mvc show pdf in div : How to insert text box in pdf file application SDK cloud html wpf .net class 5G7BGE3Z6KNWFOHBFCWN14-part1349

Viral e-mail marketing
One widespread business practice that is not covered explicitly in the PECR law is ‘viral
marketing’. The network of people referred to in the definition is more powerful in an
online context where e-mail is used to transmit the virus – rather like a cold or flu virus.
The combination of the viral offer and the transmission medium is sometimes referred
to as the ‘viral agent’. Different types of viral marketing are reviewed in Chapter 8.
Privacy verification bodies
There are several initiatives that are being taken by industry groups to reassure web users
about  threats  to  their  personal  information.  The  first  of  these  is  TRUSTe
(www
.tr
uste.or
g
), sponsored by IBM and with sites validated by PricewaterhouseCoopers
and KPMG (Figure 3.2). The validators will audit the site to check each site’s privacy
statement to see whether it is valid. For example, a privacy statement will describe:
how a site collects information;
how the information is used;
who the information is shared with;
how users can access and correct information;
how users can decide to deactivate themselves from the site or withhold information
from third parties.
A UK initiative coordinated by the Internet Media in Retail Group is ISIS (Internet
Shopping is Safe) (www
.imr
g.or
g/ISIS
). Government initiatives will also define best prac-
tice in this area and may introduce laws to ensure guidelines are followed. In the UK, the
Data Protection Act covers some of these issues and the 1999 European Data Protection
Act also has draft laws to help maintain personal privacy on the Internet.
We conclude this section on privacy legislation with a checklist summary of the prac-
tical steps that are required to audit a company’s compliance with data protection and
privacy legislation. Companies should:
1 Follow privacy and consumer protection guidelines and laws in all local markets. Use
local privacy and security certification where available.
2 Inform the user, before asking for information on:
who the company is;
what personal data are collected, processed and stored;
what is the purpose of collection.
3 Ask for consent for collecting sensitive personal data, and it is good practice to ask
before collecting any type of data.
4 Reassure customers by providing clear and effective privacy statements and explain-
ing the purpose of data collection. 
5 Let individuals know when ‘cookies’ or other covert software are used to collect infor-
mation about them.
CHAPTER 3 · THE INTERNET MACRO-ENVIRONMENT
112
provision clarifies this. The law states: ‘where such storage or access is strictly necessary
for the provision of an information society service requested by the subscriber or user’. This
indicates that for an e-commerce service session cookies are legitimate without the need
for opt-in. It is arguable whether the identification of return visitors is ‘strictly necessary’
and this is why some sites have a ‘remember me’ tick box next to the log-in. Through doing
this they are compliant with the law. Using cookies for tracking return visits alone would
seem to be outlawed, but we will have to see how case law develops over the coming
years before this is resolved.
Viral marketing
A marketing message
is communicated from
one person to another,
facilitated by different
media, such as word of
mouth, e-mail or web
sites. Implies rapid
transmission of
messages is intended.
How to insert text box in pdf file - insert text into PDF content in C#.net, ASP.NET, MVC, Ajax, WinForms, WPF
XDoc.PDF for .NET, providing C# demo code for inserting text to PDF file
how to add text to a pdf document using acrobat; how to add text box in pdf file
How to insert text box in pdf file - VB.NET PDF insert text library: insert text into PDF content in vb.net, ASP.NET, MVC, Ajax, WinForms, WPF
Providing Demo Code for Adding and Inserting Text to PDF File Page in VB.NET Program
adding text to pdf document; add text block to pdf
Never collect or retain personal data unless it is strictly necessary for the organisation’s
purposes. For example, a person’s name and full address should not be required to pro-
vide an online quotation. If extra information is required for marketing purposes this
should be made clear and the provision of such information should be optional.
7 Amend incorrect data when informed and tell others. Enable correction on-site.
8 Only use data for marketing (by the company, or third parties) when a user has been
informed this is the case and has agreed to this. (This is opt-in.)
9 Provide the option for customers to stop receiving information. (This is opt-out.)
10 Use appropriate security technology to protect the customer information on your site.
Other e-commerce legislation
Sparrow (2000) identified eight areas of law which need to concern online marketers.
Although laws have been refined since then, this is still a useful framework for consider-
ing the laws to which digital marketers are subject.
1 Marketing your e-commerce business
At the time of writing, Sparrow used this category to refer to purchasing a domain name
for its web site. There are now other legal constraints that also fall under this category.
Domain name registration
Most companies are likely to own several domains (see end of Chapter 1 for an introduc-
tion),  perhaps  for  different  product  lines  or  countries  or  for  specific  marketing
campaigns. Domain name disputes can arise when an individual or company has regis-
tered a domain name which another company claims they have the right to. This is
sometimes referred to as ‘cybersquatting’. 
One of the best-known cases was brought in 1998 by Marks and Spencer and other
high-street retailers, since another company, ‘One In a Million Limited’, had registered
names such as marks&spencer.com, britishtelecom.net and sainsbury.com. It then tried
to sell these names for a profit. The companies already had sites with more familiar
addresses such as marksandspencers.co.uk, but had not taken the precaution of register-
ing all related domains with different forms of spelling and different top-level domains
such as .net. Unsurprisingly, an injunction was issued against One in a Million which
was no longer able to use these names. 
The problem of companies’ names being misappropriated was common during the
1990s, but companies still need to be sure to register all related domain names for each
brand since new top-level domain names are created through time such as .biz and .eu.
If you are responsible for web sites, you need to check that domain names are auto-
matically renewed by your hosting company (as most are today). For example, the .co.uk
domain must be renewed every two years. Companies that don’t manage this process
potentially risk losing their domain name since another company could potentially reg-
ister it if the domain name lapsed. 
Using competitor names and trademarks in meta-tags (for search engine optimisation)
Meta-tags, which are part of the HTML code of a site are used to market web sites by
enabling them to appear more prominently in search engines as part of search engine opti-
misation (SEO)  (see  Chapter  8).  Some  companies  have  tried putting the  name of a
competitor company name within the meta-tags. This is not legal since case law has found
LEGAL AND ETHICAL ISSUES OF INTERNET USAGE
113
Domain name
The domain name
refers to the name of
the web server and it
is usually selected to
be the same as the
name of the company,
e.g. www
.company-
name.com
, and the
extension will indicate
its type.
VB.NET PDF Text Box Edit Library: add, delete, update PDF text box
Extract Field Data. Data: Auto Fill-in Field Data. Field: Insert, Delete, Update Highlight Text. Add Text. Add Text Box. Drawing Markups. PDF Print. Work with
adding text to pdf in acrobat; how to add a text box in a pdf file
C# PDF Text Box Edit Library: add, delete, update PDF text box in
with .NET PDF Library. A best PDF annotator for Visual Studio .NET supports to add text box to PDF file in Visual C#.NET project.
how to enter text in a pdf document; add text to pdf in acrobat
against companies that have used this approach. A further issue of marketing-related law is
privacy law for e-mail marketing which was considered in the previous section.
Using competitor names and trademarks in pay-per-click advertising 
A similar approach can potentially be used in pay-per-click marketing (see Chapter 8) to
advertise on competitors’ names and trademarks. For example, if a search user types
‘Dell laptop’ can an advertiser bid to place an ad offering an ‘HP laptop’? There is less
case law in this area and differing findings have occurred in the US and France (such
advertising is not permitted in France). 
Accessibility law
Web accessibility refers to enabling all users of a web site to interact with it regardless of
disabilities they may have or the web browser or platform they are using to access the
site. The visually impaired or blind are the main audience that designing an accessible
web site can help.
Many countries now have specific accessibility legislation. This is often contained
within disability and discrimination acts. In the UK, the relevant act is the Disability and
Discrimination Act 1995.
2 Forming an electronic contract (contract law and distance-selling law)
We will look at two aspects of forming an electronic contract.
Country of origin principle
The contract formed between a buyer and a seller on a web site will be subject to the
laws of a particular country. In Europe, many such laws are specified at the regional
(European Union) level, but are interpreted differently in different countries. This raises
the issue of which law applies – is it that for the buyer, for example located in Germany,
or the seller (merchant), whose site is based in France? Although this has been unclear,
in 2002 attempts were made by the EU to adopt the ‘country of origin principle’. This
means that the law for the contract will be that where the merchant is located. 
Distance-selling law
Sparrow (2000) advises different forms of disclaimers to protect the retailer. For example,
if a retailer made an error with the price or the product details were in error, then the
retailer is not bound to honour a contract, since it was only displaying the products as
‘an invitation to treat’, not a fixed offer. 
A well-known case was when an e-retailer offered televisions for £2.99 due to an error
in pricing a £299 product. Numerous purchases were made, but the e-retailer claimed
that a contract had not been established simply by accepting the online order, although
the customers did not see it that way! Unfortunately, no legal precedent was established
in this case since the case did not come to trial.
Disclaimers can also be used to limit liability if the web site service causes a problem
for the user, such as a financial loss resulting from an action based on erroneous con-
tent. Furthermore, Sparrow suggests that terms and conditions should be developed to
refer to issues such as timing of delivery and damage or loss of goods.
The distance-selling directive also has a bearing on e-commerce contracts in the
European Union. It was originally developed to protect people using mail-order (by post
or phone). The main requirements, which are consistent with what most reputable
e-retailers would do anyway, are that e-commerce sites must contain easily accessible
content which clearly states:
CHAPTER 3 · THE INTERNET MACRO-ENVIRONMENT
114
Pay-per-click (PPC)
search marketing 
Refers to when a
company pays for text
ads to be displayed on
the search engine
results pages when a
specific keyphrase is
entered by the search
users. It is so called
since the marketer
pays for each time the
hypertext link in the ad
is clicked on.
Accessibility
legislation
Legislation intended to
protect users of web
sites with disabilities
including visual
disability.
C# PDF Annotate Library: Draw, edit PDF annotation, markups in C#.
Provide users with examples for adding text box to PDF and edit font size and color in text box field in C#.NET program. C#.NET: Draw Markups on PDF File.
adding text box to pdf; how to add text to a pdf in preview
C# WPF PDF Viewer SDK to annotate PDF document in C#.NET
Support to replace PDF text with a note annotation. Ability to insert a text note after selected text. Support to create a text box annotation to PDF file.
adding text to pdf form; adding text to pdf
The company’s identity including address;
The main features of the goods or services;
Prices information, including tax and, if appropriate, delivery costs;
The period for which the offer or price remains valid;
Payment, delivery and fulfilment performance arrangements;
Right of the consumer to withdraw, i.e. cancellation terms;
The minimum duration of the contract and whether the contract for the supply of
products or services is to be permanent or recurrent, if appropriate;
Whether an equivalent product or service might be substituted, and confirmation as
to whether the seller pays the return costs in this event.
After the contract has been entered into, the supplier is required to provide written
confirmation of the information provided. An e-mail confirmation is now legally bind-
ing provided both parties have agreed that e-mail is an acceptable form for the contract.
It is always advisable to obtain an electronic signature to confirm that both parties have
agreed the contract, and this is especially valuable in the event of a dispute. The default
position for services is that there is no cancellation right once services begin.
3 Making and accepting payment
For transactional e-commerce sites, the relevant laws are those referring to liability between
a credit card issuer, the merchant and the buyer. Merchants need to be aware of their liabil-
ity for different situations such as the customer making a fraudulent transaction.
4 Authenticating contracts concluded over the Internet
‘Authentication’ refers to establishing the identity of the purchaser. For example, to help
prove a credit card owner is the valid owner, many sites now ask for a 3-digit authentica-
tion code which is separate from the credit card number. This helps reduce the risk of
someone buying fraudulently who has, for instance, found a credit card number from a
traditional shopping purchase. Using digital signatures is another method of helping to
prove the identity of purchasers (and merchants). 
5 E-mail risks
One of the main risks with e-mail is infringing an individual’s privacy. Specific laws have
been developed in many countries to reduce the volume of unsolicited commercial e-
mail or spam, as explained in the previous section on privacy. 
A further issue with e-mail is defamation. This is where someone makes a statement
that is potentially damaging to an individual or a company. A well-known example from
2000 involved a statement made on the Norwich Union Healthcare internal e-mail
system in England which was defamatory towards a rival company, WPA. The statement
falsely alleged that WPA was under investigation and that regulators had forced them to
stop accepting new business. The posting was published on the internal e-mail system to
various members of Norwich Union Healthcare staff. Although this was only on an
internal system, it was not contained and became more widespread. WPA sued for libel
and the case was settled in  an out-of-court settlement  when Norwich Union paid
£415,000 to WPA. Such cases are relatively rare.
LEGAL AND ETHICAL ISSUES OF INTERNET USAGE
115
.NET PDF Document Viewing, Annotation, Conversion & Processing
from PDF file. Read PDF metadata. Search text content inside PDF. Extract bookmark & outlines. Extract hyperlink inside PDF. PDF Write. Insert text, text box into
add text field to pdf acrobat; how to add text to a pdf in acrobat
C# WPF Viewer: Load, View, Convert, Annotate and Edit PDF
Add text to PDF document. • Insert text box to PDF file. • Draw markups to PDF document. PDF Protection. • Add signatures to PDF document.
add text to pdf document in preview; add text pdf reader
6 Protecting intellectual property (IP)
Intellectual property rights (IPRs) protect designs, ideas and inventions and include con-
tent and services developed for e-commerce sites. Closely related is copyright law which
is designed to protect authors, producers, broadcasters and performers through ensuring
they see some returns from their works every time they are experienced. The European
Directive of Copyright (2001/29/EC) came into force in many countries in 2003. This is
a significant update to the law which covers new technologies and approaches such as
streaming a broadcast via the Internet.
IP can be misappropriated in two senses online.
First, an organisation’s IP may be misappropriated and you need to protect against
this. For example, it is relatively easy to copy web content and re-publish on another
site, and this practice is not unknown amongst smaller businesses. Reputation manage-
ment services can be used to assess how an organisation’s content, logos and trademarks
are being used on other web sites.
Secondly, an organisation may misappropriate content inadvertently. Some employ-
ees may infringe copyright if they are not aware of the law. Additionally, some methods
of designing transactional web sites have been patented. For example, Amazon has
patented its ‘One-click’ purchasing option which is why you do not see this labelling
and process on other sites.
7 Advertising on the Internet
Advertising  standards  that  are  enforced  by  independent  agencies  such  as  the  UK’s
Advertising Standards Authority Code also apply in the Internet environment (although
they are traditionally less strongly policed, leading to more ‘edgy’ creative executions online.
8 Data protection
Data protection has been referred to in depth in the previous section.
Electronic communications are disruptive technologies that have, as we saw in Chapter 2,
already caused major changes in industry structure, marketplace structure and business
models. Consider a B2B organisation. Traditionally it has sold its products through a net-
work of distributors. With the advent of e-commerce it now has the opportunity to bypass
distributors and trade directly with customers via a web site; it also has the opportunity to
reach customers through new B2B marketplaces. Knowledge of the opportunities and threats
presented by these changes is essential to those involved in defining marketing strategy.
One of the great challenges for Internet marketers is to be able to successfully assess
which new technological innovations can be applied to give competitive advantage. For
example, personalisation technology (Chapter 6) is intended to enhance the customer’s
online experience and increase their loyalty. However, a technique such as personalisa-
tion may require a large investment in proprietary software and hardware technology to
be able to implement it effectively. How does the manager decide whether to proceed
and which solution to adopt? In addition to technologies deployed on the web site, the
suitability of new approaches for attracting visitors to the site must be evaluated – for
example, should registration at a paid-for search engine, or new forms of banner adverts
CHAPTER 3 · THE INTERNET MACRO-ENVIRONMENT
116
Intellectual
property rights
(IPRs)
Protect the intangible
property created by
corporations or
individuals that is
protected under
copyright, trade secret
and patent laws.
Trademark
A trademark is a
unique word or phrase
that distinguishes your
company. The mark can
be registered as plain
or designed text,
artwork or a
combination. In theory,
colours, smells and
sounds can also be
trademarks.
Technological factors
Disruptive
technologies
New technologies that
prompt businesses to
reappraise their
strategic approaches.
C# WinForms Viewer: Load, View, Convert, Annotate and Edit PDF
Add text to PDF document in preview. • Add text box to PDF file in preview. • Draw PDF markups. PDF Protection. • Sign PDF document with signature.
how to add text to a pdf file in acrobat; how to add text fields to a pdf
VB.NET PDF - Annotate PDF with WPF PDF Viewer for VB.NET
annotation. Ability to insert a text note after selected text. transparency. Support to create a text box annotation to PDF file in .NET project. VB
add text boxes to a pdf; adding text pdf files
or e-mail marketing be used? Deciding on the best mix of traffic building techniques is
discussed further in Chapter 8.
The manager may have read articles in the trade and general press or spoken to col-
leagues which has highlighted the potential of a new technology-enabled marketing
technique. They then face a difficult decision as to whether to:
ignore the use of the technique completely, perhaps because it is felt to be too expensive
or untried, or because they simply don’t believe the benefits will outweigh the costs;
ignore the technique for now, but keep an eye on the results of other companies that
are starting to use it;
evaluate the technique in a structured manner and then take a decision whether to
adopt it according to the evaluation;
enthusiastically adopt the technique without a detailed evaluation since the hype
alone convinces the manager that the technique should be adopted.
Depending on the attitude of the manager, this behaviour can be summarised as:
1 cautious, ‘wait and see’ approach;
2 intermediate approach, sometimes referred to as ‘fast-follower’. Let others take the
majority of the risk, but if they are proving successful, then rapidly adopt the tech-
nique, i.e. copy them;
3 risk-taking, early-adopter approach.
Different behaviours by different adopters will result in different numbers of adopters
through time. This diffusion–adoption process (represented by the bell curve in Figure 3.4)
was identified by Rogers (1983) who classified those trialling new products from innova-
tors, early adopters, early majority, late majority, through to the laggards.
Figure 3.4 can be used in two main ways as an analytical tool to help managers. First,
it can be used to understand the stage at which customers are in adoption of a technol-
ogy, or any product. For example, the Internet is now a well-established tool and in
many developed countries we are into the late majority phase of adoption with large
numbers of users of services. This suggests it is essential to use this medium for market-
ing purposes. But if we look at WAP technology (see below) it can be seen that we are in
the innovator phase, so investment now may be wasted since it is not clear how many
will adopt the product. Secondly, managers can look at adoption of a new technique by
TECHNOLOGICAL FACTORS
117
Early adopters
Companies or
departments that
invest in new
technologies and
techniques.
Figure 3.4 Diffusion–adoption curve
other businesses – from an organisational perspective. For example, an online supermar-
ket could look at how many other e-tailers have adopted personalisation to evaluate
whether it is worthwhile adopting the technique.
Trott (1998) looks at this organisational perspective to technology adoption. He iden-
tifies different requirements that are necessary within an organisation to be able to
respond effectively to technological change or innovation. These are:
growth orientation – a long- rather than short-term vision;
vigilance – the capability of environment scanning;
commitment to technology – willingness to invest in technology;
acceptance of risk – willingness to take managed risks;
cross-functional cooperation – capability for collaboration across functional areas;
receptivity – the ability to respond to externally developed technology;
slack – allowing time to investigate new technological opportunities;
adaptability – a readiness to accept change;
diverse range of skills – technical and business skills and experience.
A commercial application of the diffusion of innovation curve was developed by tech-
nology analyst Gartner and has been applied to different technologies since 1995. They
describe a hype cycle as a graphic representation of the maturity, adoption and business
application of specific technologies.
Gartner (2005) recognises the following stages within a hype cycle, an example of
which is given for current trends in 2005 (Figure 3.5):
1 Technology Trigger – The first phase of a Hype Cycle is the ‘technology trigger’ or break-
through, product launch or other event that generates significant press and interest.
2 Peak of Inflated Expectations – In the next phase, a frenzy of publicity typically gener-
ates over-enthusiasm and unrealistic expectations. There may be some successful
applications of a technology, but there are typically more failures.
3 Trough of Disillusionment – Technologies enter the ‘trough of disillusionment’ because
they fail to meet expectations and quickly become unfashionable. Consequently, the
press usually abandons the topic and the technology.
4 Slope of Enlightenment – Although the press may have stopped covering the technol-
ogy, some businesses continue through the ‘slope of enlightenment’ and experiment
to understand the benefits and practical application of the technology.
5 Plateau of Productivity – A technology reaches the ‘plateau of productivity’ as the bene-
fits of  it  become  widely  demonstrated  and accepted. The  technology  becomes
increasingly stable and evolves in second and third generations. The final height of
the plateau varies according to whether the technology is broadly applicable or bene-
fits only a niche market.
The problem with being an early adopter (as an organisation) is that being at the lead-
ing edge of using new technologies is often also referred to as the ‘bleeding edge’ due to
the risk of failure. New technologies will have bugs, may integrate poorly with the exist-
ing systems or the marketing benefits may simply not live up to their promise. Of
course, the reason for risk taking is that the rewards are high – if you are using a tech-
nique that your competitors are not, then you will gain an edge on your rivals. For
example, RS Components (www
.rswww
.com
) was one of the first UK suppliers of indus-
trial components to adopt personalisation as part of their e-commerce system. They
have learnt the strengths and weaknesses of the product and now know how to position
it to appeal to customers. It offers facilities such as customised pages, access to previous
order history and the facility to place repeat orders or modified re-buys. This has enabled
them to build up a base of customers who are familiar with using the RS Components
online services and are then less likely to swap to rival services in the future.
CHAPTER 3 · THE INTERNET MACRO-ENVIRONMENT
118
Hype cycle
A graphic
representation of the
maturity, adoption and
business application of
specific technologies.
It may also be useful to identify how rapidly a new concept is being adopted. When a
product or service is adopted rapidly this is known as rapid diffusion. The access to the
Internet is an example of this. In developed countries the use of the Internet has become
widespread more rapidly than the use of TV, for example. It seems that interactive digital
TV and Internet-enabled mobile phones are relatively slow-diffusion products! Activity 3.1,
later in this chapter, considers this issue further.
So, what action should e-commerce managers take when confronted by new tech-
niques and technologies? There is no straightforward rule of thumb, other than that a
balanced approach must be taken. It would be easy to dismiss many new techniques as
fads, or classify them as ‘not relevant to my market’. However, competitors are likely to
be reviewing new techniques and incorporating some, so a careful review of new tech-
niques is required. This indicates that benchmarking of ‘best of breed’ sites within sector
and in different sectors is essential as part of environmental scanning. However, by wait-
ing for others to innovate and review the results on their web site, a company has
probably already lost 6 to 12 months. Figure 3.6 summarises the choices. The stepped
curve I shows the variations in technology through time. Some changes may be small
TECHNOLOGICAL FACTORS
119
Figure 3.5 Example of a Gartner hype cycle 
Source: Gartner (2005) Gartner’s Hype Cycle Special Report for 2005
Maturity
Technology
trigger
Peak of
inflated
expectations
Trough of
disillusionment
Slope of enlightenment
Plateau of
productivity
Linux on Desktop for Mainstream Business Users
Micro Fuel Cells
Desktop Search
BPM Suites
Biometric Identity Documents
P2P Vol P
Inkjet Manufacturing
Electronic Ink/Digital Paper
Model-Driven Approaches
Carbon Nanotubes
Podcasting
Business Process
Networks
Augumented Reality
Text Mining
Corporate
Semantic Web
4G
Grid Computing
Wikis
SOA
Speech Recognition for
Telephony and Call Centre
Web-Services-
Enabled Business
Models
Really Simple Syndication
Biometric User Identification
Corporate Blogging
Prediction Markets
Network Collective Intelligence
Quantum Computing
DNA Logic
802.16 2004 WiMAX
Organic Light-Emitting Devices
Mesh Networks – Sensor
Location-Aware Applications
Business Rule
Engines
VoIP
Text-to-
Speech/
Speech
Synthesis
Internal
Web
Services
Software as Service/ASP
Handwriting Recognition
Videoconferencing
RFID (Passive)
XBRL
Tablet PC
Internet Micropayments
Trusted
Computing Group
less than 2 years
Plateau will be reached in:
Acronym key:
4G  Fourth generation
ASP  Application service provider
BPM  Business process management
P2P  Peer to peer
RFID  Radio frequency identification
SOA 
Service-oriented architecture
VoIP 
Voice over Internet Protocol
WiMAX  Worldwide Interoperability for Microwave Access
XBRL  Extensible Business Reporting Language
2 to 5 years
5 to 10 years
more than 10 years
As of August 2005
V
i
s
i
b
i
l
i
t
y
incremental changes such as a new operating system; others, such as the introduction of
personalisation technology, are more significant in delivering value to customers and so
improving business performance. Line A is a company that is using innovative business
techniques, adopts technology early, or is even in advance of what the technology can
currently deliver. Curve C shows the conservative adopter whose use of technology lags
behind the available potential. Curve B, the middle ground, is probably the ideal situa-
tion where a company monitors new ideas as early adopters, trials them and then adopts
those that will positively impact the business.
Alternative digital technologies
In this section we introduce three alternative or complementary digital media access
platforms to PC-based fixed Internet access, which provide many similar advantages.
These access platforms or environments are mobile or wireless, interactive digital TV and
digital radio.
Mobile or wireless access devices
Mobile technologies are not new – it has been possible for many years to access the
Internet for e-mail using a laptop connected via a modem. However, the need for large
devices directly connected to the Internet was overcome with the development of per-
sonal digital assistants (PDAs) such as the PocketPC or RIM Blackberry and mobile
phones. These access the Internet using a wireless connection.
The characteristics that mobile or wireless connections offer to their users are ubiq-
uity (can be accessed from anywhere), reachability (their users can be reached when not
in their normal location) and convenience (it is not necessary to have access to a power
supply or fixed-line connection). In addition to these obvious benefits, there are addi-
tional  benefits  that  are  less  obvious:  they  provide  security  –  each  user  can  be
authenticated since each wireless device has a unique identification code; their location
can be used to tailor content; and they provide a degree of privacy compared with a
desktop PC – looking for jobs on a wireless device might be better than under the gaze of
CHAPTER 3 · THE INTERNET MACRO-ENVIRONMENT
120
Figure 3.6 Alternative responses to changes in technology
C
h
a
n
g
e
s
i
n
s
t
r
a
t
e
g
y
a
n
d
t
e
c
h
n
o
l
o
g
y
Time
A. Innovator
I. Technology changes
C. Laggard
B. Responder
Access platform
A method for
customers to access
digital media.
a boss. An additional advantage is that of instant access or ‘always-on’; here there is no
need to dial up a wireless connection. Table 3.2 provides a summary of the mobile or
wireless Internet access proposition. There are considerable advantages in comparison to
PC-based Internet access, but it is currently limited by the display limitations such as
small screen size and limited graphics.
Technology convergence
Technology convergence is an important phenomenon as digital marketers consider how
they can evolve their propositions for consumers. As you know, today a mobile phone is
not just a phone, it is likely also a text messaging system, music playing system, e-mail
reading platform, camera, personal organiser, Internet access device and Global Positioning
System (GPS). Of course, just because a technology is possible does not mean it is widely
used. So, for marketers, it is important to assess new technologies and support them once
they reach critical mass, or if there is a niche which can be exploited. For example, Mintel
reported in 2005 that the downloadable content for ringtones and games is now a $1 bil-
lion market in the UK. Many users now use phones or PDAs for accessing e-mails, so it is
important that marketers ensure their messages are received on these devices.
SMS messaging
In addition to offering voice calls and data transfer, mobile phones have increasingly
been used for e-mail and Short Message Service (SMS), commonly known as ‘texting’
(Figure 3.7). SMS is, of course, a simple form of e-mail that enables messages to be trans-
ferred between mobile phones. 
Texting has proved useful for business in some niche applications. For example, banks
now notify customers when they approach an overdraft and provide weekly statements
using SMS. Text has also been used by consumer brands to market their products, partic-
ularly to a younger audience as the case studies at text agency Flytxt (www
.flytxt.com
)
and Text.It, the organisation promoting text messaging (www
.text.it
), show. Texting can
also be used in supply chain management applications for notifying managers of prob-
lems or deliveries.
TECHNOLOGICAL FACTORS
121
Technology
convergence
A trend in which
different hardware
devices such as TVs,
computers and phones
merge and have similar
functions.
Short Message
Service (SMS)
The formal name for
text messaging.
Table 3.2 Summary of mobile or wireless Internet access consumer proposition
Element of proposition
Evaluation
Not fixed location
The user is freed from the need to access via the desktop, making
access possible when commuting, for example
Location-based services
Mobiles can be used to give geographically based services, e.g. an
offer in a particular shopping centre. Future mobiles will have global
positioning services integrated
Instant access/convenience
The latest GPRS and 3G services are always on, avoiding the need
for lengthy connection (see section on alternative digital technologies)
Privacy
Mobiles are more private than desktop access, making them 
more suitable for social use or for certain activities such as an alert
service for looking for a new job
Personalisation
As with PC access, personal information and services can be 
requested by the user, although these often need to be set up via 
PC access
Security
In the future mobile may become a form of wallet, but thefts of 
mobiles make this a source of concern
Documents you may be interested
Documents you may be interested