mvc open pdf in new tab : How to insert pdf into email text application control utility azure web page windows visual studio 2BW-18906-00-part1011

Understanding
Jitter Measurement for Serial Digital Video Signals 
A Tektronix Video Primer
How to insert pdf into email text - insert text into PDF content in C#.net, ASP.NET, MVC, Ajax, WinForms, WPF
XDoc.PDF for .NET, providing C# demo code for inserting text to PDF file
adding text to a pdf in preview; adding text box to pdf
How to insert pdf into email text - VB.NET PDF insert text library: insert text into PDF content in vb.net, ASP.NET, MVC, Ajax, WinForms, WPF
Providing Demo Code for Adding and Inserting Text to PDF File Page in VB.NET Program
adding text to a pdf form; how to add text to pdf file with reader
Jitter Measurement for Serial Digital Video Signals
Primer
2
www.tektronix.com/video
1.0 Introduction . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .3
2.0 Fundamental Concepts and Terminology . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .4
2.1. Encoding method, unit interval, SDI signals . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .4
2.2. Decoding process, clock recovery, bit scrambling . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .5
2.3. Time interval error, jitter, jitter waveform, jitter spectrum  . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .5
2.4. Decoding errors, normalized jitter amplitude . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .6
2.5. Wander, timing jitter, alignment jitter . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .6
2.6. Random jitter, deterministic jitter . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .7
2.7. Intersymbol interference, equalization . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .8
2.8. Pathological signals, SDI checkfield  . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .9
2.9. Decoding decision threshold, AC-coupling effects, symmetric signals  . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .10
2.10.Jitter input tolerance, jitter transfer, intrinsic jitter, output jitter . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .11
2.11.Eye diagram, equalized Eye diagram  . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .12
2.12.Equivalent-time Eye, Real-time Eye . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .14
2.13.Bit error ratio, Bathtub curve . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .15
3.0 Specifications on Video Jitter Performance and Measurement . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .17
3.1. Standards documents . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .17
3.2. Specifications on jitter frequency bandpass  . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .18
3.3. Specifications on signal voltage levels and transition times . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .19
3.4. Specifications on connecting cables and other system elements . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .19
3.5. Specifications on peak-to-peak jitter amplitude . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .20
3.6. Specifications on measurement time . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .20
3.7. Specifications on data patterns . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .21
3.8. Summary of jitter specifications . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .21
4.0 The Functions Comprising Jitter Measurement . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .22
4.1. Equalization . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .22
4.2. Transition detection . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .23
4.3. Phase detection/demodulation . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .25
4.3.1. Phase detection/demodulation: Equivalent-time Eye method . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .25
4.3.2. Phase detection/demodulation: Phase Demodulation method . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .28
4.3.3. Phase detection/demodulation: Real-time Acquisition method . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .30
4.3.4. Phase detection/demodulation: Summary of methods . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .32
4.4. Measurement filters . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .33
4.4.1. Filter realization . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .33
4.4.2. Filter accuracy . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .35
4.5. Peak-to-Peak measurement . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .36
4.5.1. Peak-to-peak detection methods . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .36
4.5.2. Independent jitter samples and normalized measurement time  . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .36
4.5.3. Measuring the peak-to-peak amplitude of random jitter . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .37
4.5.4. Measurement times . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .39
4.5.5. Dynamic range and jitter value quantization . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .39
4.6. Jitter noise floor  . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .40
4.7. Comparing jitter measurement methods . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .41
5.0 Data Error Rates and Jitter Measurements . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .44
5.1. Random jitter and BER . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .44
5.2. Jitter measurement and standards compliance . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .45
5.3. BER and jitter measurement time . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .46
5.4. Jitter budget . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .47
6.0 Jitter Measurement with Tektronix Instruments . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .48
6.1. Jitter measurement with the Tektronix WFM700M . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .48
6.2. Jitter measurement with other Tektronix video instruments . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .48
6.2.1. Wander rejection . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .49
6.2.2. Measurement of random jitter . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .49
6.2.3. Measurement of deterministic jitter . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .50
6.3. Jitter measurement with Tektronix real-time oscilloscopes  . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .50
7.0 Recommendations for Measuring Jitter in SDI Signals . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .51
7.1. Video system monitoring, maintenance and troubleshooting . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .51
7.2. Video equipment qualification and installation . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .51
7.3. Video equipment design . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .52
8.0 Conclusion . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .53
9.0 References . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .54
10.0 Acknowledgement  . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .54
Appendix A:Impact of bandwidth limitation in video jitter measurement . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .55
Appendix B:Peak-to-Peak and RMS measurement of typical video jitter . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .57
Appendix C:Limits to clock recovery bandwidth . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .58
Contents
C# Create PDF from Excel Library to convert xlsx, xls to PDF in C#
Export PDF from Excel with cell border or no border. Free online Excel to PDF converter without email. Quick integrate online C# source code into .NET class.
acrobat add text to pdf; add text to pdf document online
RasterEdge.com General FAQs for Products
or need additional assistance, please contact us via email (support@rasteredge dedicated to provide powerful & profession imaging controls, PDF document, image
add text pdf professional; how to add text to a pdf in reader
3
www.tektronix.com/video
In this technical guide, we describe the different techniques for measuring jitter in serial digital
video signals and how they can lead to different measurement results. We further identify areas
where the standards should supply additional specifications and guidance to help ensure more
consistent jitter measurements. 
1.0 Introduction
Jitter Measurement for Serial Digital Video Signals
Primer 
This guide focuses on video jitter measurement techniques
typically found in video-specific instruments, e.g., waveform
monitors and video measurement sets. General-purpose
measurement instruments, e.g., sampling and real-time
oscilloscopes, are also used to measure jitter in serial digital
video signals. These instruments can offer more extensive
jitter analysis capabilities based on sophisticated signal 
processing.
We will briefly touch on some very basic aspects of video
jitter measurement using general-purpose instruments in
this guide, specifically related to comparing results with
measurements made on video-specific instruments. We 
will not explore the range of jitter measurement capabilities
available on sampling or real-time oscilloscopes, or on other
general-purpose instruments.
For the most part, this guide describes jitter measurement
methods broadly. It does not give details on specific 
implementations in particular instruments. It does describe
some aspects of jitter measurement on Tektronix video-
specific instruments to illustrate some of the key concepts
discussed in the guide.
Timing variation in serial digital signals and the measure-
ment of these timing variations are complex technical top-
ics. To explain how and why jitter measurements differ, this
guide gives a technical overview of jitter measurement 
techniques and includes technical descriptions of several
key concepts. Although we examine jitter measurement in
some detail, we do not comprehensively cover all aspects
of this topic nor do we explore jitter measurement in 
extensive technical depth.
Rather, this guide focuses on describing common reasons
for differences in measuring jitter in serial digital video 
signals. In particular, it examines differences associated 
with the jitter frequencies in the video signal and with the
duration of the peak-to-peak amplitude measurements
used to characterize jitter in video systems. It will not cover
some topics often mentioned in other discussions of jitter
measurement, e.g., techniques for separating random and
deterministic jitter components.
The material assumes some understanding of serial digital
transmission theory and practice, the design and implemen-
tation of signal acquisition systems, the mathematical tech-
niques used in characterizing signal transmission, and the
properties of random processes.
This guide contains the following major sections:
Fundamental Concepts and Terminology:Reviews the
key concepts and terminology we will use to describe 
jitter measurement.
Specifications on Video Jitter Performance and
Measurement:Surveys relevant standards and 
specifications.
The Functions Comprising Jitter Measurement:
Examines the steps involved in measuring peak-to-peak
jitter amplitude, the different ways to implement these 
steps, and the impacts these differences have on 
measurement results.
Data Error Rates and Jitter Measurements:Explores
the relationship between data error rates in video sys-
tems and the requirements for measuring the jitter per-
formance of video equipment used in these systems.
Jitter Measurement with Tektronix Instruments:
Describes implementations of jitter measurement 
methods in Tektronix instruments and explains 
differences in measurement results.
Recommendations for Measuring Jitter in SDI 
signals:Recommends tactics for effectively using jitter
measurement methods and tools.
C# Create PDF from Word Library to convert docx, doc to PDF in C#.
Free online Word to PDF converter without email. Description: Convert to PDF/TIFF and save it into stream. Parameters: Name, Description, Valid Value.
how to input text in a pdf; how to enter text in pdf
C# Create PDF from PowerPoint Library to convert pptx, ppt to PDF
Excellent .NET control for turning all PowerPoint presentation into high quality PDF without Free online PowerPoint to PDF converter without email.
add text to pdf file; how to insert text into a pdf file
Jitter Measurement for Serial Digital Video Signals
Primer
4
www.tektronix.com/video
In this section we review some fundamental concepts and
terminology needed to describe jitter measurement. This
review will briefly touch on several concepts. It does not
cover these concepts in any depth.
Those experienced in digital communications will be familiar
with many of the concepts reviewed in this section. They
may wish to skip this part of the guide, or scan the material
to review any less familiar terminology or concepts.
2.1 Encoding method, unit interval, SDI signals
Distributing digital video over any significant distance
requires converting the digital content into a serial digital
video signal. Creating these signals involves converting the
original digital content into a sequence of individual bits and
representing these bits by voltage or light waveforms. A
clock signal determines the time interval used to encode 
a bit in the sequence and an encodingmethod determines
the signal characteristics that represent a ‘0’ or a ‘1’ bit
value, e.g., Manchester encoding or NRZ encoding. The
time interval corresponding to one bit in these serial data
signals is called the unit interval(UI).
The Society of Motion Picture and Television Engineers
(SMPTE) has approved standards that define a serial digital
interface(SDI) for digital video equipment. SMPTE 259M
defines the interface for standard-definition (SD) digital video
formats and SMPTE 292M deals with high-definition (HD)
video formats. We will refer to serial digital video signals
conforming to these standards as SDI signals.
The SMPTE standards define serial digital interfaces for sev-
eral different video formats. The information on jitter meas-
urement given in this technical guide applies to SDI signals
conforming to any of these specifications. In this guide, we
will reference two very common types of SDI signals:
The 270 Mb/s signals conforming to SMPTE 259M
specifications for standard-definition, 4:2:2 component
video with either a 4x3 or 16x9 aspect ratio as defined in
ITU-R BT.601- 5 (SD-SDI signals)
The 1.485 Gb/s signals conforming to SMPTE 292M
specifications for various high-definition video formats
(HD-SDI signals)
The SMPTE standards specify that the clock frequency
used to create these SDI signals will equal the signal bit
rate. As a result, SDI signals encode one bit in one clock
cycle, i.e. the unit interval equals the clock period. So, the
unit interval of a 270 Mb/s SD-SDI signal equals one period
of a 270 MHz clock or 3.7 ns. Similarly, the unit interval of 
a 1.485 Gb/s HD-SDI signal equals 673 ps or one period 
of a 1.485 GHz clock.
1
The SMPTE standards also specify that SDI signals encode
the serialized data-bit values using the NRZI method (Non-
return to Zero Inverted). In this method, ‘0’ bit values are
encoded as no change in the signal level, while ‘1’ bit 
values are encoded as a change in the current signal level.
If the current signal is high, a ‘1’ bit value causes a transi-
tion to the low signal level. If the current signal level is low, 
a ‘1’ bit value causes a transition to the high signal level
(Figure 1).
2.0 Fundamental Concepts and
Terminology
Figure 1. Unit interval and encoding method for SDI signals.
1SMPTE 292M also defines an HD format with a data rate of 1.485 GHz/1.001. This SDI signal has a unit interval of 674 ps.
.NET RasterEdge XDoc.PDF Purchase Details
PDF Print. License Agreement. Support Plans Each RasterEdge license comes with 1-year dedicated support (email, online chat) with 24-hour response time (working
how to add text to a pdf document using acrobat; adding text to pdf document
C# PDF Convert to Word SDK: Convert PDF to Word library in C#.net
Create editable Word file online without email. TIFF with specified zoom value and save it into stream. zoomValue, The magnification of the original PDF page size
adding text fields to pdf; how to add text field to pdf
Jitter Measurement for Serial Digital Video Signals
Primer 
5
www.tektronix.com/video
2.2 Decoding process, clock recovery, 
bit scrambling
To extract the digital content from an SDI signal, video
equipment samples the SDI signal at the midpoint of the
time intervals containing data bits (see Figure 1) and 
converts these sampled levels to the corresponding bit 
values. The sampling process uses a clock with the same
frequency as the encoding clock, and aligned in time to
ensure sampling occurs at the midpoint of the unit interval.
Typically, video equipment does not have direct access to
the clock used to create the serial data signal. Instead,
equipment implements a clock recoveryprocess that uses
a phase-lock loop (PLL) to extract the appropriate sampling
clock from the received signal. For reliable clock recovery,
the edgesin the SDI signal, i.e. transitions between the 
signal levels, must occur at an adequate rate. Long periods
of a constant signal level can cause the sampling clock to
drift out of synchronization.
Because of the NRZI encoding, long sequences of ‘1’ bit
values in the serialized data sequence will have edges at
each bit in the sequence. However, serialized digital video
content can easily contain extended sequences of ‘0’ bit
values. This could create SDI signals with long periods at 
a constant signal level. To avoid this, the SMPTE standards
specify that SDI signal sources will randomize the data
before applying the NRZI encoding, using a process 
known as scrambling. 
The scrambling process in an SDI signal source converts
the serialized data bits into a pseudo-random bit sequence.
SDI receivers implement the inverse of this scrambling
process to extract the original data bit sequence from the
pseudo-random bit sequence. In most cases, this scram-
bling process ensures a fairly large number of bit transitions,
although long sequences of ‘0’ bits can infrequently occur.
2.3. Time interval error, jitter, jitter waveform,
jitter spectrum
Ideally, the time interval between transitions in an SDI signal
should equal an integer multiple of the unit interval. In real
systems, however, the transitions in an SDI signal can vary
from their ideal locations in time. This variation is called time
interval error(TIE), commonly referred to as jitter. This timing
variation can be induced by a variety of frequency, ampli-
tude, and phase-related effects. In this guide, we will view
jitter as essentially a phase variation in a signal’s transitions,
i.e. a phase modulation of the serial data signal.
As a simple example, suppose the edges in an SDI signal
have a sinusoidal variation around their ideal positions 
relative to a reference clock. If we viewed this SDI signal on 
an oscilloscope triggered on the reference clock, the actual
edges would appear as a blur around the ideal positions as
illustrated in Figure 2. We can fully define this simple sinu-
soidal jitter with two parameters, the frequency of the 
variation and its peak-to-peak amplitude.
In actual SDI signals, jitter will rarely have the simple sine
wave characteristics shown in this example. In real systems,
a wide variety of factors influence the timing of signal transi-
tions. These different sources introduce variations over a
range of frequencies and amplitudes. The peak amounts
that any particular edge leads or lags its ideal position may
differ and there may be long time intervals between edges
with large peak-to-peak variation.
Thejitter waveformis the amount of variation in a signal’s
transitions as a function of time, and the jitter spectrum
is the frequency-domain representation of the time-domain 
jitter waveform. In actual signals, the jitter waveform 
typically has a complex shape created by the combined
effects of various sources, and the jitter spectrum contains
a wide range of spectral components at different 
frequencies and amplitudes.
Figure 2. SDI signal with sinusoidal edge variation (ideal positions
shown in darker lines).
About RasterEdge.com - A Professional Image Solution Provider
Email to: support@rasteredge.com. We are dedicated to provide powerful & profession imaging controls, PDF document, image to pdf files and components for
how to add text box in pdf file; how to add text to a pdf file in acrobat
VB.NET Create PDF from PowerPoint Library to convert pptx, ppt to
Fill-in Field Data. Field: Insert, Delete, Update Turn all PowerPoint presentation into high quality PDF Create PDF file from PowerPoint free online without
how to insert text into a pdf; how to insert pdf into email text
Jitter Measurement for Serial Digital Video Signals
Primer
6
www.tektronix.com/video
2.4. Decoding errors, normalized jitter 
amplitude
In the decoding process, SDI receivers use a reference
clock to determine when to sample the input SDI signal.
Ideally, the transitions in the input SDI signal occur at
appropriate clock edges and sampling occurs at the mid-
point of the unit interval. In the ideal situation shown in
Figure 1, the signal transitions align with the clock’s falling
edges and sampling occurs at the clock’s rising edges.
Real SDI signals, however, have some amount of jitter in
their edges. Jitter of sufficiently large amplitude will cause
sampling errors. Figure 3 illustrates this situation. It shows
an SDI signal that encodes two ‘1’ bit values during two
clock periods, n and n+1. In the ideal situation, the sam-
pling process would capture a high signal value in clock
period n and a low signal value in clock period n+1.
In the actual signal, the transitions vary significantly from
their ideal locations relative to the reference clock. During
clock period n, the actual edge varies by less than one-half
the reference clock period. At the sampling time determined
by the reference clock, the sampling process captures a
high signal value, as it would in the ideal situation.
During clock period n+1, however, the actual transition
occurs more than one-half the clock period from its ideal
position relative to the reference clock. Since the actual
edge occurs after the sampling time determined by the ref-
erence clock, the sampling process captures a high signal
value instead of the low signal value it would have sampled
in the ideal situation.
When expressed in seconds, the amount of timing variation
needed to generate a decoding error depends on the clock
period, i.e. the size of the unit interval. For a 1.485 Gb/s
HD-SDI signal a variation of 340 ps is more than one-half
the 673 ps unit interval, while for a 270 Mb/s SD-SDI signal
this same variation is less than one-tenth of this signal’s 3.7
ns unit interval. 
In order to describe these timing variations without referring
to specific signal data rates, amplitudes are typically
expressed using unit intervals. In these normalized units, 
the variation shown in Figure 3 for clock period n+1 has an
amplitude value of slightly more than 0.5 UI. An amplitude
value of 0.5 UI would equal 1.85 ns in an SD-SDI signal 
and 337 ps in an HD-SDI signal.
2.5. Wander, timing jitter, alignment jitter
In the preceding examples, we have described variations 
in the position of signal transitions with respect to an ideal,
jitter-free reference clock, i.e. a clock signal in which all
edges occur at their ideal locations in time. Actual reference
clocks used in decoding are not jitter free.
As noted in section 2.2, the decoding process typically
uses a recovered clock extracted from the received SDI 
signal. The clock recovery process “locks” the recovered
clock to the input signal and the clock will follow timing 
variations in the input signal that fall within the bandwidth 
of the recovery process. Hence, the timing variations in 
the SDI signal introduce variations in the transitions of the
recovered clock.
Since the transitions in the recovered clock determine when
the decoder samples the SDI signal, using a recovered
clock actually reduces the number of decoding errors 
associated with low frequency variations. The sampling 
time “tracks” these variations and samples at the correct
location inside the unit interval.
The recovered clock does not track variations in signal 
transitions if the frequency of the variation lies above the
bandwidth of the clock extraction process. At these higher
frequencies, the position of signal transitions can vary 
relative to the edges of the recovered clock and these 
variations can create decoding errors.
As noted in section 2.3, the jitter spectrum in actual SDI
signals generally contains a range of spectral components.
The recovered clock will generally track spectral compo-
nents below the clock recovery bandwidth, but will not
track spectral components above this bandwidth. Hence,
the impact of jitter on decoding depends on both the jitter’s
amplitude and its frequency components. This has led to 
a frequency-based classification of jitter.
Figure 3. Decoding error caused by a large amplitude variation 
in edge position.
VB.NET Create PDF from Word Library to convert docx, doc to PDF in
Data: Auto Fill-in Field Data. Field: Insert, Delete, Update all Word text and image content into high quality Free online Word to PDF converter without email.
how to enter text into a pdf; add text box to pdf file
VB.NET Create PDF from Excel Library to convert xlsx, xls to PDF
Auto Fill-in Field Data. Field: Insert, Delete, Update Turn all Excel spreadsheet into high quality PDF Convert Excel to PDF document free online without email.
how to add a text box to a pdf; how to add text box to pdf document
Conventionally, the term “jitter” refers to short-term time
interval error, i.e. spectral components above some low 
frequency threshold. For SDI signals, the SMPTE standards
set this threshold at 10 Hz and refer to spectral compo-
nents above this frequency as timing jitter. 
The term wanderrefers to long-term time interval error. For
SDI signals, components in the jitter spectrum below 10 Hz
are classified as wander. Since video equipment can gener-
ally track these long-term variations, characterizing wander
in terms of actual edge positions relative to their ideal posi-
tions does not give meaningful information. Instead, wander
is measured in terms of frequency offset and frequency drift
rate. These parameters characterize the deviation from
expected clock rates in normalized units of parts per million
(ppm and ppm/sec) or parts per billion (ppb and ppb/s)
rather than UI. 
Alignment jitterrefers to components in the jitter spectrum
above a specified frequency threshold related to typical
bandwidths of the clock recovery processes. In other
words, alignment jitter is a subset of timing jitter that
excludes spectral components the clock recovery process
can track. The specified frequency threshold differs for 
SD-SDI and HD-SDI signals and is defined in the relevant
SMPTE standard (see section 3.2). For SD-SDI signals,
alignment jitter refers to spectral components above 1 kHz.
For HD-SDI signals, spectral components above 100 kHz
are classified as alignment jitter.
In general, video equipment does not track alignment jitter,
though some equipment may track some low frequency
alignment jitter. Thus, high amplitude alignment jitter gener-
ally introduces decoding errors. Since video equipment can
track wander and low frequency timing jitter, these spectral
components often have less impact on signal decoding.
While low frequency variations may have less impact on 
signal decoding, they can have significant impact in other
areas. Other processes, e.g., digital-to-analog conversion
stages, use this recovered clock, or a sub-multiple of this
clock. Since this clock tracks the low frequency jitter in the
input SDI signal, its edges vary from their ideal positions.
This jitter in the clock signal can introduce errors, e.g., 
non-linearity in D-to-A conversion. 
Clock recovery also affects the way jitter and wander accu-
mulate in a video system. Reclocking video equipment uses
the recovered clock to regenerate the SDI signal. Since 
the recovered clock does not track alignment jitter well,
reclocking can substantially reduce alignment jitter.
However, reclocking may not significantly reduce wander or
low-frequency timing jitter since the recovered clock tracks
these variations. Hence, low-frequency variations can build
through a video system. Amplitudes can eventually grow
beyond the tracking capability of clock recovery processes.
At this point, decoding errors will appear and the clock
recovery hardware might not remain locked to the 
input signal.
This guide examines techniques for measuring timing and
alignment jitter. We will not examine wander and wander
measurement techniques. However, wander does impact
jitter measurements since these measurements must
exclude contributions from spectral components below 
10 Hz. Differences in wander rejection can lead to different
measurement results, and we will examine these effects 
in later sections.
2.6. Random jitter, deterministic jitter
To fully understand the impact of jitter in video systems, 
we need to consider its statistical properties in addition 
to its amplitude and spectral content. Commonly used
approaches to characterizing and modeling these proper-
ties distinguish between two basic jitter types. Random 
jitterhas essentially no discernable pattern. It is best 
characterized by a probability distribution and statistical
properties like mean and variance. Deterministic jitteris
more predictable (determinable) and is often characterized
by some definable periodic or repeatable pattern with a
determinable peak-to-peak extent.
Random jitter
Random processes, e.g., thermal or shot noise, introduce
random jitter into an SDI signal. We typically use a Gaussian
probability distribution to model this jitter behavior, and we
can use the standard deviation of this distribution (equiva-
lent to the RMS value) as a measure of the jitter amplitude.
However, the peak-to-peak jitter amplitude and the RMS 
jitter amplitude are not the same. In particular, the peak-to-
peak amplitude value depends on the observation time. 
In the Gaussian distribution used to model random jitter,
small amplitude variations in edge position are most 
probable, but very large amplitude variations may infre-
quently occur. A record of amplitudes made over a short
observation time could include a large amplitude value, but
probably will not. By contrast, a record of amplitudes made
over a long observation time might not contain any large
amplitude values, but probably will contain at least one. So,
on average, we would expect that a peak-to-peak ampli-
Jitter Measurement for Serial Digital Video Signals
Primer 
7
www.tektronix.com/video
Jitter Measurement for Serial Digital Video Signals
Primer
8
www.tektronix.com/video
tude measurement made over a long observation time
would have a larger value than a peak-to-peak amplitude
measurement made over a short observation time.
The “tails” of a Gaussian distribution can reach arbitrarily
large amplitudes. Hence, by observing over a sufficiently
large time interval, we could theoretically measure arbitrarily
large peak-to-peak jitter amplitude. We describe this prop-
erty by saying that random jitter has “unbounded” peak-
to-peak amplitude. 
Technically, this description applies only to the mathematical
model for random jitter. For all practical purposes, however,
a Gaussian distribution adequately models random jitter 
in real systems. Thus, we can say that over any region of
interest, random jitter in actual SDI signals has unbounded
peak-to-peak amplitude.
Deterministic jitter
A wide range of sources can introduce deterministic jitter
into an SDI signal. For example:
Noise in a switching power supply can introduce periodic
deterministic jitter.
The frequency response of cables or devices can intro-
duce data-dependent jitterthat is correlated to the bit
sequence in the SDI signal (see section 2.7).
Differences in the rise and fall times of transition can
introduce duty-cycle dependent jitter(see section 4.2).
In addition to these general sources of deterministic jitter,
SDI signals can contain deterministic jitter correlated with
video properties. For example: 
The line and field structure of video data can introduce 
a periodic deterministic jitter that we will call raster-
dependent jitter.
Converting the 10-bit words used in digital video to and
from a serial bit sequence can introduce high frequency
data-dependent jitter at 1/10 the clock rate, typically
called word-correlated jitter.
Deterministic jitter attains some maximum peak-to-peak
amplitude within a determinable time interval. Increasing the
observation time beyond this time interval will not increase
the peak-to-peak jitter amplitude measurement. Unlike ran-
dom jitter, repeatable deterministic jitter has a determinable
upper bound on its peak-to-peak jitter amplitude.
Even if deterministic jitter has infrequent long-term deter-
minable behavior, this jitter can be adequately modeled 
with a predictable pattern that has bounded peak-to-peak
amplitude. Thus, for all practical purposes, deterministic 
jitter has bounded peak-to-peak amplitude and random 
jitter has unbounded peak-to-peak jitter amplitude.
2.7. Intersymbol interference, equalization
In real serial digital signals, transitions from one voltage level
to another do not occur instantaneously. They have finite
rise and fall times. Further, the frequency-dependent
response of devices and communication channels will
cause temporal spreading in these transitions. Intersymbol
interference(ISI) occurs when the spreading of transitions 
in earlier bits affect transitions in later bits.
These effects cause transitions to vary from their ideal
shapes and locations. In other words, ISI introduces jitter 
in the signal. Specifically, it produces predictable and
repeatable jitter whose magnitude depends on the 
frequency responses of devices and channels, and on 
the data patterns in the signal. Hence, ISI produces 
deterministic, data-dependent jitter.
In particular, cable attenuation greater than 1 dB can 
introduce significant intersymbol interference. To avoid 
data errors due to this ISI, receivers typically have cable
equalizers that compensate for the 1/√ƒ ƒ frequency
response of the cable. Figure 4 shows the typical frequency
responses of a cable and equalizer. 
Figure 4. Frequency response for 300 m of cable and typical
response of a compensating equalizer.
2.8. Pathological signals, SDI checkfield
As noted in section 2.2, clock recovery requires frequent
signal transitions, i.e. the signal must have a sufficient 
transition density. Cable equalization algorithms also need
many edges in the signal to determine and maintain the 
frequency-dependent gain that compensates for the 
1/√ƒ frequency response of the cable. Long intervals of
constant signal level stress these processes and can lead
to decoding errors or synchronization problems. Further, 
AC-coupling can reduce noise margins in decoding if the
input signal remains at the same voltage level for a signifi-
cant percentage of time (see section 2.9). 
In most cases, scrambling and NZRI encoding ensures that
SDI signals have many transitions. Typical SDI signals do
not have long intervals of constant voltage that stress clock
recovery, equalization, or decoding processes. 
However, particular word patterns in digital video content
can produce SDI signals with long constant-voltage inter-
vals. If the shift register used in the scrambling process has
a particular state and the scrambler receives one of several
special input bit sequences, the resulting SDI signal after
NRZI encoding will have one of the patterns shown in
Figure 5. The paper by Takeo Eguchi listed in the
References provides additional information.
SDI signals containing these patterns are called pathological
SDI signals. Video semiconductor and equipment designers
can use these signals to “stress test” clock recovery and
equalization processes and to verify the correct operation 
of clamping or DC-restoration circuits that compensate for
AC-coupling effects. As shown, the patterns needed for
testing equalization differs from the pattern needed to stress
test the clock recovery PLL.
Once initiated, the stress patterns in pathological SDI sig-
nals occur only to the end of an active video line. SDI signal
formats insert information between lines of active video
content, e.g., the SAV (start-of-active-video) and EAV 
(end-of-active-video) synchronization words. This added
information disrupts the special shift register state and bit
sequences that create these long constant-voltage inter-
vals. Even if the next active line contains the same special
bit sequence, the shift register will generally not have the
appropriate initial state and the SDI signal will not contain
the stress patterns.
Repeating the special bit sequence on multiple video lines
will cause the stress pattern to reappear. Eventually, the
shift register in the scrambler will enter an appropriate initial
state at the right position in the bit sequence. When this
occurs, the stress pattern will reappear and will continue to
the end of the active video line. The conditions needed to
initiate a stress pattern happen infrequently. So, pathologi-
cal SDI signals consist of occasional occurrences of video
lines containing stress patterns statistically interspersed
among many video lines that look like typical SDI signals.
Some video test signal generators can create these signals
in either full-field formats, or in split-field formats that com-
bine the clock recovery and equalizer stress patterns. For
testing recovery and equalization in video equipment with
SDI inputs, SMPTE developed two recommended practices
(RP 178 and RP 198) that define a specific split-field format
called an SDI checkfield.
Jitter Measurement for Serial Digital Video Signals
Primer 
9
www.tektronix.com/video
Figure 5. SDI signals for stress testing clock recovery and 
cable equalization.
Jitter Measurement for Serial Digital Video Signals
Primer
10 www.tektronix.com/video
2.9. Decoding decision threshold, AC-
coupling effects, symmetric signals
To determine whether a sampled signal voltage corre-
sponds to a “high” or “low” signal level, decoders compare
the sampled voltage against a particular voltage level called
the decision thresholdor decision level. An optimally 
chosen decision threshold will equally protect against errors
generated by noise on either signal level. If each signal level
has the same amount of noise, the optimal decision thresh-
old equals the average of the two signal voltage levels.
SDI receivers generally use fixed decision thresholds in the
decoding process. For optimal performance, signal levels
must keep the same relative relationship to this fixed volt-
age level. A shift in the signal relative to the decision thresh-
old reduces the noise margin for one of the signal levels,
which can lead to decoding errors. 
SDI receivers typically have AC-coupled inputs that remove
DC-offsets in the input SDI signal and maintain a constant
average voltage in the AC-coupled signal. In many imple-
mentations, this average signal level equals zero volts,
although biasing circuitry in the receiver could set the 
average signal level of the AC-coupled signal to a non-zero
value. Typically, the fixed decision threshold equals the 
average voltage of the AC-coupled signal. However, the
optimal decision threshold may differ from the average 
signal voltage if one signal level can have more noise 
than the other.
While AC-coupling filters out DC offsets in the input SDI 
signal that could lead to decoding errors, it can also shift
the signal levels in the AC-coupled signal relative to a fixed
decision threshold. Figure 6 illustrates this situation for an
implementation of AC-coupling that maintains the average
signal level in the AC-coupled signal at zero volts. In this
example, the decoding process also uses zero volts as the
fixed decision threshold.
Figure 6a shows a segment of an AC-coupled signal
derived from an input SDI signal that does not contain any
long duration at the same voltage level. In this case, the
high signal level in the AC-coupled signal equals +0.5·V
pp
and the low signal level equals -0.5·V
pp
, where V
pp
is the
peak-to-peak amplitude of the input SDI signal. The fixed
decision threshold falls at an optimal position midway
between the two levels. 
Figure 6b shows a segment of an AC-coupled signal
derived from an input SDI signal that stays at the low signal
level for long periods of time, e.g., one of the equalizer
stress patterns described in section 2.8. In this example,
the signal remains at the low signal level 95% of the time.
To maintain an average signal level of zero volts, the low
signal level in the AC-coupled signal must equal -0.05·V
pp
,
while the high signal level must equal +0.95·V
pp
. The low
signal level is very close to the fixed decision threshold for
decoding, which eliminates the noise margins for this signal
level and will lead to decoding errors. 
In effect, the AC-coupling has generated intersymbol inter-
ference. The values of earlier bits (long strings of ‘0’ bit 
values after scrambling) have impacted the decoding of
later bits.
The amount of shift depends on the coupling time constant.
For example, with a coupling constant of 10 µsec, an
equalizer stress pattern will shift almost 78% closer to the
fixed decision level over one-half of an HD video line. With 
a coupling time constant of 75 µsec, the stress pattern will
shift by less than 33% over an entire HD video line.
To compensate for this AC-coupling effect, SDI receivers
typically clamp or DC-restore the AC-coupled signal to
maintain the relationship between the signal levels and 
the fixed decision threshold.
Due to scrambling and NRZI encoding, SDI signals are
symmetric, i.e. they spend nearly the same amount of time 
at each signal level. More specifically, typical SDI signals are
symmetric when signal levels are averaged over many unit
intervals. Shorter-term, SDI signals can have several periods
of constant signal level, with pathological SDI signals as the
extreme case.
Figure 6. Shift in AC-coupled signals relative to fixed decision level.
Documents you may be interested
Documents you may be interested