mvc show pdf in div : How to enter text in pdf form Library software class asp.net winforms .net ajax 508TM12-A114-part1327

ShakeMap Manual 
Version 1.0  6/19/06 
Wu, Y. M., T. L. Teng, T. C. Shin, and N. C. Hsiao (2003). Relationship between peak ground 
acceleration, peak ground velocity and Intensity in Taiwan, Bull. Seism. Soc. Am. ,93, 386-396. 
Youngs, R. R., S.-J. Chiou, W. J. Silva, and J. R. Humphrey (1997). Strong ground-motion 
relationships for subduction zones, Seism. Res. Letters, 68, No.1, 58-73. 
REFERENCES 
141 
Tables 
How to enter text in pdf form - insert text into PDF content in C#.net, ASP.NET, MVC, Ajax, WinForms, WPF
XDoc.PDF for .NET, providing C# demo code for inserting text to PDF file
add text to pdf using preview; add text pdf acrobat
How to enter text in pdf form - VB.NET PDF insert text library: insert text into PDF content in vb.net, ASP.NET, MVC, Ajax, WinForms, WPF
Providing Demo Code for Adding and Inserting Text to PDF File Page in VB.NET Program
how to insert text box on pdf; adding text to pdf in reader
ShakeMap Manual 
Version 1.0  6/19/06 
APPENDIX A.  Regression Relationships 
The following ground-motion attenuation or regressions are available in the ShakeMap package. 
They may be selected as the de facto regression for a region, used automatically used for events 
within a certain magnitude and depth ranged, or manually selected for specific events or scenario 
events. 
Boore  and  others  (1997),  PGV 
modified  by  Newmark  &  Hall 
(1982) 
So. California, default regression 
Boatwright and others (2003) 
No. California, default regression 
Atkinson and Boore (2002) 
Scenarios only (Cascadia region) 
Somerville (1997) 
Scenarios only (directivity effects) 
Youngs and others (1997) 
Washington and Alaska (depth at 
least 41 km) 
ShakeMap Small Regression 
All regions  (M<5.3) 
The regressions calculate both random and peak component values of the estimated parameters. 
The equations given are for the mean values. We derive the peak values by scaling up the mean 
value by 15 percent  (Joyner, Campbell, personal communication.) Note that the site correction 
components of the regressions are ignored unless specified; for those without site corrections, the 
Borcherdt (1994) site correction method is used. 
Boore and others 1997 (BJF97) 
This attenuation model is used as the default relation in southern California for all events with 
magnitude ≥ 5.3. The relation has the form: 
ln (Y) = B1 + B2(M-6) + B3(M-7)2 – B5 ln R 
(A.1) 
where 
Y is either PGA or PSA in g 
M is the magnitude 
R = sqrt(Rjb2 + h2), see below 
Rjb is the “Joyner-Boore” distance to the surface projection of the fault, in km. This model 
assumes a shallow fault and uses only a 2D fault model with no depth term. 
Values  for B1-B5 and  h are  given below.  BJF97 does  not predict  3 s. PSA; we use the 
coefficients for 2 s. PSA. The factors for average slip type are used for triggered events. 
However, the slip type may be specified for scenario earthquakes in the event file, in which case 
the regression will apply the appropriate coefficients. 
APPENDIX A.  Regression Relationships 
142 
Tables 
C#: XDoc.HTML5 Viewer for .NET Online Help Manual
Enter the URL to view the online document. Office 2003 and 2007, PDF, DICOM, Gif, Png, Jpeg, Bmp Click to OCR edited file (one for each) to plain text which can
add text to pdf file online; how to insert a text box in pdf
C# HTML5 Viewer: Deployment on DotNetNuke Site
Open Web Matrix, click “New” and select “App Gallery”. Select “DNN Platform” in App Frameworks, and enter a Site Name. RasterEdge.XDoc.PDF.dll.
how to add text field to pdf form; adding text to a pdf in acrobat
ShakeMap Manual 
Version 1.0  6/19/06 
Slip type 
PSA 
Period 
(s) 
B1 
B2 
B3 
B5 
h (km) 
Strike-
PGA 
-0.313  0.527  0.000  -0.778  5.57 
slip 
0.3 
0.598  0.769  -0.161  -0.893  5.94 
1.0 
-1.133  1.036  -0.032  -0.798  2.90 
3.0 
-1.699  1.085  -0.085  -0.812  5.85 
Reverse 
PGA 
-0.117  0.527  0.000  -0.778  5.57 
0.3 
0.803  0.769  -0.161  -0.893  5.94 
1.0 
-1.009  1.036  -0.032  -0.798  2.90 
3.0 
-1.801  1.085  -0.085  -0.812  5.85 
Average  PGA 
-0.242  0.527  0.000  -0778  5.57 
0.3 
0.700  0.769  -0.161  -0.893  5.94 
1.0 
-1.080  1.036  -0.032  -0.798  2.90 
3.0 
-1.743  1.085  -0.085  -0.812  5.85 
85 
PGV is derived from PSA (1.00) using the Newmark and Hall 1982 relation (NH82). See 
Section 2.1.1.2. For comparison purposes, we also provide an earlier PGV regression relation 
using Boore and others (1982): 
log PGV = a + b(M-6) – d log R + k R 
(A.2) 
2.09 
0.49 
-1.00 
-0.0026 
-0.45 
4.00 
km 
Boatwright and others 2003 (Boatwright03) 
This attenuation model is used as the default relation in northern California for all events with 
magnitude ≥ 5.3. The relation has the form: 
[TBS] 
(A.3) 
Newmark and Hall 1982 PGV Relation (NH82) 
In order to conform with previous HAZUS studies, we derive peak ground velocity (PGV) from 
the 1.0 s spectral acceleration with the relationship of Newmark and Hall (1982). 
PGV =  PSA (1 s) * 37.27 * 2.54 
(A.3) 
APPENDIX A.  Regression Relationships 
143 
Tables 
VB.NET Image: Image Rotator SDK; .NET Document Image Rotation
allows VB.NET developers to enter the rotating Public Partial Class Form1 Inherits Form Public Sub powerful & profession imaging controls, PDF document, tiff
adding text to pdf file; add text box to pdf
VB.NET TWAIN: TWAIN Image Scanning in Console Application
WriteLine("---Ending Scan---" & vbLf & " Press Enter To Quit & automatic scanning and stamp string text on captured to scan multiple pages to one PDF or TIFF
how to add text box to pdf; adding text to pdf
ShakeMap Manual 
Version 1.0  6/19/06 
where PSA is in g and PGV is in cm/s. 
Few regressions have up-to-date PGV coefficients available. Hence, this relation is used in all 
online events and scenarios except for the ShakeMap Small Regression, which has its own PGV 
relation (See 2.1.1.x). For testing purposes, the PGV regression of Boore and others (1982) is 
available for scenarios along with the BJF97 model (See 2.1.1.1.) 
Pankow and Pechman 2002 
[TBS] 
(A.4) 
Atkinson and Boore 2003 (AB03) 
This attenuation model is available for use in scenarios in the Cascades region or other deep-
event subduction regions. Event depth is required for this regression, as well as event type 
(interface or intraslab). Because this regression normally used for deep earthquakes, only 
hypocentral distance is used; finite faults are not supported. This relation also uses a custom site 
correction (see below). 
The relation has the form: 
log10 (Y) = c1 + c2 M + c3 h + c4 R – g log10 R 
(A.5) 
Y is PGA or PSA in cm/s^2 
M is the magnitude 
R = sqrt (Rhypo2 + (0.00724 * 10(0.507 M))2) 
g = 10(1.2 – 0.18 M) for interface events
= 10(0.301 – 0.01 M) for intraslab events 
Magnitude is capped at 8.5 for interface events, or 8.0 for intraslab events. Rhypo is the 
hypocentral distance. Values for c1-c5 are given below. PGV is derived from PSA (1.00) using 
the NH82 relation. 
Event 
type 
PSA Period 
(s) 
C1 
C2 
C3 
C4 
C5 
PGA 
0.0 
2.991 
0.035 
0.0075 
-
0.00206 
Interface 
0.3 
2.5 
2.525  0.148 
0.0072 
-
0.00235 
1.0 
1.0 
2.144  0.134 
0.0052 
-
0.00110 
3.0 
0.33  2.301 
0.022 
0.0001 
0.0 
APPENDIX A.  Regression Relationships 
144 
Tables 
VB.NET TIFF: .NET TIFF Splitting Control to Split & Disassemble
Developers can enter the page range value in this VB Imports System.Drawing Imports System.Text Imports System TIFDecoder()) 'use TIFDecoder open a pdf file Dim
adding text to a pdf file; how to insert text in pdf using preview
C# TWAIN - Scan Multi-pages into One PDF Document
imaging DLLs used for scanning multiple pages into one PDF/TIFF document true; device.Acquire(); Console.Out.WriteLine("---Ending Scan---\n Press Enter To Quit
add text pdf professional; add text boxes to pdf document
ShakeMap Manual 
Version 1.0  6/19/06 
Intraslab 
PGA 
0.0  -0.0471  0.691  0.011 
-
0.00202 
0.3 
2.5 
0.0054 
0.772 
0.0017 
-
0.00178 
1.0 
1.0  -1.0213 
0.878 
0.0013 
-
0.00173 
3.0 
0.33 
-3.7001 
1.116 
0.0061 
-
0.00045 
The Atkinson and Boore (2003) regression uses a custom nonlinear site correction that replaces
the default correction.
This site correction is of the form
log10 Y(soil) = log10 Yrock + sl (C5 Sc + C6 Sd + C7 Se ) 
(A.6)
Sc, Sd, and Se determine the soil velocity (Vs30) bin for the site: 
Sc = 1, Sd = Se = 0 if Vs > 360 m/s 
Sd = 1, Sc = Se = 0 if 180 m/s <= Vs < 360 m/s 
Se = 1, Sc = Sd = 0 if Vs < 180 m/s 
and sl is a nonlinearity factor: 
sl = 1 – (f-1) (PGArx – 100) / 400
=1 if PGArx < 100 or f < 1
= 0 if PGArx > 500 
f is the frequency in Hertz (0 for PGA), PGArx is the predicted ‘rock value’ PGA in %g [check 
this] at the site. The values for C5-C7 are independent of event type and are given below. 
Period 
(s) 
C5  C6  C7 
PGA 
0.1 
0.2 
0.2 
0.3 
0.1 
0.3 
0.3 
1.0 
0.1 
0.3 
0.5 
3.0 
0.1 
0.2 
0.3 
Somerville and others 1997 (Somerville97) 
APPENDIX A.  Regression Relationships 
145 
Tables 
VB.NET Image: VB.NET Planet Barcode Generator for Image, Picture &
REFile.SaveDocumentFile(doc, "c:/planet.pdf", New PDFEncoder()). type barcode.Data = "01234567890" 'enter a 11 Color.Black 'Human-readable text-related settings
add text pdf; adding text fields to pdf
ShakeMap Manual 
Version 1.0  6/19/06 
This  attenuation  model  is  identical  the  Boore  and  others (1997)  model  modified  by  the 
Somerville and others (1997). PGV is derived from PSA (1.00) using the NH82 relation. This 
model has recommended modifications that can be applied to existing attenuation relationships 
to explicitly add directivity in a deterministic sense to large strike slip events (magnitude range 
6.0 – 6.5).  A fault file is required, and it is assumed that the fault is a simple vertical strike slip 
single-segment fault defined by the endpoints. 
The directivity correction at a site is of the form:
Ydirec = Y e(d)
d = (C1 + C2 s/L cos theta) Tr Tm 
(A.7)
where 
Y is the original ground-motion parameter (in g) 
s/L is the length ratio (fraction of fault along strike that ruptures toward the 
site) 
L is the fault length 
theta is the azimuth angle between the fault plane and the raypath to the site 
C1 and C2 are given below: 
Parameter 
Period in 
Somerville 
model (s) 
C1 
C2 
PGA or PSA (0.3 s) 
0.5 
PGV or PSA (1.0 s) 
1.0 
-0.192 
0.423 
PSA (3.0 s) 
3.0 
-0.605 
1.333 
Note that the parameters in Somerville and others (1997) do not correspond completely to the 
ShakeMap parameters. The closest or most equivalent parameters have been used. 
The directivity parameter d is further modified by a linear taper dependent on distance and 
magnitude given in Abramson (2000): 
Tr = 1 – (R-30) / 30 if 30 km <= R < 60 km 
(A.8)
= 1 if R < 30
= 0 if R > 60
Tm = 1 + (M – 6.5)2 if 6.0 <= M < 6.5 
(A.9)
= 0 if M < 6.0
= 1 if M > 6.5
To date, we have not included this correction in the online ShakeMap system. Directivity is 
typically included implicitly in most regressions, that is, they contain data that represent the 
average directivity as recorded over a wide range of faulting directivity situations.  Hence, by 
employing such a regression directivity is included in the empirical ground-motion estimates in 
an average sense. 
APPENDIX A.  Regression Relationships 
146 
Tables 
ShakeMap Manual 
Version 1.0  6/19/06 
In practice there are limitations to the explicit directivity approach of Somerville97.  First, the 
assumption of a single linear fault segment is typically violated by large earthquakes, including 
the 1992 Landers, California (M7.3) and 2002 Denali, Alaska (M7.9) events, where total fault 
curvature, or change in strike reached 25-30 degrees.  These relations require the angle with 
respect to the rupture direction, and the latter changes significantly during the rupture. Secondly, 
it  has not  yet been ascertained (mostly due to limited data) whether these recommended 
directivity functions adequately represent directivity from such large events.  For example, using 
these functions, both ends of a 200 km bilateral rupture experience no directivity, yet intuitively, 
both points experience directivity due to a 100 km fetch of rupture coming toward each station. 
Finally, for rapidly determined ShakeMaps, directivity cannot be applied without a reasonable 
constraint on the rupture location and dimensions, which is not available in near-real time. 
It is hoped that directivity for a large earthquake will be sample observational and hence will be 
locally constrained upon interpolation.  Further improvement to the empirically-based predictive 
aspects of ShakeMap might include a azimuthally-dependent term to the bias correction, capable 
of adding directivity in real-time based on direct event-specific observations. 
Youngs and others 1997 (Youngs97) 
This attenuation model is used for the Washington and Alaska ShakeMap regions and for other 
subduction zones. Event depth is required for this regression, as well as event type (interface or 
intraslab). Because this regression normally used for deep earthquakes, either hypocentral 
distance of distance to a 3D fault model can be used. This model is specified by sets of planar 
segments (quadrilaterals), each planar segment joined at a common side. Each quadrilateral 
segment is defined in the fault file by four (coplanar, noncollinear) corner points. One or two 
planar segments should be sufficient for most cases. 
The relation has the form: 
log (Y) = 0.2418 + 1.414 M + C1 + C2 (10 – M)3 
+ C3 log (Rrup + 1.7818 e(0.554 M)) + 0.00607 H 
+ 0.3846 Zt 
(A.10) 
Y is PGA or PSA\ in g 
M is the magnitude 
Rrup is the hypocentral distance or distance to fault, described above 
H is the hypocentral depth 
Zt = 1 for intraslab events, 0 otherwise 
Values for c1-c5 are given below. PGV is derived from PSA (1.00) using the NH82 relation. 
Parameter 
C1 
C2 
C3 
PGA 
-2.552 
PSA (0.3 s) 
0.246 
-0.0036 
-2.454 
APPENDIX A.  Regression Relationships 
147 
Tables 
ShakeMap Manual 
Version 1.0  6/19/06 
PSA (1.0 s) 
-1.736 
0.0064 
-2.234 
PSA (3.0 s) 
-4.511  -0.0089 
-2.003 
ShakeMap Small Regression (Small) 
The ShakeMap Small Regression is a modified form of the attenuation relationship for small 
events described in Wald and others (1999a) extending the event database to 2002. It is used as 
the default regression for events with magnitude below 5.3. The relation has the form: 
log10 (Y) = B1 + B2(M-6)– B5 log10 R 
(A.11) 
where 
Y is PGA or PSA in cm/s^2 or PGV in cm/s 
M is the magnitude 
R = sqrt(Rjb2 + h2), see below 
h = 6.00 km 
Rjb is the “Joyner-Boore” distance to the surface projection of the fault, in km. This model 
assumes a shallow fault and uses only a 2D fault model with no depth term. Values for B1-B5 
are given below. 
Parameter 
B1 
B2 
B5 
Sigma 
PGA 
4.037 
0.572 
-1.757 
0.836 
PGV 
2.223 
0.740 
-1.386 
0.753 
PSA (0.3 s) 
3.354 
0.746 
-1.827 
0.842 
PSA (1.0 s) 
2.197 
0.959 
-1.211 
0.988 
PSA (3.0 s) 
0.980 
0.909 
-0.848 
1.082 
Note that standard deviation values (sigmas) are total sigma defined in log10-amplitude space. 
Depth to Basement 
We have coded the depth of basement correction recommended by Field (2002). This model was 
developed using the Boore and others (1997) attenuation model but may be used for any relation. 
It  is  meant  for use  in scenarios only.  The correction  is applied to  each  grid point after 
interpolation to a fine grid, analogous to the site correction step. 
By specifying a map of the depth to basement, the resulting ground-motion is modified by an 
amplification factor 
Ybasin = Y e(A d + B) 
(A.12) 
where Y is the non-basin ground-motion (for PGA, PGV, or PSA), d is the basin depth in km, 
and A and B are parametric constants: 
APPENDIX A.  Regression Relationships 
148 
Tables 
ShakeMap Manual 
Version 1.0  6/19/06 
Parameter 
PGA 
6.7  x 10-5 
-0.14 
PGV 
12.0 x 10-5 
-0.25 
PSA (0.3 s)  5.7 x 10-5 
-0.12 
PSA (1.0 s)  12.0 x 10-5 
-0.25 
PSA (3.0 s)  11.0 x 10-5 
-0.18 
Currently, this is functional in the Los Angeles basin region using the SCEC Southern California 
basin model (Magistrale and others, 2000), but we do not use it for the online generation of 
ShakeMaps.  In part, this is because this correction is not that well established, nor are the basin 
depths well constrained, but more important, we have sufficient station sampling in the urban 
basin regions of to adequately represent deep basin effects observationally.  That is, any data 
above a basin records all basin effects at that point.  Interpolated values at adjacent points within 
the basin using that data naturally also reflect such effects.  Hence, having representative sites in 
basins, near basin margins, and on rock will provide a firm basis for our interpolation, which is 
only otherwise constrained by shallow site amplification terms based on 30-m shear velocity 
estimates.  Lacking representative observed values would naturally lead to poor representation of 
any potential 3-D amplification effects given the 1-D site corrections we apply; the greater the 
spatial separation, the greater the inference. 
However, the basement depth correction term is useful for comparisons of ground-motion effects 
for scenario earthquakes in the region.  This option can be easily configured prior to running a 
Scenario so we retain it for such exercises. 
Toro 
et. al.
1997 
Toro et. al. (1997) developed an attenuation relationship for Eastern North America 
based on the stochastic ground motion model. Two separate attenuation models were developed: 
1) the Mid-Continent region which includes areas north of the Tennessee/Mississippi border and 
the northern half of Arkansas and 2) the Gulf Coastal Plain region representing the southern half 
of Arkansas and areas south of Tennessee (Toro et. al., 1997). The model for the Mid-Continent 
region is used in creating ShakeMaps and the equation (A.13) is shown below. 
The attenuation equation as given by Toro et. al., (1997) is: 
ln(Y)=C
1
+C
2
(M-6)+C
3
(M-6)
2
-C
4
lnR
M
-(C
5
-C
4
)max[ln(R
M
/100),0]-C
6
R
(A.13) 
where, 
ln Y is peak ground acceleration or spectral acceleration in units of g, 
R
M
= √R
2
jb
+ C
7
R
jb
= distance to surface expression of fault plane (as defined in Abrahamson and 
Shedlock, 1997) 
and 
APPENDIX A.  Regression Relationships 
149 
Tables 
ShakeMap Manual 
Version 1.0  6/19/06 
M is moment magnitude. 
Coefficients for determining peak ground acceleration and pseudo-acceleration are shown below. 
Coefficients for Mid-continent and Moment Magnitude (M) (Toro, 1997)
Freq. (Hz) 
C1 
C2 
C3 
C4 
C5 
C6 
C7
0.5 
-0.74 
1.86 
-0.31 
0.92 
0.46 
0.0017 
6.9 
1.0 
0.09 
1.42 
-0.20 
0.90 
0.49 
0.0023 
6.8 
5.0 
1.73 
0.84 
0.00 
0.98 
0.66 
0.0042 
7.5 
PGA 
2.20 
0.81 
0.00 
1.27 
1.16 
0.0021 
9.3 
The attenuation relationship for Toro et. al., (1997) was configured to return peak ground 
motion values on hard rock with a reference velocity of approximately 1800 m/s. Distance is 
defined as R
jb
(as defined in Abrahamson and Shedlock, 1997). The ShakeMap routines scale the 
values to return %g and scale up the values by 15% to estimate a maximum value rather than a 
random component (Wald et. al., 2004). Values were calculated for peak ground acceleration, 
pseudo-acceleration (PSA 5% damped) 2.0, 1.0, and 0.30 seconds (Toro et. al., 1997). Peak 
ground velocity coefficients are not available (Toro, personal communication), and velocity was 
computed from 1-Hz PSA, in keeping with HAZUS studies (Wald et. al., 2004), using the 
Newmark-Hall (1982) equation: 
PGV = (PSA)(37.27)(2.54) 
where, 
PSA is pseudo-acceleration at 1 s. in g,
and 
PGV is in cm/s. 
Atkinson and Boore 1995 
Atkinson and Boore (1995) used the semi-empirical stochastic approach, using a two-
corner frequency source model to estimate hard rock ground motions. The polynomial equation 
of the modeled data over predicted for magnitudes below six and the use of published table 
values was highly recommended (Kaka, personal communication). 
The attenuation relationship module for Atkinson and Boore (1995) was created by the 
ShakeMap working group (Quitoriano, personal communication). The polynomial expression 
was replaced by smoothed table values (Wald, personal communication) of peak ground 
acceleration, peak ground velocity and pseudo-acceleration (5% damped) at 2.0, 1.0, and 0.30 
seconds for a given magnitude and distance. The resulting values were multiplied by 0.15 to get 
a maximum rather than random component (Wald et. al., 2004). This regression used 
hypocentral distance (R
hypo
). Magnitude was constrained between 2.5 - 7.5 and R
hypo
between 10 
km and 1000 km. The regression assumes base rock is NEHRP soil type C or 760 m/s and has a 
custom site correction method (site_correct_ab02) (Wald et. al., 2004): 
10**(c5*sl*Sc + c6*sl*Sd + c7*sl*Se) 
APPENDIX A.  Regression Relationships 
150 
Tables 
Documents you may be interested
Documents you may be interested