mvc pdf viewer free : Add text to pdf online Library application component .net windows web page mvc 45_02_Hess_ver_01_5-22_FINAL2-part1247

02_H
ESS
_
VER
_01_5-22_FINAL.
DOCX 
(D
N
OT 
D
ELETE
10/30/2013
4:47
PM 
McGeorge Law Review / Vol. 45 
71 
objectives  then  should  drive  the  subsequent  decisions  on  teaching  and 
learning methods, materials, feedback, and assessment.
173
For example, assume that a course goal is that students will be able to 
articulate  and  apply  the  principles  and  policies  governing  the  scope  of 
discovery in a civil lawsuit. Appropriate methods would include lecture on 
the basic principles and policies governing the scope of discovery, analysis 
of  applicable  provisions  of  the  Federal  Rules  of  Civil  Procedure  and 
relevant cases, application of the principles and policies to hypotheticals and 
problems,  and  evaluation  of  discovery  requests  in  simulated  or  real 
litigation documents for compliance with the scope of discovery principles 
and policies. Those teaching and learning activities could take place online 
or in the classroom. Corresponding materials could include readings (rules 
and cases), lecture support (slides,  video-lectures,  podcasts), problems and 
hypotheticals  (slides  or  handouts),  and  simulated  or  actual  discovery 
documents.  Feedback  could  include  oral feedback  to student  responses  in 
class and written feedback on students’ analyses of problems and discovery 
documents online.  Finally,  the  midterm or  final exam  could  include items 
testing students’ understanding and application of the scope of discovery. 
The  teaching  and  learning  literature  has  numerous  implications  for 
course  design  in  legal  education.
174
The  following  eight  principles  are 
derived from five types of  learning theories:  behaviorism,
175
cognitivism,
176
173. Id. 
174. See generally T
EACHING 
L
AW  BY 
D
ESIGN
,
supra note  167,  at 3–12 (describing  cognitive 
learning theory, constructivist learning theory, adult learning theory, and self-regulated learning theory); 
Schwartz, supra note 170, at 365–83 (2001) (describing  behaviorism, cognitivism, and constructivism 
and  their  implications  for  legal  education);  Value  of  Variety,  supra  note  10,  at  66–70  (discussing 
behaviorism,  cognitivism,  constructivism,  and  multiple  intelligences  and  their  implications  for  legal 
education). 
175. “Behaviorism was the predominant learning theory in the first half of the twentieth century. 
According to behaviorists, learning takes place when the student gives the appropriate response to an 
environmental  stimulus. The association  between  stimulus and response can be  strengthened  through 
feedback and appropriate reinforcement. Behaviorists pioneered the notion of programmed instruction—
that learning could be facilitated by written material, electronic media, or a machine, rather than a live 
teacher.” Value of Variety, supra note 10, at 66–67 (footnotes omitted). 
176. Cognitive learning theory focuses on the processes in the human brain. Human senses receive 
vast amounts of information from the environment, which is stored very briefly in our sensory register. A 
few bits of information receive enough attention to enter the brain’s working memory.  
The  working memory can retain five to  nine bits of information for up to 20 seconds. For 
cognitivists, the critical step in learning  is the transfer of information from the working to 
long-term memory. Four characteristics of long-term memory are keys to cognitive learning 
theory. First, not all information from the working memory is transferred to the long-term 
memory.  To  be  transferred  into  long-term  memory,  information  must  be  meaningful and 
integrated with prior knowledge. Second, the more deeply we process information, the more 
likely  we are  to remember it. Third,  the long-term memory is  organized into schemata or 
mental models, where concepts (burglary) and skills (problem  solving) are categorized and 
stored.  Finally,  the  long-term  memory  has  nearly  unlimited  capacity  and  can  store 
knowledge, experience, strategies, and feelings permanently.  
Add text to pdf online - insert text into PDF content in C#.net, ASP.NET, MVC, Ajax, WinForms, WPF
XDoc.PDF for .NET, providing C# demo code for inserting text to PDF file
how to insert text box in pdf document; add text to pdf
Add text to pdf online - VB.NET PDF insert text library: insert text into PDF content in vb.net, ASP.NET, MVC, Ajax, WinForms, WPF
Providing Demo Code for Adding and Inserting Text to PDF File Page in VB.NET Program
add text pdf reader; how to add text box to pdf document
02_H
ESS
_
VER
_01_5-22_FINAL.
DOCX 
(D
N
OT 
D
ELETE
10/30/2013
4:47
PM 
2013 / Blended Courses in Law School 
72 
constructivism,
177
self-regulated  learning,
178
and  adult  learning.
179
Principles 
from  the  legal  education  literature  on  teaching  effectiveness  generally 
overlap  with  the  principles  from  learning  theory—this  should  not  be  a 
surprise  since the  most  important measure  of  teaching  effectiveness  is  the 
quantity and quality of student learning that results from the instruction. 
General Design Principle 1: Respect and Expectations  
Mutual respect among teachers and students is an essential element of a 
healthy  teaching  and  learning  environment.  In  respectful  environments, 
students  and  teachers  explore  ideas,  share  insights,  and  challenge  one 
another  to  grow.  Teachers’  behaviors  that  foster  respect  include  learning 
students’ names,  learning about  students’ experiences, and valuing  diverse 
backgrounds  and  perspectives.  Teachers should  model  respect  in both  the 
online and face-to-face environments.
180
One important element of respect is 
Value of Variety, supra note 10, at 67–68 (footnotes omitted). 
177. Constructivism is an emerging theory of learning. Four basic tenets of constructivism  
are relevant to variety in legal education. First, knowledge is constructed by, not transmitted 
to, learners. Second,  constructivists view learning  as a  process in  which  students actively 
construct meaning based on experience. Third, learning is collaborative; knowledge is created 
through discussion and negotiation from multiple perspectives. Fourth, learning should occur 
in realistic settings because thinking is closely linked to the real-life situation in which it will 
be applied. 
Value of Variety, supra note 10, at 68 (footnotes omitted). 
178. Self-regulated  learning is the process by which successful students  manage their learning. 
“Self regulated learning is best understood as a cycle involving three phases: a planning phase, in which 
the student decides how, what, when and where to study; an implementation phase, during which the 
student executes her plans; and a reflection phase, during which the student thinks back on her results 
and  efforts, soberly evaluates her learning process and plans  how she will  learn even  better the next 
time.” T
EACHING 
L
AW BY 
D
ESIGN
,
supra note 167, at 9–10. 
179. Several  principles  of  adult  learning  theory  are  especially  relevant  to  course  design: 
voluntariness, respect, and collaboration. See Gerald F. Hess, Listening to Our Students: Obstructing and 
Enhancing Learning in Law School, 31 U.S.F.
L.
R
EV
. 941, 942–44 (1997) [hereinafter, Listening to Our 
Students]; T
EACHING 
L
AW BY 
D
ESIGN
,
supra note 167, at 8–9.  
Participation in learning is voluntary; adults engage in learning of their own volition. Adults 
pursue  education because they want to develop new skills,  sharpen existing skills, acquire 
new knowledge, and gain new insights. Adults are usually highly motivated to learn and are 
willing to engage in participatory learning methods such as discussion, simulation, and small 
group activities. However, adult learners quickly withdraw their participation if they feel that 
the education is not meeting their needs, does not connect with their past experiences, or is 
conducted at a level they find incomprehensible. 
Listening to Our Students, at 942 (footnotes omitted).  
“Mutual respect for the self-worth of teachers and students underlies an effective teaching/learning 
environment. One of the central features of good teaching is that the students feel that instructors value 
them as individuals.” Id. (footnote omitted). “Students and teachers are engaged in a cooperative effort. 
At  different  times  during  the  course,  and  for  varying  purposes,  different  individuals  can  assume 
leadership.” Id. at 943 (footnotes omitted).  
180. See
T
EACHING 
L
AW  BY 
D
ESIGN
,
supra  note  167,  at  13–14;  Gerald  F.  Hess,  Heads  and 
Hearts: The Teaching and Learning Environment in Law School, 52 J.
L
EGAL 
E
DUC
. 75, 87–90 (2002) 
VB.NET PDF insert image library: insert images into PDF in vb.net
try with this sample VB.NET code to add an image As String = Program.RootPath + "\\" 1.pdf" Dim doc New PDFDocument(inputFilePath) ' Get a text manager from
add text to pdf document in preview; how to enter text in pdf
VB.NET PDF Text Extract Library: extract text content from PDF
Online Visual Basic .NET class source code for quick evaluation. With this advanced PDF Add-On, developers are able to extract target text content from
add text pdf; how to add text box in pdf file
02_H
ESS
_
VER
_01_5-22_FINAL.
DOCX 
(D
N
OT 
D
ELETE
10/30/2013
4:47
PM 
McGeorge Law Review / Vol. 45 
73 
high  expectations  of  all  students.  Teachers’  expectations  have  a  powerful 
effect  on  student  learning.
181
“High,  realistic  expectations  lead  to  greater 
student  achievement;  low  expectations  lead  to  less  learning.”
182
High 
expectations  are  most  effective  if  they  are  clear  (student  knows  what 
teachers expect), achievable (if students try to do their best, they can meet 
the  expectations),  and  uniform  (high  expectations  of  all  students).
183
Teachers who have high expectations for their own performance can inspire 
student excellence.
184
General Design Principle 2: Variety 
Every aspect of course design benefits from variety. Learning objectives 
can  include  concepts,  theory,  analytical  skills,  performance  skills,  and 
professional  values.
185
Teaching  and  learning  methods  can  come  from  an 
extensive  menu  both  in  the  classroom  (e.g.,  Socratic  dialog,  simulations, 
problem solving, lecture, large and small group discussion) and online (e.g., 
asynchronous  discussion,  video  lectures,  podcasts,  wikis).  Materials  to 
support  those teaching  methods  include  casebooks,  statutory  supplements, 
articles,  CALI  exercises,  and  websites.
186
Teachers  should  present  new 
learning to students in  multiple  ways.  For example,  teachers could  present 
new concepts orally (a lecture online or in the classroom) and graphically (a 
diagram  or  flow  chart  as  a  handout  in  class  or  on  the  course  website). 
Multiple  examples  “help  students  learn  abstract  concepts.”
187
Feedback  to 
students can “come from the teacher, fellow students, a computer, or from 
the  student  herself.”
188
Finally,  assessment  of  student  performance  can 
include exams, quizzes, papers, participation, and performances both online 
and in the classroom.
189
[hereinafter Heads and Hearts]. 
181. See
Heads and Hearts, supra note 180, at 85.  
182. T
EACHING 
L
AW BY 
D
ESIGN
,
supra note 167, at 14.  
183. Heads and Hearts, supra note 180, at 90–92. 
184. T
EACHING 
L
AW BY 
D
ESIGN
,
supra note 167, at 14–15; Heads and Hearts, supra note 180, at 
90–92.  Respect and expectations  come  from the  adult  learning literature.  Listening  to Our Students, 
supra note 179, at 942, 953. 
185. Heads and Hearts, supra note 180, at 100.  
186. T
EACHING 
L
AW BY 
D
ESIGN
,
supra note 167, at 17–18; Value of Variety, supra, note 10, at 
72–86.  
187. Schwartz,  supra  note  170,  at  379.  The  principle  of  multiple  types  of  presentation  and 
examples comes from cognitvism. Value of Variety, supra note 10, at 69 n.35. 
188. Value of Variety, supra, note 10, at 90. 
189. See T
EACHING 
L
AW BY 
D
ESIGN
,
supra note 167, at 18; Value of Variety, supra note 10, at 91. 
VB.NET PDF Password Library: add, remove, edit PDF file password
VB: Add Password to PDF with Permission Settings Applied. This VB.NET example shows how to add PDF file password with access permission setting.
how to insert text into a pdf with acrobat; add text to pdf in acrobat
C# PDF Text Extract Library: extract text content from PDF file in
How to C#: Extract Text Content from PDF File. Add necessary references: RasterEdge.Imaging.Basic.dll. RasterEdge.Imaging.Basic.Codec.dll.
add text to pdf in preview; how to add text to a pdf document using acrobat
02_H
ESS
_
VER
_01_5-22_FINAL.
DOCX 
(D
N
OT 
D
ELETE
10/30/2013
4:47
PM 
2013 / Blended Courses in Law School 
74 
General Design Principle 3: Sequencing Instruction  
“Instruction  should  be  sequenced.”
190
Students  should  “master 
prerequisite  content  and  skills  before  encountering  more  sophisticated 
concepts and analysis.”
191
For example, in a blended course, texts, podcasts, 
or video lectures could introduce concepts outside of class and classroom.
192
To  deepen  and  retain  new  learning,  students  need  to  make  connections 
between new concepts and what they already know.
193
General Design Principle 4: Active Learning 
Learning  activities  should  further  students’  efforts  to  construct 
understanding.
194
Active  methods  help  students  acquire  and  retain  new 
concepts  and  skills.
195
Students  engage  in  active  learning  when  they  do 
something other than reading, listening, and taking notes.
196
Active learning 
methods  in  law  school  include  Socratic  dialog,  discussion,  writing, 
outlining, problem solving, simulations, and real-life experiences.
197
Each of 
those methods could take place in the classroom or online. Active learning 
facilitates student achievement of important goals: thinking skills (analysis, 
synthesis,  critical  thinking),  deep  understanding  of  concepts  and  theories, 
lawyering skills (interviewing, negotiation, oral advocacy), and professional 
values.
198
General Design Principle 5: Collaboration 
Social  interaction  plays  a  central  role  in  learning.
199
Students  need 
opportunities to engage in dialog and collaborate with other students to gain 
other perspectives and deepen understanding.
200
Students can work in small 
190. Value of Variety, supra, note 10, at 69.  
191. Id.; see Schwartz, supra note 170, at 368–69, 375. The  principle of sequencing instruction 
comes from both behaviorism and cognitvism. Id. at 356 n.32. 
192. Value of Variety, supra note 10, at 69–70.  
193. Id. at 70.  
194. T
EACHING 
L
AW BY 
D
ESIGN
,
supra note 167, at 5–7.  
195. T
EACHING 
L
AW BY 
D
ESIGN
,
supra note 167, at 5. The principle of active learning comes from 
congnitivism and constructivism. Value of Variety, supra note 10, at 69 n. 37. 
196. Id. at 5.  
197. Gerald F. Hess, Principle 3: Good Practice Encourages Active Learning, 49 J.
L
EGAL 
E
DUC
401, 406–15 (1999) [hereinafter Active Learning]; T
EACHING 
L
AW BY 
D
ESIGN
,
supra note 167, at 18. 
198. Active Learning, supra note 197, at 402–03; T
EACHING 
L
AW BY 
D
ESIGN
,
supra note 167, at 19. 
199. T
EACHING 
L
AW BY 
D
ESIGN
,
supra note 167, at 7.  
200. Value of Variety, supra note 10, at 68, 70; Schwartz, supra note 170, at 381; T
EACHING 
L
AW 
BY 
D
ESIGN
,
supra  note  167,  at  7.  The  principle  of  learning  through  social  interaction,  dialog,  and 
collaboration comes from constructivism. 
C# HTML5 PDF Viewer SDK to view PDF document online in C#.NET
Create PDF Online. Convert PDF Online. WPF PDF Viewer. View PDF in WPF. Annotate PDF in Highlight Text. Add Text. Add Text Box. Drawing Markups. PDF Print. Work
how to add text to pdf; how to insert pdf into email text
VB.NET PDF- View PDF Online with VB.NET HTML5 PDF Viewer
View PDF Online. Annotate PDF Online. Create PDF Online. Convert PDF Online. WPF PDF Highlight Text. Add Text. Add Text Box. Drawing Markups. PDF Print. Work
add text boxes to pdf; adding text to a pdf
02_H
ESS
_
VER
_01_5-22_FINAL.
DOCX 
(D
N
OT 
D
ELETE
10/30/2013
4:47
PM 
McGeorge Law Review / Vol. 45 
75 
groups  to  solve  problems,  discuss  theory  and  values,  perform  skills, 
synthesize concepts,  and engage  in many other exercises. A vast “body of 
research  in  higher  education  and  legal  education  demonstrates  the 
effectiveness  of  cooperative  learning”  to  foster  healthy  relationships  and 
student achievement.
201
Interaction and collaboration can take place through 
small group activities in the classroom or through asynchronous discussion 
online.
202
General Design Principle 6: Learning Location  
Learning  takes  place  both  in  and  out  of  the  classroom.  Students  can 
learn  concepts  outside  of  the classroom through  written  materials,  videos, 
podcasts,  outlining,  CALI  exercises,  and  threaded  discussions  online. 
Classroom  activities,  such  as  Socratic  dialog  and  simulations,  should  be 
designed to maximize the strengths of learning from a live teacher in order 
to deepen student learning.
203
General Design Principle 7: Practice and Feedback 
Practice and feedback are critical to learning.
204
“Learning  is enhanced 
when  students  practice  skills  (analytical  and  performance  skills)  and  get 
feedback  on  their  performance.”
205
Feedback  is  an  important  aspect  of 
learning, both in online and law school classrooms.
206
“Effective feedback is 
specific, corrective, positive, and timely.”
207
Feedback is most effective when teachers articulate specific criteria 
for student performance and give students feedback based on those 
criteria. Corrective feedback points out weaknesses in student work 
and  provides  strategies  for  improvement.  Positive  feedback 
identifies  the  strengths  upon  which  students  can  build.  Timely 
feedback comes relatively soon after student performance and gives 
students  an  opportunity  to  improve  before  their  performance  is 
evaluated.
208
201. T
EACHING 
L
AW BY 
D
ESIGN
,
supra note 167, at 19; Heads and Hearts, supra note 180, at 94–96. 
202. Heads and Hearts, supra note 180, at 94–96. 
203. See  Value  of  Variety,  supra,  note  10,  at  83;  Schwartz,  supra  note  170,  at  369–70.  The 
principle of some learning taking place via programmed, non-classroom instruction is from behaviorism. 
Schwartz, supra note 170, at 369–70.  
204. Heads and Hearts, supra note 180, at 108.  
205. Value of Variety, supra  note 10, at 70. 
206. Heads and Hearts, supra note 180, at 106–08.  
207. Id. at 106.  
208. T
EACHING 
L
AW BY 
D
ESIGN
,
supra note 167, at 21.  
C# PDF insert image Library: insert images into PDF in C#.net, ASP
Insert images into PDF form field. Access to freeware download and online C#.NET class source code. How to insert and add image, picture, digital photo, scanned
how to add text fields to a pdf; add text pdf file acrobat
VB.NET PDF - Annotate PDF Online with VB.NET HTML5 PDF Viewer
PDF Online. This part will explain the usages of annotation tabs on RasterEdge VB.NET HTML5 PDF Viewer. Text Markup Tab. Item. Name. Description. 1. Add sticky
add text in pdf file online; adding text box to pdf
02_H
ESS
_
VER
_01_5-22_FINAL.
DOCX 
(D
N
OT 
D
ELETE
10/30/2013
4:47
PM 
2013 / Blended Courses in Law School 
76 
General Design Principle 8: Reflection 
Students’  reflection  improves  learning.  Expert  learners  continuously 
monitor their own understanding of what they are supposed to be learning.
209
Reflective  learners  also  evaluate  how  well  and  how  efficiently  they  have 
learned  something  in  order  to  improve  their  future  learning.
210
Online 
exercises and discussion may be especially appropriate to foster reflection, 
since  the  online  environment  does  not  have  the  same  time  constraints  as 
face-to-face classes do.
211
B.  Blended Course Design Principles 
This  Section  offers  ten  recommendations  for  the  design  of  blended 
courses in law school. The recommendations include fundamental principles 
that apply to the design of any course and a set of specific issues for blended 
courses. The ten blended course design recommendations are derived from 
the  teaching,  learning,  and  instructional  design  literature,  interviews  with 
students and faculty, and findings in the 2005 and 2010 meta-analyses.
212
209. Id. at 11. 
210. Schwartz, supra note 170, at 376; T
EACHING 
L
AW BY 
D
ESIGN
,
supra note 167, at 11–12. The 
principles of reflection, self-monitoring, and self-evaluation come from cognitivism and self-regulated 
learning. 
211. C
AULFIELD
,
supra note 29, at 167–68; Rosenburg, supra note 41, at 44. 
212. Caulfield discusses eight critical questions to consider when planning a blended course. Id.
at 
58–78. 
“Question  1. What  is it  that students  must  demonstrate  they know  by  the time  they  have 
successfully completed the course?” Id. at 58. 
“Question 2. What learning activities could students actively engage in to achieve identified 
learning objectives?” Id. at 59. 
“Questions 3. How will the [face-to-face] and time out of class components be integrated into 
a single course?” Id. at 62. 
“Question  4.  As  you  consider  the  characteristics  of  our  class  (size,  area  of  study, 
demographics,  length of [face-to-face]  classes and class  duration),  how will they influence 
your course design?” Id. at 65.  
“Question 5. How will you divide the percentage of time students spend in class and out of 
class, and how will you schedule the in-class time and the out-of-class time?” Id. at 70. 
“Question 6. Faculty tend to require students to do more work in a [blended] than they might 
normally  require in a purely  traditional course. As you design your [blended] course,  how 
might you lessen the likelihood of creating a course with an excessive workload?” Id. at 71. 
“Question 7. How will you effectively communicate what will occur during class and out of 
class, including how work in both these environments will be evaluated?” Id. at 72. 
“Question 8. How will you develop social presence in your [blended] course?” Id. 
Likewise,  Garrison and Vaughn  set out a  five-phase  “Redesign  Guide  for  Blended  Learning,” 
including design questions for each phase. G
ARRISON 
&
V
AUGHN
,
supra note 6, at 177–79. The first 
three phases are most applicable to this Article. 
Analysis Phase. “What do you want your students to know when they have finished taking your 
blended learning course (e.g., key learning outcomes—knowledge, skills, and attitudes)? What do you 
VB.NET PDF Text Add Library: add, delete, edit PDF text in vb.net
Viewer & Editors, C# ASP.NET Document Viewer, C# Online Dicom Viewer, C# Online Jpeg images Viewer, C# HTML Document How to VB.NET: Add Text to PDF Page.
adding text to a pdf in acrobat; adding text to a pdf document acrobat
C# HTML5 PDF Viewer SDK to annotate PDF document online in C#.NET
PDF Online. This part will explain the usages of annotation tabs on RasterEdge C#.NET HTML5 PDF Viewer. Text Markup Tab. Item. Name. Description. 1. Add sticky
acrobat add text to pdf; how to insert text into a pdf file
02_H
ESS
_
VER
_01_5-22_FINAL.
DOCX 
(D
N
OT 
D
ELETE
10/30/2013
4:47
PM 
McGeorge Law Review / Vol. 45 
77 
Recommendation 1: Incorporate the Fundamental Principles of 
Instructional Design, Teaching, and Learning
213
The  instructional  design  process  begins  with  a  comprehensive  set  of 
learning  objectives  clearly  articulating  what  doctrine,  theory,  skills,  and 
values  students should learn in the course.
214
The selection of teaching and 
learning methods, materials, feedback mechanisms, and assessment all flow 
from  the  learning  objectives.
215
Respect,  high  expectations,  and  variety 
should  permeate  the  course.
216
Teaching  and  learning  activities  in  the 
classroom  and  online  should  allow  students  to  actively  construct 
understanding,  to  integrate  new  learning  with  prior  learning,  and  to 
collaborate  with  other  students.
217
Finally,  the  course  should  build  in 
opportunities  for  students  to  practice  skills,  get  feedback,  and  reflect  on 
their learning.
218
want to preserve from your existing course format? What would you like to transform?” Id. at 177.  
Design Phase. “What types of learning activities will you design that integrate face-to-face (F2F) 
and time-out-of-class (TOC) components? What means will you use to assess these integrated learning 
activities?  What are  your expectations for  student participation  within and outside of  the classroom? 
How will you configure and schedule the percent of time between the F2F and TOC components of your 
course?  How  will  you  use  your  course  outline  to  communicate  the  learning  outcomes,  activities, 
assessment plan, schedule, and key content topics to your students?” Id. at 177–78. 
Development Phase. “How will you use a learning management system (i.e. Blackboard) to create 
a structure for you course (e.g., content modules, key topic areas)? What existing resources can you use 
for your blended course (e.g., existing handouts, digital learning objects)? What new learning activities 
and/or content do you need to develop for your course?” Id. at 178.  
213. See B
LENDED 
L
EARNING
,
supra note 47, at 5 “Good instructional design is vitally important 
to the success of a blended learning course, perhaps even more so than in a traditional classroom or in 
fully online courses. The move to blended learning gives the faculty member an opportunity to revisit his 
or her course’s instructional design.” Id.  
214. See supra text accompanying notes 178 and 191. 
215. See supra text accompanying note 178. Garrison and Vaughn set out four key questions to 
guide the design of a blended course: 
1. What do you want your students to know when they have completed your blended 
learning course? 
2. What types of learning activities will you design that integrate face-to-face and online 
components? 
3. What means will you use to assess these integrated learning activities? 
4. How will information and communication technologies be used to support blended 
learning? 
G
ARRISON 
&
V
AUGHN
,
supra note 6, at 107. 
216. See supra text accompanying notes 184–191. 
217. See supra text accompanying notes 185–189. 
218. See supra text accompanying notes 208–113. 
02_H
ESS
_
VER
_01_5-22_FINAL.
DOCX 
(D
N
OT 
D
ELETE
10/30/2013
4:47
PM 
2013 / Blended Courses in Law School 
78 
Recommendation 2: Decide How Much of the Course to Design or Redesign 
in a Blended Format  
Designing  a  blended  course  takes significant  lead-time. The  instructor 
should  complete  the  design  process  before  the  course  begins.
219
“Faculty 
report[] working on their first blended course for two to three months before 
teaching it.”
220
A threshold question is whether to design the entire course in 
 blended  format  or  only  a  portion  of  the  course.  Most  faculty  begin  by 
redesigning a portion of a course into a blended format.
221
If only a portion 
of  the  course  is  designed  in  a  blended  format,  the  teacher  can  use  that 
experience to decide whether to redesign subsequent versions of the course 
to include more blended learning. 
Recommendation 3: Strong Organization Is Critical in a Blended Design  
A blended course design is more complex than most traditional, face-to-
face  courses.
222
The  syllabus  should  be  a  complete  guide  to  a  blended 
course,  including  course  information,  teacher  information,  course 
description,  materials,  learning  objectives,  teaching/learning  methods, 
technology  support,  course  policies,  assessment  scheme,  and  course 
schedule.
223
[S]tudents  need  a  calendar  and  a  course  plan  so  they  can  see  the 
dates  and  times  of  the  [face-to-face]  classes  and  immediately 
219. C
AULFIELD
,
supra note 29, at 194, 199. 
220. Id. at 199.   
221. Id. at 199. 
222. G
ARRISON 
&
V
AUGHN
,
supra note 6, at 5–7.   
223. Id. at 177; G
ARRISON 
&
V
AUGHN
,
supra note 6, at 205–217 (template for a blended course 
syllabus and a detailed example of a blended course syllabus). For example, a syllabus for a blended 
course could address the following: 
•  Course information (title, number, credits), 
•  Teacher information (name, office, phone, email, website, office hours),  
•  Course description (from catalog or website),  
•  Materials (books, course website, videos, podcasts, CALI exercises, Internet, etc.), 
•  Learning objectives (student learning outcomes), 
•  Teaching/learning methods (description of and rationale for blended design; teacher’s 
expectations),  
•  Technology support  (name,  phone,  email, and   hours  for  instructional  technology 
support),  
•  Course  policies  (attendance,  participation,  deadlines,  academic  honesty,  teacher 
availability, etc.), 
•  Assessment scheme (types of assessments, weight, due dates, grading scheme), and  
•  Course  schedule  (assignments,  readings,  and  activities  for  online  and  classroom 
components). 
02_H
ESS
_
VER
_01_5-22_FINAL.
DOCX 
(D
N
OT 
D
ELETE
10/30/2013
4:47
PM 
McGeorge Law Review / Vol. 45 
79 
distinguish  out-of-class and in-class work  [and] when assignments 
are due . . . . [S]tudents who have a clear sense of what the course 
plan  is  will  be  more  likely  to  actively  and  positively  engage  in 
learning activities.
224
After  completing  a  draft  blended-course  syllabus  and  plan,  view  the 
course from the students’ perspective. Walk through each part of the course 
asking how a student may become stymied or confused.
225
Recommendation 4: Treat Technology as a Tool, Not a Toy  
Student  learning outcomes,  not technology,  should drive  the  design of  a 
blended course.
226
Girdy, Wise, and Craig offer a three-step process for deciding 
what technology to use in a law school course. 
Effective  planning  for  implementing  technology  involves  three  key 
components.  First,  faculty  members  must  determine  the  academic 
goals—the educational goals or outcomes—the faculty members want 
students  to  achieve.  Second,  faculty  members  must  determine  what 
activities  or  resources  will  help  students  reach  those  goals.  This 
evaluation  should  not  be  tied  to  particular  technologies,  but  instead 
should focus on what the student needs to do or to access to achieve the 
desired  outcome.  Third,  faculty  members  then  determine  which 
technologies are appropriate for those activities or resources.
227
Teachers should be comfortable with whatever technology they choose for 
the course.
228
It is especially important for teachers to be fully familiar with the 
operation of the course website or course management system. And competent 
technology support for students should be readily available.
229
Recommendation 5: Integrate Face-to-Face and Online Components of the 
Course 
A course that blends online and face-to-face learning raises unique design 
challenges.
230
The teacher  must decide what percentage of the instruction will 
224. C
AULFIELD
,
supra  note  29,  at  72.  See  pages  73–78  for  a  detailed  example  of  a  course 
calendar and schedule of assignments for a graduate course in leadership. 
225. Id. at 200. 
226. Id. at 199. 
227. Gerdy, Wise & Craig, supra note 52, at 274. 
228. C
AULFIELD
,
supra note 29, at 178.  
229. Id. at 170, 178, 196. 
230. Id. at 70.  
02_H
ESS
_
VER
_01_5-22_FINAL.
DOCX 
(D
N
OT 
D
ELETE
10/30/2013
4:47
PM 
2013 / Blended Courses in Law School 
80 
take  place  in  the  classroom  and  what  percentage  online.
231
As  noted  above, 
ABA accreditation standards place very few limitations on blended courses in 
which  the online component does  not exceed one-third of the course.
232
Next, 
the  teacher  must  decide how to  schedule  the online  and face-to-face  classes. 
One of the pitfalls of blended course designs is that teachers tend to add online 
activities to an existing face-to-face course, resulting in an excessive workload 
that overwhelms students.
233
Consequently, one key to effective blended course 
design  is  to  integrate  the  online  and  classroom  components  to  achieve 
significant  learning  objectives.
234
For  example,  Rosenberg  integrated  face-to-
face  and online  instruction for a major assignment  in  his first-year  lawyering 
seminar—an  oral argument.  To begin preparation for oral argument, students 
viewed and discussed two videos of oral arguments in the classroom. Then, in 
an online class, the students listened to an audio recording of an oral argument, 
posted individual responses to questions  about the argument, and  commented 
on other students’ contributions.
235
Each student made an oral argument in front 
of  professors,  practitioners,  or  judges.
236
Within  twenty-four  hours  of  their 
arguments,  students  posted  online  their  reflections  on  their  oral  argument 
experience  and  their  advice  for  colleagues  on  how  to  prepare  for  oral 
arguments.
237
Finally,  in  the  classroom,  students  participated  in  small-group 
critiques of their arguments, including video clips selected by each student to 
illustrate strengths and weaknesses of their arguments.
238
Recommendation 6: Make Asynchronous Discussion a Significant Part of 
the Blended Course  
Teachers  and  students  with  extensive  experience  in  blended  courses 
recognize  that  asynchronous  discussion  can  be  a  powerful  tool  to  foster 
student  learning.
239
Students  note  that  asynchronous  discussion  provides 
equal  opportunity  for  every  student  to  participate  and  that  students  who 
participate  rarely  in  the  classroom  often  make  valuable  contributions  in 
231. Id.  
232. See supra text accompanying notes 30–31. 
233. C
AULFIELD
,
supra note 29, at 70–71. 
234. G
ARRISON 
&
V
AUGHN
,
supra note 6, at 5. Another way to achieve integration is to spend a 
few minutes  in the  face-to-face classroom  debriefing online activities.  C
AULFIELD
,
supra  note 29, at 
178–79. 
235. Rosenberg, supra note 41, at 71.  
236. Id.  
237. Id.  
238. Rosenburg,  supra  note  41,  at  71–81.  Professor  Rosenburg  describes  in  detail  how  he 
redesigned  and  delivered  an  oral  argument  module,  previously  taught  entirely  face-to-face,  into  a 
blended format. Id. 
239. See
C
AULFIELD
,
supra note 29, at 171–72, 190–192; Rosenburg, supra note 41, at 46–51. 
Documents you may be interested
Documents you may be interested