKT 160   
0.0286 + 0.05       = 0.0786    = 13 lp/mm   =   646 ppi  64% loss thru 20 lp/mm lens 
thru 20 lp/mm lens 
thru 20 lp/mm lens
solution 
thru 20 lp/mm lens 
thru 600 lp/mm lens 
lution 
thru 20 lp/mm lens  
EKT 160   
0.0286 + 0.025      = 0.0536    = 19 lp/mm   =   948 ppi  47% loss  thru 40 lp/mm lens 
EKT 160   
0.0286 + 0.0167    = 0.0453    = 22 lp/mm   = 1121 ppi  37% loss  thru 60 lp/mm lens 
EKT 160   
0.0286 + 0.0125    = 0.041    = 24 lp/mm   = 1236 ppi  30% loss  thru 80 lp/mm lens 
EKT 160   
0.0286 + 0.010      = 0.0386    = 26 lp/mm   = 1316 ppi  26% loss  thru 100 lp/mm lens 
EKT 160   
0.0286 + 0.0083    = 0.0369    = 27 lp/mm   = 1377 ppi  23%
Fuji Astia RAP has 2286 ppi (45 lp/mm)native resolution 
Fuji RAP   
0.022   + 0.025      = 0.045     = 22 lp/mm   = 1121 ppi  51% loss  thru 40 lp/mm lens 
Fuji RAP   
0.022   + 0.0167    = 0.0387    = 26 lp/mm   = 1316 ppi  42% loss  thru 60 lp/mm lens 
Fuji RAP   
0.022   + 0.0125    = 0.0345    = 29 lp/mm   = 1473 ppi  36% loss  thru 80 lp/mm lens 
Fuji RAP   
0.022   + 0.010      = 0.032    = 31 lp/mm   = 1575 ppi  31% loss  thru 100 lp/mm lens 
Fuji RAP   
0.022   + 0.0083    = 0.0303    = 33 lp/mm   = 1575 ppi  27%
Kodak Ektachrome 100GX has 3050 ppi (60 lp/mm) native resolution 
EKT 100GX  
0.0167 + 0.025      = 0.0417    = 24 lp/mm   = 1220 ppi  60% loss  thru 40 lp/mm lens 
EKT 100GX  
0.0167 + 0.0167    = 0.0334    = 30 lp/mm   = 1524 ppi  50% loss  thru 60 lp/mm lens 
EKT 100GX  
0.0167 + 0.0125    = 0.0294    = 34 lp/mm   = 1727 ppi  43% loss  thru 80 lp/mm lens 
EKT 100GX  
0.0167 + 0.010      = 0.0267    = 37 lp/mm   = 1880 ppi  38%
EKT 100GX  
0.0167 + 0.0083    = 0.025    = 40 lp/mm   = 2032 ppi  33%
Kodak Tri-X 400 (2004) has 3302 ppi (65 lp/mm) native resolution 
Kodak Tri-X  
0.0154 + 0.05       = 0.0654    = 25 lp/mm   = 1257 ppi  58% loss  thru 40 lp/mm lens 
Kodak Tri-X  
0.0154 + 0.0167    = 0.0321    = 31 lp/mm   = 1582 ppi  52% loss  thru 60 lp/mm lens 
Kodak Tri-X  
0.0154 + 0.0125    = 0.0275    = 36 lp/mm   = 1847 ppi  44% loss  thru 80 lp/mm lens 
Kodak Tri-X  
0.0154 + 0.010     = 0.0254    = 39 lp/mm   = 2000 ppi  39%
Kodak Tri-X  
0.0154 + 0.0083    = 0.0237    = 42 lp/mm   = 2143 ppi  35%
Kodak Tri-X  
0.0154 + 0.0071    = 0.0225    = 44 lp/mm   = 2258 ppi  32% loss  thru 140 lp/mm lens   
Kodak Tri-X  
0.0154 + 0.005     = 0.0204    = 49 lp/mm   = 2490 ppi  25% loss thru 200 lp/mm lens  
Fuji Velvia RVP has 4064 (80 lp/mm) native resolution 
Kodak Portra 160NC color negative film has 4064 ppi (80 lp/mm) native resolution 
Kodak Plus-X 125 (2006) has 4064 ppi (80 lp/mm) native resolution 
Kodak Plus-X  0.0125 + 0.05       = 0.0625    = 16 lp/mm   =   813 ppi  75% loss 
Kodak Plus-X  0.0125 + 0.025      = 0.0375    = 27 lp/mm   = 1355 ppi  66% loss  thru 40 lp/mm lens 
Kodak Plus-X  0.0125 + 0.0167    = 0.0292    = 34 lp/mm   = 1740 ppi  57% loss  thru 60 lp/mm lens 
Kodak Plus-X  0.0125 + 0.0125    = 0.025    = 40 lp/mm   = 2032 ppi  50% loss  thru 80 lp/mm lens 
Kodak Plus-X  0.0125 + 0.010     = 0.0225    = 44 lp/mm   = 2235 ppi  45% 
Kodak Plus-X  0.0125 + 0.0083    = 0.0208    = 48 lp/mm   = 2442 ppi 
Kodak Plus-X  0.0125 + 0.0071    = 0.0196    = 51 lp/mm   = 2592 ppi  36% loss thru 140 lp/mm lens  
Kodak Plus-X  0.0125 + 0.005     = 0.0175    = 57 lp/mm   = 2896 ppi  29% loss thru 200 lp/mm lens  
Kodak VR100 color negative film has 5080 (100 lp/mm) ppi native resolution 
Kodak VR 100  0.010   + 0.05       = 0.06     = 17 lp/mm   =   847 ppi  83% loss 
Kodak VR 100  0.010   + 0.025     = 0.035      = 29 lp/mm    = 1473 ppi   75% loss     thru 40 lp/mm lens
Kodak VR 100  0.010   + 0.0167    = 0.0267    = 37 lp/mm   = 1880 ppi  63% loss  thru 60 lp/mm lens 
Kodak VR 100  0.010   + 0.0125    = 0.0225    = 44 lp/mm   = 2235 ppi  56% loss  thru 80 lp/mm lens 
Kodak VR 100  0.010   + 0.010     = 0.020    = 50 lp/mm   = 2540 ppi 
Kodak VR 100  0.010   + 0.0083    = 0.0183    = 54 lp/mm   = 2776 ppi 
Kodak VR 100  0.010   + 0.0071    = 0.0171    = 54 lp/mm   = 2776 ppi  45% loss thru 140 lp/mm lens 
Kodak VR 100  0.010   + 0.005     = 0.015    = 67 lp/mm   = 3387 ppi  33% loss thru 200 lp/mm lens 
Kodak Technical Pan (2004 & discontinued) has 7214 ppi (142 lp/mm) native re
Technical Pan  0.007   + 0.05       = 0.057     = 18 lp/mm   =   891 ppi  88%loss 
Technical Pan  0.007   + 0.025      = 0.032     = 31 lp/mm   = 1587 ppi  78%loss  thru 40 lp/mm lens 
Technical Pan  0.007   + 0.0167    = 0.0237    = 42 lp/mm   = 2143 ppi  70% loss  thru 60 lp/mm lens 
Technical Pan  0.007   + 0.0125    = 0.0195    = 51 lp/mm   = 2605 ppi  64% loss  thru 80 lp/mm lens 
Technical Pan  0.007   + 0.010     = 0.017    = 58 lp/mm   = 2988 ppi  59%
Technical Pan  0.007   + 0.0083    = 0.0153    = 65 lp/mm   = 3320 ppi  54%
Technical Pan  0.007   + 0.0071    = 0.0141    = 71 lp/mm   = 3602 ppi  50% loss thru 140 lp/mm lens  
Technical Pan  0.007   + 0.005     = 0.012    = 83 lp/mm  = 4216 ppi  42% loss thru 200 lp/mm lens  
Technical Pan  0.007   + 0.00167  = 0.00867  = 115 lp/mm = 5859 ppi  19% loss 
Kodak Panatomic-X (1976, probably high) has 8636 ppi (170 lp/mm) native reso
Panatomic-X  0.0059 + 0.05       = 0.0618    = 16 lp/mm   =   822 ppi  90% loss 
Panatomic-X  0.0059 + 0.025      = 0.0321    = 32 lp/mm   = 1628 ppi  81% loss  thru 40 lp/mm lens 
Panatomic-X  0.0059 + 0.0167    = 0.0238    = 42 lp/mm   = 2134 ppi  75% loss  thru 60 lp/mm lens 
Panatomic-X  0.0059 + 0.0125    = 0.0184   = 54 lp/mm   = 2755 ppi  68% loss  thru 80 lp/mm lens 
Panatomic-X  0.0059 + 0.010     = 0.0159    = 63 lp/mm   = 3195 ppi  63% loss  thru 100 lp/mm lens 
Panatomic-X  0.0059 + 0.0083    = 0.0142    = 70 lp/mm   = 3577 ppi  59%
Panatomic-X  0.0059 + 0.0071    = 0.013    = 77 lp/mm   = 3908 ppi  55% loss thru 140 lp/mm lens  
Panatomic-X  0.0059 + 0.005     = 0.0109    = 92 lp/mm   = 4661 ppi  46% loss thru 200 lp/mm lens  
Panatomic-X  0.0059 + 0.00167  = 0.00867  = 115 l
loss thru 120 lp/mm lens  
loss thru 120 lp/mm lens
loss  thru 100 lp/mm lens
loss thru 120 lp/mm lens
loss   thru 100 lp/mm lens
loss  thru 120 lp/mm lens  
loss   thru 100 lp/mm lens 
40% loss  thru 120 lp/mm lens 
50% loss  thru 100 lp/mm lens
45% loss thru 120 lp/mm lens
loss  thru 100 lp/mm lens
loss thru 120 lp/mm lens  
loss thru 120 lp/mm lens  
p/mm  = 5860 ppi 32% loss thru 600 lp/mm lens
ens
<tjvitale@ix.netcom.com>
510-594-8277 
Tim Vitale © 2006 use by permission only
27
Using an Excellent Lens 
Using a "excellent" lens (100 lp/mm at 30% contrast) with Kodak 160NC color negative 
film at 4064 ppi, the resolution of the image decreases to 2235 ppi; a 45% loss of 
resolution, see the orange plot above at 100 lp/mm.  Using a "Best Possible" lens, 200 
lp/mm, the resolution only increases (from excellent lens) to 2902 ppi, only a 29% loss. 
Note that the Canon Lenses listed in the plot above (EF 50mm f1.4 USM, EF 85 mm f-
1.2 USM and EF 200 mm f-1.8 USM) are projected to have a resolution of 90-110 
lp/mm (f8) based on data from the Photodo website <
http://www.photodo.com/nav/prodindex.html
> at 
the 30% contrast limit.  The Schneider APO Symmar 150/5.6 MTF data is included to 
show the proper shape of an MTF curve for a excellent large format lens at f-11.  The 
Canon lenses, above, probably have an additional 10-15% more resolution (at 30% 
contrast) that cannot be directly shown from the linear projection of the Lars Kjellberg 
<Photodo.com> lens evaluations.   
Lars Kjellberg <Photodo.com> used one of the standard high-end lens evaluation 
protocols that terminated MTF evaluation at 40 lp/mm.  MTF is measured from the 
center of the lens to the edge of the lens glass, and is plotted along the x-axis.  They 
evaluated MTF performance at 10, 20 and 40 lp/mm.  It is rare to find MTF data to 
extinction (30% contrast, or even, to 1% contrast) at specific f-stops as in the Schneider 
APO Symmar 150/5.6 lens above.  Another common evaluation protocol (used by 
Schneider, Zeiss and Rodenstock) ranges through the point of focus; they evaluate 
image height along the x-axis, through the center of the lens.  Most lenses have best 
performance when focused at infinity, and poor performance at close focus, 1:1 or 1:2.    
When the <Photodo.com> data was harvested for use in these plots, the resolution was 
evaluated at the midpoint of evaluation: (a) 9 mm from the center for 35 mm lenses and 
(b) 21.5 mm from the center for MF lenses, with the sagittal and tangential axes 
averaged.  Evaluation at the center of the lens would be too favorable for all but the 
ideal f-stop on the best lenses.  It would increase MTF evaluations by 10-15 % at the 
wider f-stops (f 1.2 - 2.8) and the poorer lenses.  Characteristically, this makes very little 
<tjvitale@ix.netcom.com>
510-594-8277 
Tim Vitale © 2006 use by permission only
28
difference for f-8 iris setting and for the excellent lenses listed in these evaluations.  For 
an Excel worksheet with the data contact the author tjvitale@ix.netcom.com
Note that in the Nikkor Lens MTF plot above, the Nikkor (a) AF 50mm f1.8, (b) MF 55 
mm f2.8 and (b) AF 85 mm f-1.8, lenses show excellent behavior at f-8 (30% MTF 
contrast).  As with the Canon, Zeiss and Leica lenses, they have resolution of 
approximately 90-100 lp/mm, this is referred to as “excellent” in the Resolution Power 
Equation section above.   
Nikkor zoom lenses have a reputation for good performance; unfortunately this just isn’t 
the case except for a few listed above.  I have recommended the Nikkor 24-120 mm AF 
ED zoom lens in the past.  In the <Photodo.com> MTF tests, their example had very 
poor performance, as all the zoom lenses of any manufacturer, except LeicaR 80-200/4.   
<tjvitale@ix.netcom.com>
510-594-8277 
Tim Vitale © 2006 use by permission only
29
In the Zeiss Lens MTF plot above it can be seen that many of the modern versions of 
their famous lenses have “excellent” behavior: 90-110 lp/mm at 30% contrast.  It is 
interesting to note that the best lenses of the outstanding equipment manufacturers 
have fairly equal performance.  Again, based on the actual shape of the Schneider f-11 
MTF curve the actual performance at 30% could be as high as 120 lp/mm, possibly 
ven 130 lp/mm for the Planar T* 35/2 at f-8. 
e
The plot of Leica Lenses above (a) LeicaM Elmarit-M 90/2.8 and (b) LeicaM 
Summicron-M 50/2.0 show “excellent” behavior.  This is comparable to the Canon, 
Nikkor and Zeiss 35mm lenses shown in previous plots.  Not shown is the LeicaR Vario-
Elmar 80-200/4 ($1900); it has excellent behavior too, uncommon for zoom lenses. 
<tjvitale@ix.netcom.com>
510-594-8277 
Tim Vitale © 2006 use by permission only
30
Theoretical Lens Resolution 
In the plot below, the resolution performance a “theoretical lens” is based on the 
limitations of the diffusion of light around the lens iris aperture.  The smaller the aperture 
the greater the proportion of light diffused by the edge of the iris.  Thus, the smaller the 
aperture (higher the f-number), the lower the resolution.  Unfortunately, the small 
apertures (f-16, 22 and 32) are considered best by most large format photographers, 
because depth-of-field is greater when the aperture is smaller.   
Few lenses can perform in a theoretical manner.  However, note that the excellent 
Schneider Apo Symmar 150/5.6 lens has almost theoretical behavior, at f-11.  I had 
questioned whether the Lars Kjellberg Schneider APO Symmar 150/5.6 data is factual,  
and chromatic aberrations, coma and unflat field of focus, 
along with the flare from the eight air-glass interfaces (above right), compromise image 
quality when the Schneider APO Symmar 150/5.6.  The f-8 lens aperture is commonly 
considered the best aperture for most lenses; that data was not provided for this lens. 
b
ut the f-5.6 plot below convinced me that it was correct. 
Because of the huge hunks of glass used in a large format 
lens, they perform very poorly when wide open.  The 
150/5.6 is wide open at f-5.6.  The plot for its f-5.6 aperture 
of the Schneider is similar to the f-22 plot for the theoretical 
lens, the worst aperture behavior shown.   
For comparison, the theoretical behavior of f-5.6 aperture is 
the seventh line down from the top.  Astigmatism, spherical 
cal 
In the plot above, the performance of a theoretical lens with an f8 aperture (green dotted 
line) has been overlaid onto the plot of the Leica lenses seen earlier.  Notice in the plot 
above this graph, that the f-11 behavior of the Schneider APO Symmar 150/5.6 (purple) 
is almost identical to the behavior of the theoretical lens at f-11 aperture (brown).  If the 
behavior of the two Leica lenses at f8 (two graphs above) also comes close to 
Documents you may be interested
Documents you may be interested