mvc pdf viewer free : Adding text to a pdf in acrobat control SDK system azure winforms html console 440-part1231

Adding text to a pdf in acrobat - insert text into PDF content in C#.net, ASP.NET, MVC, Ajax, WinForms, WPF
XDoc.PDF for .NET, providing C# demo code for inserting text to PDF file
add text to pdf reader; how to insert pdf into email text
Adding text to a pdf in acrobat - VB.NET PDF insert text library: insert text into PDF content in vb.net, ASP.NET, MVC, Ajax, WinForms, WPF
Providing Demo Code for Adding and Inserting Text to PDF File Page in VB.NET Program
how to insert text into a pdf using reader; adding text to pdf file
E
E
E
x
x
x
i
i
i
t
t
t
ýý
ýý
ýý
G
G
G
o
o
o
t
t
t
o
o
o
P
P
P
a
a
a
g
g
g
e
e
e
&&
&&
&&
77
77
77
P
P
P
r
r
r
e
e
e
v
v
v
i
i
i
o
o
o
u
u
u
s
s
s
N
N
N
e
e
e
x
x
x
t
t
t
88
88
88
LEARNING TO SEE
VALUE STREAM MAPPING TO CREATE VALUE AND ELIMINATE MUDA
BY MIKE ROTHER AND JOHN SHOOK
FOREWORD BY JIM WOMACK AND DAN JONES
A LEAN TOOL KIT METHOD AND WORKBOOK
To purchase a hardcopy version of this workbook please contact:
THE LEAN ENTERPRISE INSTITUTE
BROOKLINE, MASSACHUSETTS, USA
Phone: 617.713.2900 FAX: 617.713.2999
www.lean.org
VERSION 1.2
JUNE 1999
VB.NET PDF: How to Create Watermark on PDF Document within
Via our PDF Watermark Creator, users are capable of adding a designed watermark and customizing it on many aspects, for example, typing any text word and
add text pdf file; adding text pdf files
VB.NET PowerPoint: VB Code to Draw and Create Annotation on PPT
other documents are compatible, including PDF, TIFF, MS in offering full options on adding and creating hand, free hand line, rectangle, text, hotspot, hotspot
how to add text to a pdf file in preview; how to enter text in pdf form
E
E
E
x
x
x
i
i
i
t
t
t
ý
ý
ý
G
G
G
o
o
o
t
t
t
o
o
o
P
P
P
a
a
a
g
g
g
e
e
e
&
&
&
7
7
7
P
P
P
r
r
r
e
e
e
v
v
v
i
i
i
o
o
o
u
u
u
s
s
s
N
N
N
e
e
e
x
x
x
t
t
t
8
8
8
Whenever there is a product for a customer,
there is a value stream.
The challenge lies in seeing it.
With gratitude to family members, Jim Womack, Guy Parsons, OffPiste Design,
and our friends at client companies who help us fine tune many ideas.
E
E
E
x
x
x
i
i
i
t
t
t
ý
ý
ý
G
G
G
o
o
o
t
t
t
o
o
o
P
P
P
a
a
a
g
g
g
e
e
e
&
&
&
7
7
7
P
P
P
r
r
r
e
e
e
v
v
v
i
i
i
o
o
o
u
u
u
s
s
s
N
N
N
e
e
e
x
x
x
t
t
t
8
8
8
CONTENTS
Foreword by Jim Womack & Dan Jones
Introduction
Part I Getting Started
What is Value Stream Mapping?
Material and Information Flow
Selecting a Product Family
The Value Stream Manager
Part II The Current-State Map
Drawing the Current-State Map
Your Turn
Part III What Makes a Value Stream Lean?
Overproduction
Characteristics of a Lean Value Stream
Part IV The Future-State Map
Drawing the Future-State Map
Your Turn
E
E
E
x
x
x
i
i
i
t
t
t
ý
ý
ý
G
G
G
o
o
o
t
t
t
o
o
o
P
P
P
a
a
a
g
g
g
e
e
e
&
&
&
7
7
7
P
P
P
r
r
r
e
e
e
v
v
v
i
i
i
o
o
o
u
u
u
s
s
s
N
N
N
e
e
e
x
x
x
t
t
t
8
8
8
Part V Achieving the Future State
Breaking Implementation Into Steps
The Value Stream Plan
Value Stream Improvement is Management’s Job
Conclusion
About the Authors
Appendix A:  Mapping Icons
Appendix B:  Current-State Map For TWI Industries
Appendix C:  Future State Map For TWI Industries
Page 1 
E
E
E
x
x
x
i
i
i
t
t
t 
ý
ý
ý
G
G
G
o
o
o 
t
t
t
o
o
o 
P
P
P
a
a
a
g
g
g
e
e
e
&
&
&
7
7
P
P
P
r
r
r
e
e
e
v
v
v
i
i
i
o
o
o
u
u
u
s
s
s
N
N
N
e
e
e
x
x
x
t
t
t
8
8
8
FOREWORD
By Jim Womack and Dan Jones
When we launched Lean Thinking in the Fall of 1996 we urged readers to “Just do it!” in the spirit of Taiichi Ohno.
With more than 100,000 copies sold so far in English and with a steady steam of e-mails, faxes, phone calls, letters,
and personal reports from readers telling us of their achievements, we know that many of you have now taken our
and Ohno’s advice.
However, we have also become aware that most readers have deviated from the step-by-step transformation
process we describe in Chapter 11 of Lean Thinking.  They have done a good job with Steps One through Three:
1. Find a change agent (how about you?)
2. Find a sensei (a teacher whose learning curve you can borrow)
3. Seize (or create) a crisis to motivate action across your firm
But then they have jumped to Step Five:
5. Pick something important and get started removing waste quickly, to surprise yourself with how much
you can accomplish in a very short period.
Yet the overlooked Step Four is actually the most critical:
4. Map the entire value stream for all your product families
Page 2
E
E
E
x
x
x
i
i
i
t
t
t
ý
ý
ý
G
G
G
o
o
o
t
t
t
o
o
o
P
P
P
a
a
a
g
g
g
e
e
e
&
&
&
7
7
7
P
P
P
r
r
r
e
e
e
v
v
v
i
i
i
o
o
o
u
u
u
s
s
s
N
N
N
e
e
e
x
x
x
t
t
t
8
8
8
Unfortunately, we have found that very few of our readers have followed our advice to conduct this critical step
with care before diving into the task of waste elimination.  Instead in too many cases we find companies rushing
headlong into massive muda elimination activities - kaizen offensives or continuous improvement blitzes.  These
well intentioned exercises fix one small part of the value stream for each product and value does flow more
smoothly through that course of the stream.  But then the value flow comes to a halt in the swamp of inventories
and detours ahead of the next downstream step.  The net result is no cost savings reaching the bottom line, no
service and quality improvements for the customer, no benefits for the supplier, limited sustainability as the
wasteful norms of the whole value stream close in around the island of pure value, and frustration all around.
Typically the kaizen offensive with its disappointing results becomes another abandoned program, soon to be
followed by a “bottleneck elimination” offensive (based on the Theory of Constraints) or a Six Sigma initiative
(aimed at the most visible quality problems facing a firm), or...But these produce the same result:  Isolated victories
over muda, some of them quite dramatic, which fail to improve the whole.
Therefore, as the first “tool kit” project of the Lean Enterprise Institute, we felt an urgent need to provide lean
thinkers the most important tool they will need to make sustainable progress in the war against muda:  the value
stream map.  In the pages ahead Mike Rother and John Shook explain how to create a map for each of your value
streams and show how this map can teach you, your managers, engineers, production associates, schedulers,
suppliers, and customers to see value, to differentiate value from waste, and to get rid of the waste.
Page 3
E
E
E
x
x
x
i
i
i
t
t
t
ý
ý
ý
G
G
G
o
o
o
t
t
t
o
o
o
P
P
P
a
a
a
g
g
g
e
e
e
&
&
&
7
7
7
P
P
P
r
r
r
e
e
e
v
v
v
i
i
i
o
o
o
u
u
u
s
s
s
N
N
N
e
e
e
x
x
x
t
t
t
8
8
8
Kaizen efforts, or any lean manufacturing technique, are most effective when applied strategically within the
context of building a lean value stream.  The value stream map permits you to identify every process in the flow,
pull them out from the background clutter of the organization, and build an entire value stream according to lean
principles.  It is a tool you should use every time you make changes within a value stream.
As in all of our tool kit projects, we have called on a team with a wide variety of practical and research experience.
Mike Rother studies Toyota, has worked with many manufacturers to introduce lean production flows, and teaches
at the University of Michigan.  John Shook spent over ten years with the Toyota Motor Corporation, much of it
teaching suppliers to see, before also joining the University of Michigan.  Together they possess a formidable body
of knowledge and experience - a painfully constructed learning curve - which they are now sharing with you.
We hope readers of Lean Thinking and participants in the activities of the Lean Enterprise Institute will use the
mapping tool immediately and widely.  And we hope you will tell us how to improve it!  Because our own march
toward perfection never ends, we need to hear about your successes and, even more important, about the nature of
your difficulties.
So again, “Just do it!” but now at the level of the value stream, product family by product family -- beginning
inside your company and then expanding beyond.  Then tell us about your experience so we can share your
achievements with the entire lean network.
Jim Womack and Dan Jones
Brookline, Massachusetts, USA and Little Birch, Hereford, UK
Tel:  (617) 731-2900;  Fax: (617) 713-2999
E-mail: info@lean.org  www.lean.org
Page 4
E
E
E
x
x
x
i
i
i
t
t
t
ý
ý
ý
G
G
G
o
o
o
t
t
t
o
o
o
P
P
P
a
a
a
g
g
g
e
e
e
&
&
&
7
7
7
P
P
P
r
r
r
e
e
e
v
v
v
i
i
i
o
o
o
u
u
u
s
s
s
N
N
N
e
e
e
x
x
x
t
t
t
8
8
8
INTRODUCTION
We have discovered an amazing thing.  While so many of us have been scratching our heads trying to figure out
why the road to lean has been rockier than it should be, a vital yet simple tool that can help us make real progress
toward becoming lean has been right under our noses.
One of us, Mike, had long searched for a means to tie together lean concepts and techniques, which seemed more
disparate than they should be, as he worked on many plant floor implementation efforts.  Mike noticed the mapping
method while studying Toyota’s lean implementation practices.  He realized mapping had potential far beyond its
usual usage, formalized the tool, and built a training method around it that has proved extraordinarily successful.
The other of us, John, has known about the “tool” for over ten years, but never thought of it as important in its own
right.  As John worked with Toyota, mapping was almost an afterthought - a simple means of communication used
by individuals who learn their craft through hands-on experience.
At Toyota, the method - called “Value Stream Mapping” in this workbook - is known as “Material and Information
Flow Mapping.”  It isn’t used as a training method, or as a mean to “Learns to See.”  It is used by Toyota
Production System practitioners to depict current and future, or “ideal” states in the process of developing
implementation plans to install lean systems.  At Toyota, while the phrase “value stream” is rarely heard, infinite
attention is given to establishing flow, eliminating waste, and adding value.  Toyota people learn about three flows
in manufacturing:  the flows of material, information, and people/process.  The Value Stream Mapping method
presented here covers the first two of these flows, and is based on the Material and Information Flow Maps used by
Toyota.
Page 5
E
E
E
x
x
x
i
i
i
t
t
t
ý
ý
ý
G
G
G
o
o
o
t
t
t
o
o
o
P
P
P
a
a
a
g
g
g
e
e
e
&
&
&
7
7
7
P
P
P
r
r
r
e
e
e
v
v
v
i
i
i
o
o
o
u
u
u
s
s
s
N
N
N
e
e
e
x
x
x
t
t
t
8
8
8
Like many others in recent years, we were struggling to find ways to help manufacturers think of flow instead of
discrete production processes and to implement lean systems instead of isolated process improvements.  We
struggled to help manufacturers make lasting, systematic improvements that would not only remove wastes, but
also the sources of the wastes so that they would never come back.  For those who simply give the mapping tool a
try, we have been pleased to see how exceptionally effective the tool has proved to be in focusing attention on flow
and helping them to see.  Now we present it to you.
Mike Rother and John Shook
Ann Arbour, Michigan
May 1998
Documents you may be interested
Documents you may be interested