mvc display pdf in partial view : Extract pdf pages to jpg Library application class asp.net html wpf ajax 8-2-020-part422

I
N
D
EPTH
V
OL
. 2, N
O
12 
S
ANTA
C
RUZ
C
OUNTY
, C
ALIFORNIA
A
UGUST
2
ND
, 2002
A Local W
ee
kly N
ew
spap
e
r for an Engag
e
d Populac
e
Un S
e
manario Locál para un Pu
e
blo Ac
t
ivo y Comprom
et
ido
50¢
Inside
Local / Regional
Granny Units Legalized In Santa Cruz.............................1
Struggle for Public Control over Internet..........................1
Update on Watsonville Living Wage Campaign................4
Will LA and Hollywood Get Divorced?..............................5
SF Day Laborers Up For the Highest Bidder....................5
Editorial
Letter from an Editor.........................................................2
Commentary
Blame Canada: Marijuana Issues North of the Border.....7
Grindin’: When Hip Hop Goes Retro................................9
Border Death-Trap..........................................................12
Mexico’s New Saint........................................................12
International
Colombia: Paramilitary Kills Journalist.............................8
Colombia: Paramilitares Asesinen Periodista...................8
Columns
In Retrospect: Random Bullets.........................................6
War Notes.........................................................................7
Youth: Perspectives on War Protesting..........................10
Ojo en el INS / Eye on the INS.......................................11
Other
Community Calendar......................................................13
Wholly Cross-Words.......................................................14
Classifieds......................................................................15
Rack Locations...............................................................16
Update on downtown 
ordinances Page 4
Random Bullets 
Page 6
Youth on Protesting 
Page 10
Crossword Puzzle  
Page 14
“Granny units” OK’d
The go-ahead may help to relieve 
Santa Cruz County’s housing crisis
the Council was pre-
sented with a report of 
a Housing Options Fea-
sibility Study. The study 
identifi ed ADUs as “a 
viable option to help 
ease the City’s housing 
crisis by providing new 
rental  housing  units 
on existing residential 
lots.”
By loosening zon-
ing standards, the City 
Council  and  Plan-
ning Commission are 
revising  the  Zoning 
Ordinance and encour-
aging the development 
of ADUs. 
The Council has also 
adopted plans to cre-
ate a low interest Loan 
Program  to  provide 
opportunities and as-
sistance in constructing 
ADUs.  Development 
HALIE JOHNSON/The Alarm! Newspaper
Heather and Darjhan from the Teen Center came out to  serve free soup at 
the Santa Cruz Farmer’s Market.
Go see ICANN on Page 4
By HALIE JOHNSON
The Alarm! Newspaper Collective
Struggle for public control over internet
Director of ICANN draws attention to 
fl aws in governance process that mirror criti-
cisms of Santa Cruz local government
By FHAR MIESS
The Alarm! Newspaper Collective
In October of 2000, Cable News Network, known 
across the globe as CNN, issued a “cease and desist” 
order to Maya Online, a Shanghai-based internet 
company that had registered the CNNEWS.COM do-
main name with a Chinese registrar named Eastern 
Communications.  A series of legal proceedings fol-
lowed, with contradictory rulings in China and—in 
April of this year—in the US.
The Internet Corporation for Assigned Names and 
Numbers (ICANN) became involved shortly after-
ward.  ICANN was originally formed by the United 
States Department of Commerce as a California 
non-profi t  organization 
providing  international 
oversight in the assign-
ment of internet domain 
names and addresses.  ICANN issued a demand 
to Eastern Communications that they transfer the 
domain name to CNN, despite the fact that the pre-
siding US Federal judge clearly stated no intention of 
dictating the activities of a Chinese registrar.  Maya 
Online further accused ICANN of “secret” communi-
cations with the registrar.
This sort of secrecy and unwarranted assump-
tion of authority has earned ICANN a consistently 
bad reputation with members of the internet com-
munity.  One of ICANN’s most vehement critics has 
been Karl Auerbach, a resident of Santa Cruz.  In 
an open and public online election, Auerbach was 
elected as ICANN’s At-Large Director for the North 
American region in November 2000.  He frequently 
denounced the organization, calling attention to its 
excessive secrecy, lack of public process, lack of ac-
countability, insuffi cient oversight by the Board of 
Directors and poor business practices.
As a Director with ICANN, Auerbach has made 
attempts on many occassions to reform the organi-
zation.  These attempts have been largely thwarted 
by the professional staff of ICANN, who have with-
held documents from Auerbach despite repeated 
verbal and written requests.  Auerbach fi nally fi led 
suit against ICANN in March of this year.  On Mon-
day, July 29, the California Superior Court ruled in 
Auerbach’s favor and compelled ICANN to provide 
Auerbach with the requested documents within a 
week.
At the root of Auerbach’s tiff with ICANN is a 
struggle to prevent the creeping privatization of the 
internet.  In a paper titled “A Prescription to Promote 
the Progress of Science and Useful Arts” he charges 
that ICANN “is a predominately non-elected body 
that is responsive primarily to those industry groups 
that stand to gain by ICANN’s decisions.  ICANN is 
effectively accountable to no one.”
Unfortunately, Auerbach will have little time to 
effect real change in ICANN.  His term expires this 
November.  Also, ac-
cording to a declaration 
made by Auerbach to 
the California Supreme 
Court, ICANN—over the course of two board meet-
ings—“took a sequence of steps that eliminated the 
public seats on ICANN’s Board of Directors and dis-
pensed with future public elections on any matter 
within ICANN.”
Auerbach had more to say in a prepared state-
ment, dated June 12 of this year, before the 
Subcommittee on Science, Technology and Space 
of the Senate Committee on Commerce, Science 
and Transportation.  “My seat on ICANN’s Board 
of Directors, and the seat of every other publicly 
elected Director, will cease to exist on October 31 of 
this year,” he said.  “On that date real public repre-
sentation within ICANN will end.  After that date, 
ICANN will be effectively controlled by a small group 
of privileged ‘stakeholders’.…That grant of favored 
status is mirrored by a nearly total exclusion of the 
public and of non-commercial and small businesses 
interests. These have been given only token voices.”
Even these stakeholder arrangements are largely 
“facades,” according to Auerbach.  “Most of ICANN’s 
plans explain the Loan 
Program as a partner-
ship between the City 
of Santa Cruz, Com-
munity Ventures Inc. 
(a non-profi t organiza-
tion  associated  with 
the Santa Cruz Com-
munity Credit Union) 
and local lenders. The 
Santa Cruz Commu-
nity Credit Union will 
contribute fi fty percent 
of the funds needed 
to implement a loan 
pool, while the City 
will provide the other 
fi fty percent. Funding 
from the City is to be 
taken from the In Lieu 
Fee Trust Fund, a trust 
made up of collections 
from developers who 
chose to pay a fee as 
opposed to building af-
fordable housing under 
the City’s Inclusionary 
Ordinance.  The  City 
The  Santa  Cruz 
City Council approved 
plans  to  lift zoning 
restrictions on the con-
struction of Accessory 
Dwelling Units (ADUs) 
or “granny units” in 
order to promote the 
development of afford-
able housing in the City 
of Santa Cruz. The deci-
sion to go forward with 
two programs (the ADU 
Development Program 
and the ADU Loan Pro-
gram) proposed by the 
City Planning and De-
velopment Commission 
was made on July 24. 
The City aims to have 
both plans completed 
in three years, with the 
Loan  Program  likely 
extending beyond that 
time.
In January of 2002, 
Manager will also ap-
ply for a grant through 
the ADU Development 
Program  under  the 
Sustainable Communi-
ties Grant and Loan 
Program.
The maximum loan 
amount  would  be 
$70,000, and anyone 
who falls below eighty 
percent of the median 
household income for 
Santa Cruz would be 
eligible.
Extract pdf pages to jpg - Select, copy, paste PDF images in C#.net, ASP.NET, MVC, Ajax, WinForms, WPF
Support PDF Image Extraction from a Page, a Region on a Page, and PDF Document
extract images from pdf; extract pdf images
Extract pdf pages to jpg - VB.NET PDF Image Extract Library: Select, copy, paste PDF images in vb.net, ASP.NET, MVC, Ajax, WinForms, WPF
Support PDF Image Extraction from a Page, a Region on a Page, and PDF Document
extract images from pdf c#; extract images from pdf online
2 
The Alarm! Newspaper 
Augus
t
2
nd
, 2002
Volume II, No. 11
Through the use of strategic investigation and 
innovative analysis, we aspire to provide quality 
reporting on the news of Santa Cruz County as a 
means to inspire and engage individuals and the 
community at large. We strive to cover news that 
matters directly in peoples’ lives. We are not inter-
ested strictly in local news, but wish to connect the 
local to regional, national and global issues.
The Alarm! Newspaper is distributed locally 
through coin-operated newspaper racks and can 
also be found at select vendors.  Our print run 
for this issue is 4,000 copies.  Home delivery and 
postal subscriptions are also available (see back 
page for rates and instructions for subscribing).
The Alarm! Newspaper
Contacts
P.O.  Box 1205
S
ANTA
C
RUZ
, CA 95061
Phone: 
831-429-NEWS (6397)
Fax: 
831-420-1498
E-mail: 
info@the-alarm.com
Website: 
www.the-alarm.com
How to Reach Us
to subscribe
subscriptions@the-alarm.com
to place a personal ad
personals@the-alarm.com
to place a classifi ed advertisement
classifi eds@the-alarm.com
to place a display advertisement
advertising@the-alarm.com
to submit letters to the editors
letters@the-alarm.com
to submit calendar items
calendar@the-alarm.com
to submit queries
for article submissions
queries@the-alarm.com
to report distribution problems
distro@the-alarm.com
to report printing problems
production@the-alarm.com
to report problems with newsracks
facilities@the-alarm.com
for questions about your bill
fi nances@the-alarm.com
Collective Members
Armando Alcaraz
armando@the-alarm.com
Leila Binder
leila@the-alarm.com
Halie Johnson
halie@the-alarm.com
Fhar Miess
fhar@the-alarm.com
Caroline Nicola
caroline@the-alarm.com
Michelle Stewart
michelle@the-alarm.com
Editorial
Education
education@the-alarm.com
Environment
enviro@the-alarm.com
Food & Agriculture
foodag@the-alarm.com
Health
health@the-alarm.com
Housing & Real Estate
housing@the-alarm.com
Labor & Economy
labor@the-alarm.com
Local Government
localgov@the-alarm.com
State Government
stategov@the-alarm.com
National / International Gov’t
natlgov@the-alarm.com
Incarceration
prisons@the-alarm.com
Transportation
transpo@the-alarm.com
Youth
youth@the-alarm.com
Contributors in this issue:
Oliver Brown, sasha & Blaize Wilkinson
If you are interested in contributing an article to The 
Alarm!, please see the guidelines for submissions on 
our website 
Special Thanks go to:
Blaize, Chris, Grant Wilson & sasha
All content Copyleft © 2002 by The Alarm! Newspaper. Except 
where noted otherwise, this material may be copied and distrib-
uted freely in whole or in part by anyone except where used for 
commercial purposes or by government agencies.
L
ette
r from an Edi
t
or
Una ola de transeúncia azotó a 
nuestro semanario.  Durante las dos 
últimas semanas ya habíamos perdido 
como miembros del colectivo (aunque 
no como colaboradoras) a Rachel 
Showstack y Caroline Nicola. Pero ésta 
semana nuestros columnistas Leila 
Binder y  Manuel Schwab, llevados 
por los vientos caprichosos de la vida, 
partieron a ejercer sus talentos en otras 
tierras—Leila a Nueva York y Manuel a 
Alemania.  Como resultado de esta re-
pentina reducción de nuestro personal, 
nos encontramos con un semanario 
con un contenido original un poco m
á
bajo que al que tenemos acostumbrado 
a nuestro público—quiz
á
s ahora si les 
ser
á
posible leer toda la edición antes 
que salga la siguiente.
De todas formas, estamos haciendo 
nuestro mejor esfuerzo por recuperar 
nuestro acostumbrado número de 
colaboraciones originales y locales 
en las semanas venideras. Mientras, 
esta semana, fi eles a nuestra propia 
condición, reportamos sobre leyes que 
afectan a aquellos que viven diferentes 
niveles de transeuncia.      
La ciudad de Watsonville aceptó la 
propuesta de la Coalición para un Sala-
rio Justo en el sentido de comenzar a 
redactar una ordenanza para un salario 
justo.  En otras ciudades en que esta 
medida se ha adoptado como ley ha 
traido como resultado una economía 
local mas sana, lo cual va en contra 
de las predicciones pesimistas de co-
merciantes que dicen no van a poder 
competir al tener que pagar salarios 
mas altos.  Una provisión de la propu-
A wave of transience has broken 
over our paper.  During the past two 
weeks we had already lost—as mem-
bers of the collective, though not as 
contributors—Rachel Showstack and 
Caroline Nicola.  But this week our 
columnists Leila Binder and Manuel 
Schwab, carried away by the unpre-
dictable winds of life, left to use their 
talents in different lands—Leila to 
New York and Manuel to Germany.  
As a result of the sudden reduction of 
our staff, we have a little less original 
content than what our readership has 
come to expect—maybe now you will 
be able to read all of the paper before 
next week’s edition comes out. 
In the following weeks we will be 
making our best effort to return to our 
accustomed number of original and 
local contributions. Meanwhile, this 
week, faithful to our own condition, 
we are reporting on laws that in some 
ways affect those who live with differ-
ent levels of transience.
The city of Watsonville has accepted 
the proposal from the Coalition for a 
Living Wage to move forward in draft-
ing a living wage ordinance.  In other 
cities where similar ordinances have 
been passed, the local economy has 
improved, going against the dire pre-
dictions of business owners who claim 
they won’t be able to compete if they 
pay higher salaries.  A provision of the 
proposal supports the rights of the City 
temporary workers to “organize and 
collectively bargain, using the living 
wage rate as the standard.”
If this provision for the ordinance 
ends up being accepted, the people of 
Watsonville will have taken a fi rst step 
in supporting the city temporary work-
ers in raising the quality of their lives.  
The challenge will then be to fi nd 
ways to take these same changes to 
the fi elds, where the big agribusinesses 
pay wages that are far from provid-
ing a decent living, taking advantage 
of the fact that most of the migratory 
workers are considered “illegal.”
Curiously enough, as it follows the 
process to adopt the downtown ordi-
nances, the Santa Cruz City Council is 
giving its own defi nitions to categories 
of legality and illegality, which are cen-
tral to restricting the activities citizens 
are allowed to practice in the public 
spaces downtown. Among the activi-
ties that will become illegal are those 
that are generally engaged in by the 
transient and
/
or the homeless, such 
as resting or sitting on the sidewalk, 
panhandling verbally, non-verbally, or 
with gestures, or even playing hackey 
sack. Also, possessions the police deem 
as unattended can be confi scated.  It 
would seem these ordinances have as 
a goal to turn into illegals those people 
whose presence is perceived as detri-
mental to the money interests of the 
businesses downtown.
Where the Santa Cruz City Council 
manages illegality to their convenience 
in a relatively small way, Ashcroft plays 
it big, reviving old INS regulations that 
turn legal residents into illegals if they 
don’t report a change of address.  Car-
los Armenta explores this latest effect 
of 9
/
11 in his debut of the Spanish 
version of “Eye on the INS” which will 
rotate on a weekly basis with the Eng-
lish version from Michelle Stewart.
The laws play, for good or for 
evil, a determinant role in our lives.  
However, their effects generally pass 
unnoticed by many.  It is easy to ignore 
the hard conditions of the temporary 
workers and forget to give them the 
support they now need.  Also, if one 
does not live the transient life of many 
of the homeless, the downtown ordi-
nances might seem unimportant, as 
could the laws enforced by Ashcroft if 
one is not an immigrant.  Those that 
for economic and social reasons live 
their lives in transience and in migra-
tion often become the most vulnerable 
as they fi nd themselves arbitrarily cat-
egorized as being outside the law.
Armando Alcaraz
esta refrenda el derecho que tienen los 
trabajadores temporales de la ciudad 
para organizarse y negociar colecti-
vamente usando el salario justo como 
est
á
ndar.
Si esta provisión acaba siendo adop-
tada, los habitantes de Watsonville 
habr
á
n conseguido dar un primer paso 
en ayudar a los trabajadores term-
porales de la ciudad a mejorar las 
condiciones de sus vidas. Su gran reto 
entonces, ser
á
llevar estos cambios 
también al campo, donde las grandes 
compañias agricultoras imponen suel-
dos que distan mucho de ser justos, 
aprovech
á
ndose del hecho que a la 
mayoría de los trabajadores migrantes 
se les considera “ilegales.”  
Curiosamente, el Concilio de Santa 
Cruz coloca la transeúncia en sus pro-
pias categorizaciones de lo legal y lo 
ilegal al seguir con el proceso de adop-
tar las ordenanzas conocidas como “the 
downtown ordinances”,  las cuales se 
centran en restringir las actividades 
que los ciudadanos puedan ejercer 
en la acera pública del centro de la 
ciudad.  Dentro de no mucho tiempo 
se volver
á
ilegal el sentarse a descan-
sar a menos de catorce pies de algún 
negocio, pedir limosna verbalmente, 
con letreros, o señas,  o jugar “hackey 
sack,” actividades ejercidas común-
mente por personas transeúntes y
/
desamparadas. Adem
á
s, todas aquellas 
pertenencias en la calle que la policía 
determine que no esten siendo aten-
didas, podr
á
n ser confi scadas. Estas 
ordenanzas parecen tener como objeto 
el convertir en ilegales a estas personas 
cuya presencia es percibida como un 
estorbo para los intereses monetarios 
de los comercios.
Pero si el Concilio de nuestra ciudad 
convierte a las personas en ilegales 
en una escala pequeña, Ashcroft 
lo hace en grande, desenpolvando 
regulaciones apócrifas del INS para 
poder aplicarlas selectivamente contra 
aquellos inmigrantes que se les designe 
“sospechosos” de poder cometer algún 
crimen. Carlos  Armenta explora esta 
última concecuencia que el 11 de sep-
tiembre trajo para los inmigrantes en 
este país,  debutando en su columna 
en español de “Ojo en el INS”,  la cu
á
se turnar
á
cada semana con su equiva-
lente en inglés de Michelle Stewart.
Las leyes juegan, para bien o 
para mal, un papel determinante en 
nuestras vidas.  Sin embargo, sus 
efectos pasan comúnmente desaperci-
bidos para muchos.  Es f
á
cil olvidar 
las condiciones de trabajo de los tra-
bajadores temporales y desdeñarles el 
apoyo que ahora necesitan. También, a 
uno puede no importarle las ordenan-
zas de  Santa Cruz al no vivir la vida 
transeúnte de muchos desamparados, 
y de igu
á
l manera, es f
á
cil que los no-
inmigrantes olviden que existen las 
leyes de Ashcroft.  Las personas cuyas 
vidas forman parte de la transeúncia 
y la migracion por diversas razones, 
ya sean económicas o sociales, son 
comúnmente las m
á
s vulnerables ante 
la ley, al encontrarse categorizadas 
como estando fuéra de esta.
Armando Alcaraz
Car
t
a d
e
un Edi
t
or
Wri
te
Us
a L
ette
r!
C# PDF Convert to Jpeg SDK: Convert PDF to JPEG images in C#.net
Turn multiple pages PDF into single jpg files respectively online. Support of converting from any single one PDF page and multiple pages.
extract photo from pdf; online pdf image extractor
VB.NET PDF Convert to Jpeg SDK: Convert PDF to JPEG images in vb.
text, C#.NET convert PDF to images, C#.NET PDF file & pages edit, C#.NET PDF pages extract, copy, paste Turn multiple pages PDF into multiple jpg files in
extract photos pdf; extract image from pdf
Augus
t
2
nd
, 2002 
The Alarm! Newspaper
3
Write to Us!
All letters to the editor will be published, with the 
following guidelines:
1)  No letters over 350 words
2)  No commercial solicitation (“plugs”)
3)  No event announcements or personal ads
4)  Letters to the editors must be sent “attn: Letters” via post 
or to letters@the-alarm.com via e-mail (we will assume that 
if you send letters to these addresses, you want them pub-
lished--if you have general questions or comments, send 
them to info@the-alarm.com). We prefer e-mail.
5)  Letters received on paper by Tuesday at 5pm or via email by 
Wednesday at noon will be published the same week.
6)  We reserve the right to reply to any letters in print in the 
same issue.
7)  Play nice.
L
ette
rs 
t
t
h
e
Edi
t
ors
D
e
ar Edi
t
or:
What is it like being in prison?
Contrary to what most people think 
prison is, it is not.  It is not the bars, 
the fences, the razor wire, the armed 
guards, the sub-standard food, the 
forty-foot wall or the iron or steel cell-
blocks. All of these items and many 
more are only a part of prison but 
by far not the most important part.  
Those things are external, prison is in-
ternal.  It is about doing time in one’s 
own head, your anger, bitterness, 
frustration, exasperation, fear, grief 
and apathy are the real fences that 
one must cope with.  These thoughts 
have to be lived with every moment, 
seven days a week, fi fty-two weeks a 
year, year after year. Many times even 
dreams are invaded by these dark 
emotions, [dreams] such as interest, 
happiness, enthusiasm and serenity. 
Your thoughts bounce off the razor 
wire, the fences, the guards and the 
unjust justice systems; you run the 
gamut of anger to apathy.  At the begin-
ning of your journey, you are stripped 
of much of your identity because you 
have created a signifi cant part of your 
personality through the clothes and 
jewelry you wear, to the kind of ve-
hicle you drive, your job, where you 
house yourself, your possessions and 
your friends and associates and fam-
ily and your blood loved ones.  Prison 
takes all of this away, it houses you in 
steel and concrete, issues you prison 
clothing and feeds you slop.  No mat-
ter how fi nancially secure you are at 
some point in time you will eat that 
slop.  You also work at a job that either 
pays you nothing or at the most a few 
cents a day. You might hear from a few 
friends and family or a true loved one 
if you’re lucky, but most will abandon 
you after a few years. You are left with 
your mind and body. Most people 
are accustomed to obtaining their 
pleasures from external sources, they 
become very unhappy and depressed 
at the start of their incarceration.  With 
time the strong learn to cope, but there 
is never a day that comes when you 
can forget where you are.  After a few 
years—give or take a few—you may 
adjust; it is then that you realize that 
your imprisonment is not only harm-
ing you, but your family more than 
you, which only adds to your misery.  
But isn’t that what prison is designed 
to do, to destroy the life of anyone 
who dares to break their laws? And in 
most cases it does, unfortunately.  In-
nocent people are involved outside the 
prison and every once in a while inside 
the prison.  I know because this is my 
story; it’s how I’ve lived and felt since 
January of 1995. Justice is blind, or at 
least in this case the jurors were, but I 
know one day we all will be judged by 
God and the Creator is not blind.
MR. RICHARD K. CORBIN
Indiana State Prison
Mi
c
higan City, Indiana
D
e
ar Alarm:
I can’t summarize the sellout of the 
Latino community in the Dolphin, 
Lee and Rex Court Apartments in the 
permitted space.  Alcaraz’s “Nueva 
Vista in Beach Flats” [July 26 Alarm] is 
simply a naive collection of anecdotes, 
largely a puff-piece for Mercy Hous-
ing.  Mercy is the monopoly housing 
provider that orchestrated the depopu-
lation of the Beach Flats community in 
these apartments.
The basic crime committed by the 
RDA (Redevelopment Agency) and 
Mercy Housing was the pattern of 
falsifi cation and privilege that allowed 
a favored non-profi t to appropriate 
all the affordable housing money for 
years to come to destroy more housing 
than they were building—over the ob-
jections of tenants and community.
Perhaps a future Alarm! writer will 
document how the harsh and pater-
nalistic treatment of Lee residents 
prompted them to walk out of  a 
March 2000 Mercy Housing “reloca-
tion” meeting and form Residentes 
Unidos.   How tenants took over a 
City-controlled Tenant Advisory Com-
mittee [TAC], threw out the City’s 
inadequate  relocation  plan,  and 
demanded Councilmembers Hernan-
dez and Fitzmaurice return to City 
Council and demand specifi c written 
guarantees that no tenant would lose 
their housing in the apartments until 
relocation funding was guaranteed 
and return to the fi nal project assured.  
How Council never gave those guar-
antees, but rushed to tear down the 
Rex Court and hand over the Dolphin 
and Lee to Mercy Housing—the group 
that designed, will build, will run and 
for 80 years, will own the Project.
How SCAN, in a tumultuous meet-
ing (May 2000) supported those 
demands, over objections from Mercy 
mainliners Bernice Belton and Nora 
Hochman.  How SCAN overrode then-
Mayor Sugar (“if you want to live, 
packed in like fi lthy sardines...”)  to 
demand Council stop any work on 
the project until it provided the guar-
antees and a forum.  How Belton and 
Hochman sabotaged that forum and 
dissolved the SCAN housing com-
mittee in a SCAN steering committee 
meeting held in a private home.
How  Councilmembers  directed 
their hand-picked TAC chair Yolanda 
Goda to block future TAC meetings 
and then dissolved TAC and barred Lee 
tenants from the Project.  How Coun-
cilmembers Sugar and Krohn, quickly 
followed by Reilly and Porter, sold out 
the tenants, their SCAN backers and 
the Beach Flats community activists in 
what seemed a shadowy-replay of the 
Rotkin-Kennedy machinations in the 
Beach Flats 
/
South of Laurel drama 
of 1998.  How a Council that won’t 
put an advisory rent control measure 
on the ballot used rent  hike scares at 
other Beach Flats housing to mislead 
Dolphin-Lee tenants. who had been 
promised a rent freeze in the Lee and 
were not getting jacked in the Dol-
phin.
How a relative handful of tenants 
(according to knowledgable sources in 
the Western Service Workers Union) 
from these apartments now remain in 
the area, the rest having been bought 
off or scared off by Mercy Housing.  
The tenants deserve better treatment 
from a “progressive” Council, and the 
readers deserve a better story from an 
activist newspaper.
Sincerely,
ROBERT NORSE
DEAR EDITORS:
Speaking as someone who used to 
live in Santa Cruz years ago and just 
moved back, I wanted to give a few 
opinions on the whole ordinances 
debate. 
It has been my experience that 
there are three or four general types of 
people in Santa Cruz: those who want 
to hang out on Pacifi c Avenue (for a 
variety of reasons), those who need to 
complain about those who like to hang 
out on the Mall, those who are sick of 
the whole matter and don’t care to 
listen to any of the harping, and lastly 
those who don’t even know what we 
are talking about right now. 
With that in mind, what you need 
to do is decide which of those four 
populations you want to have as read-
ers. 
I bring this up because if you write 
your paper only to the fi rst group you 
will be a short-lived venture. No of-
fense to those mall folks, but they are 
not going to “support” your paper in 
the ways you will need to pay your 
bills. I think it is obvious that you are 
not writing your paper to the second 
group…that is very, very obvious. 
Which leaves the last two groups, 
those who don’t care and those who 
don’t know. I think it is in your inter-
est to tap these two groups. 
You should try to write a paper that 
will make that group of disgruntled 
locals wake up, while at the same time 
writing a paper that explains these is-
sues to those people who are new to 
the area or to the local politics. 
So far you have done a fairly good 
job with local politics. However, I 
worry when I open your letters sec-
tion and always see letters from the 
same people. There are many people 
in Santa Cruz that are just sick and 
tired of hearing Robert Norse’s opinion 
on everything. He is good for a chuck-
le, however, I would not call him the 
local “expert” and I hope you are not 
regarding him as such. 
Downtown politics are more sig-
nifi cant than hacky-sackying; and 
homeless issues are more complex 
than Mr. Norse seems capable of por-
traying.
It’s been a good read so far. Just a 
few thoughts.
MEGAN JACKSON
Santa Cruz
C# Image Convert: How to Convert Adobe PDF to Jpeg, Png, Bmp, &
C# sample code for PDF to jpg image conversion. This demo code convert PDF file all pages to jpg images. // Define input and output files path.
extract images from pdf files; some pdf image extractor
C# Image Convert: How to Convert Tiff Image to Jpeg, Png, Bmp, &
RasterEdge.XDoc.Office.Inner.Office03.dll. RasterEdge.XDoc.PDF.dll. RasterEdge.XDoc. PowerPoint.dll. This demo code convert TIFF file all pages to jpg images.
extract vector image from pdf; extract images from pdf files without using copy and paste
4 
The Alarm! Newspaper 
Augus
t
2
nd
, 2002
Local News
From ICANN on Page 1
Downtown Commission 
to walk the mall 
Watsonville’s struggle for living wage
with downtown problems. 
Kathy Bisby, a resident of 
Santa Cruz, spoke in opposi-
tion to the changes at the July 
23 City Council meeting. “I’m 
not satisfi ed that these ordi-
nances address the complaints 
of the people who brought 
them up. I urge you to wait 
[on making a decision],” Bisby 
is also the Chair of the DTC. 
Still, many people feel that 
the restrictions are a necessary 
step in making downtown 
Santa Cruz safer and more ap-
pealing. Opponents included 
two out of seven City Council-
members: Christopher Krohn, 
and Keith Sugar.
For  information  regarding 
these 
c
hanges write or visit Santa 
Cruz City Hall at 809 Center 
Street, Santa Cruz, CA 95060, 
or 
c
all (831) 420-5030. You 
c
an 
also email 
c
ity
c
oun
c
il@
c
i.santa-
c
ruz.
c
a.us with 
c
omments and 
questions. See issue number 11 of 
The Alarm! for more 
c
overage and 
analysis (
c
opies 
c
an be obtained by 
c
alling (831) 429-NEWS or email-
ing info@the-alarm.
c
om). Please 
email halie@the-alarm.
c
om for 
c
omments and questions regarding 
this arti
c
le.
By HALIE JOHNSON
The Alarm! Newspaper Collective
This week members of 
the Downtown Commission 
(DTC) will be surveying the 
areas affected by changes to 
the “Ordinances Related to 
Downtown Issues,” to be im-
plemented starting September 
10 of this year. They plan to 
walk the Pacifi c Avenue Mall 
in small groups, and may be 
joined by Julie Hendee of the 
Redevelopment Agency and 
SCPD Sgt. Butch Baker. 
The survey of the area is 
meant to better orient com-
mission members with the 
approved changes, so that 
they can make informed sug-
gestions to City Council.
The DTC is made up of 
seven members who were 
appointed by City Council, all 
of whom are residents Santa 
Cruz or business owners in 
the district. The commission 
acts as an advisory board for 
the City Council on all matters 
pertaining to the maintenance 
and management of the Cen-
tral Business District. 
The changes, and the dis-
cussions the ordinances have 
inspired, make visible a polar-
ity between people concerned 
Halie Johnson/The Alarm! Newspaper Collective
Jim and BJ frequently sit at this intersection of Elm St. and Pacifi c Ave. BJ recently returned 
to Santa Cruz—a place of nostalgia for her—after being away for the four years since her 
partner died. “Hopefully I won’t have to stay out here much longer,” BJ said about being 
homeless. “I don’t like the drug thing that’s going. It’s really bad.…I think they need more 
recovery places for people that want to quit,” she went on to say.  “I think they need more 
low-income housing, if they’re able to get themselves up and out of the situation, that want 
to better things for themselves. They just need more options.”
decisions are made by its staff, often without consultation with 
the Board of Directors.”
Auerbach’s criticisms of ICANN will likely resonate with 
some of his fellow Santa Cruzans.  Throughout the process of 
considering amended ordinances in the Downtown Business 
District, the Santa Cruz City Council has faced similar charges 
of excluding public input and replacing full accountability to 
an “at-large” public with a priviledged yet ill-defi ned group of 
“stakeholders,” in combination with the largely unilateral ini-
tiatives of City Staff.
And the similarities don’t end there.  “By denying people and 
organizations the ability to form fl uid coalitions and relation-
ships according to their self-perceived interests the ‘stakeholder’ 
concept has made compromise within ICANN exceedingly 
diffi cult and rare,” writes Auerbach.  This sort of artifi cial cat-
egorization mirrors the City Council’s process, which at its most 
galvanizing point divided the public into those for and against 
the ordinance ammendments.
Of course, it is dangerous to confl ate ICANN, a California 
non-profi t corporation that presumes to impose a global gov-
ernance structure over the entire internet, with the City of 
Santa Cruz, a small municipal body attempting to legislate and 
enforce “decorum” on its main drag.  But, at the same time, 
we cannot let ourselves be duped when City legislators attempt 
to denigrate the signifi cance of their exclusionary practices by 
drawing attention to the much more nefarious activities of their 
counterparts at the Federal level.  Whether it is a relatively 
small municipality like Santa Cruz or a “private government 
organization” (PGO) like ICANN or an umbrella of repressive 
agencies like the Homeland Security Offi ce or a corporate male-
factor like WorldCom, these movements toward secrecy and 
highly-stratifi ed management and away from public process 
and accountability are not unrelated.
Council directs 
City staff to come 
back with proposed 
ordinances
By FHAR MIESS
The Alarm! Collective 
On Tuesday, July 23, the 
Watsonville  City  Council 
voted to move ahead with the 
development of a Living Wage 
Ordinance.  The Council was 
responding to a proposal put 
forward by the Santa Cruz 
County Coalition for a Living 
Wage.  While some elements of 
the Coalition’s proposal must 
still be resolved with Council-
members, the vote provided a 
solid foundation for moving a 
strong living wage agenda in 
the City of Watsonville. 
The proposal considered 
last Tuesday night includes the 
following:
• All for-profi t vendors with 
City contracts of $10,000 
or more would be required 
to pay workers a wage of 
$11.50 per hour if em-
ployer-sponsored  benefi ts 
are provided and $12.55 per 
hour if benefi ts are not pro-
vided.
•Contractors would be re-
quired to agree to remain 
neutral in union organizing.
•In the event that the City 
changes contracts for proj-
ects over $50,000, the new 
contractor would have to 
make an effort to offer jobs 
to the employees performing 
City services with the previ-
ous contractor.
•The City would be obliged 
to consider an employer’s 
record on labor relations, 
health and safety and other 
factors, rather than accept-
ing the low bid as a matter 
of course.
•Establishment of a Commu-
nity Oversight Committee 
to oversee ordinance im-
plementation, 
monitor 
compliance and make policy 
recommendations for future 
coverage.
•A  concurrent  resolution 
supporting the right of City 
temporary workers to orga-
nize and collectively bargain 
for improved wages and 
working conditions, using 
the living wage rate as the 
standard.
•Direction to City Staff to 
work with the Coalition to 
develop  recommendations 
for coverage of non-profi t 
contractors and recipients of 
Economic Development As-
sistance.
Almost all of the elements 
of the proposal received ma-
jority votes from Watsonville 
City  Councilmembers.   If 
passed, Watsonville will be the 
third Santa Cruz County juris-
diction to adopt a living wage 
law, making it one of the most 
living-wage-friendly counties 
in the nation.
The Council meeting was 
evidence of a broad base of 
support within the commu-
nity for a living wage.  The 
overfl ow  crowd  included 
representatives of the Latino 
Chamber of Commerce, labor 
unions, community groups, 
churches,  low-wage  work-
ers and their families.  Of the 
approximately thirty speak-
ers at the hearing, only one 
person, Dave Bolick, President 
and CEO of the Pajaro Valley 
Chamber of Commerce, spoke 
in opposition.
According to Bolick, a sur-
vey distributed to member 
businesses after the Chamber’s 
Board voted to oppose the 
ordinance came back with 
eighty-three percent of re-
spondents agreeing with the 
Board’s position.  However, 
he admits that only about thir-
teen percent of members had 
actually responded.
Roberto García with the 
Santa Cruz County Latino 
Chamber of Commerce, on 
the other hand, spoke in favor 
of the ordinance, saying that 
higher wages will encourage 
local economic develoment by 
providing local workers with 
the means to shop locally.
In a letter to the City 
Council, Bolick also expressed 
concern that “there would be 
less competition for City busi-
ness and the prices the City 
pays for goods and services 
will increase.”
According to Sandy Brown 
with the Coalition for a Living 
Wage, there is scant evidence 
for this argument:  “Be-
cause these laws are so new, 
they haven’t been studied 
thoroughly, but what docu-
mentation there is has actually 
proven otherwise.  There have 
not been signifi ant increased 
contract costs.”  In fact, she 
said, anectodotal reports from 
other cities have indicated that 
the opposite is the case.  “Con-
tract costs went down in the 
city of Baltimore two years af-
ter implementation of a living 
wage law.”  Some businesses 
implied that it reduced the 
turnover rate and recruitment 
and training costs, and so they 
could bid at the same level, 
she said.
There will be at least two more 
major hearings before the Wat-
sonville City Coun
c
il, 
c
urrently 
s
c
heduled for September 10 and 
September 24, both at 6
:
30pm. For 
more information or to get in-
volved in the 
c
ampaign, please 
c
onta
c
t Sandy Brown or Arturo 
López at (831)724-0211.
C# Create PDF from images Library to convert Jpeg, png images to
Batch convert PDF documents from multiple image formats, including Jpg, Png, Bmp, Gif, Tiff, Bitmap, .NET Graphics, and REImage.
extract jpg pdf; how to extract pictures from pdf files
VB.NET PDF - Convert PDF with VB.NET WPF PDF Viewer
convert PDF to text, VB.NET extract PDF pages, VB.NET Create multiple pages Tiff file from PDF document. formats with high quality, support converting PDF to PNG
extract text from pdf image; extract image from pdf acrobat
Augus
t
2
nd
, 2002 
The Alarm! Newspaper 
5
By losing 
muscle in 
Washington 
by dropping to 
the third-larg-
est city in the 
country, we will 
lose out greatly 
on our commu-
nity program 
funds.
Regional News
Adiós LA? Latinos hold key to secession vote
By PILAR MARRERO
Pacifi c News Service
EDITOR’S NOTE
:
In the battle 
either to keep Hollywood and the 
San Fernando Valley a part of Los 
Angeles or to split them off, the La-
tino vote has be
c
ome 
c
ru
c
ial. PNS 
c
ontributor Pilar Marrero reports 
on the efforts of pro- and anti-se-
c
essionists to woo the 
c
ommunity. 
Marrero (pilar.marrero@laopinio
n.
c
om) is a 
c
olumnist and politi
c
al 
editor for La Opinion, where a ver-
sion of this arti
c
le fi rst appeared.
LOS ANGELES—The lines 
have been drawn and the 
troops brought out around the 
controversial proposal to cre-
ate three cities where there has 
been only one.
In this battle to make the 
San  Fernando  Valley  and 
Hollywood separate municipali-
ties—or keep each a part of Los 
Angeles—both sides are invest-
ing millions of dollars to sway 
voters. Most believe the battle 
now hinges on gaining the sup-
port of Latinos.
Pro-secessionist forces say 
there is no better opportunity 
for political and social progress 
for the Latino community. This 
is now their rallying cry, in con-
trast to previous catchphrases 
such as “local control” and “bet-
ter services.”
“Latinos will have an un-
precedented  opportunity  to 
attain a sizeable amount of 
power in three cities,” said 
Jeffrey Gardfi eld, pro-city of 
Hollywood campaign manager. 
“On average, they will comprise 
forty percent of the population 
in each of them. There will be 
more Latinos elected, more 
emphasis on the needs of the 
community and more resources 
for their neighborhoods.”
Similar comments are heard 
daily from supporters of Valley 
secession.
Opponents, however, pre-
dict a disaster of “biblical 
proportions,” as Los Angeles 
Mayor James K. Hahn put it. 
They point to the impoverished 
and misnamed “minorities” as 
the groups with the 
most to lose should 
the city be divided.
“Only the poor 
will  suffer,”  said 
Miguel 
Contre-
ras,  Los  Angeles 
County  AFL-CIO 
secretary and trea-
surer.  “Those  in 
favor of secession 
are  a  group  of 
wealthy people who 
could care less what 
happens to East LA 
or South Central. 
By losing muscle 
in Washington by 
dropping  to  the 
third-largest 
city 
in the country, we 
will lose out greatly 
on our community program 
funds.”
In a recent Los Angeles Times 
poll, Valley Latinos favored 
secession by a margin of fi fty-
two to thirty-three percent, 
numbers close to the Valley’s 
general sentiment (fi fty-two 
percent in favor, thirty-seven 
percent against). The rest of Los 
Angeles, however, shows se-
cession losing overwhelmingly 
(forty-seven percent against, 
thirty-eight percent in favor) 
among all communities.
The goal of the secessionists 
is to obtain a very high favor-
able percentage (up to sixty-fi ve 
percent) within their area in 
order to compensate for the 
anticipated lack of support from 
the rest of the city.
To win, the initiatives must 
garner a majority of the vote 
within the particular area, as 
well as in the entire city. Thus, 
attracting the Latino vote has 
become crucial, for Latinos 
SF: Day laborer program up for bid 
Pacifi c News Service and El Reportero
The City of San Francisco 
will put up for public bid a 
program aimed at improving 
conditions of undocumented 
day laborers, reports El Report-
ero. These are the men who 
stand on street corners in the 
Mission District in search of 
work. Current program admin-
istrators say the decision to fi nd 
new administrators was made 
in retaliation for recent protests 
from laborers who accused city 
offi cials of mistreatment.
In June, workers protested at 
City Hall and the Mission Dis-
trict police station, complaining 
of continued harassment from 
make up twenty percent of the 
population of Los Angeles as a 
whole, and forty percent in the 
Valley.
This week’s withdrawal of 
Senator Richard Alarcón, a 
prominent Latino candidate for 
the Valley mayoralty, may have 
hurt secessionists’ chances to 
win Latino support.
“Richard’s absence is a hard 
blow against the secession 
movement,” said Harry Pachón 
of the Tom
á
s Rivera Public 
Policy Institute. “Every time we 
ask Latino voters whose voice 
they consider when 
making political deci-
sions, they say they 
listen to their repre-
sentatives.”
From the start, 
secessionists 
have 
argued that a cen-
tralized government 
far from the Valley 
does not provide ser-
vices equivalent to 
taxes paid by Valley 
residents.
Secessionists 
expect to collect suf-
fi cient funds to buy 
radio and television 
ads. They plan to 
hold 
community 
meetings and can-
vass door to door.
Secessionists have support 
from millionaires. Gene La 
Pietra, a wealthy businessman 
who has led the Hollywood 
movement, has said that he 
will invest “whatever is neces-
sary” in his campaign. In the 
Valley, prominent people such 
as commissioner Bert Boeck-
man, owner of Galpin Ford, 
and ex-commissioner David 
Fleming have made signifi cant 
contributions.
Since voters will be asked to 
choose the mayor of the new 
city and the fourteen city coun-
cil members on the same ballot 
as the vote for secession, seces-
sionists hope the candidates’ 
campaigns and publicity will 
boost the movement.
“Our goal is to have up to 
150 candidates if possible,” 
said Richard Close, a Valley 
VOTE leader. “They will help 
us win.”
Those who fi ght against se-
cession want “to keep the city 
united.” The anti-secessionists’ 
main strategy has been to warn 
Angelinos of risks involved in 
the change.
“They must instill the fear 
factor, question secession and 
the cost to the city,” said ana-
lyst Jeffe. “They also need to 
emphasize the benefi ts of keep-
ing the city united.”
Hahn is working against 
secession  alongside  former 
political opponents, such as 
Antonio Villaraigosa, ex-can-
didate for mayor, and former 
Mayor Richard Riordan as well 
as the majority of elected func-
tionaries of the city. Prominent 
businesspeople, 
millionaires 
and Democratic Party con-
tributors  also  support  the 
anti-secessionists.
Hahn has said that he will 
raise at least fi ve million dol-
lars to send out his message. 
He also has the support and 
organizational capacity of the 
Los Angeles County AFL-CIO, 
which opposes secession.
“We are bringing our cam-
paign to our 240,000 union 
members. We will talk to every 
union. We are sending seven 
different mailings to homes, 
phoning voters, going door 
to door and using our volun-
teers,” said local union leader 
Miguel Contreras.
Villaraigosa said that he will 
work hard on the campaign by 
having community meetings to 
deliver the “unity” message to 
Latinos and others. Strategists 
are relying on Villaraigosa’s 
appeal among all Los Angeles 
Latinos to convince those in 
the Valley to oppose the initia-
tive.
the police, who ticketed labor-
ers for disrupting traffi c. Rene 
Saucedo, current administra-
tor of La Raza Centro Legal, 
the, said to put the program 
up for bid threatens current 
long term plans, such as mov-
ing a training and job center 
from old trailers to a building 
on César Ch
á
vez Street. Coun-
tering city allegations that the 
program was being misman-
aged, Saucedo noted that the 
program regularly exceeded its 
quotas for placing workers.
©  Copyright Pacifi c News Service
C# WPF PDF Viewer SDK to convert and export PDF document to other
PDF file & pages edit, C#.NET PDF pages extract, copy, paste Create multiple pages Tiff file from PDF document. with high quality, support converting PDF to PNG
extract images pdf; extract image from pdf using
VB.NET Create PDF from images Library to convert Jpeg, png images
Support create PDF from multiple image formats in VB.NET, including Jpg, Png, Bmp, Gif, Tiff, Bitmap, .NET Graphics, and REImage.
pdf image extractor c#; extract pdf pages to jpg
6 
The Alarm! Newspaper 
Augus
t
2
nd
, 2002
In Retrospect
Random      Bullets
By BLAIZE WILKINSON
The Alarm! Newspaper Contributor
Santa Cruz has always been a rough 
town. Founded in the 1790s as part of 
Father Junípero Serra’s California beau-
tifi cation project (a subject, I am given 
to understand, that is still taught with 
surprising lack of irony to unsuspecting 
fourth graders statewide), Santa Cruz 
began with the usual problems that come 
with religious colonialist endeavours: 
fear and death instead of the promised 
salvation. There was a distinct contra-
diction between the pastoral promise of 
the potrero—where the Mission orchards 
were, and Potrero Street still is—and the 
grim reality of disease visited on a popu-
lace with no immunities to small pox 
and cholera, or of Mission soldiers hunt-
ing down and forcibly returning Native 
converts who attempted to escape.
In the 1780s, reacting to the incursion 
of Russian fur hunters along the coast, 
the Spanish colonial government decid-
ed to solidify its hold on Alta California. 
It established, in addition to the extant 
string of religious-oriented missions and 
military presidios, three secular non-mil-
itary pueblos in Alta California. The sites 
chosen were Los Angeles, San Jose and 
Branciforte. Branciforte was situated on 
a bluff just across the San Lorenzo River 
from Mission Santa Cruz, and was popu-
lated by ex-soldiers and homesteaders. 
While Branciforte neighborhood today 
is not really considered the vortex of 
trouble, there was evidently an era 
when a hot time could be had there. If 
legend is to be believed, then Branciforte 
was somewhat wild, and its race track, 
bear-baiting and generally lawless ways 
were a thorn in the side of the padres on 
the other hill.
Anti-Chinese demonstrations, bear 
attacks, bootlegging and reckless carriage 
drivers. Santa Cruz has seen it all. A brief 
survey of Santa Cruz Surf articles from 
around the turn of the twentieth century 
reveals that the town also had problems 
that seem a bit too familiar. Given the 
current hoopla about downtown getting 
a little too colorful, it might be useful, 
or, by the same token, useless, to take 
a look at what our predecessors had to 
deal with in the far-off days of yore.
April 20, 1891—An article 
headlined “Break Up the Gang: Who 
Are the Hoodlums of Mission Hill and 
Garfi eld Park?” told of people “being left 
at the mercy” of a gang of thugs “who 
rob hens’ nests, steal chickens, poison 
dogs and cows, etc., break windows 
and invade and trample down fl ower 
gardens—doing any and every kind of 
damage, according as their malignant 
fancies dictate.” While we might get a 
chuckle at the bucolic vision conjured up 
by livestock in town, surely dog-poison-
ing (dog-poisoning!?!) makes something 
like hackeysack players on the Mall 
seem like a sweet dream of youth. 
September 30, 1892—Notes 
from the meeting of the Improvement 
Society, returning to their tasks “with 
enthusiasm” after summer vacation, 
have Dr. Anderson speaking “of the 
obstructions in front of some business 
houses on Pacifi c Avenue.” Evidently, 
“the limit allowed by law for sidewalk 
displays of goods is two feet from the 
front of the store and this limit is ex-
ceeded in a number of cases.” This talk 
of feet and store fronts is eerily familiar, 
though here it is the businesses that are 
the offenders. Another Society member 
“called attention to the fact that it was 
not always pleasant for ladies to pass 
boot-black stands on account of the con-
dition of the sidewalks.” Perhaps ladies 
were fussier then. Or, perhaps not. I 
guess nowadays they could just cite the 
bootblack for spilling liquids.
January 22, 1894—“Saturday’s 
Shooting. A Fusillade of Random Bullets 
on Pacifi c Avenue.” This article told the 
story of Thomas Cowling, who had been 
arrested four months before for drawing 
a revolver outside a saloon on Cooper 
Street and given forty-eight days for 
assault. While in jail “Cowling showed 
strong evidences of insanity” and 
thought the District Attorney and Chief 
of Police “were attempting to railroad 
him to San Quentin.” The “climax of his 
insane wrath” was a shootout involving 
Cowling, the Chief and another offi cer, 
culminating in Cowling being shot. He 
died in the hospital that evening, still 
consumed by his hatred of the police 
chief. The newspaper notes that “Al-
though the man has openly shown his 
hatred and a very pronounced homicidal 
mania there has been no attempt made 
whatever to place him under restraint.” 
Nor, I imagine, to try and treat him. 
Maybe President Reagan slipped through 
a hole in the space-time continuum and 
infl uenced laws concerning proper treat-
ment of the mentally ill in the 1890s. Is 
it just me, or have other people noticed  
that there are more homeless people 
since the Tefl on president emptied the 
asylums?
None of the examples denies that 
Santa Cruz currently has problems. I 
don’t like the idea of human feces on 
the sidewalk any more than the next fel-
low, and I personally had some asshole 
throw an empty beer can at my head 
a few weeks ago just on the corner of 
Laurel and Cedar (I ducked; he missed). 
But my friend Becky, who grew up here 
in town, says that as long as she can 
remember downtown has pretty much 
been the same. When she was in grade 
school, it was punks who hung out on 
the Town Clock end of things. And she, 
talking to other people (like her mom) 
who have lived here since the 50s and 
60s, has found out that they, too, think 
that downtown has always had its scarey 
bits.
Even with the can-throwing incident, 
I feel better now walking from my house 
south of Laurel to the Town Clock end of 
the Mall than I did just a few years ago. 
Maybe it is the demise of the “hippie cor-
ner” at Pacifi c and Cathcart. Maybe it is 
the fact that I will now say to people who 
call me “sister” that I can’t trust them to 
share the Earth if they can’t even share 
the sidewalk. Maybe it’s because if I re-
ally don’t want to be panhandled, I’ll 
do something weird, like yell nonsense 
into my own purse. Maybe I have, after 
coming here twelve years ago as a wet-
behind-the-ears rube from Colorado, 
fi nally learned how to get along in a 
“small” town that—because of high pop-
ulation density, because of a large and 
varied number of impermant residents, 
because of high costs and low wages, 
because of a great climate where people 
get to be outdoors all the time—has a big 
town attitude, and, unfortunately, some 
big tow
n woes. 
Strumming Guitar won’t be the same again
Halie Johnson/The Alarm! Newspaper
A street musician with a collection container out asking for donations as 
he plays his music on Pacifi c Avenue Mall.  The new downtown ordinances 
will go into effect in September and would seriously restrict where street 
musicians like this man could perform on the public sidewalk.
Augus
t
2
nd
, 2002 
The Alarm! Newspaper
7
War Notes
A bi-monthly column following the developments of our new 
permanent war, the war on terrorism
By SASHA K
The Alarm! Newspaper Contributor
Bombs and cover-ups  
A preliminary UN investigation has 
uncovered more ugly details about the 
US bombing in early July of a wedding 
party in Afghanistan.  A couple of days 
after the incident, the Pentagon an-
nounced that it would take some time 
to investigate and that they didn’t even 
know if anyone had indeed died.  But 
according to the Times of London, the 
UN investigation found that US soldiers 
arrived on the scene within hours and 
fi lmed damaged buildings and the bod-
ies of around fi fty dead Afghanis.  The 
soldiers went much further than that, 
however.  After the attack, they appar-
ently tied up the women of the village 
and cleaned up shrapnel, bullets and 
bloodstains.  The UN investigation also 
found “no corroboration” on the ground 
that the US plane had been fi red upon.  
The Pentagon denied there was a cover-
up and still claims it is too early to draw 
any conclusions.  The UN was to make 
its full report public on Wednesday, but 
after the US denial, the UN gave the re-
port to the US and Afghan governments 
and did not make it public.  The cover-
up is being covered up.
Bombing peace  
The US, of course, isn’t the only one 
with a “collateral damage” problem.  
Israel bombed a tightly packed Gaza 
neighborhood last week, killing a Hamas 
leader and fi fteen civilians and wound-
ing around 150.  The attack is sure to 
set off many revenge bombings of Israeli 
civilian and military targets.  Even the 
US weakly condemned the attack, say-
ing that “this heavy-handed action does 
not contribute to peace.”  But was that 
really the goal of dropping a one-ton 
bomb on a crowded residential neigh-
borhood?  Ariel Sharon, Bush’s “man of 
peace,” seems to have had other aims 
for the attack, which he personally ap-
proved.  On the days leading up to the 
July 23 bombing, there were several 
signifi cant moves towards peace.  First, 
Abdul Razek Yahyia, the Palestinians’ 
interior minister, announced a new 
security plan to reduce violence.  Shi-
mon Peres, Israel’s foreign minister, was 
pleased with the plan.
At the same time, the EU, Egypt, Jor-
dan and Saudi Arabia were in the midst 
of brokering another peace plan that, as 
a fi rst step, would have groups linked to 
Yasser Arafat’s Fatah movement—such 
as the al-Aqsa Brigades—end the use of 
suicide bombing within Israel.  Finally, 
on July 22, Hamas’ spiritual leader, 
Sheikh Ahmed Yassin, said that Hamas 
would stop killing Israeli civilians if Is-
rael pulled out of the Palestinian cities 
it recently reoccupied, freed prisoners 
and stopped the assassination of Pales-
tinian leaders.  These moves towards 
peace were troubling to Sharon, whose 
continued hold on power is based on 
an Israeli fear of terrorism.  Addition-
ally, if peace began to break out, Sharon 
would have no excuse for reoccupying 
Palestinian controlled areas or for the 
removal of Arafat.  But the bombing 
quickly took care of Sharon’s mount-
ing problems, and it looks as if peace is 
again safely a long way off.
Suicide bombing and landmines  
If terrorism is defi ned as the targeting 
of civilians, is the use of landmines an 
act of terrorism?  Landmines are much 
more likely to kill civilians than mili-
tary personnel.  This fact has been the 
driving force behind the Ottawa Con-
vention, the fi ve-year-old global treaty 
banning the use of landmines.  Hamid 
Karzai, the president of Afghanistan, 
announced Sunday that Afghanistan 
would become the 126th country to 
sign the treaty.  Afghanistan has been 
badly affected by landmines: according 
to the International Committee of the 
Red Cross, 200,000 Afghanis have been 
killed or wounded by mines in the last 
twenty-three years of war.  But there 
are still a few prominent nations sup-
porting the continued use of landmines; 
the US, China and Russia have not 
signed the treaty.  It is also estimated 
that around 2,000 of the bombs the US 
dropped on Afghanistan in the recent 
war lie unexploded around the country, 
ready to randomly kill and wound.  
A chorus of doubt  
As US talk of a war on Iraq reaches 
a high point, a chorus of statements 
against the war by leaders vital to any 
war coalition is weakening Bush’s op-
portunity for a prompt attack.  Arab 
League chief Amr Musa warned that 
any attack on Iraq would threaten 
regional security.  French President 
Jacques Chirac and German Chancellor 
Gerhard Schroeder made a joint state-
ment that they would not support an 
attack on Iraq without a UN mandate.  
The Kuwaiti government called on 
Iraq to let in inspectors and avoid the 
war.  King Abdullah of Jordan, meeting 
with British Prime Minister Tony Blair, 
said that Britain should not go along 
with the US drive towards war.  King 
Abdullah, who will meet with President 
Bush this week, said, “in the light of the 
failure to move the Israeli-Palestinian 
process forward, military action against 
Iraq would really open a Pandora’s box.”  
The Egyptian and Saudi governments 
have also made statements against the 
war.  Iraq’s neighbour, Turkey, a key 
NATO ally, stated its concerns over the 
war.  But it also quietly asked the US 
to write off $4 billion of debt if the US 
does go to war.  And even in Britain, 
America’s strongest supporter, a series 
of letters and op-eds in newspapers by 
retired, high-ranking military personnel 
have denounced the war plans.
War and human rights
Last Friday, Mary Robinson, the 
UN human rights chief who is to lose 
her job due to US pressure, said the 
US “war on terror” was encouraging 
countries to roll back human rights.  
She said that countries have been using 
the crackdowns in the US and Europe 
as an excuse to step up repression in 
their own territories.  Robinson didn’t 
name any nation, but this week Egypt 
arrested sixteen members of the Mus-
lim Brotherhood (which has renounced 
violence), along with a prominent 
human rights activist and sociology 
professor, Saadeddin Ibrahim.  Ibrahim 
is being prosecuted by the Egyptian 
government for monitoring Egyptian 
elections.  In China, the government 
is increasing its repression of ethnic 
Uyghurs, a Turkish minority that lives 
in the western province of Xinjiang.  
The Chinese government—attempting 
to present itself as a US partner in the 
“war on terrorism”—now legitimates 
the repression by claiming, without any 
evidence, that Uyghur separatists are 
supported by Osama bin Laden.  
By H. G. LEVINE
Pacifi c News Service
EDITOR’S NOTE
:
Earlier this month, 
Great Britain effe
c
tively de
c
riminalized 
marijuana. Now Canada may follow—mu
c
to the 
c
hagrin of Ameri
c
a’s fervent drug war-
riors. But Canada, whi
c
h helped lead the 
United States out of the prohibition era 70 
years ago, may again show Washington 
the light. PNS 
c
ontributor Harry G. Levine 
(hglevine@
c
ompuserve.
c
om) is a professor of 
so
c
iology at Queens College, City University of 
New York, and author of “Cra
c
k in Ameri
c
a
:
Demon Drugs and So
c
ial Justi
c
e” (1997, 
University of California Press).
A specter is haunting US drug 
warriors —the specter of marijuana de-
criminalization…in Canada.
U.S. lawmakers discovered with alco-
hol in the 1920s that it’s diffi cult to run 
a successful prohibitionist regime when 
a neighboring country has more tolerant 
policies. Now it’s the same neighbor and 
a different drug.
Canada’s National Post has quoted 
Asa Hutchinson, head of the US Drug 
Enforcement Administration (DEA), 
saying that recent and proposed canna-
bis policy reforms in Canada and Britain 
could undermine support for the “war 
on drugs” within the United States.
“We (in the US) have great respect 
for Canada and Britain,” Hutchinson 
said, “and if they start shifting policies 
with regards to marijuana, it simply 
increases the rumblings in this country 
that we ought to re-examine our policy. 
It is a distraction from a fi rm policy on 
drug use.”
With classic understatement, the 
DEA chief noted that decriminalizing 
marijuana possession in Canada would 
“complicate things somewhat for the 
US” It certainly would, as two striking 
precedents show.
There is the case of the Netherlands, 
which for more than two decades has 
“complicated things” for drug warriors 
in Europe. A generation of Europeans 
has seen Holland’s regulated system of 
cannabis cafes succeed as a workable, 
reasonable alternative to punitive and 
ineffective anti-drug policies. Many 
tourists have visited Dutch border towns 
and cities to use cannabis and sometimes 
to bring it home.
The DEA chief used the Dutch 
experience to evoke the specter of a 
Netherlands-like  Canada  attracting 
marijuana tourists: “If you have lax 
marijuana policies right across the bor-
der, where possession of marijuana is 
not considered criminal conduct, that 
invites US citizens into Canada for 
marijuana use, and that will increase 
the likelihood that both US citizens and 
Canadian citizens will bring back the 
Canadian marijuana across the border 
for distribution and sale.”
A second worrisome precedent dates 
back to the 1920s, when Canada ended 
its own failed alcohol prohibition before 
the United States repealed the 18th 
Amendment in 1933. At that time, Can-
ada was a major source for the banned 
drug. Many US tourists also used their 
cars, trucks or boats to smuggle small 
quantities of alcohol.
Just as important, regulated alcohol 
policies in Canada (and England) also 
served as easy-to-witness examples of 
workable alternatives to the expensive, 
punitive and impossible crusade for an 
“alcohol-free society.” There is no doubt 
Blame Canada
that Canada’s successful example was 
extremely important in shifting opin-
ion about alcohol policy in the United 
States.
Today, Canada, Britain and other 
countries will likely play the same ex-
ample-setting role for the United States.
A growing number of mainstream 
Canadian offi cials, politicians, organi-
zations and publications have already 
proposed  reducing  or  eliminating 
criminal penalties for cannabis use. 
A year ago, the Toronto Globe urged 
the country to “decriminalize all—yes, 
all—personal drug use, henceforth to 
be regarded primarily as a health issue 
rather than as a crime.”
Recently,  Canadian  Minister  of 
Justice Martin Cauchon said that his 
country is seriously considering elimi-
nating criminal penalties for possessing 
marijuana. Cauchon is waiting for the 
recommendations of a legislative com-
mittee that is expected to recommend 
relaxing current laws. “We’re not talk-
ing about making it legal,” Cauchon 
said, “we’re talking about the possibility 
of moving ahead with what we call ‘de-
criminalization.’”
Moving ahead on decriminaliza-
tion will take time. Canada will not 
soon become the Netherlands of North 
America, nor Vancouver its Amsterdam. 
Marijuana production and sale is still il-
legal everywhere in the world, and even 
in the Netherlands most cannabis use 
is indoors, private and discrete. Finally, 
the United States, which currently ar-
rests more than 700,000 people a year 
for cannabis, shows no sign of letting 
up.
But the United States is ever more 
alone on its punitive drug-war path. 
Many democratic countries have in-
formally or offi cially decriminalized 
cannabis possession and use and oth-
ers are moving in that direction. Most 
important, this is occurring in the 
culturally  linked,  English-speaking 
countries of Great Britain, Australia, 
New Zealand and Canada.
Canada is already a cannabis-export-
ing nation and, as in Europe, indoor 
cultivation is booming. Canada’s main 
customer is the United States. As was 
true for alcohol in the 1920s, this can-
not be stopped. There can never be 
enough police to do the job.
By responsibly going ahead with 
marijuana decriminalization—by  do-
ing what is best for its own citizens 
—Canada is again likely to lead the 
way for the United States. As it did 
seventy years ago, Canada can again 
help the US see its own better drug 
policy future.
©  Copyright Pacifi c News Service
Northern neighbor’s 
pot policy irks US drug 
warriors
8 
The Alarm! Newspaper 
Augus
t
2
nd
, 2002
International/Internacional
Paramilitaries  suspects  in 
killing of radio station owne
r
BOGOTÁ,  July  1,  2002 
(CPJ)—The owner of a radio 
station, who recently had 
alerted the public to the pres-
ence of paramilitary fi ghters in 
the region, was shot and killed 
in northeastern Colombia. 
Efraín Varela Noriega, own-
er of Radio Meridiano-70, was 
driving home from a university 
graduation in Arauca Depart-
ment on the afternoon of June 
28 when gunmen yanked him 
from his car and shot him in 
the face and chest, said Col. 
Jorge Caro, acting commander 
of Arauca’s police.
Varela hosted two polemical 
news and opinion programs 
for the station in the town of 
Arauca and criticized all sides 
fi ghting in Colombia’s 38-year 
civil confl ict. 
“He criticized everyone,” 
said José Gutiérrez, who co-
hosted an afternoon program 
called “Let’s Talk Politics” with 
Varela. “No one was spared.” 
Gutiérrez said that less than 
a week before the killing, 
Varela told listeners during 
his morning news show that 
fi ghters from the paramilitary 
United Self-Defense  Forces 
of Colombia, or AUC, had 
arrived in Arauca and were 
patrolling the streets in the 
town, which is on the border 
with Venezuela. 
Tension has been build-
ing in the oil-rich province 
since early June when the 
leftist Revolutionary Armed 
Forces of Colombia, or FARC, 
began threatening to kill civil 
servants in the region who re-
fused to resign. 
The rebels are battling the 
paramilitary army for control 
over lucrative territory not 
only in Arauca but throughout 
the country. 
Three years ago, Varela’s 
name appeared on a list of 
people that the paramilitary 
army had declared military 
targets, said Caro, the acting 
police  commander,  adding 
that authorities were investi-
gating rumors that the AUC 
was responsible for the killing. 
A frequent listener of the sta-
tion, Caro said Varela seemed 
to reserve his sharpest criti-
cism for the paramilitaries.
Offi cials from Arauca’s Pros-
ecutor’s Offi ce investigating 
the case could not be reached 
for comment on July 1, which 
was a holiday in Colombia.
Varela, who was in his early 
50s, was also the secretary of 
a provincial peace commission 
as well as its former president, 
said Evelyn Varela, his 28-
year-old daughter, and the 
manager of the station. 
In recent months, Varela 
had begun warning his only 
child that his life could be in 
danger. “He had us prepared 
for the worst,” his daughter 
said.
BOGOTÁ, 1 d
e
julio d
e
2002 (CPJ)—El propietario 
de una radioemisora, quien 
recientemente alertó al pú-
blico acerca de la presencia de 
paramilitares en la región, fue 
asesinado a balazos al noreste 
de Colombia. 
Efraín  Varela  Noriega, 
propietario de Radio Meridi-
ano-70, conducía de regreso a 
casa luego de asistir a un acto 
de graduación en una uni-
versidad del departamento 
de Arauca, la tarde del 28 de 
junio, cuando unos pistoleros 
lo bajaron de su auto y le dis-
pararon a la cara y el pecho, 
según el coronel Jorge Caro, 
comandante interino de la 
policía de Arauca.
Varela era locutor de dos 
polémicos  programas  de 
noticias y opinión de la ra-
dioemisora en la ciudad de 
Arauca, y criticaba a todas las 
partes beligerantes del con-
fl icto civil colombiano, que ya 
dura 38 años.
“Criticaba a todos,” co-
mentó José Gutiérrez, quien 
preventaba junto a Varela un 
programa vespertino llamado 
“Hablemos de política.” “Na-
Sospechan de paramilitares 
en asesinato de propietario 
de radio emisoara
die se salvaba.”
Gutiérrez  declaró  que 
menos de una semana an-
tes del asesinato, Varela les 
dijo a los oyentes durante su 
noticiero matutino que los 
paramilitares de las Autode-
fensas Unidas de Colombia 
(AUC) habían llegado a Ar-
auca y estaban patrullando las 
calles de la ciudad, localizada 
en la frontera con Venezuela.
La tensión se ha venido 
acumulando en este depar-
tamento, rico en petróleo, 
desde principios de junio cu-
ando las izquierdistas Fuerzas 
Armadas Revolucionarias de 
Colombia  (FARC)  comen-
zaron a amenazar de muerte 
a los funcionarios públicos de 
la región que se negaran a re-
nunciar a sus cargos.
Los rebeldes se disputan 
con el ejército paramilitar el 
control sobre territorios lucra-
tivos, no sólo en Arauca, sino 
también en todo el país. 
Hace tres años, el nom-
bre de Varela fi guró en una 
lista de personas a quienes el 
ejército paramilitar había de-
clarado ser objetivos militares, 
precisó Caro, el comandante 
This pie
c
e was produ
c
ed by the 
Committee for the Prote
c
tion of 
Journalists.  For more infomation
:
http
:
//www.
c
pj.org.
Go see INDIA on Page 12
COLOMBIA:
interino de la policía, quien 
añadió que las autoridades 
estaban investigando rumores 
de que las AUC habían sido 
responsables del asesinato. 
Caro, asiduo oyente de la 
radioemisora,  señaló  que 
Varela parecía guardar las 
críticas m
á
s fuertes para los 
paramilitares. 
Los intentos por obtener 
declaraciones de parte de los 
funcionarios de la Fiscalía de 
Arauca encargados de investi-
gar el caso el 1 de julio fueron 
infructuosos, por haber sido 
día feriado en Colombia.
Varela, quien tenía alred-
edor de 50 años, también era 
secretario y ex-presidente de 
una comisión de paz departa-
mental, indicó Evelyn Varela, 
su hija de 28 años y gerente 
de la emisora. 
En  los  últimos  meses, 
Varela había comenzado a 
advertirle a su hija única que 
su vida podía estar en riesgo. 
“Nos preparó para lo peor.” 
declaró su hija.
Esta nota fue produ
c
ida por El 
Comité para la Prote
cc
ión de Pe-
riodistas.  Para más informa
c
ión
:
http
:
//www.
c
pj.org. 
India’s new Muslim president 
heads into storm
By SANDIP ROY
Pacifi c News Service
Nuclear scientist by profes-
sion, Muslim by faith, India’s 
new president faces a country 
still reeling from Hindu-Mus-
lim riots. The question is 
whether Dr. Abdul Kalam 
can heal these wounds.
For the thousands of Mus-
lims still huddled in refugee 
camps in Gujarat, Kalam’s as-
cension to the highest offi ce 
in the land is small consola-
tion.
Nishrin Hussain has been 
to some of those camps. 
Though she now lives in 
the United States, her fam-
ily resides in Gujarat. “I got 
a call from my brother to say 
our family home had been 
burned in the riots,” Hussain 
said. “Then he paused and 
said our father was inside at 
the time.”
So were 150 other Mus-
lims—mostly  women  and 
children—who had sought 
safety by sheltering with 
Hussain’s 74-year-old father, 
Dr. Ahsan Jafri, a former 
member of parliament.
Dr. Jafri spent three hours 
calling everyone he knew for 
help, from political bigwigs to 
police commissioners. But the 
mob outside chopped down 
the phone lines and threw 
kerosene bombs into the 
house. Jafri came out with 
folded hands and pleaded 
for the lives of those trapped 
inside. He was cut down with 
a sword and burned, and the 
house was set on fi re.
“They identifi ed 98 bod-
ies,” says Nishrin, her voice 
shaking. “I knew every single 
one of them by name. They 
were my friends, classmates, 
neighbors.”
The riots in Gujarat started 
when a train of Hindu pil-
grims coming from a disputed 
temple site clashed with local 
Muslims in Godhra. Muslims 
allegedly set the train on fi re, 
burning alive 58 Hindus. In 
the carnage that followed, 
some 2,000 people, mostly 
Muslims, are believed to 
have been killed. Around 
100,000 still languish in refu-
gee camps.
In a new book, “Ethnic 
Confl ict and Civic Life: Hin-
dus and Muslims in India,” 
writer  Asutosh  Varshney 
compares different cities in 
India with similar communal 
makeup—such  as  Aligarh 
and Kozhikode, and Ahmed-
abad and Surat—to fi nd out 
why one is prone to Hindu-
Muslim violence while the 
other is not. Varshney thinks 
the reason is that in places 
like Surat and Kozhikode, 
Hindus and Muslims have 
strong business connections. 
In Ahmedabad and Aligarh—
scenes of deadly riots in the 
past—Muslims tend to be 
ghettoized.
 fact-fi nding  mission 
from an Indian non-govern-
mental group known as the 
Citizens Initiative found that 
ghettoization is spreading to 
the villages.
The  group also  found 
that rape is being used as 
a weapon of war. Women 
were burned alive to destroy 
evidence of their sexual as-
sault. Pregnant women had 
fetuses ripped out of their 
bodies. Women arrived at 
refugee camps naked, some 
with pieces of wood inserted 
in their vaginas.
After the Godhra killings, 
where many of the victims 
were women, a Gujarati daily, 
Sandesh, had published front 
page stories of mobs dragging 
away Hindu women from the 
trains, and of Hindu women 
who had their breasts cut 
off. The stories were false. 
Published retractions were 
buried in inside pages.
When the mobs descend-
ed on a Muslim area of the 
city of Ahmedabad, they 
Augus
t
2
nd
, 2002 
The Alarm! Newspaper 
9
To “grind” is 
to work your 
hustle, whether 
it be drugs, 
stocks or real 
estate. In these 
tough times, 
everybody is 
grindin’
Commentary
Grindin’—when hip hop goes retro, it’s woe in 
the ghetto
By KEVIN WESTON
Pacifi c News Service
EDITOR’S NOTE
:
The thump and 
c
ra
c
k of early 1980s hard
c
ore beats are 
ba
c
k on the streets of urban Ameri
c
a, 
writes PNS 
c
ontributor Kevin Weston. 
That means desperation and violen
c
are ba
c
k, too, as a 
c
utthroat drive for 
survival energizes hip hop even as 
c
on-
ditions in the ‘hood deteriorate. Weston 
(kweston@pa
c
ifi 
c
news.org) is editor of 
Youth Outlook (YO!), a magazine by and 
about Bay Area youth that 
c
an be found 
at www.youthoutlook.org.
OAKLAND, 
California—That 
earthquake-like beat in the distance 
is the sound of hip hop returning to 
underground roots put down in the 
‘80s. Hip hop was hardcore back then, 
because hard times were spreading 
like the fl u—just like now.
Tik crack
Thump
/
thump
Thump
/
thump
Boom
/
Boom
/
Boom
It’s the sound that only hip hop 
can make. It’s different from the usu-
al West Coast
/
Southern “funk” hop 
(Lil Wayne, Dre, DJ Quik, Snoop), 
NY superstar rap (Nas, Jay Z) and 
fl avor-of-the-month hip pop
/
R&B 
(Ashanti
/
Ja Rule, Usher) that booms 
from car stereos.
That “tik crack” drum track “Grin-
din’‚“ by Virginia-based rap duo The 
Clipse comes through my East Oak-
land three-way intersection four or 
fi ve times a night, toppling The Big 
Tymers’ “Hood Rich” from fi rst place 
on my own unoffi cial street-bump 
chart.
To “grind” is to work your hustle, 
whether it be drugs, stocks or real es-
tate. In these tough times, everybody 
is grindin’, with the same cutthroat 
“earn by all means necessary” atti-
tude of a CEO or gangster.
Listen to Malice, who, with Pusha 
T, writes The Clipse’s raps:
“My grind’s ‘bout family, never been 
about fame,
From days I wasn’t ‘Abel
/
able,’ there 
was always ‘Cain
/
caine,’
Four and a half will get you in the 
game,
Anything less is just a goddamn 
shame,
Guess the weight, my watch got blue 
chips in the face,
Glock with two tips, whoever gets in 
the way,
Not to mention the hideaway that 
rests by the lake,
Consider my raw demeanor the icing 
on the cake,
I’m grinding.”
Sound  familiar?  Reaganomics, 
excessive materialism, high crime, 
crack, the fi rst round of welfare 
reform, the scourge of AIDS, high 
unemployment, urban decay, poor 
schools, the rise of gangs and rampant 
police brutality defi ned the nation’s 
urban landscape in the 1980s.
Now, more than just the attitude in 
Malice’s lyrics or the song’s infectious 
beats recall the ‘80s. Nationwide, 
the overall crime rate is up for the 
fi rst time in a decade. In Oakland, 
the number of murders threatens to 
double from last year’s total of forty-
eight.
Preachers and community leaders 
held a “peace march” in response to 
the recent rash of mostly Black-on-
Black violence. A similar march was 
held in 1986, when Oakland was 
literally “crackin’.” At the height of 
the crack-inspired turf wars in 1992, 
more than 200 people were mur-
dered here. Most of the killings were 
drug related, with Black victims and 
perpetrators.
The bloodletting of the mid-’80s 
through the early ‘90s set the stage 
for the L.A. riots in 1992, the mas-
sive jailing program known as the 
Clinton  Crime 
Bill in 1994 and 
the 
redemp-
tive vibes of the 
Million 
Man 
March in 1995. 
Eventually, rap 
music smoothed 
out and became 
mainstream.
But 
“Grin-
din’”  has  the 
aural  aesthetic 
of hip hop born 
in  early  ‘80s 
hardcore beats. 
The 
single—
produced 
by 
the Asian and 
Black hit-making duo known as The 
Neptunes—is all beat and boom, com-
pletely stripped down to the naked 
soul of ghetto-bred rhythm.
There have been similar sounds in 
the history of rap. Run DMC’s “Suck-
er M.C.s,” Mantronics “Fresh Is the 
Word,” Audio Two’s “Top Billin’,” Ice 
T’s “6 in Da Mornin’,” UTFO’s “Rox-
anne Roxanne” and Easy E’s (RIP) 
“Boyz in Da Hood”—all were made in 
the mid–to late 1980s, when hip hop 
wasn’t on commercial radio.
Dr. Dre’s classic “The Chronic,” 
released in 1992, and its melodic 
hit single “Nuthin But a G Thang” 
was more like an R&B tune, a sing-
songy departure from the hardcore. 
“Nuthin” was one of the fi rst gangsta 
rap singles to get mainstream radio 
play. The sound was reconciling and 
laid back, like an L.A. sunset. The 
video featured a barbecue and house 
party—two activities that were al-
most impossible to do in the roaring 
‘80s of drive-bys and crack kingpins 
like Oakland’s Felix Mitchell, L.A.’s 
Rick “Freeway” Ross and New York’s 
Nicky Barnes.
That smooth formula has ruled 
from 
the 
mid-’90s until 
now.
The  “raw 
demeanor” 
that  Malice 
raps about is 
the  attitude 
of desperation 
and  greedy 
ambition that 
drove  Felix 
Mitchell and 
many others 
to 
contrib-
ute  to  the 
destruction 
of the com-
munity while 
feeding their families—a bitter irony 
made possible only in America. I ex-
pect the music to get better as times 
threaten to get worse.
“Grindin’” reaffi rms hip hop’s 
musical power. If hip hop becomes 
a revolutionary cultural force for 
change again, know that conditions 
in the ‘hoods where the sounds are 
born are getting more desperate and 
hectic. That’s good for the music, bad 
for the ‘hood.
©  Copyright Pacifi c News Service
The Alarm! Newspaper
is looking for experienced reporters to con-
tribute news stories and feature articles.
We are especially interested in writers who can 
contribute stories in Spanish. The Alarm! pays 
13 cents per printed word. 
If you would like to be a regular contributor, 
please send a letter of interest and three writing 
samples to: 
P.O. Box 1205 
Santa Cruz, CA 95061
info@the-alarm.com
El Semanario ¡La Alarma!
esta buscando periodistas experimentados que 
colaboren con reportajes y artículos noticiosos.
Estamos especialmente interesados en colabo-
raciones en español.
La Alarma! paga 13 centavos por palabra impresa.
Si usted quisiera ser un colaborador regular, fa-
vor de mandar una carta de interés y tres ejem-
plos de sus escritos a:
P.O. Box 1205
Santa Cruz CA 95061 
info@the-alarm.com
10 
The Alarm! Newspaper 
2
This space is set aside each 
week for a youth voice and 
perspective. We welcome and 
encourage you to write on a wide 
range of topics.
We accept entries written in 
English or Spanish, whichever 
language you are most com-
fortable with. Entries should be 
approximately 750 words. Please 
contact us in advance if you’re 
planning to write an article. 
For more info call Halie John-
son at 429-NEWS. Or email 
youth@the-alarm.com with your 
name, phone number or some 
other way we can get in touch 
with you.  Please include the 
topic you are interested in cov-
ering.
Youth
Anti-what? movement: 
Berkeley protesters 
struggle for points of un
n
By RUSSELL MORSE
YO! Youth Outlook
OCTOBER 28, 2001—Dominique, a 
22-year-old Cal student, stands in a blue 
work jumpsuit with a purple bandanna 
on her head, what she calls her “Rosie 
the Riveter outfi t.” She’s holding an 
American fl ag with rainbow colored 
stripes at an anti-war rally, trying to get 
passers-bys to sign a petition to “protect 
our civil liberties.” 
“I was never politically active before 
this. Never in my entire life. A couple 
weeks ago, though, I was walking out 
of class and I heard somebody tell this 
guy, ‘Stop looking at me, you barbaric 
Arab.’ I was shocked. Then I came out 
here and heard these people cheering 
‘stop the violence, stop the hate.’ From 
there I started marching and going to 
their meetings.” 
There’s a new anti-war movement 
brewing on the Berkeley campus, but it’s 
not your parents’ protest. Young people 
are not chanting “Hell no, we won’t go.” 
They’re crying out for racial justice. It’s 
a movement that’s brought the diverse 
campus together to some extent, but 
also has driven it apart. A lot of differ-
ent groups with different agendas have 
gotten involved, which has caused con-
fusion and turned some away from the 
movement altogether. 
After two weeks of involvement in 
the organizing effort, Dominique has 
noticed some areas she feels could be 
fi ne tuned. 
“There is a laundry list of issues. A 
lot of people want to talk about a lot of 
different things. We have people with all 
different reasons why they don’t want 
war or why they want their civil liberties 
protected, so it’s kind of hard. It would 
help if we could be joined for one thing 
like ‘stop the war.’” 
Dominique got involved because she 
wanted to stop racial profi ling at her 
school. She was angered by the hate 
crimes that had been committed against 
Muslims and Arab Americans and want-
ed to see what she could do to ease the 
tension. Two weeks later, she’s trying to 
get people to sign a petition on Civil Lib-
erties. She understands it as part of the 
effort, but wants to be more involved in 
the campaign for racial justice. 
“The main issue is racism in general. 
The thing is, when you go against people 
who look Middle Eastern, that can be 
anybody. Somebody said to me ‘bring all 
your friends, we’re going to bomb your 
ass.’ I said ‘I’m from Puerto Rico—you’ve 
been bombing Vieques for the last twen-
ty-fi ve years.’ If that’s happening here in 
Berkeley, imagine what’s happening in 
New York. That’s where my family lives. 
My father’s calling me and telling me 
they’re calling him towel head. We can’t 
support terrorism but how are we going 
to fi ght terrorism with terrorism?” 
Eric is an 18-year-old freshman at Cal 
and a member of USA United Students 
of America. They’re a group of young 
people at Berkeley who have come to-
gether to show their support for America 
in the face of attacks and particularly the 
anti-war movement. 
“We are kind of disgusted in a way 
by these protests, so we decided to rise 
up and show the world that there are 
people in Berkeley that do support 
America.” 
Eric stands there, with a large Ameri-
can fl ag over his shoulder, the only fl ag 
at the rally that is not in some way de-
faced, altered or displayed upside-down. 
He is surrounded by a group of people 
who don’t share his views and he calmly 
addresses all of their questions and ac-
cusations. 
USA and its members have, expected-
ly, encountered a lot of opposition since 
the group was formed. Eric tells the story 
of an anti-war organizer who followed a 
USA co-founder to his dorm, yelling at 
him and shaking his fi st. 
“He was saying how peace was the 
way and ‘you’re completely wrong’ 
and I honestly didn’t catch much of it 
because of all the yelling and screaming. 
That’s the thing, we at USA like to keep 
things calm and rational. A lot of people 
scream and shout and they yell and they 
are very emotional about this. But we at 
USA are rational, we understand that 
there will be violence, we understand 
that there will be deaths and it’s an un-
fortunate thing that has to happen.” 
Eric and his fellow organizers at 
USA don’t want to shut the protesters 
up, though. He stressed the importance 
of ensuring that the anti-war people 
have a voice and an arena in which to 
voice their dissenting opinions, but has 
a hard time understanding why they’re 
attempting to address so many differ-
ent issues in the context of an anti-war 
dialogue. 
“I differ on their viewpoints but I 
believe in free speech. I think that some 
of the rhetoric that they’re using isn’t 
good, though. They’re tying in a lot of 
different cards—the race factor, the sex 
factor—and I don’t think that neces-
sarily applies to the situation. This is a 
war on terrorism. This isn’t a war on a 
specifi c ethnicity or religion or group or 
people.” 
Even within the group of American 
loyalists, there is some tension and 
war-hawkish people in our organiza-
iza-
-
tion that support ground troops. They 
support going in there with a lot of mili-
tary force, but there are some people in 
our group that don’t feel that way, but 
still want to show their support. What 
brings us all together, though, is that 
we’re pro-American.” 
After the rally had ended and people 
broke off into groups for further dis-
cussion and organizational meetings, 
a curious division of people became 
obvious. In the post racial-justice-rally 
shuffl e, people had broken up along 
color lines—most obviously and notably, 
black and white. 
The white students (mostly male) 
congregated at the foot of the steps 
of Sproul Hall and the black students 
around the fountain across the plaza. 
It turned out that most of the black 
students had been in class (where one 
might expect a college student to be at 
1:00 on a Wednesday) and weren’t plan-
ning on attending anyway. 
Troy, a 19-year-old Oakland native, 
was taking a test during the rally. “I care 
about the anti-war movement to an 
extent, but I don’t see how that’s gonna 
stop crazy George Bush from going to 
war. He wouldn’t even help us out with 
the energy crisis, so why would he give a 
damn about a few sons and daughters of 
hippies and Black Panthers protesting?” 
Troy acknowledged that some past 
movements had been effective in bring-
ing about social change, but said that he 
feels those days are over. 
“The thing about the 1960s is that was 
the fi rst time in a long time people really 
started taking a stand, but now people 
look at Berkeley like, ‘okay, they’re 
gonna be protesting about something, so 
who cares?’” 
Nile, also 19, is a political science 
major and works for a local assembly-
woman trying to extend political power 
to Bay Area youth. She was taking a 
midterm during the rally and supports 
aspects of the movement, but like oth-
ers, is confused by the agenda. 
“It takes a drop of water to fi ll a 
bucket, you know—you have to start 
somewhere, but it seems like the stop-
the-war movement would be more 
successful if they just focused on one 
thing.” 
Matt Smauss is a student and principal 
organizer for the Stop the War Coalition. 
He was excited that the rally had been 
successful, but was a little disappointed 
by the low turnout, which he said was 
“really small, like 100 or 200 people.” A 
lot of those were passing students who 
would stop for a little bit and then move 
on. He did note, however, that it had 
only been put together the night before. 
He spoke about a group of people on 
campus who were not happy with the 
direction the movement was taking. 
“The student Jewish organizations 
have interpreted some of our message 
as anti-Semitic, but it’s not meant that 
way. It’s criticism of Israel’s policy, not 
of Israel. There are some people in the 
movement, though, who do criticize Is-
rael and they say Zionism is imperialism 
or apartheid or colonialism or whatever, 
so we’re gonna try and address that is-
sue.” 
But just as he fi nished talking about 
some of the opposition they’ve encoun-
tered from one group, he was in the 
process of building a bridge with anoth-
er: the United Students of America. 
“It’s a coming together between the 
two opposing groups of the rally under 
the second two points of unity: End Rac-
ism and Defend Civil Liberties. So what 
we do is agree to disagree on the fi rst 
one (Stop the War) and come together 
on the second and third to try and get 
our message out.” 
So for what must be the fi rst time in 
the history of protest, members of an 
anti-war movement will be pro-war. 
Russell, 20, is a senior writer for YO!
YO! Youth Outlook is an award-winning 
literary monthly journal of youth life in the 
Bay Area.    
YO! 
c
hroni
c
les the world through the eyes 
and voi
c
e of young people—between the ages 
of 15 and 25—in the San Fran
c
is
c
o Bay Area. 
From reporting pie
c
es on Palestinian Ameri-
c
an youth in the Bay Area to interviews with 
gospel hip hop bands, from photo essays by 
homeless youth to journal entries from temp 
workers in Sili
c
on Valley, YO! offers a unique 
window into California’s youth sub
c
ultures. 
YO! has a high profi le, with a daily 
c
olumn 
in the San Fran
c
is
c
o Examiner, a national 
distribution of 40,000 and an annual expo of 
youth 
c
ommuni
c
ators—from graffi ti artists to 
fi lmmakers to in
c
ar
c
erated youth. YO! stories 
also run nationally and internationally over 
the Pa
c
ifi 
c
News Servi
c
e wire.
Visit www.youthoutlook.org for more. 
Documents you may be interested
Documents you may be interested