mvc open pdf in browser : How to extract images from pdf in acrobat application software cloud windows azure html class BestPractices-20100-part812

Best Practices for Preparing Environmental Data Sets to Share and Archive
1
Les A. Hook, Suresh K. Santhana Vannan, Tammy W. Beaty, Robert B. Cook, and Bruce E. Wilson 
September 2010 
Oak Ridge National Laboratory Distributed Active Archive Center, Oak Ridge, Tennessee, U.S.A. 
Environmental Sciences Division, Oak Ridge National Laboratory
2
Go to Best Practices - Section 2
1 Introduction
At the request of field researchers, investigators, GIS and image specialists, and data managers, 
we prepared the following data management practices that data collectors and providers should 
follow to improve the usability of their data sets. This guidance is provided for those who 
perform environmental measurements, compile data from various sources, prepare GIS 
coverages, and compile remote sensing images for environmental applications, although many of 
the practices may be useful for other data collection and archiving activities. 
We assembled what we feel are the most important practices that researchers could implement to 
make their data sets ready to share with other researchers. These practices could be performed at 
any time during the preparation of the data set, but we suggest that researchers plan for them 
before measurements are taken and implement them during measurements. The order of the 
practices is not necessarily sequential, as a researcher could provide draft data set metadata 
before any measurements are taken based on their planning. We introduce topics in the sections 
that follow and if additional resources are available, they are included in an Appendix. 
1.1 Scope 
The life cycle for collection or generation of environmental data can be configured 
and represented in various graphical ways.  All approaches have steps for research design and 
data management planning, the collection or generation of data and its processing and analysis, 
the preparation of data for sharing and dissemination, and the archiving of the data with metadata 
and documentation. The feedback and use of existing archived data at any and all steps along the 
data flow closes the loop. 
1
Previously entitled "Best Practices for Preparing Ecological and Ground-Based Data Sets to Share and Archive," 
Cook, et al., 2001.  Web version was previously updated in 2007. 
Please cite this document as:  Hook, Les A., Suresh K. Santhana Vannan, Tammy W. Beaty, Robert B. Cook, and 
Bruce E. Wilson. 2010. Best Practices for Preparing Environmental Data Sets to Share and Archive. Available 
online (
http://daac.ornl.gov/PI/BestPractices-2010.pdf
) from Oak Ridge National Laboratory Distributed Active 
Archive Center, Oak Ridge, Tennessee, U.S.A. doi:10.3334/ORNLDAAC/BestPractices-2010 
2
Oak Ridge National Laboratory is operated by UT-Battelle, LLC, for the U.S. Department of Energy under 
contract DE-AC05-00OR22725. This work was sponsored by the U.S. National Aeronautics and Space 
Administration, Earth Science Data and Information Systems Project. 
This work is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution 3.0 Unported License.
1
How to extract images from pdf in acrobat - Select, copy, paste PDF images in C#.net, ASP.NET, MVC, Ajax, WinForms, WPF
Support PDF Image Extraction from a Page, a Region on a Page, and PDF Document
extract image from pdf java; how to extract images from pdf
How to extract images from pdf in acrobat - VB.NET PDF Image Extract Library: Select, copy, paste PDF images in vb.net, ASP.NET, MVC, Ajax, WinForms, WPF
Support PDF Image Extraction from a Page, a Region on a Page, and PDF Document
extract pdf pages to jpg; extract jpg from pdf
This best practices guide does not attempt to cover the complete data life cycle (DDI, 2010;
MIT 
Libraries, 2010; and UK Data Archive, 2010). We are focusing on the "preparing data to share", 
"preservation of data", and “archiving” portions of the process.  Based on our experiences, we 
are assuming that your data have been collected, quality assured, analyses completed, results are 
likely in press or published, and that you have selected or been directed to a data archive 
pertinent to the theme of your data.  However, given the increasing emphasis and funding 
requirements on data sharing, these best practices should be taken into account early in the 
project, to reduce the level of effort required to prepare data for sharing.  Further, following these 
best practices will help with future reuse of data within your own research program, since 
sharing data with future staff and students, once those who collected the data have moved on, 
will have many of the challenges faced by external users of your data.   
This is a practical guide for preparing data to share, with some bias towards preparing data for 
archiving at the ORNL DAAC.  The ORNL DAAC provides data and information relevant to 
biogeochemical dynamics
, ecological data, and environmental processes, critical for 
understanding the dynamics relating to the biological, geological, and chemical components of 
Earth's environment. 
The scope of this guide, and the holdings of the ORNL DAAC as well, include three general 
data-types: field measurements and measurements on samples returned to the 
laboratory; geospatial data including GIS products that may have been generated incorporating 
results from measurements and modeled gridded products, and remote sensing products from 
various platforms that often coordinate with the field measurements for validation purposes. The 
need for high quality spatial and temporal attributes for all of the data products is emphasized. 
1.2 Value of Data Sharing 
We know data sharing is a good thing. Doesn't everyone else? 
Open science and new research 
Data longevity 
Data reusability 
Greater exposure to data 
Potential increased citation of source papers (Piwowar, 2007) 
Confirmation of results from publications (Thornton et al., 2005) 
Generation of value added products 
Possibility for future research collaborations 
More value for the sponsor’s research investment 
1.3 Factors That Will Influence Your Implementation of Best Practices 
1.3.1 Data Destination 
In preparation for processing and documenting your data for sharing and archiving, consider the 
potential user community, the final data archive, and the certain Web accessibility of your data. 
To maximize the usability of your data you should determine the likely final destination and 
likely mode of dissemination of your data because each data archive, clearinghouse, or Web 
2
.NET PDF Document Viewing, Annotation, Conversion & Processing
Extract hyperlink inside PDF. PDF Write. Redact text content, images, whole pages from PDF file. Edit, update, delete PDF annotations from PDF file. Print.
extract pdf images; extract image from pdf in
C# PDF Converter Library SDK to convert PDF to other file formats
other external third-party dependencies like Adobe Acrobat. NET supports file conversion between PDF and various documents and images, like Microsoft
extract image from pdf file; extract images from pdf c#
service may have specific data file format, documentation, and metadata requirements. Learning 
about these requirements in advance of final data file organization, cleanup, and formatting will 
save you time. Knowing the data destination would in many ways simplify the process of data 
collection and assembly. Best practices documents and other data preparation guidelines 
available at the data archive center would help guide you through the process. They can advise 
on data storage, collection, and dissemination strategies such as choosing the file format for 
storing geospatial data, identifying key metadata elements during data collection, and detailing 
important components for data documentation. 
1.3.2 Data Lineage 
While you can benefit from knowing where your data are going, subsequent users want to know 
where your data have been before they were archived.  (How many times have you been 
admonished to “Put that data down! You don’t know where it’s been.”?)  With the increasing 
reliance on data synthesis, database compilation, and meta-analysis activities, users want to 
know where the data came from that are now in your value-added product.  It is essential that the 
proper attribution of the source data be included with
the derived product, defining its 
provenance, or at least be included in the documentation.  For data synthesis projects and model 
validation projects, it is also important to be able to tell what data were used for the synthesis or 
model data.  Future work will need to be able to tell whether a particular observational data set 
(for example) is independent of the data used in a particular synthesis study or model calibration 
exercise.   
As you plan the progression of your data from collection, to publication, and to archiving, 
include steps that ensure the traceability and reproducibility of your process. Keep copies of your 
raw data as collected or as received, before any processing has been done. Best practices 
stipulate that data, processing codes, and documentation at all stages of development be routinely 
copied and backed up on secure and retrievable media. When possible use a processing and 
analysis tool that creates and retains a scripted program or structured work flow (such as R
©
MATLAB
©
, SAS
©
, Kepler, etc.) that becomes the record of all of your processing and analysis 
decisions (Borer et al., 2009; Islam, 2010). This record will become part of the data products 
metadata. 
1.3.3 Data Integration and Interoperability 
By integration we mean that your data set can be retrieved and combined with other data sets 
having different parameters and formats to create a more useful data set. Data integration is a key 
component for various research programs in which several data sets are combined to create 
higher-level products. For example, analysis of large-scale ecosystem phenomena requires 
multiple data products from disparate sources. Data interoperability allows for integration by 
standardizing the access to data sets. 
Data providers should expect that their data will sooner or later be integrated with other related 
data when preparing data to share. Providers should inquire about integration and interoperability 
opportunities for archived data and related data products to maximize data reuse. Data reuse 
3
C# Windows Viewer - Image and Document Conversion & Rendering in
in .NET class applications independently, without using other external third-party dependencies like Adobe Acrobat. Convert to PDF. Convert to Various Images.
pdf image extractor; pdf image text extractor
C# powerpoint - PowerPoint Conversion & Rendering in C#.NET
without using other external third-party dependencies like Adobe Acrobat. 2003, 2007 and above versions, raster images (Jpeg, Png PowerPoint to PDF Conversion.
pdf extract images; how to extract images from pdf
allows for greater exposure to data, longevity of data sets, more value for research investment, 
generation of higher-level products and possibility for future research collaborations.  There is 
also evidence that sharing of data leads to increased citation and impact factors for the source 
publications, which increases the rewards directly to the data collectors (Piwowar, 2007).   
If your data product includes a gridded image, a map, or regional GIS coverages, your data are 
likely candidates for incorporation into standards based geospatial data visualization and 
download interface. The geospatial standards such as Open Geospatial Consortium (OGC) Web 
Map Service (WMS) and Web Coverage Service (WCS) enable users to visualize and download 
spatial data using a standard web browser or software such as ESRI-ArcGIS, Google Earth, 
uDIG, etc., that support OGC standards. Interoperability allows users to visualize the data prior 
to download and also allows data centers to store data in one format but distribute them in 
multiple formats. For example, a data stored in TIFF format in Geographic coordinate system 
can be distributed in Albers equal area projection or Mercator projection, and in img/png/jpeg/gif 
formats. Also, users can access/interact with the data using tools such as ArcGIS prior to even 
downloading the data. This allows users to focus their efforts on data analysis and spend less 
time on data preparation. 
The importance of precise spatial coordinates for the entire data set and also data files (granules) 
cannot be overstated. Data integration and interoperability relies on accurate coordinates and 
geographical representation of the data. Users should provide the coordinates, projection and 
other geospatial information (including the datum basis for the coordinates) precisely and to the 
best of their knowledge. Data sets compiled from literature values or value-added synthesis 
products derived from numerous data sources with many sites that provide a regional or global 
distribution for measured parameters are more likely to be included if the necessary spatial and 
temporal parameters are available 
While this may sound like a simple process, the effort required to ensure consistency of the 
measured parameters and metadata that enable interoperability across data types, platforms, etc, 
is considerable. However, the payback is big as interoperability facilitated by using standards 
such as Open Geospatial Consortium (OGC) allows users to find, access, combine, and subset 
data from numerous sources. Data providers can facilitate the process and improve their data 
visibility/usability by providing data products that meet the applicable geospatial standards. 
1.4 Planning for and Implementing the Complete Data Life cycle. 
Numerous educational institutions and governmental agencies across various scientific 
disciplines are promoting and requiring the development of data management plans that support 
the full data life cycle to accompany new data collection proposals. Data policies make it clear 
that data sharing clearly benefits programmatic science objectives 
(
DDI, 2010;
MIT Libraries, 
2010;
UK Data Archive, 2010; 
ICPSR, 2009)
The life-cycle steps (diagrams) may differ some to 
account for organizational or discipline specifics (Higgins, 2008; Karasti and Baker, 2008; UK 
Data Archive, 2009; ANU, 2008), but the message is the same; data sharing advances science 
and planning will make your preparations more efficient and cost effective.  
4
C# Word - Word Conversion in C#.NET
without using other external third-party dependencies like Adobe Acrobat. document, including Jpeg, Png, Bmp, Gif images, .NET Graphics PDF to Word Conversion.
extract color image from pdf in c#; some pdf image extractor
JPEG to PDF Converter | Convert JPEG to PDF, Convert PDF to JPEG
Features and Benefits. Powerful image converter to convert images of JPG, JPEG formats to PDF files; No need for Adobe Acrobat Reader; Seamlessly integrated into
extract pdf pages to jpg; extract images pdf acrobat
5
1.5 Lineage of these Best Practices 
When originally published in 2001, this was a rather novel guide for use by investigators and 
likely non-specialist data providers (Cook et al., 2001). Even as we prepared the web update in 
2007, few practical guides were readily apparent or available on the web. Since then several 
publications have expanded the scope of best practices (e.g., Borer et al., 2009) and identified 
some of the related issues that might need to be overcome to encourage more data sharing 
(Barton et al., 2010). Metadata has become of paramount importance. Numerous tools have been 
developed to facilitate the capture of metadata and provide it to equally numerous searchable 
metadata clearinghouses and portals. Short courses on environmental data management lifecycle, 
metadata, data processing, and archiving are offered periodically (Cook et al., 2010; SEEK 
2007). Citations are nothing short of magical works of e-information art. And now, as we update 
this version, we are encouraged (overwhelmed?) by the best practices, data management 
planning, and data archiving guidance resources that are available by a simple Web (Google) 
search within which the international scope is most noteworthy. 
PDF to WORD Converter | Convert PDF to Word, Convert Word to PDF
No need for Adobe Acrobat and Microsoft Word; Has built-in wizard to guide your Open PDF to Word Convert first; Load PDF images from local folders in "File" in
pdf image text extractor; extract image from pdf using
C# Excel - Excel Conversion & Rendering in C#.NET
without using other external third-party dependencies like Adobe Acrobat. PPT) 2003, 2007 and above versions, raster images (Jpeg, Png Excel to PDF Conversion.
some pdf image extract; how to extract images from pdf files
2 The Seven Best Practices for Preparing Environmental Data Sets to Share are: 
1.
Define the Contents of Your Data Files
2.
Use Consistent Data Organization
3.
Use Consistent File Structure and Stable File Formats For Tabular and Image Data
4.
Assign Descriptive File Names
5.
Perform Basic Quality Assurance
6.
Assign Descriptive Data Set Titles
7.
Provide Documentation
2.1 Define the Contents of Your Data Files   
[ Return to Index ]
The contents of your data files flow directly from experimental plans and are informed by the 
destination archive and data dissemination plans. Parameters and units and other coded values 
may be required to follow certain naming standards. 
In order for others to use your data, they must fully understand the contents of the data set, 
including the parameter names, units of measure, formats, and definitions of coded values. 
Provide the English language translation of any data values and descriptors (e.g., coded fields, 
variable classes, and GIS coverage attributes) that are in another language. 
Parameter Name: 
The parameters reported in the data set need to have names that describe the 
contents and are standardized across files, data sets, and the project. The documentation should 
contain a full description of the parameter. Use commonly accepted parameter names, for 
example, Temp for temperature, Precip for precipitation, and Lat and Long for latitude and 
longitude. See the online references in the Bibliography for additional examples. Also, be sure to 
use consistent capitalization (not temp, Temp, and TEMP) and use only letters, numerals, and 
underscores in the parameter name. Several standards for parameters currently are in use, for 
example, GCMD (Olsen et al., 2007) and CDIAC AmeriFLUX (CDIAC 2010), but are not 
consistently implemented across scientific communities. If a standard vocabulary is implemented 
be sure to include the citation in the metadata and/or documentation. 
Units:
The units of reported parameters need to be explicitly stated in the data file and in the 
documentation. We recommend SI units but recognize that each discipline may have its own 
commonly used units of measure. The critical aspect here is that the units be defined in the 
documentation so that others understand what is reported.  Units standards are becoming more 
common and being implemented for specific use applications, for example, CF (Climate and 
Forecast) convention (Unidata 2007) and AmeriFlux (CDIAC 2010).  
Formats:
Within each data set, choose a format for each parameter, explain the format in the 
documentation, and use that format throughout the data set. Consistent formats are particularly 
important for dates, times, and spatial coordinates. For numeric parameters, if the number of 
decimal places should be preserved to indicate significant digits, then explicitly define the format 
such that users may take precautions to ensure that significant figures are not lost or gained 
during data transformations. 
6
GIF to PDF Converter | Convert GIF to PDF, Convert PDF to GIF
and convert PDF files to GIF images with high quality. It can be functioned as an integrated component without the use of external applications & Adobe Acrobat
extract images from pdf files without using copy and paste; extract pdf images
DICOM to PDF Converter | Convert DICOM to PDF, Convert PDF to
organized interface, allowing users to convert DICOM (DICOM) images to, from PDF documents with converters, users do not need to load Adobe Acrobat or any
online pdf image extractor; extract photos from pdf
We recommend the following formats for common parameters:
Dates:
yyyy-mm-dd or yyyymmdd, e.g., January 2, 1997 is 19970102.  Applicable date 
standards are listed in 
Appendix B
.  
Time:
Use 24-hour notation (13:30 hrs instead of 1:30 p.m. and 04:30 instead of 4:30 a.m.). 
Report in both local time and Coordinated Universal Time (UTC). Include local time zone in a 
separate field. As appropriate, both the begin time and end time should be reported in both local 
and UTC time. Because UTC and local time may be on different days, we suggest that dates be 
given for each time reported. Applicable time standards are listed in 
Appendix B
Spatial Coordinates:
Spatial coordinates should be reported in decimal degrees format to at 
least 4 (preferably 5 or 6) significant digits past the decimal point. An accuracy of 1.11 meters at 
the equator is represented by +/- 0.00001. This does not include uncertainty introduced by a GPS 
instrument. Provide latitude and longitude with south latitude and west longitude recorded as 
negative values, e.g., 80 30' 00" W longitude is -80.5000. Make sure that all location information 
in a file uses the same coordinate system, including coordinate type, datum, and spheroid. 
Document all three of these characteristics (e.g., Lat/Long decimal degrees, NAD83 (North 
American Datum of 1983), WGRS84 (World Geographic Reference System of 1984)). Mixing 
coordinate systems [e.g., NAD83 and NAD27 (North American Datum of 1927)] will cause 
errors in any geographic analysis of the data. Applicable spatial coordinate standards, decimal 
place accuracy and an accuracy calculator for a given latitude are listed in 
Appendix C
If locating field sites is more convenient using the Universal Transverse Mercator (UTM) 
coordinate system, be sure to record the datum and UTM zone (e.g., NAD83 and Zone 15N), and 
the easting and northing coordinate pair in meters, to ensure that your UTM coordinates can be 
converted to latitude and longitude.  
Elevation:
Provide elevation in meters. Include detailed information on the vertical datum used 
(e.g.- North American Vertical Datum 1988 (NAVD 1988) or Australian Height Datum (AHD)). 
Additional information on vertical datum are include in 
Appendix D
Coded Fields
Coded fields, as opposed to free text fields, often have standardized lists of predefined values 
from which the data provider may choose.  Two good examples are U.S. state abbreviations and 
postal zip codes.  Data collectors may establish their own coded fields with defined values to be 
consistently used across several data files. The use of consistent sampling site designations is a 
good application. Coded fields are more efficient for storage and retrieval of data than free text 
fields.  Investigators should be aware of, and document, any changes in the coding scheme, 
particularly for externally defined coding schemes.  Postal codes, as an example, can change 
somewhat over time, which can affect subsequent interpretation of the data.  
7
Guidance for two specific coded fields commonly used in environmental data files: 
Data Flag or Qualifying Values: 
A separate field with specified values may be used to provide 
additional information about the measured data value including, for example, quality 
considerations, reasons for missing values, or indicating replicated samples. Codes should not be 
parameter specific but should be consistent across parameters and data files. Definitions of flag 
codes should be included in the accompanying data set documentation. 
Example documentation of Data Quality Flag values: 
Flag 
Value
Description
V0
Valid value
V1
Valid value but comprised wholly or partially of below detection limit data
V2
Valid estimated value
V3
Valid interpolated value
V4
Valid value despite failing to meet some QC or statistical criteria
V5
Valid value but qualified because of possible contamination (e.g., pollution source, 
laboratory contamination source)
V6
Valid value but qualified due to non-standard sampling conditions (e.g., instrument 
malfunction, sample handling)
V7
Valid value but set equal to the detection limit (DL) because the measured value was 
below the DL
M1
Missing value because no value is available
M2
Missing value because invalidated by data originator
H1
Historical data that have not been assessed or validated
Units:  
While data collectors can generally agree on the units for reporting measured parameters, 
the exact syntax of the units designation varies widely among programs, projects, scientific 
communities, and investigators (if standardized at all).  If a shorthand notation is reported in the 
data file, the complete units should be spelled out in the documentation so that others can 
understand and interpret your representation of subscripts, superscripts, area, time intervals, etc. 
As applicable, specify the standard source for units in your data set, e.g., CF conventions 
(Unidata 2007) or the Ameriflux program which reports flux estimates, micrometeorological 
measurement data, and site biological characteristics with prescribed units (CDIAC 2010). 
Missing Values:
Consistently use the same missing value notations for numeric and text/character fields in the 
data file.  
8
9
For numeric fields:  
You may use a specified extreme value not likely to ever be confused with the valid range of 
a measured value (e.g., -9999). Representing missing data as a value outside the possible 
range of reasonable values will work for loading data into the widest range of programs. 
Alternatively, use a missing value code that matches the reporting format for the specific 
parameter. For example, use "-999.99", when the reporting format is a FORTRAN-like F7.2. 
In some cases, it may be appropriate to use the IEEE floating point NaN value (Not a 
Number) to represent missing data, particularly for floating point data columns that can 
assume any value.  Likewise, the database “NULL” may be used in some instances. NULL 
value and NaN representations may be clearer, and are supported by many programs, but can 
cause some problems, particularly with older programs.   
Do not use character codes in an otherwise numeric field (except possibly for NULL or NaN 
to represent missing data) recognizing that this may cause processing problems for 
subsequent users. 
Document what the missing and nodata values represent. 
For character fields: 
For character fields, it may be appropriate to use “NULL”, “Not applicable” or “None” 
depending upon the organization of the data file. 
For a text representation (e.g., a .csv file) it is better to use an explicit missing value 
representation rather than two successive commas.  Again, many applications will interpret 
two successive commas as a missing value, but other programs will create a mis-registration 
of the data (particularly older applications).  
It might be useful to use a placeholder value such as "Pending assignment" when compiling 
draft information to facilitate returning to incomplete fields. 
Typical Parameter Documentation:
The following text describes the parameters in a data set; this type of description should be 
included in the data set documentation. 
Data File Contents:
(kt_tree_data.csv) The files are in comma-delimited ASCII format, with 
the first line listing the data set, author, and date. The data records follow and are described in 
the table below. A value of -9.99 indicates no data. 
Column 
Description 
Units/Format
SITE 
k=Kataba forest, p=Pandamatenga, m=Near Maun, 
e=HOORC/MPG Maun tower, o=Okwa river crossing, 
t=Tshane, skukuza=Skukuza Flux Tower 
text 
SPECIES 
Scientific name up to 25 characters 
text 
DATE 
Date of measurement 
yyyymmdd 
BA 
Woody plant basal area 
m2/ha  
SEBA 
Standard error of BA 
m2/ha 
DENSITY 
Woody plant density (number of trees per hectare) 
number/ha 
SEDEN 
Standard error of DENSITY (n=42 for KT, n=49 for 
Skukuza) 
number/ha 
STEMS 
Number of stems per hectare (/ha) 
number/ha 
HEIGHT 
Basal area-weighted average height 
m2/ha 
WOOD 
Aboveground woody plant wood dry biomass 
kg/ha 
LEAF 
Aboveground woody plant leaf dry biomass 
kg/ha 
LAI 
Leaf Area Index calculated by allometry 
m2/m2 
[ Adapted from Scholes, R. J. 2005. SAFARI 2000 Woody Vegetation 
Characteristics of Kalahari and Skukuza Sites. Data set. Available on-line 
[http://daac.ornl.gov/] from Oak Ridge National Laboratory Distributed Active 
Archive Center, Oak Ridge, Tennessee, U.S.A. doi:10.3334/ORNLDAAC/777 ] 
10
Documents you may be interested
Documents you may be interested