2 Chapter 1
Launching and 
Quitting Acrobat X
You open and quit Acrobat X the way 
you open or close any application on the 
Macintosh or in Windows.
To open Acrobat X:
■ 
Do one of the following:
 Double-click the Acrobat X applica-
tion icon 
A
.
> Double-click a PDF file icon.
> On the Macintosh, click the Spotlight 
icon, type Acro, and then click on 
Acrobat X when it appears in the list 
of hits.
> In Windows, choose Acrobat X in the 
Start menu’s All Programs submenu.
In all cases, Acrobat X launches.
If you started Acrobat by double-clicking 
a PDF file icon, Acrobat presents you with 
that document’s first page.
If you double-clicked the Acrobat X 
application icon, you will see the Acrobat 
Welcome screen 
B
. We’ll talk more about 
this window in a moment.
To quit Acrobat X:
■ 
Do one of the following:
 On the Macintosh, choose Acrobat > 
Quit Acrobat.
 In Windows, choose File > Exit.
> On either platform, press Ctrl-Q 
(Command-Q).
> In Windows, close all open document 
windows.
You can also unplug the computer or whap 
it with a mallet—a bit harsh, but effective. 
The most common way to 
start Acrobat X is to double-click 
the icon of either the application 
or a PDF file.
B
When first opened, Acrobat presents you with 
the Welcome screen.
Pdf image extractor online - Select, copy, paste PDF images in C#.net, ASP.NET, MVC, Ajax, WinForms, WPF
Support PDF Image Extraction from a Page, a Region on a Page, and PDF Document
extract jpeg from pdf; extract image from pdf using
Pdf image extractor online - VB.NET PDF Image Extract Library: Select, copy, paste PDF images in vb.net, ASP.NET, MVC, Ajax, WinForms, WPF
Support PDF Image Extraction from a Page, a Region on a Page, and PDF Document
extract jpg from pdf; extract images from pdf acrobat
Starting With Acrobat  3
Using the Welcome 
Screen
When you launch Acrobat X without open-
ing a document, Acrobat presents you with 
its Welcome screen 
B
.
The Welcome screen provides convenient 
access to the most commonly used Acro-
bat activities. The left side of the window 
offers clickable links to the five most 
recently opened PDF files.
The rest of the window presents a series of 
links that execute particular actions. These 
are reasonably self-descriptive, but for the 
record here is an explanation of each:
■ 
Open (at the bottom of the recent-files 
list) lets you open a PDF file. You can 
also open an image or other type of file 
and Acrobat will do its best to convert it 
to PDF. We’ll talk about this in detail in 
Chapter 2, “Viewing a Document.”
■ 
Create PDF lets you create a PDF file 
from a TIFF, Word, or other file. You can 
even open a PDF file and convert that to 
PDF, though it’s not especially exciting. 
(See Chapter 4, “Making PDF Files.”)
■ 
Create PDF Portfolio lets you com-
bine a group of files (PDFs, images, 
spreadsheets, etc.) into a PDF package 
called a portfolio. (See Chapter 6, “PDF 
Portfolios.”)
■ 
Combine Files into PDF lets you com-
bine a set of files into a single PDF file. 
This is similar to the Portfolio link except 
the result is a vanilla PDF file. (See 
Chapter 4, “Making PDF Files.”)
continues on next page 
VB.NET TIFF: TIFF Text Extractor SDK; Extract Text Content from
In this online tutorial, we will offer you information on Standalone VB.NET TIFF text extractor SDK that extracts control SDK into VB.NET image application by
how to extract images from pdf file; extract image from pdf online
VB.NET PowerPoint: Extract & Collect PPT Slide(s) Using VB Sample
demo code using RasterEdge VB.NET PowerPoint extractor library toolkit. provide powerful & profession imaging controls, PDF document, image to pdf files and
how to extract pictures from pdf files; extract pdf pages to jpg
4 Chapter 1
■ 
Create PDF Form lets you create a 
PDF file with interactive form fields. 
(See Chapter 14, “Creating Forms with 
Acrobat Pro.”)
Some people don’t like to be faced with 
the Welcome screen every time they 
launch Acrobat. On the Macintosh, you 
can tell Acrobat not to show the Welcome 
screen in the Preferences dialog. We dis-
cuss the Preferences dialog at the end of 
this chapter.
To turn off the Welcome 
screen (Macintosh only):
1. Choose Acrobat > Preferences.
Acrobat displays its Preferences dialog. 
(See the figure at the chapter’s end.) 
2. Select the General Preferences.
3. Deselect the Show Welcome Screen 
check box 
A
.
4. Click OK.
Windows users can’t do without the 
Welcome screen because the Windows 
version of Acrobat must have at least 
onewindow open at all times; closing 
thelast window closes the application.
I prefer the Welcome screen because 
roughly 83 percent of the time it gives me 
quick access to exactly what I want to do.
A
Mac users (but not Windows users, 
go figure) can turn off the Welcome 
screen by deselecting this check box in 
the General Preferences.
VB.NET Word: Extract Word Pages, DOCX Page Extraction SDK
this VB.NET Word page extractor add-on can be also used to merge / split Word file, add / delete Word page, sort Word page order or insert image into Word page
extract text from pdf image; extract photo from pdf
VB.NET TIFF: TIFF to Text (TXT) Converter SDK; Convert TIFF to
NET developers to interpret and decode TIFF image file. But different from TIFF text extractor add-on powerful & profession imaging controls, PDF document, tiff
extract image from pdf in; pdf extract images
Starting With Acrobat  5
Examining the 
Initial Screen
When you open a document in Acrobat, 
you see a window similar to 
A
. The layout 
of this window is significantly different 
from early versions of Acrobat. In most 
cases the layout has been simplified and 
streamlined.
The main parts of a document window are 
as follows:
Drag bar. This is a standard Macintosh 
or Windows drag bar. It contains the 
name of the PDF document and all the 
controls you’ll find in any application’s 
document window, including the Close, 
Minimize, and Zoom buttons.
continues on next page 
A
When you open a document in Acrobat X, you will be looking at the new, efficient, streamlined interface.
Navigation pane 
Document pane 
Tasks pane
Menu bar 
Quick Tools toolbar  Favorites toolbar
C# Word: How to Extract Text from C# Word in .NET Project
you can rest assured because this Word text extractor preserves both to provide powerful & profession imaging controls, PDF document, image to pdf files and
extract images from pdf files without using copy and paste; pdf image extractor c#
6 Chapter 1
Document pane. This is where Acro-
bat displays the pages of your PDF 
document.
Menu bar. The location of the menu bar 
conforms to your platform’s standards. 
In Windows, the menu bar is at the top 
of the document window; on the Macin-
tosh, the menu bar runs along the top 
of the screen.
Toolbars. In Acrobat X, each document 
window has two toolbars. The top tool-
bar is called the Quick Tools toolbar; the 
bottom toolbar is the Favorites toolbar. 
Note that the myriad toolbars that 
existed in earlier versions of Acrobat 
are gone; now there are only two tool-
bars and they are always visible.
Tasks pane. This pane replaces the 
147½ toolbars in previous versions of 
Acrobat. The Tasks pane is made up of 
a series of Tool panels; each contains 
a set of tools you can use with a PDF 
file. This is where you find the tools for 
commenting, redacting, and otherwise 
working with a PDF file.
Navigation pane. This contains a num-
ber of icons that, when clicked, reveal 
a variety of tools for moving around in 
the document, including clickable page 
thumbnails and bookmarks.
The toolbars, Tasks pane, and Navigation 
pane are all highly customizable, and it’s 
easy to load them up with your favorite tools.
The drag bar’s Close button behaves 
differently on the Macintosh and Windows. 
On the Macintosh, the Close button closes 
the document window but doesn’t exit the 
Acrobat application. In Windows, if no other 
documents are open, the Close button closes 
the document and also exits Acrobat. These 
are standard behaviors on the Macintosh and 
in Windows.
Starting With Acrobat  7
Examining the Menus
Acrobat X has greatly simplified its sys-
tem of menus from the large collection of 
menus in earlier versions. There are now 
only five menus at the top of each docu-
ment window in Windows; on the Macin-
tosh, six menus span the screen 
A
. You’ll 
eventually be using items from each of 
these menus. For the moment, let’s look 
at each menu and see what kinds of tasks 
they make possible:
Acrobat menu. This Macintosh-only 
menu contains items that affect the 
operation of the application as a whole.
In particular, this is where you set the 
application preferences and exit Acro-
bat on the Macintosh.
File menu. This menu lists the com-
mands to Open, Close, Save, and 
otherwise manipulate the PDF files on 
your computer’s hard disk. This menu is 
similar to the File menu in other applica-
tions. In Windows, this is where you exit 
the application.
Edit menu. This is a reasonably stan-
dard Macintosh and Windows Edit 
menu. It contains Cut, Copy, Paste, and 
other common commands. In Windows, 
this is where you set the application 
preferences.
A
Acrobat X has half as many menus as its immediate 
predecessor. This is good.
View menu. The commands in this menu 
let you change how Acrobat presents 
your documents. You can choose items 
such as page display and zoom level. 
This is also where you specify which 
Navigation panes are visible.
Window menu. This menu lets you 
specify the details of document win-
dows. For example, you can tile or 
stack the windows, bring a particular 
document to the front, and zoom to 
fullscreen.
Help menu. This menu provides access 
to Acrobat’s extensive help system, 
which includes a full Acrobat reference. 
It also lets you check for updates and 
register your Acrobat software.
The Help menu is your friend. Adobe has 
done a remarkably good job of describing the 
purpose and use of every part of Acrobat. You 
should definitely take advantage of this infor-
mation at every opportunity. Not sure what a 
trusted identity is? Need to add page numbers 
to a PDF file? The Help system will guide you 
through the process (though not, I hasten to 
add, with this volume’s style, panache, and 
sense of excitement).
8 Chapter 1
Examining the 
Tasks Pane
The Tasks pane is new to Acrobat X and is, 
without question, my favorite single addi-
tion to the program. This pane replaces 
the array of toolbars that plagued the last 
several versions of the program.
The Tasks pane resides on the right side 
of each document window but is initially 
hidden so as not to take up unnecessary 
screen real estate. What you initially see is 
a set of three headings toward the upper 
right of the window: Tools, Comment, and 
Share 
A
. These are the clickable names 
of the three panes that collectively make 
up the Tasks pane; each subpane contains 
tools of a particular type:
The Tools pane contains a wide-
ranging set of tools for everything from 
cropping pages to creating an interac-
tive form.
The Comment pane allows you to 
attach sticky notes, circles, arrows, 
paragraphs of text, and other annota-
tions to a page.
The Share pane lets you distribute 
your PDF file to one or more recipients 
using email or Acrobat.com.
We’ll be talking in detail about the tools in 
these panes as we go through the book.
When you click on one of these names, 
Acrobat reveals that pane and its compo-
nent tools, which are organized into panels
B
. Each panel can be opened or closed by 
clicking on the panel’s name.
There are several Tasks pane panels, most 
of which you may never use. Fortunately, 
you can remove all the panels that don’t 
apply to you.
A
At the upper right of each 
document window are the 
triggers for the Tasks pane’s 
three component subpanes.
B
Tools in the Tasks pane are 
organized into a series of panels 
that can be opened or closed 
according to what you’re doing 
at the moment.
Starting With Acrobat  9
To specify which panels should 
appear in a Tasks pane:
1. Make a Tasks pane visible, if necessary, 
by clicking on its name in the document 
window.
2. Click the small menu icon at the right 
side of the bar at the top of the pane 
C
.
Acrobat displays a pop-up menu of 
all the panels available for that pane. 
Visible panels will have a check mark 
next to their names.
3. Select a panel whose visibility you want 
to change.
Acrobat reverses the visibility of that 
panel and closes the pop-up menu.
4. Repeat steps 2 and 3 for each panel 
you want to modify.
You’ll know all the Tasks panes in depth by 
the end of this book. Let’s start the process 
by looking at the panels—the sets of tools—
that reside in each of the three panes.
By default, only one Tool panel can be 
open at a time; open one panel and the previ-
ous one closes. You can change this behavior 
by selecting Allow Multiple Panels in the Tasks 
pane’s pop-up menu 
C
. Now you can have as 
many panels open as your heart desires. 
(I prefer the one-panel-at-a-time mode.)
The Share pane has only one panel, 
so of course it doesn’t offer you a choice 
of which panels should be available.
C
Clicking the tiny menu button at the top of 
the Tasks pane lets you choose which panels 
you want to display.
10 Chapter 1
Examining the Tools pane
The Tools pane is an eclectic collection of 
tools that give you access to nearly every 
Acrobat feature except commenting on 
and sharing a document 
D
. The panels 
that live in this pane include:
■ 
Pages. Rotate, delete, insert, and 
otherwise manipulate the pages in 
the PDF file.
■ 
Content. Create bookmarks, add click-
able links, and touch up text or objects.
■ 
Forms. Add or modify interactive form 
fields.
■ 
Protection. Encrypt, redact, or sanitize 
(really) a document.
■ 
Sign & Certify. Add an electronic 
signature or certify the validity of a 
document.
■ 
Recognize Text. Use optical character 
recognition to convert a scanned docu-
ment to searchable text.
■ 
Action Wizard. Add an automated 
action.
■ 
Document Processing. Add page 
numbers, optimize images, and auto-
matically create or remove links.
■ 
Print Production. Preflight, add printer 
marks, and preview overprinting.
■ 
JavaScript. Edit and debug the 
JavaScripts attached to the document.
■ 
Accessibility. Check a document for 
accessibility and add information allow-
ing accessible reading software to use 
the document.
■ 
Analyze. Measure scaled areas and 
distances within your PDF file.
D
The Tools 
pane holds tools 
that apply to a 
variety of tasks, 
from rearranging 
pages to applying 
password 
protection.
Starting With Acrobat  11
Examining the Comment pane
The Comment pane contains the tools you 
will use to annotate a PDF file 
E
. Acrobat’s 
collection of annotation tools has experi-
enced years of evolution, and this latest 
incarnation is powerful and easy to use. 
We discuss these in detail in Chapters 7–9. 
(It’s a big subject!)
The panels available in this pane include:
■ 
Annotations. Place notes, mark up text, 
and apply a virtual rubber stamp.
■ 
Drawing Markups. Draw circles, 
squares, arrows, and other graphic 
objects to call attention to particular 
places on the page.
■ 
Review. Conduct a review of a docu-
ment, sending it around to a list of 
participants for comment and approval.
■ 
Comments List. Examine and search 
through a list of all the comments in the 
document.
Examining the Share pane
The tools in the Share Pane let you, well, 
share a PDF file with one or more people 
F
. You can automatically attach a docu-
ment to an email or share the file using 
Acrobat.com.
At the top of this pane is a link inviting you 
to sign in to Acrobat.com. (Acrobat.com 
is a free service provided by Adobe; see 
Chapter 5 for a lot more detail.)
The Share pane has only one panel:
■ 
Send Files. This panel has all the tools 
you need to share your document. 
Acrobat will either attach the file to an 
email or upload it to Acrobat.com.
Acrobat.com is a big deal. Really. 
This free(!) service lets you share any file or 
collection of files with a group of recipients 
of your choice. Acrobat makes it convenient 
to share PDF files, but you can actually upload 
any kind of file to Acrobat.com free of charge. 
Authorized personnel can then download files 
to their computers. Have I mentioned that 
it’s free?
E
The Comment 
pane lets you add 
annotations to a 
page. At this point, 
Acrobat supports 
a huge array of 
annotation types.
F
The Share pane 
lets you easily email 
your document to 
a list of people or 
share it online using 
Acrobat.com.
Documents you may be interested
Documents you may be interested