mvc show pdf in div : Add text pdf acrobat professional control SDK system azure wpf windows console 508TM12-A17-part1333

ShakeMap Manual 
DRAFT: Version 1.0  6/19/06 
Figure 2.11 The Advanced National Seismograph ShakeMap network for the Wasatch 
Front Urban Corridor, Utah as of September 30, 2005. 
TECHNICAL MANUAL 
71 
Regional ShakeMap Specifications 
Add text pdf acrobat professional - insert text into PDF content in C#.net, ASP.NET, MVC, Ajax, WinForms, WPF
XDoc.PDF for .NET, providing C# demo code for inserting text to PDF file
adding text to pdf in preview; how to add text to pdf file with reader
Add text pdf acrobat professional - VB.NET PDF insert text library: insert text into PDF content in vb.net, ASP.NET, MVC, Ajax, WinForms, WPF
Providing Demo Code for Adding and Inserting Text to PDF File Page in VB.NET Program
add text to pdf file reader; adding text fields to pdf
ShakeMap Manual 
DRAFT: Version 1.0  6/19/06 
Site  Condition  Map.  Once  the  ground  motion  is  calculated  for  “rock,”  we  apply  site 
amplification factors to correct for the local geology.   These factors were calculated using 
equations 7a and 7b from the Appendix in Borcherdt (1994) and a reference velocity of 910 
m/sec.  The average shear velocity in the upper 30 meters (Vs30) for local geologic units and 
corresponding amplification factors are in Table 2.3. Detailed geologic mapping and grouping by 
Vs30 for the Utah ShakeMap region was done by the Utah Geological Survey (Ashland, 2001; 
Ashland and McDonald, 2003; G. N. MacDonald written communication, 2005).  The mapping 
was done at two scales: 1:500,000 for the state and 1:250,000 for the region from Provo to 
Brigham City.  In the finely mapped region, the grouping of Vs30 units consists of 4 distinct 
quaternary soil units—Q01, Q02, Q03, Q05, and 3  rock units -- Tertiary, Mesozoic, and 
Paleozoic rock units.  In the larger scale regions an average Quaternary soil unit and the three 
rock units were used (Figure 2.12). Although this is the mapping that is currently available, one 
area of concern is that all of the Vs30 measurements were made in Lake Bonneville deposits. 
Mapping Vs30 values from Lake Bonneville deposits to more general quaternary deposits may 
not be appropriate.  Refining the Vs30 measurements and site amplification factors are active 
areas of research in the region. 
Class  Vs30 
Short-Period (PGA) 
Mid-Period (PGV) 
150  250  350 
150  250  350 
2197 
0.73  0.80  0.92  1.05 
0.56  0.59  0.63  0.67 
1449 
0.85  0.89  0.95  1.02 
0.74  0.76  0.78  0.81 
1023 
0.96  0.97  0.99  1.01 
0.93  0.93  0.94  0.95 
234 
1.61  1.40  1.15  0.93 
2.42  2.26  2.05  1.84 
Q01  199 
1.70  1.46  1.16  0.93 
2.69  2.49  2.24  1.98 
Q02  301 
1.47  1.32  1.12  0.95 
2.05  1.94  1.80  1.65 
Q03  387 
1.35  1.24  1.09  0.96 
1.74  1.67  1.57  1.47 
Q04  437 
1.29  1.20  1.08  0.96 
1.61  1.55  1.48  1.39 
Q05  486 
1.25  1.17  1.06  0.97 
1.50  1.46  1.39  1.33 
Table 2.3  Site Correction Amplification factors. Short-Period (.1 to .5 sec) factors from 
equation 7a, Mid-Period (.4 to 2. sec) from equation 7b of Borcherdt (1994).  Class is 
geologic grouping done by Ashland (2001); Vs30 is the average shear-wave velocity in 
the upper 30 m (m/s) and PGA is cutoff input PGA in gals. 
TECHNICAL MANUAL 
72 
Regional ShakeMap Specifications 
.NET PDF Document Viewing, Annotation, Conversion & Processing
Redact text content, images, whole pages from PDF file. Add, insert PDF native annotations to PDF file. Edit, update, delete PDF annotations from PDF file. Print
how to add text to a pdf in preview; add text box in pdf
C# PDF Converter Library SDK to convert PDF to other file formats
Allow users to convert PDF to Text (TXT) file. can manipulate & convert standard PDF documents in other external third-party dependencies like Adobe Acrobat.
add text pdf; how to insert text in pdf using preview
ShakeMap Manual 
DRAFT: Version 1.0  6/19/06 
Figure 2.12 Wasatch Front Site Condition Map based on geology and Vs30.  Adapted 
from Ashland (2001) and Ashland and McDonald (2003).  The colors correspond to Vs30 
groupings.  Geologic mapping was done at two scales: Wasatch Front 1:250,000, rest of 
the region 1:500,000. 
TECHNICAL MANUAL 
73 
Regional ShakeMap Specifications 
VB.NET PowerPoint: VB Code to Draw and Create Annotation on PPT
other documents are compatible, including PDF, TIFF, MS hand, free hand line, rectangle, text, hotspot, hotspot Users need to add following implementations to
how to add text fields to a pdf; how to add text fields to a pdf document
C# powerpoint - PowerPoint Conversion & Rendering in C#.NET
other external third-party dependencies like Adobe Acrobat. Using this .NET professional PowerPoint document conversion library PowerPoint to PDF Conversion.
add text pdf professional; how to enter text in pdf form
ShakeMap Manual 
DRAFT: Version 1.0  6/19/06 
Attenuation Relationships. To approximate the ground motion to “rock” in regions of sparse 
data coverage, we use attenuation relations from Pankow and Pechmann (2004) to calculate the 
ground motion to a reference rock site.  The PGA and PSV relations for rock in Pankow and 
Pechmann (2004) are similar to those reported in Spudich et al. (1999) except that the reported 
bias at rock sites has been corrected.  The PGV relation in Pankow and Pechmann (2004) was 
developed using PGV data collected for the same events as in Spudich et al. (1999; Paul 
Spudich, personal communication).  All of these relations are appropriate for extensional tectonic 
regimes, for earthquakes with magnitudes between 5.0 and 7.7, and event-station distances < 100 
km.  For earthquakes with magnitudes < 5.0, we use PGA and PGV relations developed for 
Southern California (V. Quitoriano, written communication, 2002).  See Appendix A for more 
details. 
Other Local Characteristics. Once the ShakeMaps are produced they are transferred to the 
UUSS  web  page  (http://www.quake.seis.edu)  and  the  USGS  web  page 
(http://www.earthquake.usgs.gov).  In addition, a JPEG version of the intensity map is emailed to 
Utah Division of Emergency Services and Homeland Security, the Utah Geological Survey, and 
duty seismologists’ home email accounts.  Generally, ShakeMaps are reviewed for quality within 
the first few hours of posting.  Within several days of the earthquake, the data are manually 
reprocessed and reviewed.  At this point the map will be re-posted and the disclaimer flag “Not 
reviewed by human” is removed.   It is worth noting, UUSS runs two duplicate systems of 
Earthworm and ShakeMap. They are configured so that in case of system failure on the active 
machine the backup can be smoothly transitioned without loss of service. 
2.9.3.2  Nevada 
[TBS] 
Status.  Currently enhancing station distribution and testing ShakeMap software. 
2.9.4  Mid-America 
Coverage Area.  The Center for Earthquake Research and Information (CERI), University of 
Memphis, will generate automatic ShakeMaps for earthquakes occurring in the New Madrid 
Seismic Zone. The trigger area is located in the Upper Mississippi Embayment of the central 
United States and is centered on the New Madrid seismic zone (Figure 2.13). It covers a four by 
four degree area from 92°W to 88°W and 35°N to 39°N and is approximately 450 km by 450 km 
or 202,500 square kilometers.  The area encompasses 6 states and the major metropolitan areas 
of Memphis, Tennessee and Saint Louis, Missouri. 
TECHNICAL MANUAL 
74 
Regional ShakeMap Specifications 
C# Windows Viewer - Image and Document Conversion & Rendering in
without using other external third-party dependencies like Adobe Acrobat. Using this .NET professional raster image and document conversion Convert to PDF.
how to enter text into a pdf; adding text fields to a pdf
C# Word - Word Conversion in C#.NET
using other external third-party dependencies like Adobe Acrobat. Using this .NET professional Word document conversion library toolkit Word to PDF Conversion.
how to insert text box in pdf document; adding text field to pdf
ShakeMap Manual 
DRAFT: Version 1.0  6/19/06 
Figure 2.13  The map outline is the regional extent for the production of ShakeMap maps. 
Earthquakes located within this region, with magnitudes larger than 3.0, generate 
automatic ShakeMaps. The New Madrid Seismic Zone is defined by the seismicity 
denoted here as black dots. 
Triggering and Data Flow.  Using the Earthworm software package (see 
http://folkworm.ceri.memphis.edu/ew-doc) CERI collects data in real time from seismic stations 
throughout the surrounding region.  Using this data, Earthworm associates seismic events 
recorded at different stations and calculates a location and magnitude.  For earthquakes above 
magnitude 3.0, Earthworm also calculates parametric peak ground acceleration (PGA), peak 
ground velocity (PGV), and 5 percent-damped pseudo-acceleration (PSA) values from the 
horizontal components from up to 56 strong-motion and broadband instruments (Figure 2.14). 
This information is written to a ShakeMap compatible XML formatted file. These files are 
automatically placed in a directory that ShakeMap monitors. 
TECHNICAL MANUAL 
75 
Regional ShakeMap Specifications 
VB.NET PDF: How to Create Watermark on PDF Document within
VB Class Example Code to Add Image Watermark to PDF. Besides text, users also can 2, image__2.Height / 2)) image__2.Save("C:\1-watermark.pdf") End If.
add text boxes to pdf document; adding text pdf
C# Excel - Excel Conversion & Rendering in C#.NET
using other external third-party dependencies like Adobe Acrobat. Using this .NET professional Excel document conversion library Excel to PDF Conversion.
adding text to pdf online; how to add text to a pdf document
ShakeMap Manual 
DRAFT: Version 1.0  6/19/06 
Figure 2.14  The New Madrid Cooperative Seismic network for the Upper Mississippi 
Embayment, Mid-America, as of July 2005.  University of Memphis, CERI and St. Louis 
University broadband and strong motion stations are in red, short period seismometers in 
open triangles, the U.S. National Seismic Network (USNSN) in dark blue, the National 
Strong Motion Program (NSMP) in green.  Stations operated by CERI, SLU, and USNSN, 
are recorded at CERI in real-time. Short period stations are used for location purposes 
only. 
Once the two files for an event appear in the directory, a ShakeMap queuing program is run to 
determine if a ShakeMap should start. A local magnitude threshold of 3.0 is used for producing 
maps (Figure 2.13). In addition, the queuing program is configured to prioritize events by size 
and distance to the population centers.  This is particularly useful in the case of aftershocks or 
swarms. 
Site Condition Map.  The ground-motion is calculated for “rock,” and a site amplification factor 
is applied to correct for the effects of the local geology.  These factors were calculated using 
equations 7a and 7b from the Appendix in Borcherdt (1994) and a reference velocity of 750 m/s. 
The National Earthquake Hazard Reduction Program’s (NEHRP) system of soil classification 
(FEMA, 1994) is the standard soil classification scheme used by the Mid-America region.  This 
methodology assigned soil classification letters of A, B, C, D, E1, E2, F1, F2, F3 and F4 as 
TECHNICAL MANUAL 
76 
Regional ShakeMap Specifications 
BMP to PDF Converter | Convert Bitmap to PDF, Convert PDF to BMP
Also designed to be used add-on for .NET Image SDK and PDF files; No need for Adobe Acrobat Reader & Open Bitmap to PDF Converter first; Load PDF images from
how to add text to a pdf file in preview; adding text to pdf
TIFF to PDF Converter | Convert TIFF to PDF, Convert PDF to TIFF
doesn't require other third-party such as Adobe Acrobat. TIFF-PDF Conversion; Able to preserve text and PDF TIFF to PDF Converter first; Load PDF images from
how to add a text box to a pdf; adding text to pdf form
ShakeMap Manual 
DRAFT: Version 1.0  6/19/06 
defined by the soil’s geological description, shear wave velocity, potential to liquefy and other 
engineering parameters (Table 2.4) (FEMA, 1994). 
Table 2.4 
Soil Type
Soil profile type classification for seismic amplification (FEMA, 1994). 
Avg. Shear 
Avg. Shear 
Avg. 
Avg. Shear
Wave Velocity
General Description
 
Wave Velocity 
(m/s) 
Blow  Strength 
(feet/s) 
Counts  (lbs/sq.ft.) 
A
 
Hard Rock 
B
 
Rock 
C
 
Hard and/or stiff/very stiff soils; 
most gravels 
D
 
Sands, silts and/or stiff/very 
stiff clays, some gravels 
Small to moderate thickness 
(10 to 50 feet) 
E
 
soft to medium stiff clay, 
Plasticity Index > 20, 
water content > 40 percent 
Large thickness 
(50 to 120 feet) 
E
2
 
soft to medium stiff clay 
Plasticity Index > 20, 
water content > 40 percent 
Soils vulnerable to potential 
failure or collapse under seismic 
F
1
 
loading such as liquefiable soils, 
quick and highly sensitive clays, 
collapsible weakly cemented soils. 
Peats and/or highly organic clays
F
greater than 10 feet thick 
Very high plasticity clays 
F
3
 
greater than 25 feet thick with 
Plasticity Index > 75 
Very thick soft/medium stiff clays
F
greater than 120 feet thick 
> 5,000 
> 1,500 
2,500 - 5,000 
760 - 1,500 
1,200 - 2,500 
360 - 760 
> 50 
2,000 
600 - 1,200 
180 - 360 
15 - 50  1,000 - 2,000 
 600 
< 180 
< 15 
< 1,000 
< 600 
< 180 
< 15 
< 1000 
By definition the F classification requires that a site 
dependent evaluation of the engineering parameters be 
conducted, as they do not fall into any of the other soil 
classifications. 
The Central United States Earthquake Consortium (CUSEC) Association of State Geologists 
assembled information on earthquake hazards for the New Madrid Seismic Zone of the CUSEC 
region. They developed a standard method to create a soil amplification potential map, showing 
the potential seismic shaking hazard due to soil types (Bauer et. al., 2001). The map, 
Compilation of Databases and Map Preparation for Regional and Local Seismic Zonation Studies 
in the CUSEC Region (CUSEC Map), covered portions of the states of Arkansas, Illinois, 
Indiana, Kentucky, Mississippi, Missouri, Ohio and Tennessee, including the 1 x 2 degree (scale 
1:250,000 or 1 inch = 3.9 miles) Belleville, Rolla, Vincennes, Evansville, Dyersburg, St. Louis, 
TECHNICAL MANUAL
 
77 
Regional ShakeMap Specifications 
ShakeMap Manual 
DRAFT: Version 1.0  6/19/06 
Poplar Bluff, Blytheville, and Memphis quadrangles (Bauer et. al., 2001).  Geologic maps of 
surficial materials were used in combination with field measured shear wave velocities to 
classify the soils, according to the NEHRP soil classification schema (see above), for the upper 
15 to 30 meters and the results were distributed on compact disc (Bauer et. al., 2001). The 
Geographical Information System (GIS) format of the maps was used in the creation of the 
regional ShakeMap amplification factors. 
One topic of concern is the soil type designation of “F” on the map pertains to liquefiable soils; 
ShakeMap makes no distinction for this soil type. In order to work around this problem the “F” 
designation was assigned an “E” designation. However, it should be noted that recent 
geophysical surveys by Street et. al., (2004) showed that a section of the embayment designated 
by the CUSEC map as type “F” (assumed herein to be “E”), exhibited velocities of soil type “D”. 
Additionally, since individual State Geological Surveys conducted independent assessments of 
their respective states, there were data discrepancies from state to state (Bauer, personal 
communication). This was evident when changes in soil types at the Arkansas, Missouri border 
(Figure 2.15) were observed. The average shear velocity in the upper 30 meters (Vs30) for local 
geologic units and corresponding amplification factors are shown in Table 2.5. 
Average shear wave velocity for local geological units 
Class  Vs30 
Short-Period (PGA) 
Mid-Period (PGV) 
150  250 
350 
150  250  350 
1130 
1.00  1.00  1.00  1.00 
1.00  1.00  1.00  1.00 
BC 
750 
1.15  1.11  1.04  0.98 
1.31  1.28  1.24  1.20 
560 
1.28  1.19  1.07  0.97 
1.58  1.52  1.45  1.37 
CD 
360 
1.49  1.33  1.12  0.94 
2.10  1.99  1.83  1.67 
270 
1.65  1.43  1.15  0.93 
2.54  2.36  2.14  1.90 
DE 
180 
1.90  1.58  1.20  0.91 
3.30  3.01  2.65  2.29 
180 
1.90  1.58  1.20  0.91 
3.30  3.01  2.65  2.29 
Table 2.5  Site Correction Amplification factors. Short-Period (.1 to .5 sec) factors from
equation 7a, Mid-Period (.4 to 2. sec) from equation 7b of Borcherdt (1994).  Class is
geologic grouping done by Bauer (2001); Vs30 is the average shear-wave velocity in the
upper 30 m (m/s) and PGA is cutoff input PGA in gals.
The coverage area of the CUSEC map constrained the area for ShakeMap to accurately display 
amplified shaking. Therefore, the aerial extent of the CUSEC map is an area for future 
improvements. Recent geophysical and engineering velocity data on soil locations beyond the 
current maps should be incorporated into a new map of larger coverage area. The area to the 
south of Memphis, Tennessee in northern Mississippi and southern Arkansas should be included, 
as the population in this area is expanding rapidly (Figure 2.15). 
TECHNICAL MANUAL 
78 
Regional ShakeMap Specifications 
ShakeMap Manual 
DRAFT: Version 1.0  6/19/06 
Figure 2.15  New Madrid Seismic Zone Site Condition Map based on geology and Vs30, 
from Bauer et. al. (2001).  The colors correspond to Vs30 groupings.  Final geologic 
mapping was done at 1:250,000. 
Attenuation Relationships.  Earthquakes in the central and eastern United States are inherently 
different than those in the Western United States with regard to attenuation, energy release and 
characteristics of strong ground motion (e.g. McGuire, 1987). Therefore attenuation relationships 
calibrated for the Western United States will not adequately represent ground motions in the 
central and eastern United States (Kaka and Atkinson, 2004, Brackman, 2005). 
Several researchers developed attenuation relationships for the Central United States (e.g. Boore 
and Atkinson, 1987; Toro and McGuire, 1987; Boore and Joyner, 1991; EPRI, 1993; Toro et al., 
1997; Atkinson and Boore, 1997; Frankel et. al., 1996; Somerville et. al., 2001; Campbell, 2002; 
EPRI 2004: Kaka and Atkinson 2005).  In order to implement a well-established, consensus-
based attenuation relationship, the plan was to incorporate multiple weighted attenuation 
relations into ShakeMap in agreement with the CEUS Portion of Draft Versions of the 2002 
Update of the National Seismic Hazards Maps (Frankel, 2002). The 2002 Hazard maps include 
the attenuation relations of Atkinson and Boore (1995), Toro et al. (1997), Frankel et al. (1996), 
Somerville et al. (2001) and Campbell (2002). However, until such time as software 
TECHNICAL MANUAL 
79 
Regional ShakeMap Specifications 
ShakeMap Manual 
DRAFT: Version 1.0  6/19/06 
improvements are available, we instead use a single relationship that is most compatible with our 
needs and available data. 
The majority of eastern United States attenuation relations are designed for magnitudes greater 
than six. Kaka and Atkinson (2005), in an attempt to model smaller and more common events, 
used data from central and eastern United States empirical databases in conjunction with 
modeled data from Atkinson and Boore (1995). The equation obtained is typically based on 
recorded ground motions of magnitudes less than five. Kaka and Atkinson, (2005) state that the 
relationship might under estimate peak ground motions for magnitudes equal to or greater than 
six, therefore, limiting the range to lower magnitudes. 
The attenuation relationships of Toro et. al., (1997), Atkinson and Boore (1995) and Kaka and 
Atkinson, (2005) were tested for accuracy (Brackman, 2005). Results showed the attenuation 
relationship of Kaka and Atkinson (2005) to be in reasonable agreement with the Community 
Internet Intensity Maps with a minimal amount of over predicting (Brackman, 2005) for smaller 
events. The relationship of Toro et. al., (1997) was found sufficient for emergency response 
personnel to identify where the most intense damage has occurred and the approximate extent of 
damage (Brackman, 2005) for larger ground motions. 
For the Upper Mississippi Embayment study area the relationship of Kaka and Atkinson (2005) 
should be used to predict peak ground motions for magnitudes at and below six and the 
relationship of Toro et. al., (1997) should be used for earthquakes of magnitude greater than six. 
The relationships will need to be reassessed as new information is gathered and predictive 
models improve. 
Instrumental intensity.  ShakeMap uses the Instrumental Intensity regression to map recorded 
and modeled peak ground motions to MMI. Wald et al., (1999a) developed an instrumental 
intensity regression, for use specifically by ShakeMap locations in the Western United States. 
However, it has been recognized that intra-plate earthquakes, like those in the central and eastern 
United States, are associated with higher stresses and, in the near source these ground motions 
may be characterized by higher peak ground motions plus variable frequency content (Kanamori 
and Anderson, 1975). Atkinson (1993a) states that earthquakes recorded in California may have 
a lower frequency content than those recorded in the central and eastern United States, and 
therefore, PGV and PGA have a different meaning in the two regions. Kaka and Atkinson (2004) 
has been shown (Brackman, 2005) to be the best instrumental intensity regression for ShakeMap 
implementation in Mid America. Research to develop a relationship between PGV and MMI for 
the New Madrid region is ongoing (Atkinson, personal communication). A region specific 
regression would be a considerable advancement for ShakeMap, as it would give better 
constraints on MMI and peak ground motions. Since Kaka and Atkinson’s (2004) regression for 
instrumental intensity has the ability to be corrected for magnitude and distance, additional 
programming should be done to incorporate this aspect into the existing software, increasing 
ShakeMap’s accuracy. 
Other Local Characteristics.  Automated generation of ShakeMap at CERI is in its infancy. 
After a reasonable period of testing and evaluation we will determine the most appropriate 
notification mechanisms and recipients. 
TECHNICAL MANUAL 
80 
Regional ShakeMap Specifications 
Documents you may be interested
Documents you may be interested