mvc show pdf in div : How to add text to pdf file software SDK project winforms wpf html UWP 5G7BGE3Z6KNWFOHBFCWN12-part1347

Marketing communications
The launch of Zopa has been quite different from Egg and
other dot-coms at the turn of the millennium. Many com-
panies at that time invested large amounts in offline media
such as TV and print to rapidly grow awareness and to
explain their proposition to customers.
Instead Zopa has followed a different communications
strategy, which has relied on word-of-mouth and PR with
some online marketing activities where the cost of cus-
tomer acquisition can be controlled. The launch of such a
model and the history of its founders, makes it relatively
easy to have major pieces about the item in relevant news-
papers and magazines such as the Guardian, the Financial
Times, the Economist and the Institute of Directors house
magazine, which its target audience may read. Around
launch,  IOD  (2005)  reports  that  Duvall’s  PR  agency,
Sputnik, achieved 200 million opportunities for the new
company to be read about. Of course, not all coverage is
favourable, many of the articles explored the risk of lending
and the viability of the start-up. However, others have
pointed out that the rates for the best-rated ‘A category’
borrowers are better than any commercial loan offered by
a bank and for lenders, rates are better than any savings
account. The main online marketing activities that Zopa
uses are search engine marketing and affiliate marketing.
Funding
Zopa  initially received  funding from two private equity
groups, Munich-based Wellington Partners and Benchmark
Capital of the US. Although the model was unique within
financial services, its appeal was increased by the well-
publicised success of other peer-to-peer Internet services
such as Betfair, the gambling web site, and eBay, the
auction site.
Sources: Financial Times (2005), New Media Age (2005), Institute of
Directors  (2005),  Zopa  web  site  (www
.zopa.com
 and  blog
(http://blog.zopa.com)
.
Question
Imagine you are a member of the team at the investors
reviewing the viability of the Zopa business. On which
criteria would you assess the future potential of the busi-
ness and the returns in your investment based on Zopa’s
position in the marketplace and its internal capabilities?
CHAPTER 2 · THE INTERNET MICRO-ENVIRONMENT
Summary
92
1
The constantly changing Internet environment should be monitored by all organisa-
tions in order to be able to respond to changes in the micro-environment or the
immediate marketplace.
2
The  Internet  has  created  major  changes  to  the  competitive  environment.
Organisations should deploy tools such as Porter’s five forces and the value chain and
value network models in order to assess opportunities and potential threats posed by
the Internet.
3
The Internet can encourage the formation of new channel structures. These include
disintermediation within the marketplace as organisations’ channel partners such as
wholesalers or retailers are bypassed. Alternatively, the Internet can cause reintermedia-
tion as new intermediaries with a different purpose are formed to help bring buyers
and sellers together in a virtual marketplace or marketspace. 
4
Trading in the marketplace can be sell-side (seller-controlled), buy-side (buyer-con-
trolled) or at a neutral marketplace.
5
A business model is a summary of how a company will generate revenue, identifying
its product offering, value-added services, revenue sources and target customers.
Exploiting the range of business models made available through the Internet is
important to both existing companies and start-ups.
6
The Internet may also offer opportunities for new revenue models such as commis-
sion on affiliate referrals to other sites or banner advertising.
How to add text to pdf file - insert text into PDF content in C#.net, ASP.NET, MVC, Ajax, WinForms, WPF
XDoc.PDF for .NET, providing C# demo code for inserting text to PDF file
how to insert text into a pdf; adding text to pdf online
How to add text to pdf file - VB.NET PDF insert text library: insert text into PDF content in vb.net, ASP.NET, MVC, Ajax, WinForms, WPF
Providing Demo Code for Adding and Inserting Text to PDF File Page in VB.NET Program
adding text to a pdf form; add text to pdf file online
Exercises
7
The opportunity for new commercial arrangements for transactions includes negoti-
ated deals, brokered deals, auctions, fixed-price sales, and pure spot markets; and
barters should also be considered.
8
Customer analysis is an important part of situation analysis. It involves assessing
demand for online services, characteristics of existing online customers and the
multi-channel behaviour of customers as they select and purchase products.
9
Regular competitive benchmarking should be conducted to compare services.
10
The role of intermediaries in promoting an organisation’s services should also be
carefully assessed.
Self-assessment exercises
1
Why is environmental scanning necessary?
2
Summarise how each of the micro-environment factors may directly drive the content and
services provided by a web site.
3
What are the main aspects of customer adoption of the Internet that managers should be
aware of?
4
What are the main changes to channel structures that are facilitated through the Internet?
5
What are the different elements and different types of business model?
6
How should a marketing manager benchmark the online performance of competitors?
7
Describe two different models of online buyer behaviour.
8
How can the Internet be used to support the different stages of the buying process?
Essay and discussion questions
1
Discuss, using examples, how the Internet may change the five competitive forces of Michael
Porter.
2
‘Internet access levels will never exceed 50% in most countries.’ Discuss.
3
What are the options, for an existing organisation, for using new business models through the
Internet?
4
Perform a demand analysis for e-commerce services for a product sector and geographical
market of your choice.
5
Perform competitor benchmarking for online services for an organisation of your choice.
6
What are the alternatives for modified channel structures for the Internet? Illustrate through
different organisations in different sectors.
93
EXERCISES
VB.NET PDF Password Library: add, remove, edit PDF file password
This VB.NET example shows how to add PDF file password with access permission setting. passwordSetting.IsAssemble = True ' Add password to PDF file.
adding text fields to pdf; add text in pdf file online
C# PDF Password Library: add, remove, edit PDF file password in C#
This example shows how to add PDF file password with access permission setting. passwordSetting.IsAssemble = true; // Add password to PDF file.
add text boxes to pdf; how to enter text in pdf form
94
Examination questions
1
What options are available to a supplier, currently fulfilling to customers through a reseller, to
use the Internet to change this relationship?
2
What types of channel conflicts are caused by the Internet?
3
What are virtual organisations and how can the Internet support them?
4
Name three options for a company’s representation on the Internet in different types of
marketplace.
5
Explain the term ‘virtual value-chain’.
6
What are the three key factors that affect consumer adoption of the Internet?
7
Summarise how the bargaining power of buyers may be changed by the Internet for a
commodity product.
8
How can the internal value chain be modified when an organisation deploys Internet
technologies?
References
Agrawal, V., Arjona, V. and Lemmens, R. (2001) E-performance: the path to rational exuber-
ance, McKinsey Quarterly, No 1, 31–43.
Benjamin, R. and Wigand, R. (1995) Electronic markets and virtual value-chains on the infor-
mation superhighway, Sloan Management Review, Winter, 62–72.
Berryman, K., Harrington, L., Layton-Rodin, D. and Rerolle, V. (1998) Electronic commerce:
three emerging strategies, McKinsey Quarterly, No. 1, 152–9.
Berthon, P., Lane, N., Pitt, L. and Watson, R. (1998) The World Wide Web as an industrial
marketing communications tool: models for the identification and assessment of opportu-
nities, Journal of Marketing Management, 14, 691–704.
Bettman, J. (1979) An Information Processing Theory of Consumer Choice. Addison-Wesley,
Reading, MA.
BMRB (2001, 2004) Internet monitor, November. BMRB International, Manchester. Available
online at www
.bmrb.co.uk
.
Booms, B. and Bitner, M. (1981) Marketing strategies and organisation structure for service
firms.  In J.  Donelly and  W. George (eds) Marketing of  Services.  American Marketing
Association, New York.
BrandNewWorld (2004) AOL research published at www
.aolbrandnewworld.co.uk
.
Breitenbach, C. and van Doren, D. (1998) Value-added marketing in the digital domain:
enhancing the utility of the Internet, Journal of Consumer Marketing, 15(6), 559–75.
Chaffey, D. (2001) Optimising e-marketing performance – a review of approaches and tools.
In  Proceedings  of IBM  Workshop  on  Business Intelligence  and  E-marketing.  Warwick,  6
December.
Chaffey, D. (2006) Compilation of search engine keyphrase analysis tools. Page maintained
at: www
.davechaf
fey
.com/Inter
net-Marketing/C8-Communications/E-tools/Sear
ch-market
-
ing/Sear
ch-marketing-keyphrase-tools
.
Chase, L. (1998) Essential Business Tactics for the Net. Wiley, New York.
Clemons, E. and Row, M. (2000) Behaviour is key to web retailing. Financial Times, Mastering
Management Supplement, 13 November.
Consumers’  Association  (2001)  Annual  UK  Internet  survey,  July  (available  online  at
www
.which.net/sur
veys/intr
o.htm
).
Deise, M., Nowikow, C., King, P. and Wright, A. (2000) Executive’s Guide to E-Business. From
Tactics to Strategy. Wiley, New York.
CHAPTER 2 · THE INTERNET MICRO-ENVIRONMENT
C# PDF File & Page Process Library SDK for C#.net, ASP.NET, MVC
Read: PDF Text Extract; C# Read: PDF Image Extract; C# Write: Insert text into PDF; C# Write: Add Image to PDF; C# Protect: Add Password
how to insert text in pdf reader; acrobat add text to pdf
VB.NET PDF Text Extract Library: extract text content from PDF
this advanced PDF Add-On, developers are able to extract target text content from source PDF document and save extracted text to other file formats through VB
how to insert text box in pdf file; adding text to pdf reader
de Kare-Silver, M. (2000) EShock 2000. The Electronic Shopping Revolution: Strategies for Retailers
and Manufacturers. Macmillan, London.
DTI (2004) Business in the  Information Age – International Benchmarking Study  2004. UK
Department of Trade and Industry. www
.ukonlineforbusiness.gov
.uk
.
Economist (2000) Enter the ecosystem, The Economist, 11 November.
E-consultancy (2004) Online Retail 2004, benchmarking the user experience of UK retail sites.
Report, July, London. Available online from www
.e-consultancy
.com
.
Financial Times (2005) Lending exchange bypasses high street banks. Paul J. Davies, Financial
Times, 22 August.
Forrester Research (2002) Mapping customer paths across multiple sites helps site owners pre-
dict which  consumers are likely to buy and  when. Forrester Research  Press Release,
Cambridge, MA,  19 February.
Grossnickle, J. and Raskin, O. (2001) The Handbook of Online Marketing Research: Knowing your
Customer Using the Net. McGraw-Hill, New York.
Hagel, J. III and Rayport, J. (1997) The new infomediaries, McKinsey Quarterly, No. 4, 54–70.
Institute of Directors (2005) Profile – Richard Duvall, Director, September, 51–5.
Kalakota, R. and Robinson, M. (2000) E-Business. Roadmap for Success. Addison-Wesley,
Reading, MA.
Kothari, D., Jain, S., Khurana, A. and Saxena, A. (2001) Developing a marketing strategy for
global  online  customer  management,  International  Journal  of  Customer  Relationship
Management, 4(1), 53–8.
Kotler, P., Armstrong, G., Saunders, J. and Wong, V. (2001) Principles of Marketing, 3rd
European edn. Financial Times/Prentice Hall, Harlow.
Lewis, H. and Lewis, R. (1997) Give your customers what they want, selling on the Net.
Executive Book Summaries, 19(3), March.
McDonald, M. and Wilson, H. (2002) New Marketing: Transforming the Corporate Future.
Butterworth Heinemann, Oxford.
Menteth, H., Arbuthnot, S. and Wilson, H. (2005) Multi-channel experience consistency: evi-
dence from Lexus, Interactive Marketing, 6 (4) 317–25. 
Moe, W. (2003) Buying, searching, or browsing: differentiating between online shoppers
using in-store navigational clickstream. Journal of Consumer Psychology, 13 (1/2), 29.
Moe, W. and Fader, P. (2004) Dynamic conversion behavior at e-commerce sites. Management
Science, 50 (3), 326–35.
MORI (2002) Technology Tracker, January. Available online at:  www
.mori.com/technology/
techtracker
.shtml
.
Murdoch, R. (2005) Speech to the American Society of Newspaper editors, 13 April. Available
online at www
.newscorp.com
National Statistics (2005) National Statistics Omnibus Survey – Internet access section, May,
www
.statistics.gov
.uk
.
New Media Age (2005) Personal Lender, Dominic Dudley, 18 August.
Nunes, P., Kambil, A. and Wilson, D. (2000) The all in one market, Harvard Business Review,
May–June, 2–3.
Porter, M. (1980) Competitive Strategy. Free Press, New York.
Porter, M. (2001) Strategy and the Internet, Harvard Business Review, March, 62–78.
Rayport, J. and Sviokla, J. (1996) Exploiting the virtual value-chain, McKinsey Quarterly, No. 1,
20–32.
Robinson, P., Faris, C. and Wind, Y. (1967) Industrial Buying and Creative Marketing. Allyn and
Bacon, Boston.
Sarkar, M., Butler, B. and Steinfield, C. (1996) Intermediaries and cybermediaries. A continu-
ing role for mediating players in the electronic marketplace, Journal of Computer Mediated
Communication, issue 1.
Seybold, P. and Marshak, R. (2001) The Customer Revolution. Crown Business, New York.
Styler, A. (2001) Understanding buyer behaviour in the 21st century, Admap, September, 23–6.
Thomas, J. and Sullivan, U. (2005) Managing marketing communications with multichannel
customers, Journal of Marketing, 69 (October), 239–51.
Timmers, P. (1999) Electronic Commerce Strategies and Models for Business-to-Business Trading.
Wiley, Chichester.
Venkatraman, N. (2000) Five steps to a dot-com strategy: how to find your footing on the
web, Sloan Management Review, Spring, 15–28.
Wodtke, C. (2002) Information Architecture: Blueprints for the Web. New Riders, IN.
REFERENCES
95
C# PDF Text Extract Library: extract text content from PDF file in
How to C#: Extract Text Content from PDF File. Add necessary references: RasterEdge.Imaging.Basic.dll. RasterEdge.Imaging.Basic.Codec.dll.
add text pdf professional; how to add a text box to a pdf
C# PDF insert image Library: insert images into PDF in C#.net, ASP
using RasterEdge.Imaging.Basic; using RasterEdge.XDoc.PDF; Have a try with this sample C#.NET code to add an image to the first page of PDF file.
how to insert text into a pdf file; adding text field to pdf
Further reading
Dibb, S., Simkin, S., Pride, W. and Ferrel, O. (2001) Marketing. Concepts and Strategies, 4th
European edn. Houghton Mifflin, New York. See Chapter 2, The marketing environment.
Kotler, P., Armstrong, G., Saunders, J. and Wong, V. (2001) Principles of Marketing, 3rd European
edn. Financial Times/Prentice Hall, Harlow. See Chapter 4, The marketing environment.
Porter, M. (2001) Strategy and the Internet, Harvard Business Review, March, 62–78. A retrospec-
tive assessment of how the Internet has changed Porter’s model, first proposed in the 1980s.
Timmers, P. (1999) Electronic Commerce Strategies and Models for Business-to-Business Trading.
Wiley, Chichester. Detailed descriptions of different B2B models are available in this book.
Web links
A directory of Internet marketing links, including sources for statistics from the Internet
environment, is maintained by Dave Chaffey at www
.davechaf
fey
.com
.
Digests of reports and surveys concerned with e-commerce
1 Digests of published MR data
ClickZ Internet research (www
.clickz.com/stats
)
Market Research.com (www
.marketr
esear
ch.com
)
MR Web (www
.mr
web.co.uk
)
2 Directories of MR companies
British Market Research Association (www
.bmra.or
g.uk
)
Market Research Society (www
.mrs.or
g.uk
)
International MR agencies (www
.gr
eenbook.or
g
)
3 Traditional market research agencies
MORI (www
.mori.com/emori
)
NOP (www
.nopworld.com
)
Nielsen (www
.nielsen.com
)
4 Government sources
European government (http://eur
opa.eu.int/comm/eur
ostat
)
OECD (www
.oecd.or
g
)
UK government (www
.open.gov
.uk
, www
.ons.gov
.uk
)
US government (www
.stat-usa.gov
)
5 Online audience data
Comscore (www
.comscor
e.com
)
Hitwise (www
.hitwise.com
)
Mori (www
.mori.com/emori
)
Netratings (www
.netratings.com
)
NOP World (www
.nopworld.com
)
CHAPTER 2 · THE INTERNET MICRO-ENVIRONMENT
96
VB.NET PDF File Compress Library: Compress reduce PDF size in vb.
Also able to uncompress PDF file in VB.NET programs. Offer flexible and royalty-free developing library license for VB.NET programmers to compress PDF file.
add text pdf file; add text box to pdf
VB.NET PDF insert image library: insert images into PDF in vb.net
try with this sample VB.NET code to add an image As String = Program.RootPath + "\\" 1.pdf" Dim doc New PDFDocument(inputFilePath) ' Get a text manager from
add text pdf acrobat professional; how to enter text in pdf
Learning objectives
After reading this chapter, the reader should be able to:
Identify the different elements of the Internet macro-environment
that impact on an organisation’s Internet marketing strategy and
execution
Assess the impact of legal, moral and ethical constraints and
opportunities on an organisation and devise solutions to
accommodate them
Evaluate the significance of other macro-factors such as economics,
taxation and legal constraints
Questions for marketers
Key questions for marketing managers related to this chapter are:
Which factors affect the environment for online trading in a country?
How do I make sure my online marketing is consistent with evolving
online culture and ethics?
How do I assess new technological innovations?
Which laws am I subject to when trading online?
Links to other chapters
Like the previous chapter, this one provides a foundation for later
chapters on Internet marketing strategy and implementation:
Chapter 4, Internet marketing strategy
Chapter 5, The Internet and the marketing mix
 Chapter 6, Relationship marketing using the Internet
Chapter 7, Delivering the online customer experience
Chapter 8, Interactive marketing communications
3
Main topics
Social factors s 99
Legal and ethical issues of
Internet usage 101
Technological factors s 116
Economic factors s 136
Political factors s 139
Case study 3
Boo hoo – learning from the
largest European dot-com
failure 141
Chapter at a glance
The Internet 
macro-environment
C# PDF File Split Library: Split, seperate PDF into multiple files
page of your defined page number which starts from 0. For example, your original PDF file contains 4 pages. C# DLLs: Split PDF Document. Add necessary references
how to insert text in pdf using preview; add text field to pdf
VB.NET PDF File Merge Library: Merge, append PDF files in vb.net
by directly tagging the second PDF file to the target one, this PDF file merge function VB.NET Project: DLLs for Merging PDF Documents. Add necessary references
how to add text to a pdf document; how to add text to pdf file with reader
In the last chapter we reviewed the micro-economic factors that an organisation must
consider in order to assess the impact of the Internet. In this chapter, we will review how
the macro-economic factors can influence the way in which the Internet is used to sup-
port marketing. 
We present the macro-environment factors using the widely used SLEPT framework.
SLEPT stands for Social, Legal, Economic, Political and Technological factors. Often, these
factors are known as the PEST factors, but we use SLEPT since it is useful to stress the
importance of the Law in influencing Internet marketing practices. The SLEPT factors are:
Social factors – these include the influence of consumer perceptions in determining
usage of the Internet for different activities.
Legal and ethical factors – determine the method by which products can be promoted
and sold online. Governments, on behalf of society, seek to safeguard individuals’
rights to privacy.
Economic factors – variations in the economic performance in different countries and
regions affect spending patterns and international trade.
Political – national governments and transnational organisations have an important
role in determining the future adoption and control of the Internet and the rules by
which it is governed.
Technological factors – changes in technology offer new opportunities to the way prod-
ucts can be marketed.
Together, these macro-economic factors will determine the overall characteristics of
the micro-environment described in the previous chapter. For example, the social, legal,
economic, political and technological environment in any country will directly affect
the demand for e-commerce services by both consumers and businesses. Governments
may promote the use of e-commerce while social conventions may limit its popularity.
For instance, some southern European countries traditionally do not have a culture
suited to catalogue shopping since consumers tend to prefer personal contact. In these
countries there will be a lower propensity to buy online. 
While it can be considered that the macro-economic factors will influence all com-
petitors in a marketplace, this doesn’t mean that the macro-environment factors are
unimportant. Changes in the macro-environment such as changes in social behaviour,
new laws and the introduction of new technologies can all present opportunities or
threats. Organisations that monitor and respond best to their macro-environment can
use it as a source of differentiation and competitive advantage.
An indication of the challenge of assessing the macro-environment factors is pre-
sented in Figure 3.1. This figure of the ‘waves of change’ shows how fluctuations in the
characteristics of different aspects of the environment vary at different rates through
time. The manager has to constantly scan the environment and assess which changes
are relevant to their sphere of influence. Changes in social culture and particularly pop
culture (what’s ‘hot’ and what’s not) tend to be very rapid. Introduction of new tech-
nologies  and changes in  their popularity tend  to be frequent too and need to  be
assessed.  Government and  legal changes tend to happen over  longer  time scales,
although since this is only a generalisation new laws can be introduced relatively fast.
The trick for Internet marketers is to identify those factors which are important in the
context of Internet marketing which are critical to competitiveness and service delivery
and monitor these. We believe it is the technological and legal factors which are most
important to the Internet marketer, so we focus on these.
CHAPTER 3 · THE INTERNET MACRO-ENVIRONMENT
98
Introduction
In the last chapter, in the sections on customer adoption of Internet technology, we
looked at how Internet usage varies across different countries in terms of levels of access,
amount of usage, its influence on offline purchase and the proportion of online pur-
chases. These variations are in part dependent on how the Internet is perceived in
society. An indication of how social perceptions shape access is clear from a UK govern-
ment-sponsored  survey  (Booz  Allen  Hamilton,  2002)  of  perceptions  in  different
countries. It noted that social barriers to adoption of the Internet included:
No perceived benefit
Lack of trust
Security problems
Lack of skills
Cost.
These factors combine to mean that there is a significant group in each national pop-
ulation of around a third of the adult population that does not envisage ever using the
Internet. Clearly, the lack of demand for Internet services from this group needs to be
taken into account when forecasting future demand. It is not sufficient to simply extrap-
olate past rates of Internet adoption growth, since in many developed countries it
appears that penetration within households is reaching a plateau as saturation of serv-
ices amongst those who require them is reached. Taking the UK as an example of
possible saturation of fixed PC-based Internet access, National Statistics (2005) reports
that in the UK, just under one third (32 per cent) of adults had never used the Internet
as of May 2005. Of those who had not used the Internet, 43 per cent stated that they did
not want to use, or had no need for, or no interest in, the Internet; 38 per cent had no
SOCIAL FACTORS
99
Figure 3.1 ’Waves of change’ – different timescales for change in the environment
Infrastructure
road, railways
Government
Commerce
Technology
Social
Pop culture
The natural
environment
Social factors
Internet connection; and 33 per cent felt they lacked knowledge or the confidence to
use it. These adults were also asked which of four statements best described what they
thought about using the Internet. Over half (55 per cent) of non-users chose the state-
ment ‘I have not really considered using the Internet before and I am not likely to in the future’.
This core group of non-Internet users represented 17 per cent of all adults in the UK. 
Social exclusion
The social impact of the Internet has also concerned many commentators because the
Internet has the potential effect of accentuating differences in quality of life, both
within a society in a single country, and between different nations, essentially creating
‘information haves’ and ‘information have-nots’. This may accentuate social exclusion
where one part of society is excluded from the facilities available to the remainder and
so becomes isolated. The United Nations, in a 1999 report on human development
(p. 63), noted that parallel worlds are developing where 
those with income, education and – literally – connections have cheap and instantaneous
access to information. The rest are left with uncertain, slow and costly access . . . the
advantage of being connected will overpower the marginal and impoverished, cutting off
their voices and concerns from the global conversation.
While the problem is easy to identify, it is clearly difficult to rectify. Developed coun-
tries with the economies to support it are promoting the use of IT and the Internet
through social programmes such as the UK government’s UK Online initiative, which
operated between 2000 and 2004 to promote the use of the Internet by business and
consumers. In some developing countries, the Internet is seen as a catalyst for change.
The Guardian (2005) reported how Ethiopia has developed a high-speed broadband
infrastructure to facilitate education and commerce.
Like other innovations such as mechanised transport, electricity or the phone, the
Internet has been used to support social progress. Those with special needs and interests
can now communicate on a global basis and empowering information sources are read-
ily available to all. For example, visually impaired people are no longer restricted to
Braille books, but can use screen readers to hear information available to sighted people
on the web. As we will see, this has implications for disability discrimination laws which
impact accessibility. However, these same technologies, including the Internet, can have
negative social impacts such as changing traditional social ideals and being used as a
conduit for crime. The Internet has facilitated the publication of and access to informa-
tion, which has led to many benefits, but it has also led to publication of and access to
information which most in society would deem inappropriate. Well-known problems
include the use of the Internet to incite racial hatred and terrorism, support child
pornography and for identity theft. Such social problems can have implications for mar-
keters who need to respond to laws or the morals established by society and respond to
the fears generated. For example, portals such as MSN (www
.msn.com
) and Yahoo!
(www
.yahoo.com
) discontinued their use of unmoderated chatrooms in 2003 since pae-
dophiles were using them to ‘groom’ children for later real-world meetings.
CHAPTER 3 · THE INTERNET MACRO-ENVIRONMENT
100
Social exclusion
Part of society is
excluded from the
facilities available to
the remainder.
Ethical standards are personal or business practices or behaviours which are generally
considered acceptable by society. A simple test is that acceptable ethics can be described
as moral or just and unethical practices as immoral or unjust.
Ethical issues and the associated laws developed to control the ethical approach to
Internet marketing is an important consideration of the Internet business environment
for marketers. Privacy of consumers is a key ethical issue on which we will concentrate
since many laws have been enacted and it affects all types of organisation regardless of
whether they have a transactional e-commerce service. A further ethical issue for which
laws have been enacted in many countries is providing an accessible level of Internet
services for disabled users. We will also review other laws that have been developed for
managing commerce and distance-selling online.
Privacy legislation
Privacy refers to a moral right of individuals to avoid intrusion into their personal affairs
by third parties. Privacy of personal data such as our identities, likes and dislikes is a
major concern to consumers, particularly with the dramatic increase in identity theft.
According to the Guardian (2003a), quoting the Credit Industry Fraud Avoidance System
(CIFAS), the UK’s fraud prevention service, it is the fastest-growing white-collar crime,
generating a criminal cashflow of £10m a day. In 1999, there were 20,264 reported cases
of identity theft in the UK; but by 2002, that figure had reached 74,766, and in 2003,
the figure was 101,000. Identity fraud involving credit and debit cards rose by 45 per
cent in 2003.
Yet, for marketers to better understand their customers’ needs, this type of informa-
tion is very valuable. Through collecting such information it will also be possible to use
more targeted communications and develop products that are more consistent with
users’ needs. How should marketers respond to this dilemma? An obvious step is to
ensure that marketing activities are consistent with the latest data protection and pri-
vacy laws. Although compliance with the laws may sound straightforward, in practice
different interpretations of the law are possible and since these are new laws they have
not been tested in court. As a result, companies have to take their own business decision
based on the business benefits of applying particular marketing practices, against the
financial and reputational risks of less strict compliance. 
Effective e-commerce requires a delicate balance to be struck between the benefits the
individual customer will gain to their online experience through providing personal
information and the amount and type of information that they are prepared for compa-
nies to hold about them. 
What are the main information types used by the Internet marketer which are gov-
erned by ethics and legislation? The information needs are:
1 Contact information. This is the name, postal address, e-mail address and, for B2B com-
panies, web site address.
2 Profile information. This is information about a customer’s characteristics that can be
used for segmentation. They include age, sex and social group for consumers, and
company characteristics and individual role for business customers. The specific types
of information and how they are used is referenced in Chapters 2 and 6. The willing-
ness of consumers to give this information and the effectiveness of incentives have
LEGAL AND ETHICAL ISSUES OF INTERNET USAGE
101
Legal and ethical issues of Internet usage
Ethical standards
Practices or behaviours
which are morally
acceptable to society.
Privacy
A moral right of
individuals to avoid
intrusion into their
personal affairs.
Identity theft
The misappropriation
of the identity of
another person,
without their
knowledge or consent.
Documents you may be interested
Documents you may be interested