mvc show pdf in div : How to insert text box on pdf Library control class asp.net azure .net ajax 508TM12-A10-part1321

ShakeMap Manual 
Version 1.0  6/19/06 
A D V A N C E D  N A T I O N A L  S E I S M I C  S Y S T E M
ShakeMap
®
Manual
T
ECHNICAL 
M
ANUAL
, U
SERS 
G
UIDE
AND 
S
OFTWARE 
G
UIDE 
Prepared by
David J. Wald, Bruce C.  Worden, Vincent Quitoriano, and Kris L. Pankow
How to insert text box on pdf - insert text into PDF content in C#.net, ASP.NET, MVC, Ajax, WinForms, WPF
XDoc.PDF for .NET, providing C# demo code for inserting text to PDF file
add text to pdf in acrobat; add text to pdf without acrobat
How to insert text box on pdf - VB.NET PDF insert text library: insert text into PDF content in vb.net, ASP.NET, MVC, Ajax, WinForms, WPF
Providing Demo Code for Adding and Inserting Text to PDF File Page in VB.NET Program
how to add text box in pdf file; add text to pdf online
ShakeMap Manual 
Version 1.0  6/19/06 
FOREWORD  
ShakeMap (http://earthquake.usgs.gov/shakemap)—rapidly, automatically generated shaking and 
intensity maps—combines instrumental measurements of shaking with  information about local 
geology and earthquake location and magnitude to estimate shaking variations throughout a 
geographic area.  The results are  rapidly available via the Web through a variety of map 
formats, including Geographic Information System (GIS) coverages.  These maps have become a 
valuable tool for emergency response, public information, loss estimation, earthquake planning, 
and post-earthquake engineering and scientific analyses.  With the adoption of ShakeMap as a 
standard tool for a wide array of users and uses came an impressive demand for up-to-date 
technical documentation and more general guidelines for users and software developers.  This 
manual is meant to address this need. 
ShakeMap, and associated Web and data products, are rapidly evolving as new advances in 
communications,  earthquake science, and  user needs drive improvements.   As such, this 
documentation  is organic in  nature.   We  will  make every  effort to keep  it  current,  but 
undoubtedly necessary changes in operational systems take precedence over producing and 
making documentation publishable.   As this report is published through the USGS, the sole 
location of this manual is at Web Uniform Resources Locator (URL): 
Some sections or subsections of the manual are seemingly incomplete.   However, we have 
purposely included section or subsection headings as placeholders for products in development 
or regional ShakeMap information so that the user is aware of its existence and ongoing 
development.  In these circumstances we simply mark the section with [TBS], for “to be 
specified.” 
Please address and any concerns or specific questions about this documentation to the ShakeMap 
Working Group via the ShakeMap Web page comment form. 
FOREWORD 
http://pubs.usgs.gov/tm/2005/12A01/
VB.NET PDF Text Box Edit Library: add, delete, update PDF text box
Extract Field Data. Data: Auto Fill-in Field Data. Field: Insert, Delete, Update Highlight Text. Add Text. Add Text Box. Drawing Markups. PDF Print. Work with
adding text to a pdf form; how to insert text box on pdf
C# PDF Text Box Edit Library: add, delete, update PDF text box in
C# PDF: Add Text Box. C#.NET PDF SDK - Add Text Box to PDF Page in C#.NET. C# Explanation to How to Add Text Box to PDF Page in C# Project with .NET PDF Library.
adding text to a pdf in acrobat; how to add text to a pdf file in acrobat
ShakeMap Manual 
DRAFT: Version 1.0  6/19/06 
TABLE OF CONTENTS
FOREWORD..........................................................................................................................2
TABLE OF CONTENTS........................................................................................................3
INTRODUCTION AND OVERVIEW....................................................................................7
MESSAGE TO USERS ........................................................................................................10
ACKNOWLEDGMENTS.....................................................................................................11
1  USERS’ GUIDE ...............................................................................................................13
1.1  Introduction...............................................................................................................13
1.2  Current Applications of ShakeMap............................................................................14
1.2.1 
Emergency Response and Loss Estimation.........................................................14
1.2.2 
Public Information and Education......................................................................16
1.2.3 
Earthquake Engineering and Seismological Research.........................................17
1.2.4 
Planning and Training: ShakeMap Earthquake Scenarios...................................17
1.3  Maps and Data Products............................................................................................18
1.3.1 
Interpolated Grid File.........................................................................................19
1.3.2 
Grid File Metadata.............................................................................................20
1.3.3 
GIS Products......................................................................................................20
1.4  Web Pages.................................................................................................................22
1.4.1 
About the Web Pages.........................................................................................23
1.4.2 
ShakeMap Home Web Page Layout...................................................................25
1.4.3 
Individual Event Pages ......................................................................................25
1.4.4 
Earthquake Archives..........................................................................................27
1.4.5 
Download Pages: A Summary of ShakeMap Products .......................................29
1.4.6 
Related Web Pages............................................................................................32
1.4.7 
Web Server Capacity and Redundancy...............................................................32
1.5  Automatic Delivery and Use of ShakeMap................................................................32
1.5.1 
FTP “Push:” Automatic ShakeMap Delivery......................................................32
1.5.2 
ShakeCast (“ShakeMap BroadCast”) .................................................................33
1.6  Future Applications of ShakeMap..............................................................................36
2  TECHNICAL MANUAL..................................................................................................38
2.1  Introduction...............................................................................................................38
2.1.1 
History and Development ..................................................................................38
2.1.2 
Other Systems Worldwide .................................................................................39
2.2  ShakeMap Software Overview ..................................................................................40
2.3  Recorded Ground-motion Parameters........................................................................41
2.3.1 
Data Acquisition................................................................................................41
2.3.2 
Derived Parametric Ground-motion Values........................................................42
2.4  Estimating and Interpolating Ground-motions ...........................................................42
2.4.1 
Phantom Station Grid.........................................................................................43
2.4.2 
Empirical Ground-motion Equations..................................................................43
2.4.3 
Site Corrections .................................................................................................48
2.4.4 
Fault Finiteness..................................................................................................52
2.5  Instrumental Intensity................................................................................................54
2.5.1 
Converting from Peak Acceleration and Velocity to Instrumental Intensity........54
TABLE OF CONTENTS 
C# PDF Annotate Library: Draw, edit PDF annotation, markups in C#.
C#.NET: Add Text Box to PDF Document. Provide users with examples for adding text box to PDF and edit font size and color in text box field in C#.NET program.
how to insert text into a pdf file; how to insert text into a pdf
C# WPF PDF Viewer SDK to annotate PDF document in C#.NET
Support to replace PDF text with a note annotation. Ability to insert a text note after selected text. Support to create a text box annotation to PDF file.
how to insert a text box in pdf; add text to pdf
ShakeMap Manual 
DRAFT: Version 1.0  6/19/06 
2.5.2 
ShakeMap Instrumental Intensity Scale Text Descriptions.................................56
2.5.3 
Color Palette for the ShakeMap Instrumental Intensity Scale .............................58
2.6  Discussion of Chosen Map Parameters......................................................................59
2.6.1 
Use of Peak Values Rather than Mean ...............................................................59
2.6.2 
Adding New Parameters ....................................................................................61
2.7  ShakeMap Uncertainty ..............................................................................................61
2.7.1 
Factors Contributing to Uncertainty...................................................................61
2.7.2 
Quantifying Uncertainty ....................................................................................62
2.7.3 
Examples for Significant and Scenario Earthquakes...........................................62
2.8  Recent Example ShakeMaps......................................................................................62
2.8.1 
1999 Hector Mine, California Earthquake..........................................................62
2.8.2 
2000 Napa Valley (Yountville), California Earthquake......................................63
2.8.3 
2001 Seattle (Nisqually), Washington Earthquake..............................................65
2.9  Regional ShakeMap Specifications............................................................................66
2.9.1 
California...........................................................................................................67
2.9.2 
Pacific Northwest ..............................................................................................68
2.9.3 
Intermountain West............................................................................................68
2.9.4 
Mid-America.....................................................................................................74
2.9.5 
Northeast...........................................................................................................81
2.9.6 
Alaska ...............................................................................................................81
2.9.7 
Hawaii...............................................................................................................81
2.9.8 
Puerto Rico and U.S. Territories ........................................................................81
2.10  Scenario Earthquakes ................................................................................................82
2.10.1  Generating Earthquake Scenarios.......................................................................82
2.10.2  Standardizing Earthquake Scenarios ..................................................................84
2.11  Composite ShakeMaps ..............................................................................................87
2.11.1  Definitions.........................................................................................................87
2.11.2  Combining Macroseismic Data with Scenarios ..................................................88
2.11.3  Combining Macroseismic and Instrumental Data...............................................88
2.11.4  Combining Macroseismic and Instrumental Data with Numerical Predictions....90
3  SOFTWARE GUIDE........................................................................................................92
3.1  System and Software Requirements...........................................................................92
3.1.1 
Operating System ..............................................................................................92
3.1.2 
Perl....................................................................................................................93
3.1.3 
GMT..................................................................................................................94
3.1.4 
convert...............................................................................................................94
3.1.5 
PBM/PBMPLUS ...............................................................................................94
3.1.6 
Ghostscript ........................................................................................................95
3.1.7 
Make .................................................................................................................95
3.1.8 
SCCS.................................................................................................................95
3.1.9 
C compiler.........................................................................................................95
3.1.10  MySQL..............................................................................................................95
3.1.11  mp (Metadata Parser).........................................................................................96
3.1.12  Zip.....................................................................................................................96
3.1.13  Ssh.....................................................................................................................96
3.2  Installing the Software...............................................................................................97
TABLE OF CONTENTS 
.NET PDF Document Viewing, Annotation, Conversion & Processing
Extract bookmark & outlines. Extract hyperlink inside PDF. PDF Write. Insert text, text box into PDF. Edit, delete text from PDF. Insert images into PDF.
how to add a text box to a pdf; how to enter text into a pdf form
C# WPF Viewer: Load, View, Convert, Annotate and Edit PDF
Add text to PDF document. • Insert text box to PDF file. • Draw markups to PDF document. PDF Protection. • Add signatures to PDF document.
add text to pdf in preview; how to add text to a pdf file
ShakeMap Manual 
 
DRAFT: Version 1.0  6/19/06 
3.2.1 
Installing and Configuring MySQL....................................................................97
3.2.2 
Installation and Upgrade....................................................................................99
3.3  Customizing ShakeMap...........................................................................................102
3.3.1 
Region-Specific Files.......................................................................................102
3.3.2 
Configuration Files..........................................................................................102
3.3.3 
Passwords........................................................................................................103
3.3.4 
Web Pages.......................................................................................................103
3.3.5 
Automation......................................................................................................104
3.3.6 
Attenuation Relations.......................................................................................104
3.4  Running ShakeMap.................................................................................................105
3.4.1 
Data Directory Structure..................................................................................105
3.4.2 
Creating the Maps............................................................................................105
3.4.3 
The Gory Details .............................................................................................106
3.4.4 
A Note about Shake Flags................................................................................113
3.4.5 
A Note about CSV Databases ..........................................................................114
3.4.6 
A Note about Estimates and Flagged Stations ..................................................114
3.4.7 
A Note about Finite Faults...............................................................................115
3.4.8 
Sending Email .................................................................................................115
3.4.9 
Scenarios.........................................................................................................115
3.5  Common Problems..................................................................................................116
3.5.1 
Shake flags database causes confusion.............................................................116
3.5.2 
Files in incorrect format...................................................................................116
3.6  XML Formats in ShakeMap ....................................................................................117
3.6.1 
About XML.....................................................................................................117
3.6.2 
ShakeMap XML Files......................................................................................118
3.6.3 
Retrieving Data from a Database......................................................................122
3.6.4 
External Data XML Files.................................................................................122
3.7  Development Model................................................................................................125
3.8  Tables......................................................................................................................126
REFERENCES.......................................................................................................................133
APPENDIX A.  Regression Relationships...............................................................................142
Boore and others 1997 (BJF97).......................................................................................142
Boatwright and others 2003 (Boatwright03)....................................................................143
[TBS]..............................................................................................................................143
Newmark and Hall 1982 PGV Relation (NH82)..............................................................143
Pankow and Pechman 2002.............................................................................................144
Atkinson and Boore 2003 (AB03) ...................................................................................144
Somerville and others 1997 (Somerville97).....................................................................145
Youngs and others 1997 (Youngs97)...............................................................................147
ShakeMap Small Regression (Small)...............................................................................148
Depth to Basement..........................................................................................................148
Toro et. al. 1997..............................................................................................................149
Atkinson and Boore 1995................................................................................................150
Kaka and Atkinson (2005)...............................................................................................151
APPENDIX B. 
 
Supplemental Documents..............................................................................153
ShakeMap Fact Sheet..........................................................................................................153
5
 
TABLE OF CONTENTS 
C# WinForms Viewer: Load, View, Convert, Annotate and Edit PDF
Add text to PDF document in preview. • Add text box to PDF file in preview. • Draw PDF markups. PDF Protection. • Sign PDF document with signature.
how to add text boxes to pdf; adding text to pdf
VB.NET PDF - Annotate PDF with WPF PDF Viewer for VB.NET
annotation. Ability to insert a text note after selected text. transparency. Support to create a text box annotation to PDF file in .NET project. VB
how to insert text into a pdf using reader; how to add text to a pdf document using acrobat
ShakeMap Manual 
DRAFT: Version 1.0  6/19/06 
ShakeCast Information Sheet ..............................................................................................153
Introduction to ShakeCast...................................................................................................153
Using ShakeMap in HAZUS...............................................................................................153
INDEX ...................................................................................................................................154
TABLE OF CONTENTS 
ShakeMap Manual 
DRAFT: Version 1.0  6/19/06 
INTRODUCTION AND OVERVIEW
The most common information available immediately following damaging earthquakes has 
traditionally been their magnitude and epicentral location.  However, the damage pattern is not a 
simple function of these two parameters alone, and more detailed information is necessary to 
properly evaluate the situation.  ShakeMap® has proven to be a useful, descriptive display for 
rapidly assessing the scope and extent of shaking and potential damage following an earthquake. 
ShakeMap’s production of the maps is automatic, triggered by any significant earthquake in an 
area of the country where the ShakeMap system is in place.  Maps are made available within 
several minutes of the earthquake for public and scientific consumption via the World Wide 
Web; they will be made available with dedicated communications for emergency response 
agencies and critical users.  Such maps have traditionally been difficult to produce rapidly and 
reliably due to limitations of seismic network instrumentation and data telemetry.  In addition, 
adequate relationships between recorded ground-motions and damage intensities have only 
recently  been  developed.   However, with  recent advances in  digital  communication and 
computation, it is now technically feasible to develop systems to display ground-motions in an 
informative manner almost instantly. 
We generate separate maps of the spatial distribution of peak ground-motions (acceleration, 
velocity, and spectral response) as well as a map of instrumentally derived seismic intensities. 
These maps provide a rapid portrayal of the extent of potentially damaging shaking following an 
earthquake and can be used for emergency response, loss estimation, and for public information 
through the media.  For example, maps of shaking intensity can be combined with databases of 
inventories of buildings and lifelines to rapidly produce maps of estimated damage.  A detailed 
description of the shaking over a large region requires interpolation of measured ground-motions 
unless the recordings are extremely abundant.  In the ShakeMap implementation, empirically 
based ground-motion estimation combined with simple geologically based, frequency and 
amplitude-dependent site correction factors provide a useful first-order correction for local 
amplification in areas that are not instrumented. 
In this manual we describe the current ShakeMap system and implementation as well as ongoing 
operational and development efforts pertinent to ShakeMap  under the Advanced National 
Seismic System (ANSS). ShakeMap was originally designed to be a Web-based information 
system; so much of its functionality and utility is fundamentally integrated into its Web pages. 
However, a number of other ShakeMap-related products are now available.   In Section 1, the 
Users’ Guide, these products and their methods for delivery and use are fully outlined.  In 
Section 2, the Technical Manual, the production of the ShakeMap and its associated products is 
explained in detail, providing users the necessary background to understand the derivation of 
each product thereby assuring the most appropriate uses and decision making practices. Because 
the ShakeMap software has been ported to a number of regions within the United States as well 
as in other countries, we also  include Section 3, a Software  Guide,  which  provides an 
introduction  to the ShakeMap  software  package, including  background and  guidance  for 
installation and operation. 
INTRODUCTION AND OVERVIEW 
ShakeMap Manual 
DRAFT: Version 1.0  6/19/06 
An overview of the contents of these manuals is provided below.  There is some redundancy 
among these three sections, in particular between the User’s Guide and the Technical Manual, 
because the intent and likelihood is that, as Web-based manuals, these will be downloaded and 
used independently. 
In the Users’ Guide, we describe basic ShakeMap products and their current and potential uses. 
First, we provide an overview of current ShakeMap applications.  We then explain the different 
formats and types of maps available and describe the ShakeMap Web pages.  Next, we expand 
on different automated mechanisms to receive ShakeMap, including new approaches undergoing 
further  development,  particularly  ShakeCast.   We  also  describe  Scenario  Earthquake 
ShakeMaps, which provide the basis for pre-earthquake planning and understanding the potential 
effects of large earthquakes in the future.   In each subsection, we try to provide concrete 
examples of potential uses of each product as well as notable users for each example.  Although 
we show several ShakeMap Web page examples in the User’s Guide, this guide is no substitute 
for the ShakeMap Web pages, and we recommend having a Web browser open to those pages 
while the User’s Guide is in hand. 
The Technical Manual  is meant as the definitive source of information pertaining to the 
generation of ShakeMaps.  The initial description of Wald and others (1999a) is outdated and is 
superseded by this manual.  In the Technical Manual, we detail the approaches used for gap 
filling between stations by employing predictive ground-motion relationships, interpolation using 
inferred site amplifications, and the conversion of ground-motion recordings to instrumental 
intensity.  We also provide background and some justifications for the choice of the ground-
motion parameters mapped and describe both the data acquisition and processing procedures. 
The approach used for generating Earthquake Scenario ShakeMaps (used for response planning 
purposes) and Composite ShakeMaps (combining predictive ground-motions, observed ground-
motions, and historic or other macroseismic intensities) is also detailed. 
Finally, in order to enable customization for specific earthquakes or for different regions of the 
United  States,  each  ShakeMap  module  has  an  accompanying  collection  of  configurable 
parameters set in separate configuration files.   For example, in these files one assigns the 
regional boundaries and mapping characteristics to be used by the Generic Mapping Tool 
(GMT), where and how to transfer the maps, email lists and file delivery lists, and so on. 
Specific details about the software and configuration files are described in detail in the Software 
Guide. 
Technical users of ShakeMap should, however, also consult the User’s Guide for additional 
information pertaining to the format, availability, and the range of ShakeMap related products 
that are available. 
The Software Guide provides an overview of the ShakeMap software package for current and 
potential users of the software, and includes both the necessary background and guidance for 
ShakeMap installation and operation.  ShakeMap is a collection of programs, largely written in 
INTRODUCTION AND OVERVIEW 
ShakeMap Manual 
DRAFT: Version 1.0  6/19/06 
the PERL programming language. These programs are run sequentially to produce ground-
motion maps as well as Web pages and pager/email notifications.  In addition to PERL, a number 
of other software packages are used.  In keeping with our development philosophy, all additional 
software components are built from freely available, open-source packages. 
PERL is a powerful, freely available scripting language that runs on all computer platforms.  The 
collection of PERL modules allows the processing to flow in discrete steps that can be run 
collectively or individually.   Within the PERL scripts, other software packages are called, 
specifically packages that enable the graphics.  For instance, maps are made using the Generic 
Mapping Tool (GMT; Wessel and Smith, 1991). Parametric and earthquake-specific data and 
mapping parameters are stored and queried via   MySQL databases, and much of the Web and 
parametric data handling is done with XML tagging. 
With recent advances in GIS software and usage, several aspects of the ShakeMap system could 
be accomplished within GIS applications, but the open-source, freely available nature of GMT 
combined with PERL scripting tools allows for a flexible and readily available ShakeMap 
software package.   Nonetheless, we do take advantage of GIS for a number of products as 
described in the User’s Guide. 
INTRODUCTION AND OVERVIEW 
ShakeMap Manual 
 
DRAFT: Version 1.0  6/19/06 
MESSAGE TO USERS
ShakeMap is designed to rapidly produce shaking and intensity maps for use by emergency 
response organizations, local, county, State and Federal Government agencies, public and private 
companies and organizations, the media, and the general public. 
Users should be aware of the following specific limitations: 
 
ShakeMaps are automatic computer generated maps that have not necessarily been 
checked by human oversight. Because the input data is raw and unchecked, the maps may 
contain errors. The maps are preliminary in nature and will be updated as data arrives 
from distributed sources. 
 
Interpolation, contouring, and color-coding can be misleading because data gaps may 
exist.  Caution should be used in deciding which features in the contour patterns are 
required by the data.   Ground-motions and intensities can vary greatly  over small 
distances, so these maps are only approximate; at small scales and away from data points, 
they may be unreliable. 
 
The  instrumental  intensity  map  is  derived  from  ground-motions  recorded  by 
seismographs and represents Modified Mercalli Intensities (MMI) that are likely to have 
been associated with the ground-motions.   Unlike conventional MMI, the estimated 
intensities are not based directly on observations of earthquake effects on people or 
structures. 
 
Locations within the same intensity area will not necessarily experience the same level of 
damage because damage depends heavily on the type of structure, the nature of the 
construction, and the details of the ground-motion at that site.  For these reasons, more or 
less damage than described in the MMI scale may occur. 
 
Large earthquakes can generate very long duration and long period ground-motions that 
can cause damage at great distances from the epicenter; although the intensity estimated 
from the ground-motions may be small, significant effects to large structures (bridges, tall 
buildings, storage tanks) may be notable. 
ShakeMap should be regarded as a work in progress. Additional improvements for rapidly and 
accurately depicting the distribution and intensity of shaking are in progress, and improvements 
and additions are underway.  Further deployment of seismic instrumentation will also lead to 
significant improvements in the accuracy of the depiction of shaking.  To assist us in further 
improving ShakeMap, users and researchers are invited to submit comments on methodological, 
software, or presentation issues via the comment form on the ShakeMap World Wide Web 
homepage at: 
http://earthquake.usgs.gov/shakemap 
10
 
MESSAGE TO USERS 
Documents you may be interested
Documents you may be interested