mvc show pdf in div : How to enter text into a pdf form SDK application service wpf windows azure dnn 508TM12-A15-part1331

ShakeMap Manual 
DRAFT: Version 1.0  6/19/06 
contour  the  interpolated,  site-corrected  PGA,  PGV,  and  response  spectral  values.   The 
interpolation and contouring is done using tools available with Generic Mapping Tools (GMT, 
Wessel and Smith, 1991). 
First, we use the GMT routine blockmean, which reads arbitrarily located (latitute, longitude) 
points and  writes out a mean position and value for every block in the define grid region. In the 
process, blockmean acts a filter to avoid spatial aliasing and remove redundant data.  We then 
pass this grid to the routine surface, an adjustable-tension continuous curvature surface gridding 
algorithm  that  fits  the  constraining data  exactly  (Smith  and Wessel, 1990).   Hence, our 
contouring consists of  first  finding  an adjustable-tension (with configurable  interior and 
boundary tension factor, surface_tension; default is 0.9), continuous-curvature surface.  Then, 
the GMT tool grdcontour is used to produce contour maps and lines. Grdcontour simply reads a 
2-D gridded file and produces a contour map by tracing each contour through the grid. Much 
more detailed descriptions of the algorithms involved with the GMT commands blockmean and 
surface  at  the  GMT  Web  site  as  well  as  within  their  application  manual  pages 
(http://gmt.soest.hawaii.edu/). 
Despite fitting the data in the derivation of the continuous surface, the grid of values sampled 
from this surface we produce does not include the exact location of the data, unless by close 
coincidence.  For this reason, the exported fine grid we produce is insufficient for recovering the 
exact values of the data at the original station locations.  However, we tabulate these values and 
provide them with all maps (See User’s Guide).  Of course, grid nodes nearby a station will be 
greatly influenced by the data values at that site.  A more detailed discussion of the implications 
for  the  accuracy  of  the  resulting  ShakeMaps  can  be  found  in  Section  2.7  (ShakeMap 
Uncertainty). 
In Figure 2.2, we show a map of the recorded peak acceleration distribution (contoured in %g) 
for the 1994 magnitude 6.7 Northridge earthquake to illustrate the nature of the information 
generated by ShakeMap and the effects of applying the site correction for a larger earthquake. 
For Figure 2.2a, we have not yet applied the site correction.   The contour pattern is only a 
reflection of the motions as recorded (not corrected to bedrock); In this particular example, the 
ground-motion data are from existing analog networks (CDMG, USGS, University of Southern 
California, Southern California Edison, the Los Angeles Department of Water and Power), not 
the current CISN digital instrument deployment, which postdates the Northridge earthquake. 
The station density today is comparable to that for this Northridge example; however, these data 
were not fully available digitally until months after that event. 
Typically, for moderate-to-large events, the pattern of peak ground velocity reflects the pattern 
of the earthquake faulting geometry, with largest amplitudes in the near-source region and in the 
direction of rupture directivity.  For the Northridge earthquake, rupture updip and toward the 
north resulted in significant directivity in that direction.  Differences between rock and soil sites 
are apparent, but the overall pattern is more a reflection of the source proximity and rupture 
process. Even though the site effects are still important (see the tabulated amplification factors in 
Table 2.1), we expect that site corrections for larger events (which are dominated by strong 
TECHNICAL MANUAL 
51 
Estimating and Interpolating Ground-motions 
How to enter text into a pdf form - insert text into PDF content in C#.net, ASP.NET, MVC, Ajax, WinForms, WPF
XDoc.PDF for .NET, providing C# demo code for inserting text to PDF file
how to add text field to pdf form; how to add a text box to a pdf
How to enter text into a pdf form - VB.NET PDF insert text library: insert text into PDF content in vb.net, ASP.NET, MVC, Ajax, WinForms, WPF
Providing Demo Code for Adding and Inserting Text to PDF File Page in VB.NET Program
how to insert text into a pdf with acrobat; how to insert text into a pdf file
ShakeMap Manual 
DRAFT: Version 1.0  6/19/06 
shaking)  are  less  significant  than  for  the  lower  shaking  levels  associated  with  smaller 
earthquakes.  This is particularly true at higher frequencies. 
The peak acceleration map for the Northridge earthquake, now applying the ShakeMap site 
correction approach, is shown in Figure 2.2b.  The differences between the ground accelerations 
within the valleys and surrounding mountains become more evident once the site corrections are 
applied.  In addition, originally smooth contours that simply connected remote stations become 
more complex when intervening geologically based site corrections play a role in determining 
the interpolated amplitudes. 
From these figures it is clear that the site correction has a more dramatic effect where the station 
coverage is sparse.   Where there are sufficient ground-motion data, the recorded amplitudes 
define the site effects, and nearby site corrections are applied with respect to these observations. 
In  areas  lacking  observations,  the  amplitude  pattern  variations  primarily reflect the  site 
corrections modifying an otherwise smoothly varying function of amplitude.  In this respect, for 
areas of sparse coverage, we can consider the application of the geology-based site corrections to 
be adding data (in the form of our knowledge of site amplification) where there is none. 
Note that this approach to interpolation presents an interesting dilemma that has yet to be 
addressed.  If empirically derived, frequency-dependant site amplification factors are available 
for stations, there is currently no way of implementing them in the ShakeMap algorithm. 
Although presumably more accurate information would be contained in the empirically derived 
factors than those based generically on idealized site classifications, the combination of better 
established amplification factors at randomly located stations and those used for the interpolated 
grid, which are derived from geology-based inferences, may be in conflict.  It this case, there 
would be many instances where a station and its surrounding nearby grid points would require 
different amplification factors, resulting in a complex pattern that only reflects the disagreement 
between map-derived and empirically derived site amplification factors.   Using empirically 
derived amplification factors for a finely spaced grid, perhaps using temporary station arrays, 
would be one approach. 
2.4.4  Fault Finiteness 
When the geometry and dimensions of the causative fault become available, this information can 
then be used for refining the predictive aspects of ShakeMap.  In particular, the distance to a 
given point for empirical regression estimates of shaking are then measured to the fault rather 
than to the epicenter as is done in the initial, immediate post-earthquake maps.  For the Boore 
and others  (1997) regression, for example, distance is then measured to the surface projection of 
the fault rupture. 
In practice, any estimate of the rupture dimensions are placed in a simple text file as ordered 
pairs of latitude and longitude points and the associated fault depth.  In the forward ground-
motion estimates, distance to the rupture surface is then computed consistent with the distance 
measure convention of the specific attenuation relationship being employed.   This faulting 
geometry might be constrained by surface observations, known fault locations combined with 
TECHNICAL MANUAL 
52 
Estimating and Interpolating Ground-motions 
C# HTML5 Viewer: Deployment on DotNetNuke Site
Select “DNN Platform” in App Frameworks, and enter a Site Name RasterEdge.XDoc.PDF. HTML5Editor.dll. 4.0, only put <system.web.extensions> into <configuration
add text to pdf acrobat; add text boxes to pdf document
C#: XDoc.HTML5 Viewer for .NET Online Help Manual
Enter the URL to view the online document. Office 2003 and 2007, PDF, DICOM, Gif, Png, Jpeg, Bmp Click to OCR edited file (one for each) to plain text which can
how to add text box to pdf document; how to add text to pdf file
ShakeMap Manual 
DRAFT: Version 1.0  6/19/06 
aftershock distributions, aftershock locations alone, or from finite-fault modeling when it is 
available rapidly. Currently, as limited by the current generation of attenuation relationships, slip 
variations, even if well constrained, cannot be accounted for explicitly; only distance to the fault 
is considered. 
However, if a kinematic finite-fault rupture model is available and forward estimates of the peak 
ground-motions are computed from that model, we can automatically substitute the modeled 
(numerical) estimates, which then include both slip distribution and rupture timing, for the 
empirical estimates obtained from the attenuation relation (by replacing the estimates.xml file). 
This provides event-specific constraints on the ground-motions and can potentially provide a 
significant improvement over a generic attenuation relationship, even though corrected for a 
event-specific amplitude bias.  In California, this approach depends on the regional waveform 
modeling approach of Dreger (see Dreger and others, 2000) at the University of California, 
Berkeley.  Based on previous experience, the Berkeley system can provide a robust estimate of 
the faulting geometry and dimensions in the hours immediately following an earthquake. 
For a moderate-sized event with an abundance of ground-motion recordings, such as the 
Northridge earthquake, adding finiteness has very limited effects because both directivity and 
fault finiteness are accounted for and are well constrained observationally.  For more remote 
events like the 1999 Hector Mine earthquake, which occurred in the sparsely instrumented 
Mojave Desert, the addition of the rupture dimension makes a noticeable difference in near-fault 
ground-motions.  Logically, this dictates that dense sampling observationally is necessary in 
highly populated regions where it is critical to rapidly recover the characteristics of the near-
source 
Figure 2.4  Comparison of Hector Mine ShakeMap with fault finiteness (left) and without 
(right).  The map does not change at all in regions with stations, mainly urban areas, but in 
the remote epicentral region knowledge of the fault dimension changes the picture 
significantly. 
ground-motions. Conversely, despite the significant variations between the Hector Mine map 
with and without finiteness (Figure 2.4), response and loss estimates based on either map would 
not vary significantly due to the paucity of inhabitants and associated infrastructure in the near-
fault region.   In fact, ground-motions for this event were well constrained where significant 
TECHNICAL MANUAL 
53 
Estimating and Interpolating Ground-motions 
C# TWAIN - Scan Multi-pages into One PDF Document
true; device.Acquire(); Console.Out.WriteLine("---Ending Scan---\n Press Enter To Quit RasterEdge also illustrates how to scan many pages into a PDF or TIFF
add text fields to pdf; how to insert text in pdf reader
VB.NET Image: Image Rotator SDK; .NET Document Image Rotation
which allows VB.NET developers to enter the rotating VB.NET image rotation control SDK into ASP.NET powerful & profession imaging controls, PDF document, tiff
adding text fields to a pdf; adding text pdf file
ShakeMap Manual 
DRAFT: Version 1.0  6/19/06 
exposure existed, and these motions did not change with the addition of the faulting dimensions 
because these locations were observationally controlled.  Again, having high station density in 
urban areas is a stated goal for station deployment within the ANSS (USGS, 1999). 
We are currently expanding our capacity to recover source finiteness rapidly by using teleseismic 
(worldwide) seismic waveforms to independently constrain the source rupture geometry and 
complexity (see Ji and others, 2003).   With such a system, we hope to constrain the rough 
rupture characteristics with finite fault rupture modeling in the absence of near-fault strong 
motion  data  in  areas  worldwide  that  are  lacking  in  real-time  strong  motion  networks. 
Additionally, including surface offset observations, geodetic displacements, regional and local 
waveforms can be added as they become available. 
2.5  Instrumental Intensity 
In addition to the PGA, PGV, and spectral response maps, we also map estimates of the ground-
motion shaking intensity.  Seismic intensity has been traditionally used worldwide as a method 
for quantifying the shaking pattern and the extent of damage for earthquakes. Though derived 
prior to the advent of today's modern seismometric instrumentation, seismic intensity still 
provides  a  useful  means  of  describing  information  contained  in  these  recordings.  Such 
simplification is helpful for those users who are unfamiliar with instrumental ground-motion 
parameters. 
That is not to say that instrumentally derived seismic intensity alone is sufficient for loss 
estimation.  In fact, peak velocity and spectral response provide a more physical basis for such 
analyses.  However, for the majority of users, we expect that the intensity map will be more 
readily interpreted than other maps of ground-motion parameters and will be, therefore, more 
useful. 
2.5.1  Converting from Peak Acceleration and Velocity to Instrumental
Intensity 
Wald and others (1999b) recently developed regression relationships between Modified Mercalli 
intensity I
mm 
(Wood and Neumann, 1931, later revised by Richter, 1958) and PGA or PGV 
specifically for ShakeMap use by comparing the peak ground-motions to observed intensities for 
eight significant California earthquakes.  For the limited range of Modified Mercalli intensities V 
≤ I
mm 
≤ VIII, Wald and others (1999a) found that for PGA, 
I
mm
= 3.66 log (PGA) - 1.66 
(sigma = 1.08) 
(1.1) 
and for peak velocity (PGV) within the range  V ≤ I
mm 
≤ IX, 
I
mm
= 3.47 log (PGV) + 2.35  (sigma = 0.98) 
(1.2) 
TECHNICAL MANUAL 
54 
Instrumental Intensity 
VB.NET TWAIN: TWAIN Image Scanning in Console Application
WriteLine("---Ending Scan---" & vbLf & " Press Enter To Quit & automatic scanning and stamp string text on captured to scan multiple pages to one PDF or TIFF
how to insert pdf into email text; how to enter text into a pdf form
VB.NET TIFF: .NET TIFF Splitting Control to Split & Disassemble
to split 500+ page TIFF file into individual one Developers can enter the page range value in this Data Imports System.Drawing Imports System.Text Imports System
how to add text to a pdf in preview; add text to pdf in acrobat
ShakeMap Manual 
DRAFT: Version 1.0  6/19/06 
Because we are also interested in estimating intensity at lower values, and our current collection 
of data from historical earthquakes does not provide constraints for lower intensity, we have 
imposed the following relationship between PGA and I
mm
I
mm
= 2.20 log (PGA) + 1.00 
(1.3) 
This basis for the above relationship comes from correlation of peak ground-motions for recent 
magnitude 3.5 to 5.0 earthquakes in southern California with intensities derived from voluntary 
response from Internet users (Wald and others, 1999c) for the same events.  We determined that 
the boundary between “not felt” and “felt” (I
mm 
I and II, respectively) regions corresponds to 
approximately 1 to 2 cm/s/s, at least for this range of magnitudes.  We then assigned the slope 
such that the curve would intersect the relationship in equation 1 at I
mm 
= V.  This relationship 
may need to be refined as more digital data become available.  The corresponding equation for 
PGV and I
mm
is: 
I
mm
= 2.10 log (PGV) + 3.40 
(1.4) 
By  comparing  maps  of  instrumental  intensities  with  I
mm 
for  eight  significant  California 
earthquakes (see Wald and others, 1999b) we have found that a relationship that follows 
acceleration for I
mm 
< VII and follows velocity for I
mm 
> VII works fairly well in reproducing the 
observed I
mm
.  In practice, we compute the I
mm 
from the I
mm 
verses PGA relationship (equations 
1.1 and 1.2), and if the intensity value determined from peak acceleration is ≥
VII, we then use 
the  value of I
mm 
derived from the I
mm 
verses PGV relationship (equation 1.2).   If the I
mm 
determined from PGA is between V and VII, we weight both the PGA-derived and PGV-derived 
values, weighted by a factor linearly ramping from 1.0 for PGA at I
mm 
V to 0.0 at I
mm 
VII and 
vice versa.   The switch to PGV for higher intensity  insures that spurious high-frequency 
acceleration spikes will not result in high intensities because the corresponding velocity for such 
a spike will be low.  With our procedure, whereas the large acceleration peak would provide an 
abnormally  high  intensity,  the  much  smaller  velocity  amplitude  would  provide  a  more 
appropriate, lower intensity. 
Using peak acceleration to estimate low intensities is intuitively consistent with the notion that 
lower (<VI) intensities are assigned based on felt accounts, and people are more sensitive to 
ground acceleration than velocity.  Higher intensities are defined by the level of damage; the 
onset of damage at the intensity VI to VII range is usually characterized by brittle-type failures 
(masonry walls, chimneys, unreinforced masonry, etc.), which are sensitive to higher frequency 
accelerations.  With more substantial damage (VII and greater), failure begins in more flexible 
structures, for which peak velocity is more indicative of failure (Hall and others, 1996).  This 
practice is consistent with the recent analysis of Sokolov (1998) in which it was shown that 
seismic intensities correlate well for rather narrow ranges of Fourier amplitude spectra of ground 
acceleration, with 0.7-1.0 Hz being most representative of I
mm 
> VIII, whereas the 3-6 Hz range 
best represents I
mm 
V to VII, and the 7-8 Hz range best correlates with the lowest I
mm 
range.  In 
addition, Boatwright and others (2001) have found that for the Northridge earthquake, PGV and 
the 3-0.3 Hz averaged spectral velocity are better correlated with intensity (VI and greater) than 
peak acceleration and their correlation with intensity and peak spectral velocity is strongest at 
0.67 Hz. 
TECHNICAL MANUAL 
55 
Instrumental Intensity 
VB.NET Image: VB.NET Planet Barcode Generator for Image, Picture &
VB: How to Insert Planet Barcode into PDF. select barcode type barcode.Data = "01234567890" 'enter a 11 Drawing.Color.Black 'Human-readable text-related settings
how to add text fields to a pdf document; adding text to pdf online
ShakeMap Manual 
DRAFT: Version 1.0  6/19/06 
Figure 2.5 gives the peak ground-motions that correspond to each unit Modified Mercalli 
intensity value according to our regression of the observed peak ground-motions and intensities 
for California earthquakes.   In assigning integer intensity values using equations 1.1-1.4, the 
rounding adheres to the convention that, for example, values between 5.50 and 6.49 round to 
intensity VI.   As seen in Figure 2.5,  in general a  factor of two change in PGA or PGV 
corresponds approximately to a full step in intensity. 
2.5.2  ShakeMap Instrumental Intensity Scale Text Descriptions 
Note  that  the  estimated  intensity  map  is  derived  from  ground-motions  recorded  by 
accelerographs and represents intensities that are likely to have been associated with the ground-
motions.  However, unlike conventional intensities, the instrumental intensities are not based on 
observations of the earthquake effects on people or structures.  The terms “perceived shaking” 
and “potential damage” in the ShakeMap Legend are chosen for this reason; these intensities 
were not observed, but they are consistent on average with intensities at these ranges of ground-
motions recorded in a number of past earthquakes (Wald and others, 1999b).   Two-word 
descriptions of both shaking and damage levels are provided to easily summarize the effects in 
an area; they were derived with careful consideration of the existing descriptions in the Modified 
Mercalli descriptions (L. Dengler and J. Dewey, written commun., 1998, 2003). 
Figure 2.5  ShakeMap Instrumental Intensity Scale Legend: Color palette, two-word text 
descriptors, and ranges of peak motions for Instrumental Intensities. 
The ShakeMap qualitative descriptions of shaking are intended to be consistent with how people 
perceive the shaking in earthquakes.  The descriptions for intensities up to VII are constrained by 
the work of Dengler and Dewey (1998) did, in which they compared results of telephone surveys 
with USGS MMI intensities for the 1994 (Figure 2.6) Northridge earthquake.  The ShakeMap 
descriptions up to intensity VII may be viewed as a rendering of Dengler and Dewey's Figure 7a. 
The instrumental intensity map for the Northridge earthquake shares most of the notable features 
of the Modified Mercalli map prepared by the USGS (Dewey and others, 1995), including the 
relatively high intensities near Santa Monica and southeast of the epicenter near Sherman Oaks. 
However, in general, the area of I
mm 
IX on the instrumentally derived intensity map is slightly 
larger than on the USGS Modified Mercalli intensity map. This reflects the fact that although 
much of the Santa Susanna mountains, north and northwest of the epicenter, were very strongly 
shaken, the region is also sparsely populated, hence, observed intensities were not determined 
there.  This is a fundamental difference between observed and instrumentally-derived intensities: 
Instrumental intensities will show high levels of strong shaking, independent of the exposure of 
TECHNICAL MANUAL 
56 
Instrumental Intensity 
ShakeMap Manual 
DRAFT: Version 1.0  6/19/06 
populations and  buildings; observed intensities only represent  intensities where there are 
structures to damage and people to experience the earthquake. 
The ShakeMap descriptions of Shaking begin to lose meaning above VII or VIII.  In the Dengler 
and Dewey study, peoples' perception of shaking began to saturate in the  intensity VII -- VIII 
range, with more than half the people at VII-VIII and above reporting the shaking as "violent" on 
a scale from "weak" to "violent."  In the ShakeMap descriptions, we intensified the descriptions 
of shaking with increases of intensity above VII, because the evidence from instrumental data is 
that the shaking is stronger.  But we know of no solid evidence that one could discriminate 
intensities higher than VII on the basis of different individuals' descriptions of perceived shaking 
alone. 
ShakeMap is not unique in describing intensity VI as corresponding to strong shaking.   In the 7-
point Japanese macroseismic scale, for which intensity 4 is equivalent to MMI VI, intensity 4 is 
described as  "strong." In the European Macroseismic Scale  1998,  which  is more  or less 
equivalent to the MMI, the bullet description of intensity V is   "strong."  Higher EMS-98 
intensities are given bullet descriptions in terms of the damage they produce, rather than the 
strength of perceived shaking. 
TECHNICAL MANUAL 
57 
Instrumental Intensity 
ShakeMap Manual 
DRAFT: Version 1.0  6/19/06 
Figure 2.6  Northridge Instrumental Intensity Map. Shaded relief map showing recorded 
peak instrumental intensity for the magnitude 6.7, 1994 Northridge earthquake. The open 
star shows the epicenter and the black rectangle depicts the fault surface projection. 
2.5.3  Color Palette for the ShakeMap Instrumental Intensity Scale 
Color-coding for the Instrumental Intensity map is a standard rainbow palette (see Table 2.2). 
Such a “cool” to “hot” color scheme is familiar to most and is readily recognizable as it is used 
as a standard (for example, see USA Today’s daily weather temperature maps of the US).  Note 
that we do not feel like intensity II and III can be consistently distinguished from ground-
motions alone, so they are grouped together (Figure 2.5).  In addition, we saturate intensity X+ 
with dark red;  observed ground-motions alone are not sufficient to warrant any higher intensities 
given the empirical relationship used does not have any values of intensity greater than IX.  In 
recent years, the USGS has limited observed Modified Mercalli intensities to IX, reserving 
intensity X for possible future observations (see Dewey and others, 1995, for more details);   no 
longer do they assign intensity XI and XII. 
Intensity 
Red 
Green 
Blue 
Intensity 
Red 
Green 
Blue 
255 
255 
255 
255 
255 
255 
255 
255 
255 
191 
204 
255 
191 
204 
255 
160 
230 
255 
160 
230 
255 
128 
255 
255 
128 
255 
255 
122 
255 
147 
122 
255 
147 
255 
255 
255 
255 
255 
200 
255 
200 
255 
145 
255 
145 
255 
255 
10 
200 
10 
200 
13 
128 
Table 2.2  Color Mapping Table for Instrumental Intensity. This is a portion of the
Generic Mapping Tools (GMT) “cpt” file. Color values for intermediate intensities are
linearly interpolated from the Red, Green, and Blue (RGB) values in columns 2-4 to
columns 6-8.
We drape the color-coded Instrumental Intensity values on the topography to maximize the 
information  available  in  terms  of  both  geographic  location  and  likely  site  conditions. 
Topography does serve as a simple yet effective proxy for examining basin amplification. 
By relating recorded peak ground-motions to Modified Mercalli Intensities, we can now generate 
instrumental intensities within a few minutes of the event.  With the color-coding and two-word 
text descriptors, we can now adequately describe the associated perceived shaking and potential 
damage consistent with both human and damage assessments of the effects of past earthquakes. 
TECHNICAL MANUAL 
58 
Instrumental Intensity 
ShakeMap Manual 
DRAFT: Version 1.0  6/19/06 
2.6  Discussion of Chosen Map Parameters 
2.6.1  Use of Peak Values Rather than Mean 
With ShakeMap, we chose to represent peak ground-motions as recorded.  We depict the larger 
of the two horizontal components, rather than as either a vector sum, or as a mean value.  The 
initial choice of peak values was necessitated by the fact that roughly two thirds of the TriNet 
strong motion data (the CGS data) are delivered as peak values for individual components of 
motion, that is, as parametric data, not waveforms.  This left two options: provide peak values or 
mean values; determining vector sums of the two horizontal components was not an option 
because the peak values on each component do not necessarily occur at the same time. 
We chose to map peak ground-motion values.  Despite the common use of median values in 
attenuation relations and loss-estimation, we decided that computing and depicting median 
values, which effectively reduces information and discards the largest values of shaking, was not 
acceptable.  This is particularly true for highly directional, near-fault pulse-like ground-motions, 
for which peak velocities can be large on one component and small on the other.  Mean values 
for such motions (particularly when determined in log space) can seriously under-represent the 
largest motion that a building may have experienced, so that option was discarded.  What’s more, 
the fact that these pulse-like motions are typically associated with the regions of greatest damage 
made this issue particularly important. 
Initially, our use of PGA and PGV for estimating intensities was also simply practical.  We were 
only retrieving peak values from a large subset of the network, so it was impractical to compute 
more specific ground-motion parameters, such as average response spectral values, kinetic 
energy, cumulative absolute velocities (CAV, EPRI, 1991), or the JMA intensity algorithm 
(JMA, 1996) for example.    However, because near-source strong ground-motions are often 
dominated  by  short-duration,  pulse-like  ground-motions  (usually  associated  with  source 
directivity), PGV does appear to be a robust measure of intensity for strong shaking.  In other 
words, the kinetic energy (proportional to  velocity squared) available for damage is well 
characterized by PGV.  In addition, the close correspondence of the JMA intensities and peak 
ground velocity (Kaezashi and Kaneko, 1997) indicates that our use of peak ground velocities for 
higher intensities is consistent with the algorithm used by JMA.  More recent work by Wu and 
others (2003) indicates a very good correspondence of PGV and damage for data collected on the 
island of Taiwan, which included high-quality loss data and densely sampled strong motion 
observations for the 1999 Chi-Chi earthquake.   Finally, consideration in the choice of peak 
ground-motion values, rather than derived parameters, is the ease of relating intensity directly to 
simple ground-motion observables. 
Nonetheless, for large distant earthquakes, the peak values will be less informative, and duration 
and  spectral  content  may  become  key  parameters.   Although  we  may  eventually  adopt 
corrections for these situations, it is difficult to assign intensities in such cases.  For instance, 
what is the intensity in the zone of Mexico City where numerous high-rises collapsed during the 
1985 Michoacan earthquake?  It was obviously high intensity shaking for high-rise buildings. 
However, the majority of smaller buildings were unaffected, indicating much lower intensity. 
Whereas the peak ground velocities were moderate and would imply I
mm 
VIII, resonance and 
TECHNICAL MANUAL 
59 
Discussion of Chosen Map Parameters 
ShakeMap Manual 
DRAFT: Version 1.0  6/19/06 
duration conspired to cause a more substantial disaster.   Although this is, in part, a shortcoming 
of using peak parameters alone, it is more a limitation imposed by simplifying the complexity of 
ground-motions into a single parameter.  Therefore, in addition to providing peak ground-motion 
values and intensity, we are also producing spectral response maps (for 0.3, 1.0, and 3.0 s). 
Users who can take advantage of this information for loss estimation will have a clearer picture 
than can be provided with maps of PGA and PGV alone.  However, as discussed earlier, a simple 
intensity map is extremely useful for the overwhelming majority of users, which includes the 
general public and many involved with the initial emergency response. 
We have also not yet addressed the potential for severe site effects and liquefaction of soft soil in 
California (NEHRP categories DE and E) such as in the Los Angeles Harbor region, much of the 
San Francisco Bay area, and along former and current river channels.  Additional and significant 
losses can also result from down-slope ground deformation.  For example, much of the losses in 
the greater Anchorage area during the 1964 Alaskan earthquake resulted from such movement 
and not from direct shaking damage.   Estimated intensities derived from peak velocity will not 
be sufficient for recognizing such effects and the increased effective intensity due directly to 
ground failure. 
Not only are we limited by the lack of sufficiently detailed geologic maps of such areas, but also 
the connection between the surface geology, the site amplification, and ground failure is not fully 
established for strong motions.  Similarly, basin edge effects are not included, and differences 
between very deep basin and shallow basin sites are not yet distinguished.  In addition, only peak 
values have been considered here; site resonance is not yet considered.  Shaking duration has 
also not yet been included, though it may be important under certain circumstances.   For 
instance, currently, we may underestimate the extent of damage (in terms of instrumental 
intensity)  in Los Angeles for a great San Andreas event because only peak amplitude is 
considered.  Similarly, intensities may be underestimated in Anchorage for a repeat of the great 
1964  (magnitude  9.2)  Alaska  earthquake basing  them  on  peak  amplitude  alone  and  not 
considering effects of long duration (particularly on ground failure), but currently there is little 
empirical constraint upon which to base a modification to the instrumental intensity computation 
for such an event.  For such an earthquake, evaluation of the response spectral map may give 
more reliable estimates of potential damage. 
The peak ground-motion versus intensity correlation is based on observations collected from 
recent California earthquakes.  Hence, this relationship is subject to revision for other ANSS 
regions and to accommodate additional observations.  At present, there is little data to correlate 
lower intensity values and recorded ground-motions because most of the ground-motion data are 
for larger earthquakes, and intensity data are not typically collected for smaller events, until 
recently.  In addition, the calibration we have is primarily for analog recordings, so the noise 
level is high, especially for low amplitude (once-integrated) velocity seismograms. The digital 
data now being collected within ANSS regions will be more useful in calibrating against 
intensity at lower amplitudes.   We are also collecting intensity measurements at near-station 
locations  through  voluntary  response  on  the  Internet  (Wald  and  others,  1999c;  URL 
http://pasadena.wr.usgs.gov/ shake).  The combination of assigning intensities for low shaking 
levels with digital recordings will help constrain the relationship between acceleration, velocity, 
and intensity at the lowest values. 
TECHNICAL MANUAL 
60 
Discussion of Chosen Map Parameters 
Documents you may be interested
Documents you may be interested