‘Miss Bennet,’ replied her Ladyship, in an angry tone, ‘you ought to know that I am not to be trifled
with. But however insincere you may choose to be, you shall not find me so. My character has ever been
celebrated for its sincerity and frankness; and in a cause of such moment as this, I shall certainly not
depart from it. A report of a most alarming nature reached me two days ago. I was told, that not only
your sister was on the point of being most advantageously married, but that you, that Miss Elizabeth
Bennet would, in all likelihood, be soon afterwards united to my nephew, my own nephew, Mr. Darcy.
Though I know it must be a scandalous falsehood, though I would not injure him so much as to suppose
the truth of it possible, I instantly resolved on setting off for this place, that I might make my sentiments
known to you.’
‘If you believed it impossible to be true,’ said Elizabeth, colouring with astonishment and disdain, ‘I
wonder you took the trouble of coming so far. What could your Ladyship propose by it?’
‘At once to insist upon having such a report universally contradicted.’
‘Your coming to Longbourn, to see me and my family,’ said Elizabeth coolly, ‘will be rather a
confirmation of it; if, indeed, such a report is in existence.’
‘If! do you then pretend to be ignorant of it? Has it not been industriously circulated by yourselves? Do
you not know that such a report is spread abroad?’
‘I never heard that it was.’
‘And can you likewise declare that there is no foundation  for it?’
‘I do not pretend to possess equal frankness with your Ladyship. You may ask questions which I shall
not choose to answer.’
‘This is not to be borne. Miss Bennet, I insist on being satisfied. Has he, has my nephew, made you an
offer of marriage?’
‘Your Ladyship has declared it to be impossible.’
‘It ought to be so; it must be so while he retains the use of his reason. But your arts and allurements
may, in a moment of infatuation, have made him forget what he owes to himself and to all his family.
You may have drawn him in.’
‘If I have I shall be the last person to confess it.’
‘Miss Bennet, do you know who I am? I have not been accustomed to such language as this. I am
almost the nearest relation he has in the world, and am entitled to know all his dearest concerns.’
‘But you are not entitled to know mine; nor will such behaviour as this ever induce me to be explicit.’
‘Let me be rightly understood. This match, to which you have the presumption to aspire, can never take
place. No, never. Mr. Darcy is engaged to my daughter. Now, what have you to say?’
‘Only this,—that if he is so, you can have no reason to suppose he will make an offer to me.’
Lady Catherine hesitated for a moment, and then replied,—
‘The engagement between them is of a peculiar kind. From their infancy, they have been intended for
Adding text pdf file - insert text into PDF content in C#.net, ASP.NET, MVC, Ajax, WinForms, WPF
XDoc.PDF for .NET, providing C# demo code for inserting text to PDF file
adding text to pdf file; how to insert text into a pdf file
Adding text pdf file - VB.NET PDF insert text library: insert text into PDF content in vb.net, ASP.NET, MVC, Ajax, WinForms, WPF
Providing Demo Code for Adding and Inserting Text to PDF File Page in VB.NET Program
how to insert text in pdf reader; how to add text to pdf document
each other. It was the favourite wish of his mother, as well as of hers. While in their cradles we planned
the union; and now, at the moment when the wishes of both sisters would be accomplished, in their
marriage, to be prevented by a young woman of inferior birth, of no importance in the world, and wholly
unallied to the family! Do you pay no regard to the wishes of his friends? To his tacit engagement with
Miss De Bourgh? Are you lost to every feeling of propriety and delicacy? Have you not heard me say
that from his earliest hours he was destined for his cousin?’
‘Yes; and I had heard it before. But what is that to me? If there is no other objection to my marrying
your nephew, I shall certainly not be kept from it by knowing that his mother and aunt wished him to
marry Miss De Bourgh. You both did as much as you could in planning the marriage. Its completion
depended on others. If Mr. Darcy is neither by honour nor inclination confined to his cousin, why is not
he to make another choice? And if I am that choice, why may not I accept him?’
‘Because honour, decorum, prudence, nay interest, forbid it. Yes, Miss Bennet, interest; for do not
expect to be noticed by his family or friends, if you wilfully act against the inclinations of all. You will
be censured, slighted, and despised by every one connected with him. Your alliance will be a disgrace;
your name will never even be mentioned by any of us.’
‘These are heavy misfortunes,’ replied Elizabeth. ‘But the wife of Mr. Darcy must have such
extraordinary sources of happiness necessarily attached to her situation, that she could, upon the whole,
have no cause to repine.’
‘Obstinate, headstrong girl! I am ashamed of you! Is this your gratitude for my attentions to you last
spring? Is nothing due to me on that score? Let us sit down. You are to understand, Miss Bennet, that I
came here with the determined resolution of carrying my purpose; nor will I be dissuaded from it. I have
not been used to submit to any person’s whims. I have not been in the habit of brooking disappointment.’
‘That will make your Ladyship’s situation at present more pitiable; but it will have no effect on me.
‘I will not be interrupted! Hear me in silence. My daughter and my nephew are formed for each other.
They are descended, on the maternal side, from the same noble line; and, on the father’s, from
respectable, honourable, and ancient, though untitled, families. Their fortune on both sides is splendid.
They are destined for each other by the voice of every member of their respective houses; and what is to
divide them?—the upstart pretensions of a young woman without family, connections, or fortune! Is this
to be endured? But it must not, shall not be! If you were sensible of your own good, you would not wish
to quit the sphere in which you have been brought up.’
‘In marrying your nephew, I should not consider myself as quitting that sphere. He is a gentleman; I a
gentleman’s daughter; so far we are equal.’
‘True. You are a gentleman’s daughter. But what was your mother? Who are your uncles and aunts? Do
not imagine me ignorant of their condition.’
‘Whatever my connection may be,’ said Elizabeth, ‘if your nephew does not object to them, they can be
nothing to you.’
‘Tell me, once for all, are you engaged to him?’
Though Elizabeth would not, for the mere purpose of obliging Lady Catherine, have answered this
question, she could not but say, after a moment’s deliberation,—
VB.NET PDF Page Insert Library: insert pages into PDF file in vb.
If you want to read the tutorial of PDF page adding in C# class, we suggest you go to C# Imaging - how to insert a new empty page to PDF file.
how to input text in a pdf; how to insert text box in pdf document
VB.NET PDF Library SDK to view, edit, convert, process PDF file
Feel free to define text or images on PDF document and extract accordingly. Capable of adding PDF file navigation features to your VB.NET program.
adding text to a pdf document acrobat; adding text fields to a pdf
‘I am not.’
Lady Catherine seemed pleased.
‘And will you promise me never to enter into such an engagement?’
‘I will make no promise of the kind.’
‘Miss Bennet, I am shocked and astonished. I expected to find a more reasonable young woman. But do
not deceive yourself into a belief that I will ever recede. I shall not go away till you have given me the
assurance I require.’
‘And I certainly never shall give it. I am not be to intimidated into anything so wholly unreasonable.
Your Ladyship wants Mr. Darcy to marry your daughter; but would my giving you the wished-for
promise make their marriage at all more probable? Supposing him to be attached to me, would my
refusing to accept his hand make him wish to bestow it on his cousin? Allow me to say, Lady Catherine,
that the arguments with which you have supported this extraordinary application have been as frivolous
as the application was ill-judged. You have widely mistaken my character, if you think I can be worked
on by such persuasions as these. How far your nephew might approve of your interference in his affairs, I
cannot tell; but you have certainly no right to concern yourself in mine. I must beg, therefore, to be
importuned no further on the subject.’
‘Not so hasty, if you please. I have by no means done. To all the objections I have already urged I have
still another to add. I am no stranger to the particulars of your youngest sister’s infamous elopement. I
know it all; that the young man’s marrying her was a patched-up business, at the expense of your father
and uncle. And is such a girl to be my nephew’s sister? Is her husband, who is the son of his late father’s
steward, to be his brother? Heaven and earth!—of what are you thinking? Are the shades of Pemberley to
be thus polluted?’
‘You can now have nothing further to say,’ she resentfully answered. ‘You have insulted me in every
possible method. I must beg to return to the house.’
And she rose as she spoke. Lady Catherine rose also, and they turned back. Her Ladyship was highly
incensed.
‘You have no regard, then, for the honour and credit of my nephew! Unfeeling, selfish girl! Do you not
consider that a connection with you must disgrace him in the eyes of everybody?’
‘Lady Catherine, I have nothing further to say. You know my sentiments.’
‘You are then resolved to have him?
‘I have said no such thing. I am only resolved to act in that manner which will, in my own opinion,
constitute my happiness, without reference to you, or to any person so wholly unconnected with me.’
‘It is well. You refuse, then, to oblige me. You refuse to obey the claims of duty, honour, and gratitude.
You are determined to ruin him in the opinion of all his friends, and make him the contempt of the
world.’
‘Neither duty, nor honour, nor gratitude,’ replied Elizabeth, ‘has any possible claim on me, in the
present instance. No principle of either would be violated by my marriage with Mr. Darcy. And with
VB.NET PDF Text Box Edit Library: add, delete, update PDF text box
code below to your VB.NET class program for adding text box on Dim outputFilePath As String = Program.RootPath + "\\" Annot_9.pdf" ' open a PDF file Dim doc
adding text to pdf in reader; how to add text box in pdf file
C# PDF Text Box Edit Library: add, delete, update PDF text box in
for adding text box to PDF document in .NET WinForms application. A web based PDF annotation application able to add text box comments to adobe PDF file online
how to add text to a pdf file; how to enter text in pdf form
regard to the resentment of his family, or the indignation of the world, if the former were excited by his
marrying me, it would not give me one moment’s concern—and the world in general would have too
much sense to join in the scorn.’
‘And this is your real opinion! This is your final resolve! Very well. I shall now know how to act. Do
not imagine, Miss Bennet, that your ambition will ever be gratified. I came to try you. I hoped to find you
reasonable; but depend upon it I will carry my point.’
In this manner Lady Catherine talked on till they were at the door of the carriage, when, turning hastily
round, she added,—
‘I take no leave of you, Miss Bennet. I send no compliments to your mother. You deserve no such
attention. I am most seriously displeased.’
Elizabeth made no answer; and without attempting to persuade her Ladyship to return into the house,
walked quietly into it herself. She heard the carriage drive away as she proceeded upstairs. Her mother
impatiently met her at the door of her dressing-room, to ask why Lady Catherine would not come in
again and rest herself.
‘She did not choose it,’ said her daughter; ‘she would go.’
‘She is a very fine-looking woman! and her calling here was prodigiously civil! for she only came, I
suppose, to tell us the Collinses were well. She is on her road somewhere, I daresay; and so, passing
through Meryton, thought she might as well call on you. I suppose she had nothing particular to say to
you, Lizzy?’
Elizabeth was forced to give in to a little falsehood here; for to acknowledge the substance of their
conversation was impossible.
Chapter LVII
THE DISCOMPOSURE of spirits which this extraordinary visit threw Elizabeth into could not be easily
overcome; nor could she for many hours learn to think of it less than incessantly. Lady Catherine, it
appeared, had actually taken the trouble of this journey from Rosings for the sole purpose of breaking off
her supposed engagement with Mr. Darcy. It was a rational scheme to be sure! but from what the report
of their engagement could originate, Elizabeth was at a loss to imagine; till she recollected that his being
the intimate friend of Bingley, and her being the sister of Jane, was enough, at a time when the
expectation of one wedding made everybody eager for another, to supply the idea. She had not herself
forgotten to feel that the marriage of her sister must bring them more frequently together. And her
neighbours at Lucas Lodge, therefore (for through their communication with the Collinses, the report,
she concluded, had reached Lady Catherine), had only set that down as almost certain and immediate
which she had looked forward to as possible at some future time
In revolving Lady Catherine’s expressions, however, she could not help feeling some uneasiness as to
the possible consequence of her persisting in this interference. From what she had said of her resolution
to prevent the marriage, it occurred to Elizabeth that she must meditate an application to her nephew; and
how he might take a similar representation of the evils attached to a connection with her she dared not
pronounce. She knew not the exact degree of his affection for his aunt, or his dependence on her
judgment, but it was natural to suppose that he thought much higher of her Ladyship than she could do;
C# PDF Annotate Library: Draw, edit PDF annotation, markups in C#.
Provide users with examples for adding text box to PDF and edit font size and color in text box field in C#.NET program. C#.NET: Draw Markups on PDF File.
how to add text to pdf file with reader; how to insert text box in pdf file
VB.NET PDF Text Add Library: add, delete, edit PDF text in vb.net
convert PDF to text, C#.NET convert PDF to images, C#.NET PDF file & pages Professional VB.NET Solution for Adding Text Annotation to PDF Page in VB
adding text to a pdf in acrobat; add text box to pdf
and it was certain, that in enumerating the miseries of a marriage with one whose immediate connections
were so unequal to his own, his aunt would address him on his weakest side. With his nations of dignity,
he would probably feel that the arguments, which to Elizabeth had appeared weak and ridiculous,
contained much good sense and solid reasoning.
If he had been wavering before as to what he should do, which had often seemed likely, the advice and
entreaty of so near a relation might settle every doubt, and determine him at once to be as happy as
dignity unblemished could make him. In that case he would return no more. Lady Catherine might see
him in her way through town; and his engagement to Bingley of coming again to Netherfield must give
way.
‘If, therefore an excuse for not keeping his promise should come to his friend within a few days,’ she
added, ‘I shall know how to understand it. I shall then give over every expectation, every wish, of his
constancy. If he is satisfied with only regretting me, when he might have obtained my affections and
hand, I shall soon cease to regret him at all.’
The surprise of the rest of the family, on hearing who their visitor had been, was very great: but they
obligingly satisfied it with the same kind of supposition which had appeased Mrs. Bennet’s curiosity; and
Elizabeth was spared from much teasing on the subject.
The next morning, as she was going downstairs, she was met by her father, who came out of his library
with a letter in his hand.
‘Lizzy,’ said he, ‘I was going to look for you: come into my room.’
She followed him thither; and her curiosity to know what he had to tell her was heightened by the
supposition of its being in some manner connected with the letter he held. It suddenly struck her that it
might be from Lady Catherine, and she anticipated with dismay all the consequent explanations.
She followed her father to the fireplace, and they both sat down. He then said,—
‘I have received a letter this morning that has astonished me exceedingly. As it principally concerns
yourself, you ought to know its contents. I did not know before that I had two daughters on the brink of
matrimony. Let me congratulate you on a very important conquest.’
The colour now rushed into Elizabeth’s cheeks in the instantaneous conviction of its being a letter from
the nephew, instead of the aunt; and she was undetermined whether most to be pleased that he explained
himself at all, or offended that his letter was not rather addressed to herself, when her father continued,—
‘You look conscious. Young ladies have great penetration in such matters as these; but I think I may
defy even your sagacity to discover the name of your admirer. This letter is from Mr. Collins.’
‘From Mr. Collins! and what can he have to say?’
‘Something very much to the purpose, of course. He begins with congratulations on the approaching
nuptials of my eldest daughter, of which, it seems, he has been told by some of the good-natured,
gossiping Lucases. I shall not sport with your impatience by reading what he says on that point. What
relates to yourself is as follows:—“Having thus offered you the sincere congratulations of Mrs. Collins
and myself on this happy event, let me now add a short hint on the subject of another, of which we have
been advertised by the same authority. Your daughter Elizabeth, it is presumed, will not long bear the
C# PDF Page Insert Library: insert pages into PDF file in C#.net
By using reliable APIs, C# programmers are capable of adding and inserting (empty) PDF page or pages from various file formats, such as PDF, Tiff, Word, Excel
add text field pdf; how to enter text in pdf
C# PDF File & Page Process Library SDK for C#.net, ASP.NET, MVC
VB.NET read PDF, VB.NET convert PDF to text, VB.NET an (empty) page to a PDF and adding empty pages Certainly, random pages can be deleted from PDF file as well
add text pdf; adding text box to pdf
name of Bennet, after her eldest sister has resigned it; and the chosen partner of her fate may be
reasonably looked up to as one of the most illustrious personages in this land.”
‘Can you possibly guess, Lizzy, who is meant by this?”
‘“This young gentleman is blessed, in a peculiar way, with everything the heart of mortal can most
desire,—splendid property, noble kindred, and extensive patronage. Yet, in spite of all these temptations,
let me warn my cousin Elizabeth, and yourself, of what evils you may incur by a precipitate closure with
this gentleman’s proposals, which, of course, you will be inclined to take immediate advantage of.”
‘Have you any idea, Lizzy, who this gentleman is? But now it comes out.’
‘“My motive for cautioning you is as follows:—We have reason to imagine that his aunt, Lady
Catherine de Bourgh, does not look on the match with a friendly eye.”
‘Mr. Darcy, you see, is the man! Now, Lizzy, I think I have surprised you. Could he, or the Lucases,
have pitched on any man, within the circle of our acquaintance, whose name would have given the lie
more effectually to what they related? Mr. Darcy, who never looks at any woman but to see a blemish,
and who probably never looked at you in his life! It is admirable!’
Elizabeth tried to join in her father’s pleasantry, but could only force one most reluctant smile. Never
had his wit been directed in a manner so little agreeable to her.
‘Are you not diverted?’
‘Oh yes. Pray read on.’
‘“After mentioning the likelihood of his marriage to her Ladyship last night, she immediately, with her
usual condescension, expressed what she felt on the occasion; when it became apparent that on the score
of some family objections on the part of my cousin she would never give her consent to what she termed
so disgraceful a match. I thought it my duty to give the speediest intelligence of this to my cousin, that
she and her noble admirer may be aware of what they are about, and not run hastily into a marriage
which has not been properly sanctioned.” Mr. Collins, moreover, adds, “I am truly rejoiced that my
cousin Lydia’s sad business has been so well hushed up, and am only concerned that their living together
before the marriage took place should be so generally known. I must not, however, neglect the duties of
my station, or refrain from declaring my amazement, at hearing that you received the young couple into
your house as soon as they were married. It was an encouragement of vice; and had I been the rector of
Longbourn, I should very strenuously have opposed it. You ought certainly to forgive them as a
Christian, but never to admit them in your sight, or allow their names to be mentioned in your hearing.”
That is his notion of Christian forgiveness! The rest of his letter is only about his dear Charlotte’s
situation, and his expectation of a young olive-branch. But, Lizzy, you look as if you did not enjoy it.
You are not going to be missish, I hope and pretend to be affronted at an idle report, For what do we live,
but to make sport for our neighbours. and laugh at them in our turn?’
‘Oh,’ cried Elizabeth, ‘I am exceedingly diverted. But it is so strange!’
‘Yes, that is what makes it amusing. Had they fixed on any other man it would have been nothing; but
his perfect indifference and your pointed dislike make it so delightfully absurd! Much as I abominate
writing, I would not give up Mr. Collins’s correspondence for any consideration. Nay, when I read letter
of his, I cannot help giving him the preference even over Wickham, much as I value the impudence and
hypocrisy of my son-in-law. And pray, Lizzy, what said Lady Catherine about this report? Did she call to
refuse her consent?’
To this question his daughter replied only with a laugh; and as it had been asked without out the least
suspicion, she was not distressed by his repeating it. Elizabeth had never been more at a loss to make her
feelings appear what they were not. It was necessary to laugh when she would rather have cried. Her
father had most cruelly mortified her by what he said of Mr. Darcy’s indifference; and she could do
nothing but wonder at such a want of penetration, or fear that, perhaps, instead of his seeing too little, she
might have fancied too much.
Chapter LVIII
INSTEAD of receiving any such letter of excuse from his friend as Elizabeth half expected Mr. Bingley
to do, he was able to bring Darcy with him to Longbourn before many days had passed after Lady
Catherine’s visit. The gentlemen arrived early; and, before Mrs. Bennet had time to tell him of their
having seen his aunt, of which her daughter sat in momentary dread, Bingley, who wanted to be alone
with Jane, proposed their all walking out. It was agreed to. Mrs. Bennet was not in the habit of walking,
Mary could never spare time, but the remaining five set off together. Bingley and Jane, however, soon
allowed the others to outstrip them. They lagged behind, while Elizabeth, Kitty, and Darcy were to
entertain each other. Very little was said by either; Kitty was too much afraid of him to talk; Elizabeth
was secretly forming a desperate resolution; and, perhaps, he might be doing the same.
They walked toward the Lucases’, because Kitty wished to call upon Maria; and as Elizabeth saw no
occasion for making it a general concern, when Kitty left them she went boldly on with him alone. Now
was the moment for her resolution to be executed; and while her courage was high she immediately
said,—
‘Mr. Darcy, I am a very selfish creature, and for the sake of giving relief to my own feelings care not
how much I may be wounding yours. I can no longer help thanking you for your unexampled kindness to
my poor sister. Ever since I have known it I have been most anxious to acknowledge to you how
gratefully I feel it. Were it known to the rest of my family I should not have merely my own gratitude to
express.’
‘I am sorry, exceedingly sorry,’ replied Darcy, in a tone of surprise and emotion, ‘that you have ever
been informed of what may, in a mistaken light, have given you uneasiness. I did not think Mrs. Gardiner
was so little to be trusted.’
‘You must not blame my aunt. Lydia’s thoughtlessness first betrayed to me that you had been
concerned in the matter; and, of course, I could not rest till I knew the particulars. Let me thank you
again and again, in the name of all my family, for that generous compassion which induced you to take
so much trouble, and bear so many mortifications, for the sake of discovering them.’
‘If you will thank me,’ he replied, ‘let it be for yourself alone. That the wish of giving happiness to you
might add force to the other inducements which led me on I shall not attempt to deny. But your family
owe me nothing. Much as I respect them, I believe I thought only of you.’
Elizabeth was too much embarrassed to say a word. After a short pause, her companion added, ‘You are
too generous to trifle with me. If your feelings are still what they were last April, tell me so at once. My
affections and wishes are unchanged; but one word from you will silence me on this subject for ever.’
Elizabeth, feeling all the more than common awkwardness and anxiety for his situation, now forced
herself to speak; and immediately, though not very fluently, gave him to understand that her sentiments
had undergone so material a change since the period to which he alluded as to make her receive with
gratitude and pleasure his present assurances. The happiness which this reply produced was such as he
had probably never felt before; and he expressed himself on the occasion as sensibly and as warmly as a
man violently in love can be supposed to do. Had Elizabeth been able to encounter his eyes, she might
have seen how well the expression of heartfelt delight, diffused over his face, became him; but though
she could not look she could listen; and he told her of feelings which, in proving of what importance she
was to him, made his affection every moment more valuable.
They walked on without knowing in what direction. There was too much to be thought, and felt, and
said, for attention to any other objects. She soon learnt that they were indebted for their present good
understanding to the efforts of his aunt, who did call on him in her return through London, and there
relate her journey to Longbourn, its motive, and the substance of her conversation with Elizabeth;
dwelling emphatically on every expression of the latter, which, in her Ladyship’s apprehension,
peculiarly denoted her perverseness and assurance, in the belief that such a relation must assist her
endeavours to obtain that promise from her nephew which she had refused to give. But, unluckily for her
Ladyship, its effect had been exactly contrariwise.
‘It taught me to hope,’ said he, ‘as I had scarcely ever allowed myself to hope before. I knew enough of
your disposition to be certain that had you been absolutely, irrevocably decided against me, you would
have acknowledged it to Lady Catherine frankly and openly.’
Elizabeth coloured and laughed as she replied, ‘Yes, you know enough of my frankness to believe me
capable of that. After abusing you so abominably to your face, I could have no scruple in abusing you to
all your relations.’
‘What did you say of me that I did not deserve? For though your accusations were ill founded, formed
on mistaken premises, my behaviour to you at the time had merited the severest reproof. It was
unpardonable. I cannot think of it without abhorrence.’
‘We will not quarrel for the greater share of blame annexed to that evening,’ said Elizabeth. ‘The
conduct of neither, if strictly examined, will be irreproachable; but since then we have both, I hope,
improved in civility.’
‘I cannot be so easily reconciled to myself. The recollection of what I then said, of my conduct, my
manners, my expressions, during the whole of it, is now, and has been many months, inexpressibly
painful to me. Your reproof, so well applied, I shall never forget: “Had you behaved in a more
gentlemanlike manner.” Those were your words. You know not, you can scarcely conceive, how they
have tortured me; though it was some time, I confess, before I was reasonable enough to allow their
justice.’
‘I was certainly very far from expecting them to make so strong an impression. I had not the smallest
idea of their being ever felt in such a way.’
‘I can easily believe it. You thought me then devoid of every proper feeling, I am sure you did. The turn
of your countenance I shall never forget, as you said that I could not have addressed you in any possible
way that would induce you to accept me.’
‘Oh, do not repeat what I then said. These recollections will not do at all. I assure you that I have long
been most heartily ashamed of it.’
Darcy mentioned his letter. ‘Did it,’ said he,—‘did it 
soon make you think better of me? Did you, on
reading it, give any credit to its contents?’
She explained what its effects on her had been, and how gradually all her former prejudices had been
removed.
‘I knew,’ said he, ‘that what I wrote must give you pain, but it was necessary. I hope you have
destroyed the letter. There was one part, especially the opening of it, which I should dread your having
the power of reading again. I can remember some expressions which might justly make you hate me.’
‘The letter shall certainly be burnt, if you believe it essential to the preservation of my regard; but,
though we have both reason to think my opinions not entirely unalterable, they are not, I hope, quite so
easily changed as that implies.’
‘When I wrote that letter,’ replied Darcy, ‘I believed myself perfectly calm and cool; but I am since
convinced that it was written in a dreadful bitterness of spirit.’
‘The letter, perhaps, began in bitterness, but it did not end so. The adieu is charity itself. But think no
more of the letter. The feelings of the person who wrote and the person who received it are now so
widely different from what they were then, that every unpleasant circumstance attending it ought to be
forgotten. You must learn some of my philosophy. Think only of the past as its remembrance gives you
pleasure.’
‘I cannot give you credit for any philosophy of the kind. Your retrospections must be so totally void of
reproach, that the contentment arising from them is not of philosophy, but, what is much better, of
ignorance. But with me, it is not so. Painful recollections will intrude, which cannot, which ought not to
be repelled. I have been a selfish being all my life, in practice, though not in principle. As a child I was
taught what was right, but I was not taught to correct my temper. I was given good principles, but left to
follow them in pride and conceit. Unfortunately an only son (for many years an only child), I was spoiled
by my parents, who, though good themselves (my father particularly, all that was benevolent and
amiable), allowed, encouraged, almost taught me to be selfish and overbearing, to care for none beyond
my own family circle, to think meanly of all the rest of the world, to wish at least to think meanly of their
sense and worth compared with my own. Such I was, from eight to eight-and-twenty; and such I might
still have been but for you, dearest, loveliest Elizabeth! What do I owe you! You taught me a lesson hard
indeed at first, but most advantageous. By you I was properly humbled. I came to you without a doubt of
my reception. You showed me how insufficient were all my pretensions to please a woman worthy of
being pleased.’
‘Had you then persuaded yourself that I should?’
‘Indeed I had. What will you think of my vanity? I believed you to be wishing, expecting my
addresses.’
‘My manners must have been in fault, but not intentionally, I assure you. I never meant to deceive you,
but my spirits might often lead me wrong. How you must have hated me after that evening!’
‘Hate you! I was angry, perhaps, at first, but my anger soon began to take a proper direction.’
‘I am almost afraid of asking what you thought of me when we met at Pemberley. You blamed me for
coming?’
‘No, indeed, I felt nothing but surprise.’
‘Your surprise could not be greater than mine in being noticed by you. My conscience told me that I
deserved no extraordinary politeness, and I confess that I did not expect to receive more than my due.’
‘My object then,’ replied Darcy, ‘was to show you, by every civility in my power, that I was not so
mean as to resent the past; and I hoped to obtain your forgiveness, to lessen your ill-opinion, by letting
you see that your reproofs had been attended to. How soon any other wishes introduced themselves I can
hardly tell, but I believe in about half an hour after I had seen you.’
He then told her of Georgiana’s delight in her acquaintance, and of her disappointment at its sudden
interruption; which naturally leading to the cause of that interruption, she soon learnt that his resolution
of following her from Derbyshire in quest of her sister had been formed before he quitted the inn, and
that his gravity and thoughtfulness there had arisen from no other struggles than what such a purpose
must comprehend.
She expressed her gratitude again, but it was too painful a subject for each to be dwelt on farther.
After walking several miles in a leisurely manner, and too busy to know anything about it, they found at
last, on examining their watches, that it was time to be at home.
‘What could have become of Mr. Bingley and Jane!’ was a wonder which introduced the discussion of
their affairs. Darcy was delighted with their engagement; his friend had given him the earliest
information of it.
‘I must ask whether you were surprised?’ said Elizabeth.
‘Not at all. When I went away, I felt that it would soon happen.’
‘That is to say, you had given your permission. I guessed as much.’ And though he exclaimed at the
term, she found that it had been pretty much the case.
‘On the evening before my going to London,’ said he, ‘I made a confession to him, which I believe I
ought to have made long ago. I told him of all that had occurred to make my former interference in his
affairs absurd and impertinent. His surprise was great. He had never had the slightest suspicion. I told
him, moreover, that I believed myself mistaken in supposing, as I had done, that your sister was
indifferent to him; and as I could easily perceive that his attachment to her was unabated, I felt no doubt
of their happiness together.’
Elizabeth could not help smiling at his easy manner of directing his friend.
‘Did you speak from your own observation,’ said she, ‘when you told him that my sister loved him, or
merely from my information last spring?’
‘From the former. I had narrowly observed her, during the two visits which I had lately made her here;
and I was convinced of her affection.’
Documents you may be interested
Documents you may be interested