mvc show pdf in div : How to add text to a pdf in reader Library SDK component .net wpf asp.net mvc 5G7BGE3Z6KNWFOHBFCWN16-part1351

3 Integrity – checks that the message sent is complete, i.e. that it isn’t corrupted.
4 Non-repudiability – ensures sender cannot deny sending message.
5 Availability – how can threats to the continuity and performance of the system be
eliminated?
Approaches to developing secure systems
Digital certificates
There are two main methods of encryption using digital certificates or ‘keys’:
1 Secret-key (symmetric) encryption. This involves both parties having an identical
(shared) key that is known only to them. Only this key can be used to encrypt and
decrypt messages. The secret key has to be passed from one party to the other before
use in much the same way a copy of a secure attaché case key would have to be sent
to a receiver of information. This approach has traditionally been used to achieve
security between two separate parties, such as major companies conducting EDI. Here
the private key is sent out electronically or by courier to ensure it is not copied.
This method is not practical for general e-commerce since it would not be safe for
a purchaser to give a secret key to a merchant since control of it would be lost and it
could not then be used for other purposes. A merchant would also have to manage
many customer keys.
2 Public-key (asymmetric) encryption. Asymmetric encryption is so called since the keys
used by the sender and receiver of information are different. The two keys are related
by a numerical code, so only the pair of keys can be used in combination to encrypt
and decrypt information. Figure 3.11 shows how public-key encryption works in an
e-commerce context. A customer can place an order with a merchant by automati-
cally looking up the public key of the merchant and then using this key to encrypt
the message containing their order. The scrambled message is then sent across the
Internet and on receipt by the merchant is read using the merchant’s private key. In
this way only the merchant who has the only copy of the private key can read the
order. In the reverse case the merchant could confirm the customer’s identity by read-
ing identity information such as a digital signature encrypted with the private key of
the customer using their public key.
Digital signatures
Digital signatures can be used to create commercial systems by using public-key encryp-
tion to achieve authentication: the merchant and purchaser can prove they are genuine.
The purchaser’s digital signature is encrypted before sending a message using their private
CHAPTER 3 · THE INTERNET MACRO-ENVIRONMENT
132
Digital certificates
(keys)
Consist of keys made
up of large numbers
that are used to
uniquely identify
individuals.
Symmetric
encryption
Both parties to a
transaction use the
same key to encode
and decode messages.
Asymmetric
encryption
Both parties use a
related but different
key to encode and
decode messages.
Digital signatures
A method of identifying
individuals or
companies using
public-key encryption.
Figure 3.11 Public-key or asymmetric encryption
How to add text to a pdf in reader - insert text into PDF content in C#.net, ASP.NET, MVC, Ajax, WinForms, WPF
XDoc.PDF for .NET, providing C# demo code for inserting text to PDF file
adding text to pdf online; add text to pdf document online
How to add text to a pdf in reader - VB.NET PDF insert text library: insert text into PDF content in vb.net, ASP.NET, MVC, Ajax, WinForms, WPF
Providing Demo Code for Adding and Inserting Text to PDF File Page in VB.NET Program
how to add text to pdf; how to insert pdf into email text
key and on receipt the public key of the purchaser is used to decrypt the digital signature.
This proves the customer is genuine. Digital signatures are not widely used currently due
to the difficulty of setting up transactions, but will become more widespread as the
public-key infrastructure (PKI) stabilises and use of certificate authorities increases.
The public-key infrastructure (PKI) and certificate authorities
In order for digital signatures and public-key encryption to be effective it is necessary to be
sure that the public key intended for decryption of a document actually belongs to the
person you believe is sending you the document. The developing solution to this problem
is the issuance by a trusted third party (TTP) of a message containing owner identification
information and a copy of the public key of that person. The TTPs are usually referred to
as certificate authorities (CAs) – an example is Verisign (www
.verisign.com
). The message is
called a certificate. In reality, as asymmetric encryption is rather slow, it is often only a
sample of the message that is encrypted and used as the representative digital signature.
Examples of certificate information are:
user identification data;
issuing authority identification and digital signature;
user’s public key;
expiry date of this certificate;
class of certificate;
digital identification code of this certificate.
Virtual private networks
A virtual private network (VPN) is a private wide-area network (WAN) that runs over the
public network, rather than a more expensive private network. The technique by which
a VPN operates is sometimes referred to as tunnelling, and involves encrypting both
packet headers and content using a secure form of the Internet protocol known as IPSec.
VPNs enable the global organisation to conduct its business securely, but using the
public Internet rather than more expensive proprietary systems.
Current approaches to e-commerce security
In this section we review the approaches used by e-commerce sites to achieve security
using the techniques described above.
Secure Sockets Layer protocol (SSL)
SSL is a security protocol, originally developed by Netscape, but now supported by all
web browsers such as Microsoft Internet Explorer. SSL is used in the majority of B2C
e-commerce transactions since it is easy for the customer to use without the need to
download additional software or a certificate.
When a customer enters a secure checkout area of an e-commerce site SSL is used and
the customer is prompted that ‘you are about to view information over a secure connec-
tion’ and a key symbol is used to denote this security. When encryption is occurring
they will see that the web address prefix in the browser changes from ‘http://’ to
‘https://’ and a padlock appears at the bottom of the browser window.
How does SSL relate to the different security concepts described above? The main facil-
ity it provides is security and confidentiality. SSL enables a private link to be set up
between customer and merchant. Encryption is used to scramble the details of an e-com-
merce transaction as it is passed between the sender and receiver and also when the details
TECHNOLOGICAL FACTORS
133
Certificates and
certificate
authorities (CAs)
A certificate is a valid
copy of a public key of
an individual or
organisation together
with identification
information. It is issued
by a trusted third party
(TTP) or certificate
authority (CA). CAs
make public keys
available and also issue
private keys.
Virtual private
network
Private network
created using the
public network
infrastructure of the
Internet.
Secure Sockets
Layer (SSL)
A commonly used
encryption technique
for scrambling data as
they are passed across
the Internet from a
customer’s web
browser to a
merchant’s web server.
C# PDF insert image Library: insert images into PDF in C#.net, ASP
inserting image to PDF in preview without adobe PDF reader installed. Insert images into PDF form field. How to insert and add image, picture, digital photo
how to add text to a pdf file in preview; how to add text to a pdf in reader
VB.NET PDF Text Extract Library: extract text content from PDF
With this advanced PDF Add-On, developers are able to extract target text content from source PDF document and save extracted text to other file formats
how to enter text into a pdf; how to add text field to pdf
are held on the computers at each end. It would require a determined attempt to intercept
such a message and decrypt it. SSL is more widely used than the rival S-HTTP method.
The detailed stages of SSL are as follows:
1 Client browser sends request for a secure connection.
2 Server responds with a digital certificate which is sent for authentication.
3 Client and server negotiate session keys, which are symmetrical keys used only for the
duration of the transaction.
Since, with enough computing power, time and motivation, it is possible to decrypt
messages encrypted using SSL, much effort is being put into more secure methods of
encryption such as SET. From a merchant’s point of view there is also the problem that
authentication of the customer is not possible without resorting to other methods such
as credit checks.
Secure Electronic Transaction (SET)
Secure Electronic Transaction (SET) was once touted as the way forward for increasing
Internet security, but adoption was limited due to the difficulty of exchanging keys and
the time of transaction, with most e-commerce sites still using SSL. SET is a security pro-
tocol based on digital certificates, developed by a consortium led by Mastercard and
Visa, which allows parties to a transaction to confirm each other’s identity. By employ-
ing digital certificates, SET allows a purchaser to confirm that the merchant is legitimate
and conversely allows the merchant to verify that the credit card is being used by its
owner. It also requires that each purchase request include a digital signature, further
identifying the cardholder to the retailer. The digital signature and the merchant’s digi-
tal certificate provide a certain level of trust.
Alternative payment systems
The preceding discussion has focused on payment using credit card systems since this is
the prevalent method for e-commerce purchases. Throughout the 1990s there were
many attempts to develop alternative payment systems to credit cards. These focused on
micropayments or electronic coinage such as downloading an online newspaper, for
which the overhead and fee of using a credit card was too high. One system that has suc-
ceeded is PayPal (www
.paypal.com
) which was purchased by eBay and is a major part of
their revenue stream since it is used for payment by those who don’t have access to
credit cards. BT has launched BT ‘Click and Buy’ for micropayments which is successful
within the UK.
Reassuring the customer
Once the security measures are in place, content on the merchant’s site can be used to
reassure the customer, for example Amazon (www
.amazon.com
) takes customer fears
about security seriously judging by the prominence and amount of content it devotes to
this issue. Some of the approaches used indicate good practice in allaying customers’
fears. These include:
use of customer guarantee to safeguard purchase;
clear explanation of SSL security measures used;
highlighting the rarity of fraud (‘ten million customers have shopped safely without
credit card fraud’);
CHAPTER 3 · THE INTERNET MACRO-ENVIRONMENT
134
Secure Electronic
Transaction (SET)
A standard for public-
key encryption intended
to enable secure e-
commerce transactions
lead-developed by
Mastercard and Visa.
Payment systems
Methods of transferring
funds from a customer
to a merchant.
Micropayments
Small-denomination
payments.
VB.NET PDF insert image library: insert images into PDF in vb.net
try with this sample VB.NET code to add an image As String = Program.RootPath + "\\" 1.pdf" Dim doc New PDFDocument(inputFilePath) ' Get a text manager from
add text to pdf reader; add text to pdf
C# PDF Text Extract Library: extract text content from PDF file in
How to C#: Extract Text Content from PDF File. Add necessary references: RasterEdge.Imaging.Basic.dll. RasterEdge.Imaging.Basic.Codec.dll.
how to insert text into a pdf with acrobat; adding text to a pdf document acrobat
the use of alternative ordering mechanisms such as phone or fax;
the prominence of information to allay fears – the guarantee is one of the main
menu options.
Companies can also use independent third parties that set guidelines for online pri-
vacy and security. The best-known international bodies are TRUSTe (www
.tr
uste.or
g
) and
Verisign for payment authentication (www
.verisign.com
). Within particular countries
there may be other bodies such as, in the UK, ISIS (www
.imr
g.or
g.uk/isis
).
Malicious threats to e-commerce security
Hackers can use techniques such as ‘spoofing’ to hack into a system and find credit card
details. Spoofing, as its name suggests, involves someone masquerading as someone else.
Spoofing can be of two sorts:
IP spoofing is used to gain access to confidential information by creating false identifi-
cation data such as the originating network (IP) address. The objective of this access can
be espionage, theft or simply to cause mischief, generate confusion and damage corpo-
rate public image or political campaigns. Firewalls can be used to reduce this threat.
Site spoofing, i.e. fooling the organisation’s customers: using a similar URL such as
www
.amazno.com
can divert customers to a site which is not the bona fide retailer.
Firewalls can be used to minimise the risk of security breaches by hackers and viruses.
Firewalls are usually created as software mounted on a separate server at the point the
company is connected to the Internet. Firewall software can then be configured to
accept only links from trusted domains representing other offices in the company or key
account customers. A firewall has implication for marketers since staff accessing a web
site from work may not be able to access some content such as graphics plug-ins.
Denial-of-service attacks
The risk to companies of these attacks was highlighted in the spring of 2000, when the top
web sites were targeted. The performance of these sites such as Yahoo! (www
.yahoo.com
)
and eBay (www
.ebay
.com
) was severely degraded as millions of data packets flooded the
site from a number of servers. This was a distributed attack where the sites were bom-
barded from rogue software installed on many servers, so it was difficult for the e-tailers to
counter. Since then, fraudsters have attempted to blackmail online merchants at critical
times, for example online betting companies before a major sporting event or e-retailers
before Christmas. These are often very sophisticated attacks which involve using viruses to
compromise many ‘zombie’ computers around the world which are not adequately pro-
tected by firewalls and are then subsequently used to broadcast messages. Such attacks are
very difficult to counter.
‘Phishing’
Phishing (pronounced ‘fishing’) is a specialised form of online identity theft. The most
common form of ‘phishing’ is where a spam e-mail is sent out purporting to be from an
organisation such as a bank or payment service. In 2004, the sites barclaysprivate.com and
eurocitibank.com – neither of them anything to do with existing banks – were shut down,
having been used to garner ID details for fraud. Recipients are then invited to visit a web
site to update their details after entering their username and password. The web address
directs them to a false site appearing the same as the organisation’s site. When the username
TECHNOLOGICAL FACTORS
135
Firewall
A specialised software
application mounted on
a server at the point
where the company is
connected to the
Internet. Its purpose is
to prevent
unauthorised access
into the company from
outsiders.
Phishing
Obtaining personal
details online through
sites and e-mails
masquerading as
legitimate businesses.
VB.NET PDF Password Library: add, remove, edit PDF file password
VB: Add Password to PDF with Permission Settings Applied. This VB.NET example shows how to add PDF file password with access permission setting.
how to add text boxes to pdf; adding text to a pdf in acrobat
C# PDF Password Library: add, remove, edit PDF file password in C#
C# Sample Code: Add Password to PDF with Permission Settings Applied in C#.NET. This example shows how to add PDF file password with access permission setting.
how to insert text into a pdf using reader; adding text to pdf in preview
and password are entered these are then collected and used for removing money from the
recipient’s real account. Such scams are a modern version of the scam devised by criminals
where they install a false ATM in a wall with a card reader to access someone’s account
details. This form of scam is difficult to counter since the e-mail and web site can be made
to appear identical to those of the organisation through copying. The main countermea-
sure is education of users, so banks for instance will tell their customers that they would
never send this form of e-mail. However, this will not eradicate the problem since with
millions of online customers some will always respond to such scams. A further approach
is the use of multiple passwords, such that when an account is first accessed from a new
system an additional password is required which can only be obtained through mail or by
phone. Of course, this will only work if identity theft hasn’t occurred. So, for organisations
subject to phishing attacks, options for e-mail marketing are limited.
The economic prosperity and competitive environment in different countries will deter-
mine the e-commerce potential of each. Managers developing e-commerce strategies will
target the countries that are most developed in the use of the technology. Knowledge of
different economic conditions is also part of budgeting for revenue from different coun-
tries. For example, Fisher (2000) noted that the Asian market for e-commerce is
predicted to triple within three years. However, within this marketplace there are large
variations. Relative to income, the cost of a PC is still high in many parts of Asia for
people on low incomes. In China there is regulation on foreign ownership of Internet
portals and ISPs which could hamper development. User access to certain content is also
restricted. Despite this, access in China is doubling every 6 months and at this rate
China could have the largest user base within 10 years!
The trend to globalisation can arguably insulate a company to some extent from fluc-
tuations in regional markets, but is of course no protection from a global recession.
Managers can also study e-commerce in leading countries to help predict future e-com-
merce trends in their own country.
In Chapter 2 we saw that there is wide variation in the level of use of the Internet in
different continents and countries, particularly for consumer use. According to Roussel
(2000), economic, regulatory and cultural issues are among the factors affecting use of
the Internet for commercial transactions. The relative importance of these means e-com-
merce will develop differently in every country. Roussel (2000) rated different countries
according to their readiness to use the Internet for business (Figure 3.12). This was based
on two factors – propensity for e-commerce and Internet penetration. To calculate the
propensity of a country for e-commerce transactions, the business environment was
evaluated using the Economic Intelligence Unit (www
.eiu.com
) rating of countries
according to 70 different indicators, such as the strength of the economy, political stabil-
ity, the regulatory climate, taxation policies and openness to trade and investment.
Cultural factors were also considered, including language and the attitude to online pur-
chasing as opposed to browsing. The two graphed factors do not correspond in all
countries, for example, Scandinavian users frequently use the Internet to gain informa-
tion, helped by widespread English usage, but they are less keen to purchase online due
to concerns about security. Internet penetration varies widely and is surprisingly low in
some countries, for example in France, which was earlier a leader in e-commerce
through its Minitel system, and in Japan.
CHAPTER 3 · THE INTERNET MACRO-ENVIRONMENT
136
Economic factors
VB.NET PDF Text Add Library: add, delete, edit PDF text in vb.net
Read: PDF Image Extract; VB.NET Write: Insert text into PDF; Add Image to PDF; VB.NET Protect: Add Password to VB.NET Annotate: PDF Markup & Drawing. XDoc.Word
add text pdf; how to enter text in pdf file
C# PDF Text Add Library: add, delete, edit PDF text in C#.net, ASP
Read: PDF Image Extract; VB.NET Write: Insert text into PDF; Add Image to PDF; VB.NET Protect: Add Password to VB.NET Annotate: PDF Markup & Drawing. XDoc.Word
how to input text in a pdf; how to add text box to pdf
Globalisation
Globalisation refers to the move towards international trading in a single global market-
place and the blurring of social and cultural differences between countries. Some
perceive it as ‘Westernisation’ or even ‘Americanisation’.
Quelch and Klein (1996) point out some of the consequences for organisations that
wish to compete in the global marketplace. They say a company must have:
a 24-hour order-taking and customer service response capability;
regulatory and customs-handling experience to ship internationally;
in-depth understanding of foreign marketing environments to assess the advantages of its
own products and services.
Language and cultural understanding may also present a problem and a small or
medium-sized company is unlikely to possess the resources to develop a multi-language
version of its site or employ staff with language skills. On the other hand, Quelch and
Klein (1996) note that the growth of the use of the Internet for business will accelerate
the trend of English becoming the lingua franca of commerce.
Hamill and Gregory (1997) highlight the strategic implications of e-commerce for
business-to-business exchanges conducted internationally. They note that there will be
increasing standardisation of prices across borders as businesses become more aware of
price differentials. Secondly, they predict that the importance of traditional intermedi-
aries  such  as  agents and  distributors  will be  reduced  by  Internet-enabled  direct
marketing and sales.
Larger organisations typically already compete in the global marketplace, or have
the financial resources to achieve this. But what about the smaller organisation? Most
ECONOMIC FACTORS
137
Figure 3.12 Leaders and contenders in e-commerce
Source: Adapted from the Economist Intelligence Unit/Pyramid Research e-readiness ranking (www
.eiu.com
)
Globalisation
The increase of
international trading
and shared social and
cultural values.
VB.NET PDF Text Box Edit Library: add, delete, update PDF text box
Read: PDF Image Extract; VB.NET Write: Insert text into PDF; Add Image to PDF; VB.NET Protect: Add Password to VB.NET Annotate: PDF Markup & Drawing. XDoc.Word
how to enter text in a pdf document; how to insert text box in pdf
governments are looking to encourage SMEs to use electronic commerce to tap into the
international market. Advice from governments must reassure SMEs wishing to export.
Hamill and Gregory (1997) identify the barriers to SME internationalisation in Table 3.4.
Complete Activity 3.2 to look at the actions that can be taken to overcome these barriers.
The political and regulatory environment is shaped by the interplay of government agen-
cies, public opinion and consumer pressure groups such as CAUCE (the coalition against
unsolicited e-mail) which were active in the mid-1990s and helped in pressurising for laws,
www
.cauce.or
g
, and industry-backed organisations such as TRUSTe (www
.tr
uste.or
g
) that
promote best practice amongst companies. The political environment is one of the drivers
for establishing the laws to ensure privacy and to collect taxes, as described in previous
sections.
Political action enacted through government agencies to control the adoption of the
Internet can include:
promoting the benefits of adopting the Internet for consumers and business to
improve a country’s economic prosperity;
sponsoring research leading to dissemination of best practice amongst companies, for
example the DTI international benchmarking survey;
enacting legislation to regulate the environment, for example to protect privacy or
control taxation;
CHAPTER 3 · THE INTERNET MACRO-ENVIRONMENT
138
Activity 3.2
Overcoming SME resistance to e-commerce
Purpose
To highlight barriers to exporting amongst SMEs and suggest measures by which they may be
overcome by governments.
Activity
For each of the four barriers to internationalisation given in Table 3.4 suggest the management
reasons why the barriers may exist and actions governments can take to overcome these
barriers. Evaluate how well the government in your country communicates the benefits of
e-commerce through education and training.
Table 3.4 Issues in SME resistance to exporting (barriers from Hamill and Gregory
(1997) and Poon and Jevons (1997))
Barrier
Management issues
How can barrier be overcome?
1 Psychological
2 Operational
3 Organisational
4 Product/market
Political factors
setting up international bodies to coordinate the Internet such as ICANN (the
Internet Corporation for Assigned Names and Numbers, www
.icann.com
) which has
introduced new domains such as .biz and .info.
Some examples of the role of government organisations in promoting and regulating
e-commerce is given by these examples from the European Commission:
In 1998 new data protection guidelines were enacted, as is described in the section on
privacy, to help protect consumers and increase the adoption of e-commerce by
reducing security fears.
In May 2000 the eEurope Action Plan was launched with objectives of ‘a cheaper,
faster, more secure Internet; investing in people’s skills and access; and stimulating
the use of the Internet’. The Commission intends to increase Internet access relative
to the USA, in order to make Europe more competitive.
Also in May 2000 the Commission announced that it wants the supply of local loops, the
copper cables that link homes to telephone exchanges, to be unbundled so that newer
companies can compete with traditional telecommunications suppliers. The objective
here is the provision of widespread broadband services as a major aim of the EU.
In June 2000 an e-commerce directive was adopted by the European Union. Pullen
and Robinson (2001) note that the most fundamental provision of the Act is in
Article 3 which defines the principles of country of origin and mutual recognition.
This means that any company trading in an EU member state is subject in that coun-
try to the laws of that country and not those of the other member states. This
prevents the need for companies to adhere to specific advertising or data protection
laws in the countries in which they operate.
The type of initiative launched by governments is highlighted by the launch in the UK
in September 1999 of a new ‘UK online’ campaign, a raft of initiatives and investment
aimed at moving people, business and government itself online (e-government). E-envoy
posts and an e-minister have also been appointed. The prime minister said in 1999:
There is a revolution going on in our economy. A fundamental change, not a dot.com fad,
but a real transformation towards a knowledge economy. So, today, I am announcing a
new campaign. Its goal is to get the UK on-line. To meet the three stretching targets we
have set: for Britain to be the best place in the world for e-commerce, with universal
access to the Internet and all Government services on the net. In short, the UK on-line
campaign aims to get business, people and government on-line.
Specific targets have been set for the proportion of people and businesses that have
access, including public access points for those who cannot currently afford the technol-
ogy. Managers who are aware of these initiatives can tap into sources of funding for
development or free training to support their online initiatives.
Internet governance
Internet governance describes the control put in place to manage the growth of the
Internet and its usage. Governance is traditionally undertaken by government, but the
global nature of the Internet makes it less practical for a government to control cyber-
space. Dyson (1998) says:
Now, with the advent of the Net, we are privatising government in a new way – not only in
the traditional sense of selling things off to the private sector, but by allowing organisa-
tions independent of traditional governments to take on certain ‘government’ regulatory
POLITICAL FACTORS
139
E-government
The use of Internet
technologies to provide
government services to
citizens.
Internet governance
Control of the operation
and use of the Internet.
roles. These new international regulatory agencies will perform former government func-
tions in counterpoint to increasingly global large companies and also to individuals and
smaller private organisations who can operate globally over the Net.
The US approach to governance, formalised in the Framework for Global Electronic
Commerce in 1997 is to avoid any single country taking control.
Dyson (1998) describes different layers of jurisdiction. These are:
1 physical space comprising each individual country where their own laws such as
those governing taxation, privacy and trading and advertising standards hold;
2 ISPs – the connection between the physical world and the virtual world;
3 domain name control (www
.icann.net
) and communities;
4 agencies such as TRUSTe (www
.tr
uste.or
g
).
Taxation
How to change tax laws to reflect the globalisation through the Internet is a problem
that many governments are grappling with. The fear is that the Internet may cause sig-
nificant reductions in tax revenues to national or local governments if existing laws do
not cover changes in purchasing patterns. In Europe, the use of online betting in lower-
tax areas such as Gibraltar has resulted in lower revenues to governments in the
countries where consumers would have formerly paid gaming tax to the government via
a betting shop. Large UK bookmakers such as William Hill and Victor Chandler are offer-
ing Internet-based betting from ‘offshore’ locations such as Gibraltar. The lower duties in
these countries offer the companies the opportunity to make betting significantly
cheaper than if they were operating under a higher-tax regime. This trend has been
dubbed LOCI or Location Optimised Commerce on the Internet by Mougayer (1998).
Meanwhile, the government of the country from which a person places the bet will face
a drop in its tax revenues. In the UK the government has sought to reduce the revenue
shortfall by reducing the differential between UK and overseas costs.
The extent of the taxation problem for governments is illustrated by the US ABC
News (2000) reporting that between $300 million and $3.8 billion of potential tax rev-
enue was lost by authorities in 2000 in the USA as more consumers purchased online.
The revenue shortfall occurs because online retailers need to impose sales or use tax only
when goods are being sent to a consumer who lives in a state (or country) where the
retailer has a bricks-and-mortar store. Buyers are supposed to voluntarily pay the appro-
priate sales taxes when buying online, but this rarely happens in practice. This makes
the Internet a largely tax-free area in the USA.
Since the Internet supports the global marketplace it could be argued that it makes
little sense to introduce tariffs on goods and services delivered over the Internet. Such
instruments would, in any case, be impossible to apply over products delivered electron-
ically. This position is currently that of the USA. In the document ‘A Framework for
Global Electronic Commerce’, President Clinton stated that:
The United States will advocate in the World Trade Organisation (WTO) and other appro-
priate international fora that the Internet be declared a tariff-free zone.
Tax jurisdiction
Tax jurisdiction determines which country gets tax income from a transaction. Under
the current system of international tax treaties, the right to tax is divided between the
country where the enterprise that receives the income is resident (‘residence’ country)
CHAPTER 3 · THE INTERNET MACRO-ENVIRONMENT
140
and that from which the enterprise derives that income (‘source’ country). Laws on taxa-
tion are rapidly evolving and vary dramatically between countries. A proposed EU
directive intends to deal with these issues by defining the place of establishment of a
merchant as where they pursue an economic activity from a fixed physical location. At
the time of writing the general principle that is being applied is that tax rules are similar
to those for a conventional mail-order sale; for the UK, the tax principles are as follows:
(a) if the supplier (residence) and the customer (source) are both in the UK, VAT will be
chargeable;
(b) exports to private customers in the EU will attract either UK VAT or local VAT;
(c) exports outside the EU will be zero-rated (but tax may be levied on import);
(d) imports into the UK from the EU or beyond will attract local VAT, or UK import tax
when received through customs;
(e) services attract VAT according to where the supplier is located. This is different from
products and causes anomalies if online services are created. For example, a betting
service located in Gibraltar enables UK customers to gamble at a lower tax rate than
with the same company in the UK.
CASE STUDY 3
Boo hoo – learning from the largest European 
dot-com failure
Case Study 3
Context
‘Unless we  raise $20 million by midnight, boo.com  is
dead.’ So said Boo.com CEO Ernst Malmsten, on 18 May
2000. Half the investment was raised, but this was too
little, too late, and at midnight, less than a year after its
launch, Boo.com closed. The headlines in the Financial
Times, the next day read: ‘Boo.com collapses as Investors
refuse funds. Online Sports retailer becomes Europe’s first
big Internet casualty.’
The Boo.com case remains a valuable case study for all
types of businesses, since it doesn’t only illustrate the
challenges of managing e-commerce for a clothes retailer,
but rather highlights failings in e-commerce strategy and
management that can be made in any type of organisation.
Company background
Boo.com was a European company founded in 1998 and
operating out of a London head office, which was founded
by three Swedish entrepreneurs, Ernst Malmsten, Kajsa
Leander and Patrik Hedelin. Malmsten and Leander had
previous business experience in publishing where they
created a specialist publisher and had also created an
online bookstore, bokus.com, which in 1997 became the
world’s third largest book e-retailer behind Amazon and
Barnes & Noble. They became millionaires when they sold
the company in 1998. At Boo.com, they were joined by
Patrik Hedelin who was  also  the  financial director  at
bokus, and at the time they were perceived as experi-
enced European Internet entrepreneurs by the investors
who backed them in their new venture.
Company vision
The vision for Boo.com was for it to become the world’s first
online global sports retail site.  It would be a European
brand, but with a global appeal. Think of it as a sports and
fashion retail version of Amazon. At launch it would open its
virtual doors in both Europe and America with a view to
‘amazoning the sector’. Note  though  that,  in contrast,
Amazon did not launch simultaneously in all markets. Rather
it became established in the US  before providing local
European distribution through acquisition and re-branding
of other e-retailers in the United Kingdom for example.
The boo.com brand name
According to Malmsten et al. (2001), the Boo brand name
originated from film star Bo Derek, best known for her role
in the movie 10. The domain name ‘Bo.com’ was unavail-
able, but adding an ‘o’, they managed to procure the
domain ‘Boo.com’ for $2,500 from a domain name dealer.
According  to  Rob  Talbot,  director  of  marketing  for
Boo.com, Boo were ‘looking for a name that was easy to
spell across all the different countries and easy to remem-
ber ... something that didn’t have a particular meaning’.
Target market
The audience targeted by Boo.com can be characterised
as ‘young, well-off and fashion-conscious’ 18-to-24-year-
olds. The concept was that globally the target market
would be interested in sports and fashion brands stocked
by Boo.com.
141
Documents you may be interested
Documents you may be interested