mvc open pdf in new tab : Adding text to pdf application control tool html azure web page online 2BW-18906-05-part1016

Jitter Measurement for Serial Digital Video Signals
Primer 
51
www.tektronix.com/video
As noted in section 5.0, we cannot determine the jitter in 
a video system and its impact on system operation by 
making a single peak-to-peak amplitude measurement with
one jitter measurement method. Assessing jitter perform-
ance in video systems requires the effective use of multiple
jitter measurement methods and techniques.
In this section, we make a few recommendations for 
measuring jitter in three applications:
Video system monitoring, maintenance and 
troubleshooting
Video equipment qualification and installation
Video equipment design
In these recommendations, we show how the jitter meas-
urements made with different methods can give additional
insight into the jitter characteristics of a video system.
7.1. Video system monitoring, maintenance
and troubleshooting
Assessing jitter in a video system and diagnosing jitter-
related problems may require measuring jitter with both 
the Phase Demodulation and Equivalent-time Eye methods.
Since the Phase Demodulation method continuously moni-
tors a demodulated jitter signal, it can detect and generate
alarms on a wide range of signal jitter, including peak-to-
peak jitter amplitude greater than 1 UI. By including an
equalization stage, instruments can monitor jitter throughout
a video system and detect jitter in the equalized signal the
receiver decodes.
Typical implementations of the Phase Demodulation method
measure jitter over several frames of the video signal. This
can capture raster-dependent deterministic jitter related to
line and field rates and can catch sporadic jitter. The jitter
waveform and spectrum displays available with this method
can help better characterize and diagnose jitter-related
problems.
Measurements made with the Equivalent-time Eye method
can complement measurements made by the Phase
Demodulation method. In particular, the Equivalent-time Eye
method can measure the peak-to-peak amplitude of deter-
ministic jitter at frequencies above the bandwidth of the
clock recovery process used to implement the Phase
Demodulation method. This high-frequency jitter may not
propagate through a video system (see section 2.5), but it
may affect individual link operation.
Comparing measurements from both methods can help
determine a signal’s jitter characteristics. Typically, measure-
ments made with the Equivalent-time Eye method use
fewer independent jitter samples than measurements made
with the Phase Demodulation method. Thus, if both meth-
ods measured only random jitter, the Phase Demodulation
method would usually produce a larger measurement.
So, if measurements made with the two methods agree,
the signal most likely has highly regular deterministic jitter
(e.g., sinusoidal jitter) and a small amount of random jitter. 
If the Equivalent-time Eye method consistently produces 
the larger measurement, the signal contains regular, high
frequency deterministic jitter. If the Phase Demodulation
method produces a much larger value, the signal contains
some combination of narrow jitter spikes, intermittent 
deterministic jitter or a significant level of random jitter.
7.2. Video equipment qualification 
and installation
Measuring jitter with more than one method also helps 
in qualifying and installing new video equipment. 
The benefits of the Phase Demodulation method identified
above for video system monitoring, maintenance, and trou-
bleshooting also apply in this application. With continuous,
Nyquist-rate sampling of the demodulated jitter signal, this
method can detect and log the effects of narrow jitter
spikes, intermittent deterministic jitter, or significant levels 
of random jitter. 
By sampling the demodulated jitter signal at the Nyquist
rate, this method can collect a large number of independent
jitter samples quickly. These long normalized measurement
times can help assess the impact of random jitter on data
error rates.
The jitter signal output available in some implementations 
of the Phase Demodulation method complements the 
internally-generated jitter signal displays. Routing this output
to an oscilloscope or spectrum analyzer can reveal more
details on the temporal and frequency characteristics of 
signal jitter.
An equalization stage also helps in equipment installation.
When this stage is present, installers and engineers can
measure jitter at the end of long cables. With this capability,
they can evaluate jitter at the receiver’s input as well as the
source output. This helps detect and diagnose problems
due to jitter introduced by equipment or connections
7.0 Recommendations for Measuring Jitter in SDI Signals
Adding text to pdf - insert text into PDF content in C#.net, ASP.NET, MVC, Ajax, WinForms, WPF
XDoc.PDF for .NET, providing C# demo code for inserting text to PDF file
add text pdf file acrobat; add text to pdf in acrobat
Adding text to pdf - VB.NET PDF insert text library: insert text into PDF content in vb.net, ASP.NET, MVC, Ajax, WinForms, WPF
Providing Demo Code for Adding and Inserting Text to PDF File Page in VB.NET Program
adding text fields to pdf acrobat; how to insert text box in pdf
Jitter Measurement for Serial Digital Video Signals
Primer
52 www.tektronix.com/video
between the source and receiver, e.g., patch panels and
non-reclocking distribution amplifiers.
The jitter noise floor in implementations of the Phase
Demodulation method may be larger than implementation
of other methods, primarily due to contributions from 
equalization and clock recovery. If the jitter in a source 
output signal is close to the SMPTE-specified limits, the
peak-to-peak amplitude measurement may not have the
resolution needed to separate sources during a precision
qualification process.
In this case, peak-to-peak amplitude measurements made
with an implementation of the Real-time Acquisition method
can complement measurements made with the Phase
Demodulation method. These implementations can have 
a very low noise floor. Measurements made on a single
acquisition do not have contributions from equalization,
clock recovery, or trigger jitter. They offer more than ade-
quate resolution for precision screening of video equipment
or components.
Implementations of the Real-time Acquisition method can
also measure contributions from high-frequency determinis-
tic jitter in a source output that the Phase Demodulation
method would miss. By making a TIE measurement at each
edge, the method samples this deterministic jitter above the
Nyquist rate.
With multiple acquisitions, the Real-time Acquisition method
can collect a large population of independent jitter samples.
Peak-to-peak amplitude measurements of random jitter
made with this method can complement measurements
made using the Phase Demodulation method. These imple-
mentations also offer a variety of jitter displays and analysis
algorithms that can help in qualifying video equipment.
In many cases, general-purpose measurement instruments
that use equivalent-time sampling can substitute for an
implementation of the Real-time Acquisition method in this
application. Typical implementations of the Equivalent-time
Eye method in video-specific equipment do not have similar
capabilities and can only partially substitute for these more
powerful instruments.
7.3. Video equipment design
Jitter measurements with the Real-time Acquisition and the
Phase Demodulation methods best address needs in video
equipment design. 
With an implementation of the Phase Demodulation
method, designers can functionally verify a design and
make initial assessments of jitter performance. Most of the
capabilities applicable to monitoring jitter in video systems,
qualifying and installing video equipment, and diagnosing 
jitter-related problems apply in this design application. Using
a common measurement method across these varied 
applications can help correlate design parameters with
behaviors in actual video systems. The jitter waveform 
display of the demodulation jitter signal available with this
method is especially useful for detecting raster-correlated 
deterministic jitter.
An implementation of the Real-time Acquisition method
offers additional measurement precision and in-depth analy-
sis capabilities that help characterize jitter behaviors. The
stored acquisition record that contains a highly-sampled
version of the input SDI signal offers unique benefits.
Designers can isolate and examine individual edges in the
SDI signal and correlate jitter behaviors with particular data
patterns.
Both methods can collect a large number of independent
jitter samples over reasonably short measurement times.
This supports a thorough examination of random jitter and
its impact on data error rates. The Phase Demodulation
method can continuously monitor the demodulated jitter
signal to detect jitter spikes or other intermittent determinis-
tic jitter. Finally, both methods measure peak-to-peak jitter
amplitudes greater than 1 UI.
The combined capabilities of these two jitter measurement
methods offer the breadth and depth needed in video
equipment design applications.
VB.NET PDF Text Box Edit Library: add, delete, update PDF text box
Provide VB.NET Users with Solution of Adding Text Box to PDF Page in VB.NET Project. Adding text box is another way to add text to PDF page.
how to add text field to pdf; add text boxes to pdf
C# PDF Text Box Edit Library: add, delete, update PDF text box in
Provide .NET SDK library for adding text box to PDF document in .NET WinForms application. Adding text box is another way to add text to PDF page.
add text to pdf; adding text to a pdf in reader
Jitter Measurement for Serial Digital Video Signals
Primer 
53
www.tektronix.com/video
In this technical guide, we described the three commonly
used methods for automated jitter measurement and 
how differences in these methods can generate dissimilar
peak-to-peak jitter amplitude measurements. Variation 
in the number of independent jitter samples used in the
peak-to-peak measurement was a common contributor 
to this divergence. Several other factors can bring about
discrepancies and in some cases can generate significant
differences.
We explored the complex nature of jitter in digital video 
signals and the challenges involved in measuring jitter. By
gaining a better understanding of different jitter characteris-
tics and the key elements of jitter measurement, engineers
can more quickly resolve problems with signal jitter, and
more fully use the varied jitter measurement and analysis
solutions.
Standards bodies play a key role in evolving best 
practices in jitter measurement. Additional specification 
and guidance on jitter budgets and jitter measurement
techniques are needed to ensure greater consistency in
measurement results. 
Additional information from video equipment manufacturers
on jitter input tolerance and jitter transfer will also help in
designing and qualifying video equipment that ensures 
low data error rates in video systems.
Tektronix remains committed to delivering high quality tools
for monitoring and measuring jitter in video systems and 
to working with standards bodies, industry groups, video
equipment manufacturers, and video network operators to
address the recommendations made in this technical guide.
8.0 Conclusion
VB.NET PDF Page Insert Library: insert pages into PDF file in vb.
Support adding PDF page number. Offer PDF page break inserting function. DLLs for Adding Page into PDF Document in VB.NET Class. Add necessary references:
acrobat add text to pdf; how to add a text box to a pdf
VB.NET PDF Library SDK to view, edit, convert, process PDF file
Support adding protection features to PDF file by adding password, digital signatures and redaction feature. Various of PDF text and images processing features
how to add text fields in a pdf; how to add text box in pdf file
Jitter Measurement for Serial Digital Video Signals
Primer
54 www.tektronix.com/video
Tektronix wishes to gratefully acknowledge the extensive
contribution of Dr. Dan H. Wolaver in the development of
this technical guide.
10.0 Acknowledgement
1. SMPTE RP 184-1996, Specification of Jitter in Bit-Serial
Digital Systems
2. SMPTE RP 192-2003, Jitter Measurement Procedures 
in Bit-Serial Digital Interfaces
3. SMPTE EG 33-1998, Jitter Characteristics and
Measurements
4. ANSI/SMPTE 259M-1997, 10-Bit 4:2:2 Component and
4fsc Composite Digital Signals — Serial Digital Interface
5. SMPTE 292M-1998, Bit-Serial Digital Interface for 
High-Definition Television Systems
6. IEEE Std 1521™-2003, IEEE Trial-Use Standard for
Measurement of Video Jitter and Wander
7. Understanding and Characterizing Timing Jitter, 
Tektronix Primer, 2003
8. Takeo Eguchi,Pathological Check Codes for Serial
Digital Interface Systems, SMPTE Journal, August, 1992,
pages 553-558
9.0 References
VB.NET PDF Text Add Library: add, delete, edit PDF text in vb.net
VB.NET PDF - Annotate Text on PDF Page in VB.NET. Professional VB.NET Solution for Adding Text Annotation to PDF Page in VB.NET. Add
how to enter text into a pdf; add text pdf acrobat
C# PDF Annotate Library: Draw, edit PDF annotation, markups in C#.
Provide users with examples for adding text box to PDF and edit font size and color in text box field in C#.NET program. C#.NET: Draw Markups on PDF File.
adding a text field to a pdf; how to enter text in a pdf document
Jitter Measurement for Serial Digital Video Signals
Primer 
55
www.tektronix.com/video
In the Phase Demodulation method, the bandwidth of the
clock recovery process used in the implementation deter-
mines the upper limit for jitter frequencies included in the
peak-to-peak jitter amplitude measurement. The bandwidth
of commonly used clock recovery hardware falls well below
the 1/10 clock rate high-frequency cutoff that SMPTE spec-
ifies for measuring timing and alignment jitter. In particular,
the Phase Demodulation method implemented in the
Tektronix WFM700M has a 5 MHz high-frequency cutoff.
This bandwidth limitation will not significantly affect meas-
urement results if the bandpass covers most of the jitter’s
spectral content. In this appendix, we describe an experi-
ment to test the assertion that the video jitter spectrum 
in “typical” video signals has negligible content above 
common bandwidths for clock recovery.
Figure A-1 shows the test setup used for the experiment.
We used the internally-generated color bar test pattern from
an evaluation board for a commercially-available video IC 
as the test signal containing “typical” jitter. An analysis of
the output test pattern from the evaluation board indicated
that this signal contained predominately random jitter. The
evaluation board also provided a 74.25-MHz crystal clock
for triggering the oscilloscope.
We used the WFM700M to measure jitter with the Phase
Demodulation method. The WFM700M determined the
peak-to-peak amplitude of 5 x 106 independent jitter sam-
ples. For comparison, we made separate measurements
with two WFM700Ms. The peak-to-peak jitter measure-
ments are designated y
1
and y
2
.
We used the Tektronix CSA803A oscilloscope to measure
jitter using the Equivalent-time Eye method. We configured
the CSA803A to determine the peak-to-peak jitter 
amplitude using a histogram of 5 x 106 edge variation
measurements collected within the histogram window
shown in Figure A-2. The reading from the CSA803A 
is designated x
1
.
Figure A-1. Test setup for comparing jitter measurement methods.
Figure A-2. CSA803A histogram window.
Appendix A: Impact of Bandwidth Limitation in Video Jitter
Measurement
C# PDF insert image Library: insert images into PDF in C#.net, ASP
application? To help you solve this technical problem, we provide this C#.NET PDF image adding control, XDoc.PDF for .NET. Similar
how to add text to a pdf document using acrobat; how to add text fields to a pdf
C# PDF Page Insert Library: insert pages into PDF file in C#.net
By using reliable APIs, C# programmers are capable of adding and inserting (empty) PDF page or pages from various file formats, such as PDF, Tiff, Word, Excel
how to add text field to pdf form; adding text to pdf reader
Table A-1 shows the peak-to-peak jitter amplitudes meas-
ured by the three instruments. The three raw measurements
of peak-to-peak jitter amplitude shown in this table agree
within 8.5%. 
Some of this difference in measurement values is due to
compensation for internal jitter. The WFM700M compen-
sates for internal jitter. The reading from the CSA803A
includes uncompensated jitter noise, primarily trigger jitter,
which contributes to the higher x
1
reading. This internal 
jitter in the CSA803A is also essentially random jitter, and 
is uncorrelated with the predominately random jitter in the
test pattern output.
Figure A-3 shows the setup used to measure the peak-to-
peak amplitude, x
0
, of this internal jitter in the CSA803A.
In order to compensate for this internal jitter (x
0
) in the x
1
measurement made in this experiment, we viewed the
measured jitter as the sum of two uncorrelated random jitter
components, the actual random jitter in the test signal and
the internal random jitter from the CSA803A. In this case,
the RMS value (standard deviation) of the measured signal,
σ
1
, equals the root sum of squares of the actual RMS value
of the random jitter in test signal, 
σ
act
, and the RMS value
of the random internal jitter in the CSA803A, 
σ
0
.
For random jitter, the average value of the peak-to-peak 
jitter amplitude (J) and the RMS value (
σ
) are related by the
equation J = N
σ
, where N is the normalized measurement
time (section 4.5.3). 
Thus:
We apply this relationship between the average peak-
to-peak jitter amplitude measurements to the values we 
measured in this experiment6, i.e.
Using this equation to compensate for internal jitter on the
CSA803A, the final values x
act
, y
1
, and y
2
agree within 3.5%. 
The agreement among the measured values indicates that
the test output from the evaluation board does not have
significant jitter above the 5 MHz loop bandwidth of the
clock recovery process used in the WFM700M.
We ran this experiment on a particular signal that we 
considered representative of typical video signals. Others
could perform the same experiment on signals of interest 
to determine if the bandwidth limitation in the WFM700M
affects the results of a peak-to-peak amplitude 
measurement.
Figure A-3. Test setup for calibrating the intrinsic noise x
0
of the
CSA803A.
Jitter Measurement for Serial Digital Video Signals
Primer
56 www.tektronix.com/video
Equipment
CSA803A
WFM700M #1
WFM700M #2
raw measurement
x
1
= 178 ps p-p
y
1
= 164 ps p-p
y
2
= 170 ps p-p
intrinsic jitter
x
0
= 45 ps p-p
final measurement
x
act
= 172 ps p-p
y
1
= 164 ps p-p
y
2
= 170 ps p-p
Table A-1. Peak-to-peak jitter amplitude measurements.
6In general, the peak-to-peak amplitudes of jitter sources do not add as root sums of squares. Using this approach to compensate for the internal jitter in the CSA803A pro-
duces a reasonable result in this case because the two jitter sources are uncorrelated with predominately random jitter.
Jitter Measurement for Serial Digital Video Signals
Primer 
57
www.tektronix.com/video
To illustrate the relationship between peak-to-peak 
amplitude measurements for purely random jitter and 
those for “typical” video jitter, we measured jitter on the 
output signal from an evaluation board for a commercially-
available video IC.
Figure B-1 shows the measurement setup. We set the SDI
signal output to a 1080i/60 color bar output and measured
the output Eye diagram on a Tektronix CSA803A oscillo-
scope triggered on the 74.25-MHz crystal clock from the
evaluation board. We determined that the output had negli-
gible jitter components below 1 kHz and so did not need 
to implement any high-pass filtering.
We measured the RMS and peak-to-peak jitter amplitudes
using the Equivalent-time Eye method (see Figure 21) with
four different histograms containing N = 3 x 103
N= 1.6 x 104, N = 5 x 105, and N = 1.3 x 107 measure-
ments of edge variation. For each of the first three values of
N, we made 16 measurements to find the standard 
deviation between measurements. Because of the meas-
urement time required for N= 1.3 x 107, we only made 
one measurement. 
Table B-1 gives the RMS jitter amplitude J
rms
, the average
peak-to-peak jitter amplitude J
p-p
, and the standard devia-
tion σ
p-p
of the peak-to-peak jitter amplitude for each N.
Figure 29 shows a plot of the J
p-p
/J
rms
and Figure 30
shows a plot of σ
p-p
/J
p-p
.
Figure B-1. Test setup for measuring “typical” video jitter.
Appendix B: Peak-to-Peak and RMS Measurement of Typical 
Video Jitter
N
3 x 103
1.6 x 104
5 x 105
1.3 x 107
J
rms
(ps)
18.8
18.8
18.8
18.8
J
p-p
(ps)
129
142
168
196
σ
p-p
(ps)
5.3
4.5
3.9
J
p-p
/J
rms
6.867
7.534
8.937
10.396
σ
p-p
/J
p-p
4.1%
3.2%
2.3%
Table B-1. Video jitter measurement versus jitter sample number N.
Jitter Measurement for Serial Digital Video Signals
Primer
58 www.tektronix.com/video
SMPTE 259M and SMPTE 292M specify that the high 
frequency cutoff of the bandpass filters used to measure
timing and alignment jitter should be at least 1/10 of the
data clock rate. This specification corresponds to a jitter
measurement bandwidth of 148.5 MHz for HD-SDI signals
and 27 MHz for SD-SDI signals. 
In theory, the Phase Demodulation method could realize this
cutoff if the clock recovery process used in the measure-
ment had a bandwidth of one-tenth the bit rate. In practice,
however, such a high bandwidth leads to unacceptable
phase noise in the recovered clock.
Unavoidable offset in the phase detector of the phase-
locked loop (PLL) used in clock recovery causes this noise.
The PLL uses the signal data transitions to apply a non-
zero phase at the input to cancel this offset voltage on
average. In lock, then, the phase detector output has an
average voltage of zero.
However, when the data pattern has no transitions (a long
sequence of either ‘0’s or ‘1’s), the phase detector output
equals the offset voltage. This offset voltage causes a fre-
quency offset at the PLL output, corresponding to a ramp
of the output phase ø
out
lasting as long as the period with
no transitions. This generates data-dependent jitter that
corrupts the jitter measurement. 
Figure C-1 illustrates this data-dependent jitter. In this
example, the clock recovery bandwidth is one-tenth the bit
rate and the phase detector has a 0.015 UI offset. Note
that the phase ramps upward when the signal has no 
transitions, and it descends exponentially when the signal
has transitions.
In general, we can approximate the peak-to-peak value 
of this data-dependent jitter by the formula:
Where:
BW
= the loop bandwidth of the clock recovery PLL
ƒ
b
= SDI input signal bit rate
N
max
= the maximum period without transitions
ƒ
off
= the phase detector offset 
For a loop bandwidth of one-tenth the bit rate, this 
formula becomes
ø
outpp
= 0.67·N
max
·ƒ
off
,
In Figure C-1, the longest period without data transition 
is N
max
= 14 UI, making the peak-to-peak jitter in this
example equal to 0.132 UI.
An offset of ø
off
= 0.015 UI is close to the lowest value we
could reasonably expect in a well-designed clock recovery
circuit. Further, these circuits should allow for periods of
N
max
= 20 without data transitions. For BW = 0.1·ƒ
b
these
parameters result in ø
outpp
= 0.2 UI. 
Hence, we can see that the SMPTE requirement for the
high frequency cutoff of the timing and alignment jitter 
filters will lead to an excessive amount of internally 
generated clock recovery jitter in the Phase Demodulation
method, especially when trying to verify conformance 
to a 0.2 UI limit. 
Appendix C: Limits to Clock Recovery Bandwidth
Figure C-1. Data pattern d and corresponding pattern-dependent jitter ƒ
out 
.
Jitter Measurement for Serial Digital Video Signals
Primer 
59
www.tektronix.com/video
From the general formula, we see that the peak-to-peak 
jitter amplitude decreases with decreasing loop bandwidth
of the clock recovery PLL. At BW/ƒ
b
= 0.0036 the general
formula becomes ø
outpp
≈ 0.05·N
max
·ø
off
, which gives 
ø
outpp
= 0.015 UI for ø
off
= 0.015 UI and N
max
= 20. 
We can accept this small amount of internally generated
data-dependent jitter when measuring against a 0.2 UI
acceptance limit.
In the Phase Demodulation method implemented in the
Tektronix WFM700M, the clock recovery PLL has a 5 MHz
loop bandwidth. For 1.485 Gb/s HD-SDI signals, this 
corresponds to BW/ƒ
b
= 0.0034. Hence, this approach 
will generate less than 0.015 UI of internal jitter during long
periods of no data transitions. For 270 Mb/s SD-SDI 
signals, BW/ƒ
b
= 0.0185 and this component of internal 
jitter will fall below 0.05 UI.
Contact Tektronix:
ASEAN / Australasia / Pakistan  (65) 6356 3900
Austria  +41 52 675 3777
Balkan, Israel, South Africa and other ISE Countries +41 52 675 3777
Belgium  07 81 60166
Brazil & South America  55 (11) 3741-8360
Canada  1 (800) 661-5625
Central East Europe, Ukraine and the Baltics  +41 52 675 3777
Central Europe & Greece  +41 52 675 3777
Denmark  +45 80 88 1401
Finland  +41 52 675 3777
France & North Africa +33 (0) 1 69 86 81 81
Germany  +49 (221) 94 77 400
Hong Kong  (852) 2585-6688
India (91) 80-22275577
Italy  +39 (02) 25086 1
Japan  81 (3) 6714-3010
Luxembourg  +44 (0) 1344 392400
Mexico, Central America & Caribbean  52 (55) 56666-333
Middle East, Asia and North Africa  +41 52 675 3777
The Netherlands  090 02 021797
Norway  800 16098
People’s Republic of China  86 (10) 6235 1230
Poland  +41 52 675 3777
Portugal  80 08 12370
Republic of Korea  82 (2) 528-5299
Russia & CIS  7 095 775 1064
South Africa  +27 11 254 8360
Spain  (+34) 901 988 054
Sweden  020 08 80371
Switzerland  +41 52 675 3777
Taiwan  886 (2) 2722-9622
United Kingdom & Eire  +44 (0) 1344 392400
USA  1 (800) 426-2200
For other areas contact Tektronix, Inc. at: 1 (503) 627-7111
Updated 15 June 2005
For Further Information
Tektronix maintains a comprehensive, constantly expanding collection of
application notes, technical briefs and other resources to help engineers
working on the cutting edge of technology. Please visit www.tektronix.com
Copyright © 2005, Tektronix, Inc. All rights reserved. Tektronix products are covered by U.S. and foreign
patents, issued and pending. Information in this publication supersedes that in all previously 
published material. Specification and price change privileges reserved. TEKTRONIX and TEK are
registered trademarks of Tektronix, Inc. All other trade names referenced are the service marks,
trademarks or registered trademarks of their respective companies.  
10/05   EA/WOW
2BW-18906-0
Documents you may be interested
Documents you may be interested