mvc open pdf in new tab : Add text pdf Library SDK component .net asp.net wpf mvc 2BW-18906-03-part1014

Jitter Measurement for Serial Digital Video Signals
Primer 
31
www.tektronix.com/video
The figure shows a reference clock, a data signal with 
sinusoidal jitter, and samples of the jitter signal taken at the
clock rate. TIE measurements correspond to the samples
shown in red. The samples shown in black, dashed lines
have no corresponding TIE measurement because the data
signal does not have a transition at this sample point. 
The value of these “missing” samples can be interpolated
from the actual TIE measurements. The combined set of
actual and interpolated TIE measurements correspond to
sampling a demodulated jitter signal at the data clock rate.
This “effective” sampling rate is well above the Nyquist 
criteria for spectral components in the jitter signal with 
frequencies less than 1/10 the data clock rate, i.e. the 
minimum high-frequency corner point for measuring timing
or alignment jitter. At these sampling rates, the Real-time
Acquisition method can collect a large number of TIE 
measurements in a short duration.
The Real-time Acquisition method cannot continuously
monitor the jitter signal over durations longer than the time
span of a single acquisition record. It can detect any inter-
mittent jitter spikes and other occasional or non-periodic 
jitter behaviors that occur during an acquisition, but will 
not capture behaviors that occur during the gaps between
acquisitions.
Signal displays and manual measurement
The plotting subsystem shown in Figure 24 can generate
several graphical views of the TIE measurements. In partic-
ular, this section can produce a time trend plot of the TIE
measurements that is equivalent to the jitter waveform 
display available with the Phase Demodulation method.
Applying a Fourier transform to the TIE measurements will
yield a jitter spectrum display.
The jitter waveform and spectrum displays contain informa-
tion on the jitter frequencies that can be adequately 
captured in a single acquisition record. Because of the 
gaps between acquisition records, these displays cannot
accurately represent low frequency jitter components that
cannot be captured in a single record.
Due to the high sampling rates used in data acquisition, the
Real-time Acquisition method can determine the shape of
the input SDI signal. In particular, it can show actual edge
transitions in a Real-time Eye diagram or in a signal wave-
form display. Engineers can “zoom in” on various displays
to examine the signal data in different parts of the acquisi-
tion record at various scales. They can use this capability to
correlate specific jitter behavior with data patterns or other
signal characteristics in the SDI input signal.
Vertical cursors can be used to make manual jitter meas-
urement on either a Real-time Eye or Equivalent-time Eye
using the procedure described in section 4.3.1. Many
instruments also offer Eye mask testing and other analysis
tools that can help characterize both amplitude noise and
jitter in SDI signals.
Figure 25. TIE measurements and jitter samples.
Add text pdf - insert text into PDF content in C#.net, ASP.NET, MVC, Ajax, WinForms, WPF
XDoc.PDF for .NET, providing C# demo code for inserting text to PDF file
adding text to a pdf in acrobat; how to add text to a pdf in reader
Add text pdf - VB.NET PDF insert text library: insert text into PDF content in vb.net, ASP.NET, MVC, Ajax, WinForms, WPF
Providing Demo Code for Adding and Inserting Text to PDF File Page in VB.NET Program
adding text to pdf in reader; how to insert text box in pdf file
Jitter Measurement for Serial Digital Video Signals
Primer
32 www.tektronix.com/video
4.3.4. Phase detection/demodulation: Summary 
of methods
For the three phase detection/demodulation methods
described in this section, Table 3 summarizes the key 
characteristics that most affect peak-to-peak jitter 
measurement.
Operation
Frequency response
Dynamic range
Sampling of
baseband
jitter
modulation
Coverage
Signal displays
Equivalent-time Eye
Measures individual edge
variation using samples
from widely separated
edges captured in an
Equivalent-time Eye
No frequency-related 
limitations
Typically less than 1 UI
Equivalent-time
< 1.5 MS/sec
Depending on observation
time, low sample density
can miss contribution from
intermittent jitter behaviors
Cannot construct jitter
waveform or spectrum dis-
play from histogram data
Phase Demodulation
Demodulates baseband jit-
ter signal from input signal
using recovered clocks,
band-limited by clock
recovery bandwidth
Clock recovery bandwidth
affects measurement of
high frequency jitter
Typically greater than 1 UI
Real-time
5-20 MS/sec
Continuously monitors
band- limited demodulated
jitter signal (phase detector
output)
Can produce jitter 
waveform and spectrum
displays of band-limited
demodulated jitter signal
Real-time Acquisition
Measures individual edge
variation on all edges 
captured in one or more
acquisitions
Acquisition record size
affects measurement of 
low frequency jitter
Greater than 1 UI
Real-time
Typically between 25% 
and 50% of data rate
Full coverage within acqui-
sition record, no coverage
in gaps between records
Can produce jitter wave-
form and spectrum displays
from TIE measurements
within a single acquisition
record
Table 3. Summary of jitter specifications.
Style
Typical rates
Phase Detection/Demodulation Method
C# PDF insert image Library: insert images into PDF in C#.net, ASP
C#.NET PDF SDK - Add Image to PDF Page in C#.NET. How to Insert & Add Image, Picture or Logo on PDF Page Using C#.NET. Add Image to PDF Page Using C#.NET.
how to add text to a pdf file in preview; how to enter text into a pdf form
VB.NET PDF insert image library: insert images into PDF in vb.net
try with this sample VB.NET code to add an image As String = Program.RootPath + "\\" 1.pdf" Dim doc New PDFDocument(inputFilePath) ' Get a text manager from
add text pdf reader; add text to pdf without acrobat
4.4. Measurement filters
Differences in the phase detection/demodulation methods
lead to differences in realizing the bandpass restrictions
specified for measuring timing and alignment jitter (Figure
13, Figure 14). In this section, we present a short mathe-
matical analysis of these differences. We also describe the
impact of filter accuracy on jitter measurement.
4.4.1. Filter realization
We start with an analysis for the Phase Demodulation
method. As shown in Figure 22, this method uses two
phase-locked loops, i.e. the wide-band clock recovery 
PLL and a narrow-band PLL. This makes the analysis
slightly more complex.
Figure 26 is a mathematical flow graph of the phase pro-
cessing corresponding to Figure 22. The phase of the input
signal is designated θ
in
, and the phases of clocks x and y
are designated θ
x
and θ
y
, respectively. The lowpass transfer
function of the clock recovery is H
4
(s), and the lowpass
transfer function of the narrow-band PLL is H
3
(s). The com-
bination of these two transfer functions realize a bandpass
function H(s) that satisfies the frequency restrictions for
measuring timing and alignment jitter.
For this analysis, let the s-domain representation of the 
lowpass transfer functions of the narrow-band PLL and 
the clock recovery be:
Where:
a
3
= 2πƒ
3
= 2π · (0.1 MHz),  a
4
= 2πƒ
4
= 2π · (148.5 MHz).
H
3
(s) is the transfer function for a 3rd-order narrow-band
PLL and H
4
(s) is the transfer function for a 1st-order wide-
band clock recovery process. The values selected for a
3
and a
4
will realize the bandpass specification for measuring
alignment jitter on an HD-SDI signal.
The total transfer function is:
H(s) = H
4
(s)[1 – H
3
(s)] =
Jitter Measurement for Serial Digital Video Signals
Primer 
33
www.tektronix.com/video
Figure 26. Mathematical flow graph of Phase 
Demodulation method.
VB.NET PDF Text Extract Library: extract text content from PDF
With this advanced PDF Add-On, developers are able to extract target text content from source PDF document and save extracted text to other file formats
how to add text to a pdf file; adding text pdf
VB.NET PDF Password Library: add, remove, edit PDF file password
VB: Add Password to PDF with Permission Settings Applied. This VB.NET example shows how to add PDF file password with access permission setting.
how to insert text in pdf file; adding text fields to pdf
Jitter Measurement for Serial Digital Video Signals
Primer
34 www.tektronix.com/video
The frequency responses of these transfer functions are
plotted in Figure 27. Note that the lowpass function H
3
(s),
when subtracted from unity, yields the highpass function 
in H(s). Compare the frequency response of |H(s)| with the
frequency response in Figure 14.
The choice of a
4
realizes the SMPTE 292M specification
that ƒ
4
be at least 1/10 of the 1.485 GHz clock rate of the
HD-SDI signal. As noted in section 4.3.2, clock recovery
hardware cannot achieve this loop bandwidth because SDI
signals do not have sufficient edges. For an actual imple-
mentation of the Phase Demodulation method, a
4
would be
a smaller value determined by the clock recovery bandwidth.
This situation does not necessarily imply that measurements
made with the Phase Demodulation method will be lower
than measurements made with the other methods. The jitter
spectrum of many SDI signals does not contain significant
energy above commonly available clock recovery band-
widths. In this case, measurements made with the Phase
Demodulation method can agree closely with the measure-
ments from other methods (Appendix A).
With a 3rd-order, narrow-band PLL, the highpass slope 
of H(s) rises faster than the minimum 40 dB/decade 
specification shown in Figure 14. Instead, it realizes the 60
dB/decade highpass slope shown in Figure 13 and speci-
fied by IEEE Std. 1521 for proper rejection of wander. Using
this approach, the same implementation can measure either
timing or alignment jitter.
Removing H
4
(s) from the model in Figure 26 produces the
mathematical flow graph of the phase processing for the
Equivalent-time Eye method (Figure 20). To conform to IEEE
Std. 1521, the narrow-band PLL in this method would need
the same lowpass transfer function:
This leads to a high-pass transfer function for the total
transfer function H(s) of:
H(s) = 1 – H
3
(s) = 
Figure 27. Frequency responses of H3(s), H4(s), and H(s) in Figure 26.
C# PDF Text Extract Library: extract text content from PDF file in
How to C#: Extract Text Content from PDF File. Add necessary references: RasterEdge.Imaging.Basic.dll. RasterEdge.Imaging.Basic.Codec.dll.
add text to a pdf document; how to add text fields to a pdf document
C# PDF Password Library: add, remove, edit PDF file password in C#
C# Sample Code: Add Password to PDF with Permission Settings Applied in C#.NET. This example shows how to add PDF file password with access permission setting.
how to insert text into a pdf file; add text in pdf file online
The result is a total transfer function H(s) that effectively has
no roll-off at high frequencies, as shown in Figure 28. This
response is consistent with the specification that ƒ
4
be at
least1/10 the clock rate. If a
3
equal 2π · (0.1 MHz), the
response shown in the figure has a low-frequency cutoff
that meets SMPTE 292M requirements for measuring 
alignment jitter.
In the Real-time Acquisition method, proper configuration 
of the measurement filter stage could realize a frequency
response like Figure 28. Proper configuration of PLL-based
clock recovery software could also realize this transfer 
function if the clock recovery algorithm could implement 
a 3rd-order PLL. Otherwise, additional filtering would be
required to realize the appropriate highpass slope. This
method could also realize the frequency response in Figure
27 with proper configuration of the filtering and clock 
recovery algorithms.
For all methods, setting a
3
= 2π · (10 Hz) in the narrow-
band PLL produces a system transfer function that realizes
the bandpass restriction for measuring timing jitter 
(Figure 13).
4.4.2. Filter accuracy
To correctly reject wander components in SDI signals, IEEE
Std. 1521 specifies that the highpass corner of the band-
pass for timing jitter measurements, ƒ
1
, should equal 10 Hz
± 20%. The standards do not specify accuracy for ƒ
3
and
ƒ
4
. As described in section 3.2, the standards specify mini-
mum values for the bandpass slopes. The slopes shown in
Figure 13 and Figure 14 represent the combination of mini-
mal specifications from all relevant standards.
Using different values for the frequency cutoffs and slopes
can produce different peak-to-peak jitter amplitude meas-
urements. The amount of variation depends on the spectral
characteristics of the jitter signal.
Filter accuracy has an especially strong impact on timing 
jitter measurement because these measurements need to
reject wander components. Some video devices, e.g.,
MPEG decoders, can produce outputs with large wander
components. Further, wander can build as a signal flows
through a video system.
In these cases, differences in realizing the bandpass cutoff
frequency and slope specified for timing jitter measure-
ments can lead to significantly different values for peak-to-
peak amplitude. In particular, measurements made with a
bandpass that conforms to the SMPTE RP 192 specifica-
tion for at least 40 dB/decade wander rejection can be
much larger than measurements made with a bandpass
that conforms to the IEEE Std. 1521 specification for 60
dB/decade wander rejection (see section 6.2.1).
Jitter Measurement for Serial Digital Video Signals
Primer 
35
www.tektronix.com/video
Figure 28. Frequency response of total transfer function H(s) for
Equivalent-Eye Method.
VB.NET PDF Text Add Library: add, delete, edit PDF text in vb.net
How to VB.NET: Add Text to PDF Page. Add necessary references: This is a piece of VB.NET demo code to add text annotation to PDF page.
how to add a text box in a pdf file; how to insert text box on pdf
C# PDF Text Add Library: add, delete, edit PDF text in C#.net, ASP
A best PDF annotation SDK control for Visual Studio .NET can help to add text to PDF document using C#. C#.NET Demo Code: Add Text to PDF Page in C#.NET.
adding text to pdf file; how to add text to a pdf document
Jitter Measurement for Serial Digital Video Signals
Primer
36 www.tektronix.com/video
4.5. Peak-to-Peak measurement
The last stage of the jitter measurement process determines
the peak-to-peak jitter amplitude. While the standards
specify that output jitter shall be specified and measured as
a peak-to-peak quantity, they give little guidance on making
the measurement (see section 3.6). Much of the variation
seen in jitter measurement results arises from differences 
in implementing this stage in the process.
4.5.1. Peak-to-peak detection methods
The Equivalent-time Eye method and the Real-time
Acquisition method measure peak-to-peak amplitude by
calculating the difference between the minimum and maxi-
mum values in a collection of jitter amplitude values.
The Phase Demodulation method measures the peak-to-
peak amplitude of a band-limited demodulated jitter signal
(phase detector output). Earlier-generation implementations
of the Phase Demodulation method use analog peak detec-
tion. Later-generation implementations digitally sample the
signal from the phase detector and measure the peak-to-
peak amplitude of the jitter samples.
In analog peak detection, the attack time of the peak detec-
tors strongly affects the accuracy of the peak-to-peak
amplitude measurements. Short attack times let the peak
detector more accurately track rapid changes in jitter signal
amplitudes. Long attack times cannot track these changes
and produce lower amplitude measurements. Generally,
digital implementations can more accurately measure the
true peak-to-peak value.
4.5.2. Independent jitter samples and normalized meas-
urement time
In section 3.6, we briefly described the relationship between
measured peak-to-peak jitter amplitude and measurement
time. In exploring this relationship further, we will use two
concepts connected with sampling the jitter signal: 
Nyquist-rate sampling and independent samples.
To collect all the available information about a jitter signal,
including the jitter waveform shape, the sampling rate 
must be at least the Nyquist rate. The Nyquist rate equals
2· ƒ
JBW
where ƒ
JBW
is the “effective” jitter signal bandwidth.
In the case of the Phase Demodulation method, the effec-
tive jitter signal bandwidth is less than or equal to the loop
bandwidth of the wide-band clock recovery process. To the
degree that the other two methods realize the measurement
bandpass shown in Figure 28, the effective jitter signal
bandwidth equals the highest jitter frequency in the 
input signal.
A set of samples collected at a rate greater than the
Nyquist rate will have the information needed to reconstruct
the jitter signal. In fact, this sample set contains redundant
information about the jitter signal. Specifically, adjacent
samples are not independent samples of the demodulated
jitter signal. The larger sample set can be constructed 
from a smaller subset of independent samples. Adjacent
samples in the full sample set have some degree of 
time-correlation.
5
Any set of jitter samples collected at a rate lower than the
Nyquist rate cannot represent the complete jitter signal.
However, this set may be sufficient to determine several
statistical properties of the phase modulation, e.g., mean,
variance, and RMS. For best results, this sub-Nyquist sam-
pling should produce a set of independent jitter samples.
With a sufficient number of independent jitter samples, this
set can yield acceptable estimates of statistical properties.
As we show in the following sections, both the sampling
method and the number of independent jitter samples used
in a peak-to-peak amplitude measurement can significantly
impact the measurement result. The different jitter measure-
ment methods collect independent jitter samples in different
ways and at different rates. Thus, we cannot easily com-
pare peak-to-peak measurements made over identical time
intervals because these measurements do not involve the
same number of independent jitter samples. 
Instead, we will use the number of independent jitter sam-
ples as a method-independent way to describe how the
duration of a peak-to-peak amplitude measurement affects
the measurement result. We will call the number of inde-
pendent jitter samples collected during measurement time 
T the normalized measurement time. We can then compare
the actual measurement times each method requires to col-
lect the number of independent jitter samples correspon-
ding to a particular normalized measurement time. 
5In mathematical terms, the first zero in the autocorrelation function associated with the demodulated jitter signal occurs at ± 1/ (2·ƒ
BW
), where ƒ
BW
is the bandwidth of the 
signal’s power spectrum. Samples separated by this time interval will be independent, i.e. will not be time-correlated. Samples spaced at less than this interval will have some
degree of correlation. A sample spacing of 1/ (2·ƒ
BW
) corresponds to a sample rate of 2·ƒ
BW
, i.e. the Nyquist rate.
VB.NET PDF Text Box Edit Library: add, delete, update PDF text box
VB.NET PDF - Add Text Box to PDF Page in VB.NET. Add Annotation – Add Text Box Overview. Adding text box is another way to add text to PDF page.
add text box to pdf; adding text to pdf
The normalized measurement time, N, corresponding 
to an actual measurement time, T, is given by the equation
N = T · min(S, 2·ƒ
JBW
). In this equation, S is the actual rate
that the jitter measurement process collects samples of the
signal jitter; ƒ
JBW
is the effective jitter signal bandwidth; 
and the function min(x,y) equals the minimum value of the
two arguments.
4.5.3. Measuring the peak-to-peak amplitude of 
random jitter
We first consider the impact of normalized measurement
time on the measured peak-to-peak amplitude of random
jitter. As noted in section 2.6, random jitter is generally
modeled by a Gaussian amplitude distribution. In practice,
the peak-to-peak amplitude of random jitter has the
“unbounded” property associated with this probability 
distribution, i.e. the measured peak to peak amplitude
increases as the measurement time increases.
With any random process, measurement results depend on
the number of independent samples used in the measure-
ment. A more precise statement of the unbounded property
would say that the measured peak-to-peak amplitude of
random jitter increases as the number of independent 
samples of the random jitter increases. In other words, the
peak-to-peak amplitude measurement increases monotoni-
cally with increased normalized measurement time.
Figure 29 shows the relationship between peak-to-peak
amplitude and normalized measurement time for Gaussian
random jitter (red line). The graph plots the ratio of the
peak-to-peak measurement (J) to the RMS jitter amplitude
as a function of normalized measurement time. 
As expected, the ratio increases. Increasing the number of
independent jitter samples increases the probability that the
set of jitter samples will include some of the high amplitude
values in the tails of the Gaussian distribution. Hence, 
Jincreases with respect to the RMS value. Since the
Gaussian distribution has unbounded peak-to-peak 
amplitude, this ratio will continue to grow with the number
of independent jitter samples.
However, using the same number of independent jitter sam-
ples in multiple measurements of peak-to-peak amplitude
will not yield identical results because these measurements
are sampling a random process. Different sample sets will
contain amplitudes from different points in the Gaussian dis-
tribution. Thus, multiple peak-to-peak amplitude measure-
ment will also have random variation.
The red line in Figure 30 shows this variation for Gaussian
random jitter by plotting the ratio of the standard deviation
in a set of peak-to-peak measurements (
σ
) to the average
peak-to-peak measurement (J) as a function of normalized
measurement time. As the number of independent jitter
samples increases, this ratio decreases. The larger sample
sets more fully characterize the random jitter and produce
more consistent results over multiple measurements.
Typical video signals include both deterministic jitter and
random jitter. The J/rms and 
σ
/J ratios for signals contain-
ing both deterministic and random jitter will not fall on the
red lines in Figure 29 and Figure 30. 
Jitter Measurement for Serial Digital Video Signals
Primer 
37
www.tektronix.com/video
Figure 29. Effect of normalized measurement time on measured
peak-to-peak jitter amplitude (J/rms).
Figure 30. Effect of normalized measurement time on the 
consistency (standard deviation σ) of a peak-to-peak
jitter measurement.
Jitter Measurement for Serial Digital Video Signals
Primer
38 www.tektronix.com/video
To see why, consider two signals, A and B, where signal 
A contains only Gaussian-like random jitter and signal B
contains both Gaussian-like random jitter and deterministic
jitter. Suppose the RMS amplitude of the random jitter in
signal A, (RMS
A
) equals the RMS amplitude of the total 
jitter in signal B from both random and deterministic com-
ponents (RMS
B
). In this case, the random jitter in signal 
B (RMS
Bran
) must have lower RMS amplitude than the 
random jitter in signal A (RMS
A
).
The sketch in Figure 31 illustrates the relationship between
peak-to-peak jitter amplitude measurements and normal-
ized measurement times for these two signals. In signal 
A (green line) random jitter determines the peak-to-peak
amplitude measurement for all normalized measurement
times. Consistent with Figure 29, the peak-to-peak ampli-
tude measurement increases as the normalized measure-
ment time increases.
For signal B (blue line), bounded deterministic jitter domi-
nates the peak-to-peak jitter amplitude measurement for
normalized measurement time below some value, N. For
normalized measurement times larger than N, the unbound-
ed Gaussian-like random jitter in B determines the value of
the peak-to-peak jitter amplitude measurement. Since
RMS
Bran
is less than RMS
A
the peak-to-peak jitter ampli-
tude in signal B does not grow as quickly as the peak-to-
peak jitter amplitude of signal A when the normalized 
measurement time increases.
Suppose J
A
is the peak-to-peak amplitude of 1 x 104
independent samples of the jitter in signal A, and J
B
is the
peak-to-peak jitter amplitude of signal B over the same nor-
malized measurement time. Since signal A has only random
jitter, the ratio J
A
/ RMS
A
will fall on the red line in Figure 29.
For signal B, this same ratio will fall below the red line. The
ratio J
B
/ RMS
B
is less than the ratio J
A
/ RMS
A
because
RMS
A
= RMS
B
and J
B
< J
A
So, for the same normalized measurement time, the J/rms
ratio for a signal with only random jitter (signal A) will fall on
the red line in Figure 29, while the J/rms ratio for a signal
with both deterministic and random jitter will fall below this
red line. The 
σ
/J ratios will behave in the same way.
Appendix B describes an experiment that measures peak-
to-peak jitter amplitudes for one example of a typical video
signal. The blue lines in Figure 29 and Figure 30 show a
plot of these measurements. The results agree with the 
preceding analysis that the presence of deterministic jitter
decreases the J/rms and 
σ
/J ratios relative to the values for
signals containing only random jitter.
As these plots illustrate, we cannot define a “correct” 
normalized measurement time based on the distribution of
jitter values, either Gaussian or mixed. The measured peak-
to-peak amplitude continues to increase as the normalized
measurement time increases. It does not “level off” above
some specific number of independent jitter samples. 
Thus, to enable greater consistency in the peak-to-peak 
jitter amplitude measurements made by different measure-
ment methods, the standards need to specify the number
of independent jitter samples used in these measurements.
For example, if each method measured the peak-to-peak
amplitude of 5 x 105 independent jitter samples from a 
typical video signal, Figure 30 indicates that the standard
deviation of the measured values would fall between 
2% and 2.5%.
Figure 31. Peak-to-peak jitter amplitude for signals A and B.
4.5.4. Measurement times
The different methods can collect jitter samples at different
rates. As a result, peak-to-peak amplitude measurements
made over the same duration can involve significantly differ-
ent numbers of jitter samples. As shown in section 4.5.3,
measurements made over different normalized measure-
ment times can yield significantly different results, primarily
due to the unbounded nature of random jitter.
To produce comparable results, the different jitter measure-
ments need to measure the peak-to-peak jitter amplitude
over the same normalized measurement time, i.e. the same
number of independent jitter samples. This will require 
different actual measurement times. As a simple example,
we consider the actual time each method requires to collect
1 x 106 jitter samples.
As described in section 4.3.1, the Equivalent-time Eye
method collects histogram values at a rate determined by
the sampling rate used in forming the Eye and the height of
the histogram window. If the measurement process collects
histogram values at a 5 kS/s rate, it will take 3.33 minutes
to collect 1 x 106 jitter samples. At a 250 kS/s rate, this
measurement time decreases to 4 seconds.
A digital implementation of the Phase Demodulation
method directly samples the output of the phase detector
at or above the Nyquist rate for this band-limited signal. If
the measurement process samples at 10 MS/s it can col-
lect 1 x 106 jitter samples of this band-limited demodulated
jitter signal in 100 ms. 
As discussed in section 4.3.3, the Real-time Acquisition
method samples the jitter signal on each transition in the
data signal, so the number of samples in an acquisition
depends on the number of signal edges that occurred 
during the acquisition. If transitions occurred on 50% of 
the unit intervals in a 1.485 Gb/sec HD-SDI signal, then
acquisitions covering 1.35 ms of this signal would acquire 
1 x 106 jitter samples.
The degree of time correlation between adjacent jitter 
samples depends on the spacing between samples and 
the jitter spectral components (see section 4.5.2). Broadly
speaking, widely-separated samples, e.g., like samples 
collected in the Equivalent-time Eye method, will have less
time correlation than more closely-spaced samples, e.g.,
like samples collected by the Real-time Acquisition method.
Thus, peak-to-peak amplitude measurements made over
the same number of jitter samples do not necessarily corre-
spond to measurements made over the same number of
independent jitter samples, i.e. over the same normalized
measurement time. If low frequency jitter dominates the 
jitter spectrum, a larger number of closely-spaced samples
may be needed to correspond to the same normalized
measurement time as a set of more widely-spaced samples.
4.5.5. Dynamic range and jitter value quantization
Implementation of the three jitter measurement methods
can differ in the dynamic range and quantization of the
peak-to-peak amplitude measurement. In particular, some
implementations may measure peak-to-peak amplitude
greater than 1 UI, while others may measure only peak-to-
peak jitter amplitudes up to 1 UI. If the two implementations
capture peak-to-peak amplitude measurements in digital
words with the same number of bits, values in an imple-
mentation with a dynamic range greater than 1 UI will have
larger quantization steps than values in an implementation
with a 1 UI dynamic range.
Jitter Measurement for Serial Digital Video Signals
Primer 
39
www.tektronix.com/video
Jitter Measurement for Serial Digital Video Signals
Primer
40 www.tektronix.com/video
4.6. Jitter noise floor
Every implementation of any jitter measurement method has
internal distortions, noise, and variations. These can arise
from unavoidable physical properties or from engineering
choices made when designing and implementing a jitter
measurement process. While careful design can reduce the
impact of these inherent behaviors, it cannot eliminate them
completely. They impose a lower bound on jitter amplitude
measurements, called the jitter noise floor.
Any step in the measurement process can contribute to the
jitter noise floor. Primary contributors include:
Timebase jitter: Various processes, e.g., sampling and
clock recovery, require a stable timing reference. Many
implementations use crystal or dielectric resonator oscil-
lators to create a timing reference signal. Phase noise 
or other distortions in these oscillators contribute to 
the jitter noise floor. Silicon oscillators can contribute 
significant timebase jitter to the jitter noise floor.
Clock recovery jitter:Distortions and noise in the hard-
ware-based clock recovery process can also contribute
to the jitter noise floor. Phase noise can contribute ran-
dom jitter and long strings of identical bits can contribute
deterministic, data-dependent jitter. The peak-to-peak
amplitude of this data-dependent jitter is proportional to
the clock recovery bandwidth. In Appendix C, we show
that clock recovery bandwidths large enough to realize
SMPTE measurement bandpass specifications introduce
significant data-dependent jitter.
Equalizer jitter:Hardware-based equalization processes
can also contribute random and deterministic jitter com-
ponents to the jitter noise floor. This includes determinis-
tic data-dependent ISI due to imperfect equalization and
duty-cycle dependent jitter from non-optimal threshold
detection (section 4.1).
The frequency-dependent gain used in equalization (see
Figure 4 in section 2.7) can also introduce jitter. This gain
can increase amplitude noise present in the pre-equal-
ized signal. In the transition detection stage, amplitude
noise near the decision threshold can cause noticeable
phase noise (jitter) in the detected signal edges. This
AM-to-PM effect contributes high frequency jitter to the
noise floor.
Trigger jitter:If a jitter measurement process collects
samples from acquisitions taken over multiple triggers,
variations in this triggering process can introduce varia-
tions in the timing of the sampling process. These timing
variations can contribute to the jitter noise floor.
Documents you may be interested
Documents you may be interested