mvc open pdf in browser : Extract images from pdf online control SDK platform web page winforms asp.net web browser BestPractices-20101-part813

This example shows reporting of local and UTC times and dates, use of Chemical Abstract 
Service Registry Numbers (CAS), explicitly defined units, and missing codes formatted like the 
measured values. The chemical names follow CAS 9
th
Collective Index nomenclature. 
Data File Contents:  
NARSTO_EPA_SS_HOUSTON_FRASER_ORG_SPEC_24HR_V1.txt
COLUMN NAME
NAME 
TYPE
CAS RN
UNITS
FORMAT 
TYPE
FORMAT 
FOR 
DISPLAY
MISSING 
CODE
SAMPLE 
PREPARATION
BLANK 
CORRECTION
Site ID: standard
Variable
None
None
12
None
Not applicable
Not applicable
Date start: local 
time
Variable
None
yyyy/mm/dd
Date
10
None
Not applicable
Not applicable
Time start: local 
time
Variable
None
hh:mm
Time
5
None
Not applicable
Not applicable
Date end: local 
time
Variable
None
yyyy/mm/dd
Date
10
None
Not applicable
Not applicable
Time end: local 
time
Variable
None
hh:mm
Time
5
None
Not applicable
Not applicable
Time zone: local
Variable
None
None
Char
3
None
Not applicable
Not applicable
Date start: UTC
Variable
None
yyyy/mm/dd
Date
10
None
Not applicable
Not applicable
Time start: UTC
Variable
None
hh:mm
Time
5
None
Not applicable
Not applicable
Date end: UTC
Variable
None
yyyy/mm/dd
Date
10
None
Not applicable
Not applicable
Time end: UTC
Variable
None
hh:mm
Time
5
None
Not applicable
Not applicable
Fluoranthene
Variable
206-44-0
ng/m3 
(nanogram 
per cubic 
meter)
Decimal
8.2
-999.99
Organic 
extraction
Blank 
corrected
Fluoranthene
Flag
206-44-0
None
Char
2
None
Organic 
extraction
Blank 
corrected
Pyrene
Variable
129-00-0
ng/m3 
(nanogram 
per cubic 
meter)
Decimal
8.2
-999.99
Organic 
extraction
Blank 
corrected
Pyrene
Flag
129-00-0
None
Char
2
None
Organic 
extraction
Blank 
corrected
Benz[a]anthracene
Variable
56-55-3
ng/m3 
(nanogram 
per cubic 
meter)
Decimal
8.2
-999.99
Organic 
extraction
Blank 
corrected
Benz[a]anthracene
Flag
56-55-3
None
Char
2
None
Organic 
extraction
Blank 
corrected
[ Adapted from Fraser, Matthew. 2003. NARSTO EPA_SS_HOUSTON TEXAQS2000 PM2.5 Organic Speciation Data. Available on-
line (http://eosweb.larc.nasa.gov/PRODOCS/narsto/table_narsto.html
) at the Langley DAAC, Hampton, Virginia, U.S.A. ] 
11
Extract images from pdf online - Select, copy, paste PDF images in C#.net, ASP.NET, MVC, Ajax, WinForms, WPF
Support PDF Image Extraction from a Page, a Region on a Page, and PDF Document
extract jpg pdf; extract jpeg from pdf
Extract images from pdf online - VB.NET PDF Image Extract Library: Select, copy, paste PDF images in vb.net, ASP.NET, MVC, Ajax, WinForms, WPF
Support PDF Image Extraction from a Page, a Region on a Page, and PDF Document
extract images from pdf acrobat; extract images pdf
2.2 Use Consistent Data Organization     
[ Return to Index ]
We recommend that you organize the data within a file in one of two ways. Whichever style you 
use, be sure to place each observation in a separate line (row). Most often each row in a file 
represents a complete record, and the columns represent all the parameters that make up the 
record. This arrangement is similar to a spreadsheet or matrix. For example:  
Example Data File Records:
(soils_C_N_iso.csv) 
SAFARI 2000 Plant and Soil C and N Isotopes, Southern Africa, 1995-2000 
SITE,COUNTRY,LAT,LONG,DATE,START_DEPTH,END_DEPTH,CHARACTERISTICS,C,N,d13C,d15N
units,none,decimal degrees,decimal 
degrees,yyyy/mm/dd,cm,cm,none,percent,percent,per mil,per mil 
USGS-1,Botswana,-21.62,27.37,1999/07/12,5,20,Hardveld,0.67,0.052,-17,8.9 
USGS-2,Botswana,-21.07,27.42,1999/07/12,5,20,Hardveld,0.68,0.063,-18.3,8 
USGS-3,Botswana,-20.72,26.83,1999/07/12,5,20,Hardveld,0.94,0.087,-17,6.8 
USGS-4,Botswana,-20.52,26.41,1999/07/12,5,20,Hardveld,0.53,0.04,-19.9,5.5 
USGS-5,Botswana,-20.55,26.15,1999/07/12,5,20,Lacustrine,2.11,0.162,-15.2,5.9 
... 
USGS-30,Botswana,-19.81,23.63,1999/07/18,5,20,Alluvium,0.67,0.063,-19.2,11.8 
USGS-31,Botswana,-20.62,22.74,1999/07/18,5,20,Hardveld,0.23,0.014,-16.8,16.2 
USGS-32,Botswana,-21.06,22.4,1999/07/18,5,20,Hardveld,0.39,0.028,-20.9,9.5 
USGS-33,Botswana,-22.01,21.37,1999/07/19,5,20,Sandveld,0.19,0.01,-17.9,9.1 
USGS-34,Botswana,-22.99,22.18,1999/07/19,5,20,Sandveld,0.16,0.006,-19.7,8.7 
USGS-35,Botswana,-23.7,22.8,1999/07/19,5,20,Sandveld,0.37,0.019,-20.7,15.2 
[ From: Aranibar, J. N. and S. A. Macko. 2005. SAFARI 2000 Plant and Soil C and N Isotopes, Southern Africa, 
1995-2000. Data set. Available on-line [http://daac.ornl.gov/] from Oak Ridge National Laboratory Distributed 
Active Archive Center, Oak Ridge, Tennessee, U.S.A. doi:10.3334/ORNLDAAC/783 ]
If you use a coded value or abbreviation for a site or station, be sure to provide a definition, 
including spatial coordinates, in the documentation.  
A second arrangement may be more efficient when most records do not have measurements for 
most parameters, that is, a very sparse matrix of data, with many missing values. In this 
arrangement, one column is used to define the parameter and another column is used for the 
value of the parameter. Other columns may be used for site, date, treatment, units of measure, 
etc. For example:
12
VB.NET PDF Text Extract Library: extract text content from PDF
Extract highlighted text out of PDF document. extraction control provides text extraction from PDF images and image Best VB.NET PDF text extraction SDK library
extract photo from pdf; pdf image extractor online
C# PDF Text Extract Library: extract text content from PDF file in
Free online source code for extracting text from Ability to extract highlighted text out of PDF control provides text extraction from PDF images and image
extract images from pdf online; extract image from pdf online
Coast redwood NPP data from Humboldt Redwoods State Park, California, USA; Busing & Fujimori, 
June 2005  
Old stand plot study at Bull Creek with bole diameter measurements at 1.7 m aboveground in 1972 and 2001 
Orig_sort 
_order 
Parameter 
Measurement 
_Type 
Value 
Units 
Species 
Sequoia 
_sp_grav
Equation 
1
Latitude
Site Characteristics
40.35
decimal degree
Not applicable
-999.9
Not applicable
2
Longitude
Site Characteristics
-123
decimal degree
Not applicable
-999.9
Not applicable
3
Terrain
Site Characteristics
Alluvial flat
Not applicable
Not applicable
-999.9
Not applicable
4
Slope
Site Characteristics
0
degree
Not applicable
-999.9
Not applicable
5
Elevation 
(above mean sea 
level)
Site Characteristics
80
m (meter)
Not applicable
-999.9
Not applicable
6
Total site area 
Site Characteristics
1.44
ha (hectare)
Not applicable
-999.9
Not applicable
7
Density
Density
380
stems/ha  
(stems per hectare)
All species
-999.9
Not applicable
8
Basal area
Area
330
m2/ha  
(square meter  
per hectare)
All species
-999.9
Not applicable
9
Basal area
Area
329
m2/ha  
(square meter  
per hectare)
Sequoia
-999.9
Not applicable
...
123
Total tree ANPP
ANPP
581-697
g/m2/yr  
(gram per square 
meter  
per year)
All species
0.33
eq. 2 estimates
124
Total tree ANPP
ANPP
669-802
g/m2/yr  
(gram per square 
meter  
per year)
All species
0.38
eq. 2 estimates
Sequoia_sp_grav:  *Specific gravity, 0.33 mg/cm3, see WE Westman & RH Whittaker, 1975, J. Ecol. for details. 
Sequoia_sp_grav:  ^Specific gravity, 0.38 mg/cm3, from DW Green et al., 1999, USDA Forest Service FPL-GTR-113. 
Method:  **Calculations & allometric equations described by RT Busing & T Fujimori, 2005, Plant Ecol. 
Notes:  ***Range of values results from min. & max. estimation ratios of WE Westman & RH Whittaker, 1975, J. Ecol.
From: Busing, R. T., and T. Fujimori. 2005. NPP Temperate Forest: Humboldt Redwoods State Park, California, 
U.S.A., 1972-2001. Data set. Available on-line [http://daac.ornl.gov] from Oak Ridge National Laboratory 
Distributed Active Archive Center, Oak Ridge, Tennessee, U.S.A. doi:10.3334/ORNLDAAC/803 
Keep Similar Information Together 
An important issue with data organization is the number of records in each file (file size). There 
are a number of factors that determine the optimal number of records in a file, and we don't have 
any hard and fast rules. In general, keep a set of similar measurements together (e.g., same 
investigator, methods, time basis, and instruments) in one data file. Please do not break up your 
data into many small files, e.g., by month or by site if you are working with several months, 
years, or sites. Instead, make month or site a parameter and have all the data in one large file. 
Researchers who later use your relatively large data file won't have to process many small files 
individually.  
There is an upper limit to the size of files, though. Large files (on the order of several tens of 
thousands of records, or several tens of megabytes) do become unwieldy and may be too large 
13
C# HTML5 Viewer: Load, View, Convert, Annotate and Edit Raster
C#.NET RasterEdge HTML5 Viewer supports convert images to Tiff (.tif, .tiff) online, create PDF document from images. Raster Images Annotation.
extract image from pdf java; extract image from pdf acrobat
VB.NET PDF- View PDF Online with VB.NET HTML5 PDF Viewer
PDF to text, C#.NET convert PDF to images, C#.NET file & pages edit, C#.NET PDF pages extract, copy, paste C#.NET read barcodes from PDF, C#.NET OCR scan PDF.
how to extract a picture from a pdf; extract vector image from pdf
14
for some applications. For example, Excel 2003 will support 65,000 rows and 256 columns of 
data. Excel 2007 does not have these limitations.  Large tabular data files may need to be broken 
into logical smaller files.  
Organization by Data Type
If you are collecting many observations of several different types of measurements at a site (e.g., 
leaf area index and above- and belowground biomass), place each type of measurement in a 
separate data file. For each data file, use similar data organization, parameter formats, and 
common site names, so that users understand the interrelationships between data files.  
Data types collected on different time bases (e.g., per hour, per day, per year) might be handled 
more efficiently in separate files. 
Alternatively, if relatively few observations are made at a site for a suite of parameters, then all 
data could be placed in one file. Thorough data set documentation would be needed. 
VB.NET PDF Page Extract Library: copy, paste, cut PDF pages in vb.
Use corresponding namespaces; using RasterEdge.Imaging.Basic; using RasterEdge.XDoc.PDF; VB.NET: Extract All Images from PDF Document.
extract images from pdf file; extract image from pdf c#
C# HTML5 PDF Viewer SDK to view PDF document online in C#.NET
Form Process. Data: Read, Extract Field Data. Data: Auto Redact Text Content. Redact Images. Redact Pages. Annotation & Add Text Box. Drawing Markups. PDF Print.
extract images from pdf files; extract photos pdf
2.3 Use Consistent File Structure and Stable File Formats For Tabular and Image Data   
[ Return to Index ]
In choosing a file format, data collectors should select a consistent format that can be read well 
into the future and is independent of changes in applications.  Excel, as an example, is a useful 
tool for data manipulations and data visualization, but versions of Excel files may become 
obsolete and may not be easily readable over the longer term.  Likewise, database files can be a 
very effective way to store and manipulate data, but the raw formats tend to change over time 
(even a few years).  If your collection operation has used proprietary file formats, creating an 
export in a stable, well-documented, and non-proprietary format is important for maximizing 
others’ abilities to use and build upon your data. 
Tabular Data File Structure and Format
Using delimited text file formats is the best way to ensure that measurement data are readable in 
the future.  
Use the same structure throughout the file - don't have a different number of columns or 
re-arrange the columns within the file.  
Use a consistent structure across all data files prepared for a study or project. 
Figures and analyses should be reported in companion documents - don't place figures or 
summary statistics in the data file.  
ASCII American Standard Code for Information Interchange) is the most common text 
encoding and the one most likely to be readable by tools.  Other text encodings, such as 
UTF-8 are possible and may be necessary for some non-English applications.  Avoid 
obscure text encodings.  Use ASCII if possible, with UTF-8 or UTF-16 as secondary 
options.   
At the top of the file, include several header rows: 
The first row should contain descriptors that link the data file to the data set, for example, 
the data file name, data set title, author, today's date, date the data within the file were last 
modified.  
Other header rows (column headings) should describe the content of each column, 
including one row for parameter names and one for parameter units.  
Column headings should be constructed for easy importing by various data systems. 
Headings should contain only numbers, letters, hyphens, and underscores -- no spaces or 
special characters.  This also applies to column names and table names in databases. 
While many databases will allow spaces in table or column names, many do not and the 
use of spaces in table and column names causes the resulting SQL statements to be more 
difficult to read and more error-prone when editing is required. 
Within the text file, follow these guidelines.  
Delimit the column headings and parameter fields using commas, tabs, semicolons, or 
vertical bars (|); these are listed in order of preference.   
15
VB.NET PDF - Convert PDF Online with VB.NET HTML5 PDF Viewer
NET read PDF, VB.NET convert PDF to text, VB.NET extract PDF pages, VB Able to set scaling value of converted images. VB.NET HTML5 PDF Viewer: Convert PDF Online.
extract pictures from pdf; extract image from pdf in
VB.NET PDF - Create PDF Online with VB.NET HTML5 PDF Viewer
PDF to text, C#.NET convert PDF to images, C#.NET file & pages edit, C#.NET PDF pages extract, copy, paste C#.NET read barcodes from PDF, C#.NET OCR scan PDF.
extract images from pdf; extract jpg from pdf
Avoid delimiters that also occur in the data fields. If this cannot be avoided, enclose data 
fields that also contain a delimiter in single or double quotes.  
As noted above, do not use single or double quotes as part of a column name and avoid 
them in field values if at all possible. 
If the data fields use the comma as the decimal separator (rather than the period) the 
semicolon would be the preferred column delimiter. 
Use an explicit value for missing values, rather than an empty field.  This is particularly 
important for tab delimited data files. 
Don't include rows with summary statistics; it is best to put summary statistics, figures, 
and other comments in a separate companion data file or in the data set documentation. 
Use the data file extension that best indicates the type of file and field delimiters. For example, 
*.csv for comma-delimited text file and *.txt for a text file delimited with tabs or semicolons. 
Don't use *.dat since it has special meaning for PCs.  
See file extension reference, Appendix A.
In the data set documentation, specifically add the following data file information: 
Description of the data file names, particularly if the file names are composed of multiple 
acronyms, site abbreviations, or other project specific designations.  
Expanded descriptions of the parameters (column headings) and their units of measure 
from the data file. 
File delimiter. 
Missing value codes. 
Example data file records.  
Other data file documentation, as listed in Best Practice 7, which would be helpful to a 
secondary data user. 
Image (Raster) Data File Format: 
Some researchers may generate Image (Raster) data sets. Below are some guidelines / 
recommendations for archiving these types of data files.  
Researchers should use non-proprietary file formats for storing their image data. Below are some 
suggested non-proprietary file formats:  
GeoTIFF/TIF (*.tiff, *.tif)  
ESRI ASCII Grid (*.asc, *.txt) with detailed information on storage structure such as the 
number of Columns, Rows, spatial resolution of the pixels, and projection information 
(*.prj) 
Binary Image files (BSQ/BIL/BIP) in (*.dat, *.bsq, *.bil) with detailed information on 
storage structure such as the number of Columns, Rows, Byte order (little endian or big 
endian), Data type (Float, Unsigned Integer, Double Precision, etc.), and Interleave 
defined in a companion header file (*.hdr). 
netCDF (CF convention)/netCDF – CF convention files (*.nc) 
HDF-EOS / HDF (*.hdf) 
16
If you have access to popular GIS packages, such as ENVI, ESRI ArcGIS, ERDAS IMAGINE, 
and IDRISI, make sure the image files can be opened readily using one of these software 
packages. Open source image readers, such as uDIG, GDAL and GRASS, can also be used to 
make sure the image files can be opened directly by these geospatial image readers. 
If you cannot use any of the above formats, another option is to use any non-proprietary public 
domain data format. Whatever file format you use, be sure to thoroughly document the format 
and follow our suggested guidelines.  Creating image files in a customized format that can only 
be used with your own FORTRAN or C program is strongly discouraged.  
Geospatial Information for Image Files: 
All image files should be supported with documentation describing all necessary geospatial 
information to correctly geolocate the images. Below is a list of required geospatial parameters: 
Definition of Projection/Coordinate reference system 
Definition of the referenced Datum  
EPSG code, if available 
Spatial resolution of the data. If the resolution is different in X and Y direction, both 
resolutions need to be provided. 
Bounding Box – X, Y coordinates of the top-left/bottom-right pixels. While stating the 
corner pixel coordinates, indicate if these coordinates lie within the center of the pixel or 
at one of the edges. 
Note: There are multiple standards (e.g. OGC WKT (Open Geospatial Consortium Well-Known 
Text), ESRI WKT (Well-Known Text), and *.prj file) that can be used to define the 
projection/coordinate reference system and datum. A good reference site is 
http://spatialreference.org/
If possible provide a companion header file with projection information. Example header files: 
ENVI, *.hdr file; TIF world file, *.tfw; ESRI projection file, *.prj. 
Image files should be georeferenced prior to sending to the archive. File formats such as 
GeoTIFF that facilitate embedding the geospatial information inside the image file should be 
used where possible.  
If this additional documentation is available provide it along with the geospatial information. 
1.
Rational for choosing a particular projection 
2.
Issues with reprojecting the data 
3.
Suggested resampling techniques (Nearest neighbor/Cubic convolution…etc) 
4.
Projection constraints 
17
Storage Structure for Image Files: 
Store the image files in data types that fall within the valid range and type of the data 
contained in the image files. For example, if values of a parameter range from 1 to 100 
and only have integer numbers, when it is stored in an image file, pick the BYTE data 
type for storing the data. This would ensure that the least amount of disk space is used 
while maintaining data integrity. Likewise pick signed integer/unsigned integer/float etc 
depending on the data range and type.  
Pick consistent and optimal NODATA values. Preferably 0 or -9999. Embed the 
NODATA values in the image files if possible. For example, GeoTIFF format allows the 
nodata values to be embedded in the file so software can automatically read the 
NODATA value and render the image accordingly.  
Document NODATA values; FILL Values, Valid ranges, scale factor and offset of the 
data values. 
Document what the nodata/fill values represent. 
Additional considerations: 
If available provide a color look up table if available in the following format for the 
purpose to visualize the image file. 
Red Green Blue Value 
100 123 124 23 
122 123 53 34 
…………. 
Include pictures of binary image files so that a user can use them to check and to make 
sure that the binary images were read correctly. For example, include a *.jpg, *.png, 
*.gif, *.bmp, .tif, or .tiff pictures of geographic images 
Avoid using generic file extensions (e.g., *.bin or *.img). These extensions are used by 
many programs and could cause confusion on their origin. If the data are available in a 
generic format, explicitly state the software used to create/read the files. 
Provide information on what software package and version was used to create the data 
file(s). If the data files were created with custom code, provide a software program to 
enable the user to read the files (e.g., FORTRAN, C code, etc). 
Proprietary Software Data Formats: 
Data that are provided in a proprietary software format must include documentation of the 
software specifications (i.e., Software Package, Version, Vendor, and native platform). The 
archive data center will use this information to convert to a non-proprietary format for the 
archive. 
18
19
Why follow these image recommendations: 
1.
Storing data in recommended formats with detailed documentation ensures data 
longevity. Using non-proprietary formats allows data to be easily read many years into 
the future 
2.
Storing the data using the recommendations listed above allows for the data to be readily 
exposed using interoperability standards such as OGC-Web Map service, Web Coverage 
Service. This increases data usage and allows one storage format but multiple distribution 
formats. 
3.
Users can spend more time analyzing the data and spend less time in data preparation.  
4.
Easy access means improved usability of the data in more researchers using and citing 
your data. 
Vector Data: 
Below are suggested vector file formats. These are mostly proprietary data formats; please be 
sure to document the Software Package, Version, Vendor, and native platform. 
ARCVIEWsoftware -- we require *.shp, *.sbx, *.sbn, *.prj, and *.dbf  files that contain 
the basic components of an ARCVIEW shape file.   [ http://www.esri.com/
ENVI -- *.evf (ENVI vector file)                [ http://www.rsinc.com/whoweare/index.asp
ESRI
Arc/Info export file (.e00)                  [ http://www.esri.com/
]    
Also make sure that the vectors are properly geo-referenced and the geometry type (Point, Line, 
Polygon, Multipoint, etc) is specified. The requirements in the “Geospatial Information” section 
for Image Data also apply to Vector Data. 
2.4 Assign Descriptive File Names    
[ Return to Index ]
File names should reflect the contents of the file and include enough information to uniquely 
identify the data file. File names may contain information such as project acronym, study title, 
location, investigator, year(s) of study, data type, version number, and file type. The file name 
should be provided in the documentation (described in Sect. 2.7) and in the first line of the 
header rows in the file itself. 
Clear, descriptive, and unique file names may be important later when your data file is combined 
in a directory or FTP site with your own data files or with the data files of other investigators. 
Avoid using file names such as mydata.dat or 1998.dat.  
File names should be constructed for easy management by various data systems. Names should 
contain only numbers, letters, dashes, and underscores -- no spaces or special characters. Also, in 
general, lower-case names are less software and platform dependent and are preferred.  If you 
use mixed case file names (for readability), make sure that you do not have two filenames which 
differ only by case. When choosing a file name, check for any database management limitations 
on the use of special characters and file name length. For practical reasons of legibility and 
usability, file names should not be more than 64 characters in length and if well constructed 
could be considerably less. 
You may want to use similar logic when designing directory structures and names. Also, the data 
set title (see Sect. 2.6) should be similar to the data file name(s).  
Tabular Data File Naming Conventions: 
Version Number: 
Including a data file creation date or version number enables data users to 
quickly determine which data they are using if an update to the data set is released (e.g., 
*_v1.csv, *_r1.csv, or *_20100615.csv).  
File Type or Extensions:
Use *.txt, *.csv generally for tabular data. Section 2.3 addresses 
formats and extensions for image data files. 
If the Files are Compressed:
Use *.zip, *.gz, or *.tar file extensions, as appropriate for the 
compression software.  The individual files may be compressed for space conservation or several 
files may be aggregated and then compressed as one file of reduced size. When multiple files are 
compressed together, the same file naming guidelines apply to the compressed collection of files. 
Example Data File Names:
c130_a792_20000916.csv 
(From data set SAFARI 2000 C-130 Aerosol and Meteorological Data, Dry Season 2000) 
WBW_veg_inventory_all_20050304.csv 
(From data set Walker Branch Watershed Vegetation Inventory, 1967-1997) 
20
Documents you may be interested
Documents you may be interested