mvc show pdf in div : How to add text to a pdf file Library application class asp.net html winforms ajax 5G7BGE3Z6KNWFOHBFCWN11-part1346

customer will choose for searching and then ensure that the company or its product is
featured prominently. 
4 Consumer: evaluate and select. Supplier: assist purchase decision
One of the most powerful features of web sites is their facility to carry a large amount of
content at relatively low cost. This can be turned to advantage when customers are look-
ing to identify the best product. By providing relevant information in a form that is easy
to find and digest, a company can use its web site to help in persuading the customer. For
example, the Comet site (Figure 2.25) enables customers to readily compare product fea-
tures side-by-side, so the customer can decide on the best products for them. Thanks to
the web, this stage can now overlap with earlier stages. Brand issues are important here,
as proved by research in the branding section of Chapter 5, since a new buyer naturally
prefers to buy from a familiar supplier with a good reputation – it will be difficult for a
company to portray itself in this way if it has a slow, poorly designed or shoddy web site. 
5 Consumer: purchase. Company: facilitate purchase
Once a customer has decided to purchase, then the company will not want to lose the
custom at this stage! The web site should enable standard credit-card payment mecha-
nisms with the option to place the order by phone or mail. Online retailers pay great
attention to identifying factors that encourage customers to convert once they have
added a product to their ‘shopping basket’. Security guarantees, delivery choices and free
delivery offers, for example, can help increase conversion rates.
CHAPTER 2 · THE INTERNET MICRO-ENVIRONMENT
82
Figure 2.24 Initial product search showing e-retailers available
How to add text to a pdf file - insert text into PDF content in C#.net, ASP.NET, MVC, Ajax, WinForms, WPF
XDoc.PDF for .NET, providing C# demo code for inserting text to PDF file
adding text to pdf document; how to add text boxes to pdf
How to add text to a pdf file - VB.NET PDF insert text library: insert text into PDF content in vb.net, ASP.NET, MVC, Ajax, WinForms, WPF
Providing Demo Code for Adding and Inserting Text to PDF File Page in VB.NET Program
how to insert a text box in pdf; add text field pdf
6 Consumer: post-purchase service, evaluation and feedback. Company: support
product use and retain business
The Internet also provides great potential for retaining customers, as explained in
Chapter 6 since:
value-added services such as free customer support can be provided by the web site
and these encourage repeat visits and provide value-added features;
feedback on products can be provided to customers; the provision of such informa-
tion will indicate to customers that the company is looking to improve its service;
e-mail can be used to give regular updates on products and promotions and encour-
age customers to revisit the site;
repeat visits to sites provide opportunities for cross-selling and repeat selling through
personalised sales promotions messages based on previous purchase behaviour.
In this section we have reviewed simple models of the online buying process that can
help Internet marketers convert more site visitors to lead and sale; however, in many
cases, the situation is not as simple as the models. Mini Case Study 2.3 ‘Multi-site online
car purchase behaviour’ indicates the complexity of online buyer behaviour, suggesting
that it is difficult to develop general models that define online buyer behaviour.
ONLINE BUYER BEHAVIOUR
83
Figure 2.25 Comet product comparison facility (www
.c
omet.c
o.uk
)
VB.NET PDF Text Extract Library: extract text content from PDF
this advanced PDF Add-On, developers are able to extract target text content from source PDF document and save extracted text to other file formats through VB
add text to pdf document online; adding text pdf files
VB.NET PDF Password Library: add, remove, edit PDF file password
This VB.NET example shows how to add PDF file password with access permission setting. passwordSetting.IsAssemble = True ' Add password to PDF file.
adding text to pdf in reader; how to add text fields in a pdf
CHAPTER 2 · THE INTERNET MICRO-ENVIRONMENT
84
Forrester (2002) has analysed online buyer behaviour in the car industry in detail. They estimate that
different sites such as car manufacturers, dealers, and independent auto sites collectively invest more than
$1 billion each year trying to turn online auto shoppers into buyers. They recommend that to effectively
identify serious car buyers from the millions of site visitors, auto site owners must correlate car buyers’
multi-site behaviour to near-term (within three months) vehicle purchases. In the research, Forrester
analysed behaviour across sites from three months of continuous online behaviour data and buyer-reported
purchase data provided by comScore Networks, extracted from comScore’s Global Network of more than
1.5 million opt-in Internet users. To find the correlation between online shopping behaviour and car buying,
Forrester observed 78,000 individual consumers’ paths through 170 auto sites and interviewed 17 auto site
owners and software providers. Behaviour patterns like frequency and intensity of online research sessions
and cross-site comparison-shopping were strong purchase predictors.
By researching user paths from site to site, Forrester found that:
Online auto marketing and retailing continues to see strong growth despite weak demand in 2001
from the car market. While independent sites remain popular with consumers, manufacturer sites saw
a 59 per cent increase in traffic in 2001.
Site owners currently lack the data and software tools to know where they fit in the online auto retail
landscape – or even how individual customers use their sites.
Roughly one in four auto site visitors buys a car within three months.
Repeat visitors are rare. Sixty-four per cent of all buyers complete their research in five sessions or less.
Auto shoppers’ web research paths predict their probability of vehicle purchase; on some paths, 46
per cent are near-term buyers.
The theory of a ‘marketing funnel’ doesn’t map to actual car buyer behaviour. Conventional wisdom
suggests that shoppers first visit information sites, then manufacturers’, then e-retailers’ or dealer
sites, as they go from awareness to interest, desire, and action. Mapping consumer data reveals a
messier, more complex consideration process.
Summarising the research Mark Dixon Bünger, senior analyst, Forrester Research says:
Common assumptions about customer behavior when shopping for vehicles online are wrong. For
example, loyalty and repeat visits are actually an anti-predictor of purchase. Most people who buy
come in short, intense bursts, and don’t hang out on auto sites. Single-site traffic analysis is not
enough to understand and influence multisite, multisession auto shoppers. Today’s Web site
analysis tools weren’t created to measure the complex nature of online auto shopping, which
involves many sites over several episodes.
A segmentation of car buying profiles
Forrester developed what they call a ‘site owner road map’ to help car site owners better understand
their customers and segment them into four distinct car buying profiles. Since this segmentation is not
predictive, Forrester suggests that to sell more cars through a better site experience, companies need to
help each type of buyer reach its different goals. The four types are:
Explorers. Forrester suggests that car buying is a ‘journey of discovery’ for these users, so suggests giving
them a guide tour or user guides. This should lead them through a convenient, explicit buying process.
Offroaders. These perform detailed research before visiting showrooms, but often leave without purchasing.
If dealers can identify these visitors through the number of configurations, comparisons and number of
page views they have, then dealers should quickly respond to the number of quotes they require.
Drive-bys. These are the largest segment of car site visitors. They visit four sites or fewer, but only 20
per cent buy online. Forrester suggests profiling these customers by incentivising them in order to
better understand their purchase intentions.
Cruisers. Frequent visitors, but only 15 per cent buy a car in the short term. These are influencers
who have a great interest in cars, but are not necessarily interested in purchase.
Mini Case Study 2.3
Multi-site online car purchase behaviour
C# PDF Text Extract Library: extract text content from PDF file in
How to C#: Extract Text Content from PDF File. Add necessary references: RasterEdge.Imaging.Basic.dll. RasterEdge.Imaging.Basic.Codec.dll.
add text to pdf acrobat; add text in pdf file online
C# PDF File & Page Process Library SDK for C#.net, ASP.NET, MVC
Read: PDF Text Extract; C# Read: PDF Image Extract; C# Write: Insert text into PDF; C# Write: Add Image to PDF; C# Protect: Add Password
how to add text to a pdf document; how to insert text into a pdf file
Competitor analysis or the monitoring of competitor use of Internet marketing for acqui-
sition and retention of customers is especially important because of the dynamic nature
of the Internet medium. As Porter (2001) has pointed out, this dynamism enables new
services to be launched and elements of the marketing mix such as price and promotion
changed much more frequently than was traditionally the case. Copying of concepts
and approaches may be possible, but can on some occasions be controlled through
patenting. For example, Amazon.com has patented the ‘One Click’ approach to pur-
chase, so this term and approach is not seen on other sites. The implications of this
dynamism are that competitor benchmarking is not a one-off activity while developing
a strategy, but needs to be continuous. 
‘Benchmarking’ is the term used for structured comparison of e-commerce services
within a market. Its purpose is to identify threats posed by changes to competitor offer-
ings, but also to identify opportunities for enhancing a company’s own web services
through looking at innovative approaches in non-competing companies. Competitor
benchmarking is closely related to developing the customer experience and is informed
by understanding the requirements of different customer personas as introduced earlier
in this chapter.
Traditionally competitors will be well known. With the Internet and the global mar-
ketplace there may be new entrants that have the potential to achieve significant market
share. This is particularly the case with retail sales. For example, successful new compa-
nies have developed  on the Internet who sell books, music,  CDs and electronic
components. As a consequence, companies need to review the Internet-based perform-
ance of both existing and new players. Companies should review:
well-known local competitors (for example, UK or European competitors for British
companies);
well-known international competitors;
new Internet companies local and worldwide (within sector and out of sector).
Chase (1998) advocates that when benchmarking, companies should review competi-
tors’ sites, identifying best practices, worst practices and ‘next practices’. Next practices
are where a company looks beyond its industry sector at what leading Internet compa-
nies such as Amazon (www
.amazon.com
) and Cisco (www
.cisco.com
) are doing. For
instance, a company in the financial services industry could look at what portal sites are
providing and see if there are any lessons to be learnt on ways to make information pro-
vision easier. When undertaking scanning of competitor sites, the key differences that
should be watched out for are:
new approaches from existing companies;
new companies starting on the Internet;
new technologies, design techniques and customer support on the site which may
give a competitive advantage.
As well as assessing competitors on performance criteria, it is also worthwhile categoris-
ing them in terms of their capability to respond. Deise et al. (2000) suggest an equation
that can be used in combination to assess the capability of competitors to respond:
Agility × Reach
Competitive capability = ––––––––––––––––
Time-to-market
COMPETITORS
85
Competitors
Competitor analysis
Review of Internet
marketing services
offered by existing and
new competitors and
adoption by their
customers.
C# PDF Password Library: add, remove, edit PDF file password in C#
This example shows how to add PDF file password with access permission setting. passwordSetting.IsAssemble = true; // Add password to PDF file.
how to add text fields to a pdf; add text to pdf document in preview
C# PDF insert image Library: insert images into PDF in C#.net, ASP
using RasterEdge.Imaging.Basic; using RasterEdge.XDoc.PDF; Have a try with this sample C#.NET code to add an image to the first page of PDF file.
add text to pdf file online; adding text to a pdf in reader
‘Agility’ refers to the speed at which a company is able to change strategic direction and
respond to new customer demands. ‘Reach’ is the ability to connect to or to promote
products and generate new business in new markets. ‘Time-to-market’ is the product life-
cycle from concept through to revenue generation. Companies with a high competitive
capability within their market and competitive markets are arguably the most important
ones to watch.
Companies  can  also  turn  to  benchmarking  organisations  such  as  Gomez
(www
.gomez.com
) to review e-commerce scorecards. In some sectors such as banking,
competitors share data with a benchmarking organisation, enabling them to see their
relative performance (without knowing actual sales or efficiency levels). An example is
eBenchmarkers, which in the UK produces reports for different financial services mar-
kets. Performance criteria are related to the conversion efficiency introduced earlier –
companies are ranked relative to each other on their capacity to attract, convert and
retain customers to use their e-commerce services.
To assess the success of competitors in generating visitors to their web sites, a variety of
data sources can be used; the methods of collection are explained further in Chapter 9.
Panel data can be used to compare number and type of visitors to competitor sites
through time.
Summaries of ISP data such as Hitwise (www
.hitwise.co.uk
) can be used to assess visi-
tor rankings for different competitors.
Audits of web site traffic such as that produced by ABCelectronic (www
.abce.or
g
) can
be used for basic comparison of visitors.
We revisit competitor benchmarking in more detail in Chapters 4 and 7.
The most significant aspect of monitoring suppliers in the context of Internet marketing
is with respect to the effect suppliers have on the value of quality of product or service
delivered to the end customer. Key issues include the effect of suppliers on product price,
availability and features. This topic is not discussed further since it is less significant
than other factors in an Internet marketing context.
Marketing intermediaries are firms that can help a company to promote, sell and distrib-
ute its products or services. In the Internet context, online intermediaries can be
contrasted with destination sites which are typically merchant sites owned by manufac-
turers or retailers which offer information and products (in reality any type of site can be
adestination site, but the term is generally used to refer to merchant and brand sites). 
Online intermediary sites provide information about destination sites and provide a
means of connecting Internet users with product information. The best known online
intermediaries are the most popular sites such as Google, MSN and Yahoo! These are
known as ‘portals’ and are described further below. Other consumer intermediaries such
as Kelkoo (www
.kelkoo.com
) and Bizrate (www
.bizrate.com
) provide price comparison
CHAPTER 2 · THE INTERNET MICRO-ENVIRONMENT
86
Suppliers
Intermediaries
Marketing
intermediaries
Firms that can help a
company to promote,
sell and distribute its
products or services.
Destination sites
Sites typically owned by
merchants, product
manufacturers or
retailers, providing
product information.
VB.NET PDF File Compress Library: Compress reduce PDF size in vb.
Also able to uncompress PDF file in VB.NET programs. Offer flexible and royalty-free developing library license for VB.NET programmers to compress PDF file.
adding text to pdf file; how to insert text box on pdf
VB.NET PDF insert image library: insert images into PDF in vb.net
try with this sample VB.NET code to add an image As String = Program.RootPath + "\\" 1.pdf" Dim doc New PDFDocument(inputFilePath) ' Get a text manager from
how to add text to a pdf file in preview; how to add text to a pdf file in reader
for products, as described earlier in this chapter. Most newspaper and magazine publish-
ers such as VNU (www
.vnu.com
) and Emap (www
.emap.com
) now provide online
versions of their publications. These are as important in the online world in promoting
products as newspapers and magazines are in the offline world.
Online intermediaries are businesses which support business and consumer audi-
ences, so they can serve both B2B and B2C information exchanges. Auction sites are
another type of online intermediary that support the B2B and the C2C exchanges intro-
duced in Chapter 1. Online intermediaries sometimes support online social networks
which are a form of online community described in more detail in the section on virtual
communities at the end of Chapter 6. The Google Orkut service (www
.orkut.com
) is an
example  of a  personal  social  network,  while Linked  In  (www
.linkedin.com
) and
Eacademy (www
.eacademy
.com
) are examples of business networks. A business-to-busi-
ness community serving the interest of Internet marketers is the E-consultancy forums
(www
.e-consultancy
.com/for
um
). 
Online intermediaries are typically independent of merchants and brands, but can be
owned by brands. In business-to-business marketing examples of such intermediaries
include  Clearly  Business  (www
.clearlybusiness.com
 from  Barclays  or  bCentral
(www
.bcentral.co.uk
) from Microsoft. These are examples of ‘countermediaries’ referred
to earlier in the chapter which are created by a service provider to provide valuable con-
tent or services to their audience with a view to enhancing their brand, so they are not
truly independent.
Sarkar et al. (1996) identified many different types of potential online intermediaries
(mainly from a B2C perspective) which they refer to as ‘cybermediaries’. Some of the
main intermediaries identified by Sarkar et al. (1996), listed with current examples, are:
Directories (such as Yahoo! directory, Open Directory, Business.com).
Search engines (Google, Yahoo! Search).
Malls (now replaced by comparison sites such as Kelkoo and Pricerunner).
Virtual resellers (own inventory and sells direct, e.g. Amazon, CDWOW).
Financial intermediaries (offering digital cash and payment services such as PayPal
which is now part of eBay).
Forums, fan clubs and user groups (referred to collectively as ‘virtual communities’ or
social networks such as HabboHotel for youth audiences).
Evaluators (sites which act as reviewers or comparison of services such as Kelkoo).
At the time that Sarkar et al. (1996) listed the different types of intermediaries given
above, there were many separate web sites offering these types of services. For example,
AltaVista (www
.altavista.com
) offered search engine facilities and Yahoo! (www
.yahoo.com
)
offered a directory of different web sites. Since this time, such sites have diversified the serv-
ices offered. Yahoo! now offers all these services and additional types such as dating,
communities and auctions. Diversification has occurred through the introduction of new
intermediaries that provide services to other intermediaries and also through acquisition and
merger. Since Google issued shares it has increasingly acquired or developed new services in
its Google Labs (http://labs.google.com
) to integrate into its services as Yahoo! has done
throughout its history. For example, it has purchased provider Blogger (www
.blogger
.com
)
and has introduced the Gmail e-mail service and Orkut social networking service.
Activity 2.6 highlights the alternative revenue models available to these new interme-
diaries, in this case an evaluator, and speculates on their future.
INTERMEDIARIES
87
Online social
network
A service facilitating
the connection,
collaboration and
exchange of
information between
individuals.
Online intermediary
sites
Web sites that facilitate
exchanges between
consumer and business
suppliers.
Search engines,
spiders and robots
Automatic tools known
as ‘spiders’ or ‘robots’
index registered sites.
Users search by typing
keywords and are
presented with a list of
pages.
Directories or
catalogues
Structured listings of
registered sites in
different categories.
C# PDF File Split Library: Split, seperate PDF into multiple files
page of your defined page number which starts from 0. For example, your original PDF file contains 4 pages. C# DLLs: Split PDF Document. Add necessary references
add text field to pdf; how to add text to a pdf document using reader
C# PDF File Merge Library: Merge, append PDF files in C#.net, ASP.
document splitting, PDF page reordering and PDF page image and text extraction Add necessary references In addition, C# users can append a PDF file to the end of
add text to pdf without acrobat; add text to pdf using preview
Hagel and Rayport (1997) use ‘infomediary’ specifically to refer to sale of customer
information, although it is sometimes used more widely to refer to sites offering detailed
information about any topic. Traditional infomediaries are Experian (www
.experian.com
)
and Claritas (www
.claritas.com
) which provide customer data for direct marketing or
credit scoring. Such companies now use the web to collect additional customer informa-
tion from prize draw sites such as Email Inform (www
.emailinfor
m.com
). An example of
an infomediary providing detailed information about a sector, in this case e-marketing
topics, is E-consultancy (www
.e-consultancy
.com
).
A further type of intermediary is the virtual marketplace or virtual B2B trading commu-
nity mentioned earlier in the chapter. 
CHAPTER 2 · THE INTERNET MICRO-ENVIRONMENT
88
Activity 2.6
Kelkoo.com, an example of revenue models for new 
intermediaries
Purpose
To provide an example of the services provided by cybermediaries and explore their viability
as businesses.
Questions
1 Visit the Kelkoo web site (www
.kelkoo.com
) shown in Figure 2.26 and search for this book, a
CD or anything else you fancy. Explain the service that is being offered to customers.
2 Write down the different revenue opportunities for this site (some may be evident from the
site, but others may not); write down your ideas also.
3 Given that there are other competing sites in this intermediary category, such as Shopsmart
(www
.shopsmar
t.com
), assess the future of this online business using press releases and
comments from other sites such as Moreover (www
.mor
eover
.com
).
visit the
w.w.w.
Figure 2.26 Kelkoo.com, a European price comparison site
Infomediary
An intermediary
business whose main
source of revenue
derives from capturing
consumer information
and developing detailed
profiles of individual
customers for use by
third parties.
Portals
An Internet portal is a web site that acts as a gateway to information and services avail-
able on the Internet. Essentially, it is an alternative term for online intermediary, but the
main emphasis is on providing access to information on the portal site and other sites.
Portals are important to Internet marketers since portals are where users spend the
bulk of their time online when they are not on merchant or brand sites. Situation analy-
sis involves assessing which portals target customers with different demographics and
psychographics use. It also relates to competitor benchmarking, since the sponsorship
deals and co-branding arrangements set up by competitors should also be reviewed.
For marketers to extend the visibility or reach of their company online, they need to
be well represented on a range of portals through using sponsorships, online adverts and
search marketing, as explained in Chapter 8. Portals also enable targeted communica-
tions.  Specialist  portals  enable  markets  to  target  a  particular  audience  through
advertising, sponsorship and PR while general portals often have sections or ‘channels’
which indicate a particular product interest. For example, financial services provider
Alliance and Leicester uses a Loan calculator to sponsor the Money, Loans channel on
ISP portal Wanadoo (www
.wanadoo.com.uk
) and web measurement company NetIQ
sponsors the relevant channel on ClickZ (www
.clickz.com
) to reach their target audi-
ences. Main portals such as newspapers and trade magazines also have registration, so
can provide options for delivering messages via e-mail also.
Many  portals  are  related  to  Internet  service  providers  –  ISPs  such  as  AOL
(www
.aol.com
) and Wanadoo (www
.wandadoo.com
) have created a portal as the default
home page for their users. The Microsoft Network (www
.msn.com
) is a popular portal
since when users install the Internet Explorer browser it will be set up so that the home
page is a Microsoft page.
Types of portals
Portals vary in scope and in the services they offer, so naturally terms have evolved to
describe the different types of portals. It is useful, in particular, for marketers to under-
stand these terms since they act as a checklist that companies are represented on the
different types of portals. Table 2.8 shows different types of portals. It is apparent that
there is overlap between the different types of portal. Yahoo! for instance, is a horizontal
portal since it offers a range of services, but it has also been developed as a geographical
portal for different countries and, in the USA, even for different cities. Many vertical and
marketplace portals such as Chemdex and many Vertical Net sites (now VertMarkets
(www
.ver
tmarkets.com
)) which were created at the height of the dot-com boom proved
unsustainable and have largely been replaced by online versions of trader magazines for
these markets. 
INTERMEDIARIES
89
Portal
A web site that acts as
a gateway to
information and
services available on
the Internet by
providing search
engines, directories
and other services such
as personalised news
or free e-mail.
Activity 2.7
Which are the top portals?
To see the most important portals in your region, visit Nielsen//NetRatings
(www
.netratings.com
) and choose ‘Top Rankings’. This gives the top 10 most 
popular sites in the countries listed. You will see that the largest portals such as 
MSN and Google can be used to reach over 50% of the Internet audience in a country. 
The pattern of top sites is different in each country, so international marketers need to ensure
they are equally visible in different countries.
visit the
w.w.w.
The following case study is an example of a new business model and gives you an
opportunity to review the marketplace for this product.
CHAPTER 2 · THE INTERNET MICRO-ENVIRONMENT
Table 2.8 Portal characteristics
Type of portal
Characteristics
Example
Access portal
Associated with ISP
Wanadoo (www
.wanadoo.com
)
AOL (www
.aol.com
)
Horizontal or
Range of services: 
Yahoo! (www
.yahoo.com
functional portal
search engines, directories,  MSN (www
.msn.com
)
news recruitment, personal  Lycos (www
.lycos.com
information management, 
shopping, etc.
Vertical
A vertical portal covers a 
Construction Plus 
particular market such as 
(www
.constr
uctionplus.co.uk
)
construction with news and  Chem Industry (www
.chemindustr
y
.com
)
other services
Media portal
Main focus is on consumer  BBC (www
.bbc.co.uk
or business news or 
Guardian (www
.guar
dian.co.uk
)
entertainment
ITWeek (www
.itweek.co.uk
)
Geographical
May be:
(region, country, local)
horizontal 
Yahoo! country and city versions
vertical
Countyweb (www
.countyweb.com
Marketplace
May be:
EC21 (
www
.ec21.com
)
horizontal
eBay (
www
.eBay
.com
)
vertical
geographical
Search portal
Main focus is on search
Google (www
.google.com
)
Ask Jeeves (www
.ask.com
Media type
May be:
BBC (www
.bbc.co.uk
voice 
Silicon (www
.silicon.com
video 
Delivered by streaming 
media or downloads of files
Zopa launches a new lending model
Case Study 2
Context
It might be thought that innovation in business models
was left behind in the dot-com era, but still fledgling busi-
nesses are launching new online services. Zopa is an
interesting example launched in March 2005.
Zopa is an online service which enables borrowers and
lenders to bypass the big high street banks. It is an exam-
ple of a consumer-to-consumer exchange intermediary. It
illustrates the challenges and opportunities of launching a
new business online, especially a business with a new
business model.
Zopa stands for ‘Zone of Possible Agreement’ which is a
term from business theory. It refers to the overlap between
one person’s bottom line (the lowest they’re prepared to
receive  for  something  they  are  offering)  and  another
person’s top line (the most they’re prepared to pay for
something). In practice, this approach underpins negotia-
tions about the majority types of products and services.
The business model
The  exchange  provides  a  matching  facility  between
people who want to borrow and people who want to lend.
Significantly,  each  lender’s  money  is  parcelled  out
between at least 50 borrowers. Zopa revenue is based on
charging borrowers 1 per cent of their loan as a fee, and
from commission on any repayment protection insurance
90
that the borrower selects. At the time of writing, Zopa esti-
mates it needs to gain just a 0.2 per cent share of the UK
loan market to break even, which it could achieve within
18 months of launch.
The main benefit for borrowers is that they can borrow
relatively cheaply over shorter periods for small amounts.
This is the reverse of banks, where if you borrow more and
for longer it gets cheaper. The service will also appeal to
borrowers who have difficulty gaining credit ratings from
traditional financial services providers.
For lenders, higher returns are possible than through
traditional savings accounts if there are no bad debts.
These are in the range of 20 to 30% higher than putting
money in a deposit account, but of course, there is the
risk of bad debt. Lenders choose the minimum interest
rate that they are prepared to accept after bad debt has
been taken into account for different markets within Zopa.
Borrowers are placed in different risk categories with dif-
ferent interest rates according to their credit histories
(using the same Equifax-based credit ratings as used by
the banks) and lenders can decide which balance of risk
against return they require.
Borrowers who fail to pay are pursued through the
same mechanism as banks use and also get a black mark
against their credit histories. But for the lender,  their
investment  is  not  protected  by  any  compensation
scheme, unless they have been defrauded.
The Financial Times reported that banks don’t currently
see Zopa as a threat to their high street business. One
financial analyst said Zopa was ‘one of these things that
could catch on but probably won't’.
Zopa does not have a contact centre. According to its
web site, enquiries to Zopa are restricted to e-mail in order
to keep its costs down. However, there is a service promise
of answering e-mails within 3 hours during working hours.
Although the service was launched initially in the UK in
2005, Financial Times (2005) reported that Zopa has 20
countries where people want to set up franchises. These
include the US, where Zopa has a team trying to develop
the business through the regulatory hurdles. Other coun-
tries  include  China,  New  Zealand,  India  and  South
American countries.
About the founders
The three founders of Zopa are chief executive Richard
Duvall, chief financial officer James Alexander and David
Nicholson. All were involved with Egg, with Richard Duvall
creating  the  online  bank  for  Prudential  in  1998.  Mr
Alexander had been strategy director at Egg after joining
in 2000, and previously had written the business plan for
Smile, another online bank owned by the Co-operative.
The founders were also joined by Sarah Matthews, who
was Egg’s brand development director.
Target market
The idea for the business was developed from market
research that showed there was a potential market of
‘freeformers’ to be tapped. 
Freeformers are typically not in standard employment,
rather they are self-employed or complete work that is proj-
ect-based or freelance. Examples include consultants and
entrepreneurs. Consequently, their incomes and lifestyles
may be irregular, although they may still be assessed as
creditworthy. According to James Alexander, ‘they're people
who are not understood by banks, which value stability in
people's  lives  and  income  over  everything  else’.  The
Institute of Directors (IOD) (2005) reported that the research
showed that freeformers had ‘much less of a spending
model of money and much more of an asset model’.
Surprisingly, the research indicated a large number of
freeformers. New Media Age reported Duvall as estimat-
ing  that  in  the  UK  there  may  be  around  6  million
freeformers (of a population of around 60 million). Duvall is
quoted  as  saying:  ‘it’s  a  group  that’s  growing  really
quickly. I think that in 10 or 15 years time most people will
work this way. It’s happening right across the developing
world. We’ve been doing some research in the US and we
think there are some 30 or 40 million people there with
these attitudes and behaviours’.
Some of the directors see themselves as freeformers,
they have multiple interests and do not only work for
Zopa; James Alexander works for one day a week in a
charity and Sarah Matthews works just 3 days a week for
Zopa. You can see example personas of typical borrowers
and lenders on the web site: www
.zopa.com/ZopaW
eb/
public/how/zopamembers.shtml
.
From reviewing the customer base, lenders and borrow-
ers are often united by a desire to distance themselves from
conventional institutions. James Alexander says: ‘I spend a
lot of time talking to members and have found enormous
goodwill towards the idea, which is really like lending to
family members or within a community’. But he also says
that some of the lenders are simply entrepreneurs who have
the funds, understand portfolio diversification and risk and
are lending on Zopa alongside other investments.
Business status
The Financial Times (2005) reported that Zopa had just
300 members at launch, but within 4 months it had 26,000
members. According to James Alexander, around 35 per
cent are lenders, who between them have £3m of capital
waiting to be distributed. The company has not, to date,
revealed how much has been lent, but average loans have
been between £2,000 and £5,000. Moneyfacts.co.uk isn't
showing any current accounts with more than 5 per cent
interest, but Zopa is a riskier product, so you'd expect
better rates. Unlike a deposit account, it's not covered by
any compensation schemes.
91
CASE STUDY 2
Documents you may be interested
Documents you may be interested