mvc show pdf in div : How to add text fields in a pdf Library application class asp.net html windows ajax 06110-part137

FLAT TAX REFORMS IN THE U.S.: A BOON 
FOR THE INCOME POOR 
Javier Díaz-Giménez and Josep Pijoan-Mas 
CEMFI Working Paper No. 0611 
July 2006 
CEMFI 
Casado del Alisal 5; 28014 Madrid 
Tel. (34) 914 290 551. Fax (34) 914 291 056 
Internet: www.cemfi.es 
This paper follows up from the research conducted by Ana Castañeda for her PhD Dissertation 
and  from  later  work  with  José-Víctor  Ríos-Rull.  Ana is  no  longer  in  academics  and  has 
gracefully declined to sign this paper, which is hers and much as ours. We have benefited 
enormously both from her input and from her code. José-Víctor moved on to other projects 
when we were well into in research. To both of them we are most grateful. Additionally, this 
research has benefited from comments by assistants to seminars held at CEMFI, Queen Mary, 
Universidad de Alicante, Universidad Carlos III, Universitat de Barcelona, Universitat Pompeu 
Fabra and University of Oslo, as well as by attendants to the 12
th
International Conference of 
Computing in Economics and Finance. Díaz-Gíménez gratefully acknowledges the financial 
support of the Fundación de Estudios de Economía Aplicada (FEDEA) and of the Spanish 
Ministerio de Ciencia y Tecnología (Grant SEC2002-004318). 
How to add text fields in a pdf - insert text into PDF content in C#.net, ASP.NET, MVC, Ajax, WinForms, WPF
XDoc.PDF for .NET, providing C# demo code for inserting text to PDF file
how to add text to pdf; how to insert pdf into email text
How to add text fields in a pdf - VB.NET PDF insert text library: insert text into PDF content in vb.net, ASP.NET, MVC, Ajax, WinForms, WPF
Providing Demo Code for Adding and Inserting Text to PDF File Page in VB.NET Program
how to add text field to pdf form; how to add text to a pdf in reader
CEMFI Working Paper 0611 
July 2006 
FLAT TAX REFORMS IN THE U.S.: A BOON 
FOR THE INCOME POOR 
Abstract 
In this article we quantify the aggregate, distributional and welfare consequences of 
two revenue neutral flat-tax reforms using a model economy that replicates the U.S. 
distributions of earnings, income and wealth in very much detail. We find that the less 
progressive reform brings about a 2.4 percent increase in steady-state output and a 
more unequal distribution of after-tax income. In contrast, the more progressive reform 
brings about a -2.6 percent reduction in steady-state output and a distribution of after-
tax income that is more egalitarian. We also find that in the less progressive flat-tax 
economy aggregate welfare falls by -0.17 percent of consumption, and in the more 
progressive flat-tax economy it increases by 0.45 percent of consumption. In both flat-
tax reforms the income poor pay less income taxes and obtain sizeable welfare gains. 
JEL Codes
: D31, E62, H23 
Keywords
 Flat-tax  reforms,  efficiency,  inequality,  earnings  distribution,  income 
distributions, wealth distribution. 
Javier Díaz-Giménez 
Universidad Carlos III de Madrid and CAERP 
kueli@eco.uc3m.es 
Josep Pijoan-Mas 
CEMFI 
pijoan@cemfi.es 
VB.NET PDF Form Data Read library: extract form data from PDF in
featured PDF software, it should have functions for processing text, image as Add necessary references Demo Code to Retrieve All Form Fields from a PDF File in
how to add text to a pdf in preview; how to add text to a pdf document using reader
C# PDF Form Data Read Library: extract form data from PDF in C#.
Able to retrieve all form fields from adobe PDF file in C# featured PDF software, it should have functions for processing text, image as Add necessary references
add text to a pdf document; add text to pdf in preview
1 Introduction
The debate onfundamentaltaxreformshasbeenheatingupinrecentyearsassome countries,
mostly in Eastern Europe, are starting to adopt flat-tax systems. Since the publication of
the seminal work of Hall and Rabushka (1995), academics have been arguing in favor of a
simplification ofthe taxcode, a broadening of the taxbase and a reductionof marginaltaxes.
More recently, academics have simulated the consequences of fundamental tax reforms
in models of the U.S. economy. Ventura (1999), for instance, studies a flat-tax reform in a
quantitative general equilibrium model of the U.S. economy. He concludes that a flat-tax
reform would bring about large gainsin outputand productivity atthe expense of significant
increases in inequality. Using a similar methodology, Altig, Auerbach, Kotlikoff, Smetters,
and Walliser (2001) also find that a flat-tax reform of the current U.S. income tax system
would result in aggregate output gains, and that it would benefitboth the very income-poor
and the very income-rich at the expense of the middle classes. In this article, we take the
discussion one step further, and we simulate two flat-tax reforms in a model economy that
replicatesmostofthe features of the currentU.S.taxandtransfersystems,andthataccounts
for the aggregate and distributional featuresof the U.S. economyin much greater detailthan
previous research.
Our model economy is a version of the neoclassical growth model that combines dynastic
and life-cycle features and it is an extension of the model economy described in Casta˜neda,
D´ıaz-Gim´enez, and R´ıos-Rull (2003). Our households have identical preferences, they are
altruistic towards their descendants, and they go through the life-cycle stages of working
age and retirement. The duration of their lives and their wages are random, and they make
optimal dynamic consumption and labor decisions. The firms in our model economy behave
competitively and all prices are flexible.
AsshowninCasta˜neda,D´ıaz-Gim´enez,andR´ıos-Rull(2003),thisclassofmodeleconomies
replicatesthe U.S. marginal distributions of labor earnings, income and wealth in very much
detail. Thisisa critical feature forthe quantitative evaluation of taxreformsbecause the tax
burdens and the incentivesto work and save that a tax code creates are very different at dif-
ferent points of the earnings and wealth distributions. Moreover, as Mirrlees (1971) pointed
out, the distributional details are fundamental in measuring the trade-offs involved in choos-
ing between efficiency and equality, since both the aggregate and the welfare changes depend
crucially on the exact number of households of each type that there are in the economy.
Another distinguishing feature of our model economy is that we replicate the U.S. tax
system and the lump-sum part of U.S. transfers in very much detail. Specifically, ourbench-
1
VB.NET PDF Convert to Text SDK: Convert PDF to txt files in vb.net
Convert PDF to text in .NET WinForms and ASP.NET project. Text in any PDF fields can be copied and pasted to .txt files by keeping original layout.
adding text pdf; add text to pdf file online
C# PDF insert image Library: insert images into PDF in C#.net, ASP
C#.NET PDF SDK - Add Image to PDF Page in C#.NET. How to Insert & Add Image, Picture or Logo on PDF Page Using C#.NET. Add Image to PDF Page Using C#.NET.
how to add text box in pdf file; adding text pdf files
mark model economy includes a personal income tax, a corporate income tax, a payroll tax,
aconsumption tax and an estate tax. We have designed these taxes to replicate the main
properties and to collect the same revenues as the corresponding taxes in the U.S. economy.
To simulate the flat-tax reform, we replace our versions of the corporate income tax and
the personal income tax with an integrated flat-tax on capital and labor income. To make
the average tax rates of the labor income tax progressive, a large amount of labor income is
tax-exempt.
We study two revenue-neutral flat-tax reforms that differ in their tax rates and in the
amounts of the labor income tax exemption. In the first flat-tax reform the tax rate is 22
percent and the labor income tax exemption is $16,000 per household. In the second flat-
tax reform the tax rate is 29 percent and the labor income tax exemption is $32,000 per
household. For obvious reasons, we call the first reform the less progressive flat-tax reform
and we call the second reform the more progressive flat-tax reform.
We find that these two flat-tax reforms have very different steady-state aggregate, distri-
butional and welfare consequences. The less progressive flat-tax reform turns outto be more
efficientthan the current progressive taxsystem. Underthis reform,steady-state outputand
labor productivity increase by 2.4 and 3.2 percent, when compared with the corresponding
values of the benchmark model economy. In contrast, the more progressive flat-tax reform
is less efficient than the current income tax system. Under this reform, steady-state output
and labor productivity decrease by –2.6 percent and –1.4 percent. These last results, which
we discuss at length in Section 5 below, differ widely from the findings of previous research
and from the conventional wisdom about the efficiency of flat taxes.
We also find that both reforms result in significant increases in wealth inequality. The
Gini index of wealth in our benchmark model economy is 0.818.
1
In the steady-state of the
less progressive flat-tax reform it increases to 0.839, and in the steady state of the more
progressive flat-tax reform it increases further to 0.845. However, both reforms have very
different distributional implications in other dimensions. For instance, the less progressive
flat-tax reform results in more unequal distributions of earnings and, more importantly, of
after-tax income (their Gini indexes are 0.615 and 0.524 compared to 0.613 and 0.510 in the
benchmark economy). In contrast, and perhaps surprisingly, the distributions of earnings
and after-tax income under the more progressive flat-tax reform are more egalitarian (their
Gini indexes are 0.610 and 0.497). Therefore, we find that a simple income tax code with
1
According to the 1998 Survey of Consumer Finances, the Gini index of wealth in the U.S. economy is
0.803.
2
VB.NET PDF Text Extract Library: extract text content from PDF
With this advanced PDF Add-On, developers are able to extract target text content from source PDF document and save extracted text to other file formats
how to add text box to pdf; adding text to a pdf document acrobat
VB.NET PDF insert image library: insert images into PDF in vb.net
try with this sample VB.NET code to add an image As String = Program.RootPath + "\\" 1.pdf" Dim doc New PDFDocument(inputFilePath) ' Get a text manager from
add text to pdf in acrobat; how to add text fields to pdf
only two parameters (the marginal tax rate and the fixed deduction) may bring about a
distribution of after-tax income thatis more egalitarian than the one that obtains under the
current personal and corporate income taxes.
These results establish that a policymaker who was required to choose between these two
reformswouldface the classicaltrade-offbetweenefficiencyandequality. InSection5.6we use
ourmodel economyto ask ourselveswhich economyshe should choose: the more efficientbut
less egalitarian model economy E
1
,or the less efficient but more egalitarian model economy
E
2
? To quantify the trade-off and to answer this question, we compare the steady-state
aggregate welfare of our three model economies using a Benthamite social welfare function.
We find that the less progressive tax-reform results in a steady-state welfare loss which
is equivalent to −0.17 percent of consumption, and that the more progressive tax-reform
results in a steady-state welfare gain which is equivalent to +0.45 percent of consumption.
2
Finally, we compute the individual welfare changes for each household-type and we find that
both reforms are a significant boon for the income poor. More precisely, the households in
the bottom40 percentof the after-tax income distribution of the benchmark model economy
would be happierin the lessprogressive flat-taxeconomy,andthe share of happierhouseholds
increases to an impressive 70 percent in the more progressive flat-tax economy.
Adetailed description of the model economy and itscalibration, and an intuitive analysis
of our findings follows in the ensuing pages.
2 The model economy
2.1 Population and endowment dynamics
Our modeleconomyisinhabited by a measure one continuum of households. The households
are endowed with unitsofdisposable time eachperiodand theyareeitherworkersorretirees.
Workers face an uninsured idiosyncratic stochastic process that determines the value of their
endowmentof efficiency laborunits. They also face an exogenous and positive probability of
retiring. Retireesare endowedwithzero efficiencylaborunitsand theyface anexogenousand
positive probability of dying. When a retiree dies, itisreplaced by a working-age descendant
who inherits the retiree’s estate and, possibly, some of its earning abilities. We use the
one-dimensional shock, s, to denote the household’s random age and random endowment of
2
Economists often argue that welfare comparisons between steady states are not very interesting since
they abstract from the often large changes in welfare that occur during the transitions. This particular
case, however, mayvery well be an exception, since we believe thatthe accounting for the transitionswould
reinforce oursteadystate welfare findings. See section5.6 fora detaileddiscussion of this issue.
3
VB.NET PDF Password Library: add, remove, edit PDF file password
VB: Add Password to PDF with Permission Settings Applied. This VB.NET example shows how to add PDF file password with access permission setting.
add text pdf file; how to insert text in pdf reader
C# PDF Text Extract Library: extract text content from PDF file in
How to C#: Extract Text Content from PDF File. Add necessary references: RasterEdge.Imaging.Basic.dll. RasterEdge.Imaging.Basic.Codec.dll.
add text to pdf reader; how to add text fields to a pdf
efficiency labor units jointly.
We assume that thisprocess is independentand identicallydistributed acrosshouseholds,
and that it follows a finite state Markov chain with conditional transition probabilities given
by Γ = Γ(s
|s) = Pr{s
t+1
=s
|s
t
=s}, where s and s
∈S. We assume that s takes
values in one of two possible J–dimensional sets, that is S = E ∪ R = {1,2,...,J} ∪ {J+
1,J+2,...,2J}. When a household draws shock s ∈ E, it is a worker and its endowment
of efficiency labor units is e(s) > 0. When a household draws shock s ∈ R it is retired, and
its endowment of efficiency labor units is e(s) = 0. We use the s ∈ R to keep track of the
realization of s that a worker faced during the last period of its working-life. We use this
information to generate the appropriate intergenerational correlation and life-cycle pattern
of earnings (see the discussion in Section 3.1.2 below).
This notation allows us to represent every demographic change in our model economy as
atransition between the sets E and R. When a household’s shock changes from s ∈ E to
s
∈R, we say that it has retired and when it changes from s ∈ R to s
∈E, we say that it
has died and has been replaced by a working-age descendant. Moreover, this specification of
the joint age and endowment process implies that the transition probability matrix Γ con-
trols the demographics of the model economy, by determining the expected durations of the
households’ working-livesand retirements; the life-time persistence of earnings, by determin-
ing the mobility of households between the states in E; the life cycle pattern of earnings, by
determining how the endowments of efficiency labor units of new entrants differ from those
of senior working-age households; and the intergenerational persistence of earnings, by deter-
mining the correlation between the states in E forconsecutive members of the same dynasty.
In Section 3.1.2 we discuss these issues in greater detail.
2.2 Liquidation of assets
We assume thatevery household inherits the estate of the previous memberof its dynasty at
the beginning of the firstperiod of its working-life. More specifically, we assume that retirees
exit the economy and are replaced by theirworking-age descendants when they drawa shock
s
∈E at the beginning of the period. At this moment the deceased household’s estate is
liquidated, and the household’s descendant inherits a fraction 1−τ
e
(z
t
)of this estate, where
z
t
denotes the value of the household’sstock of wealth atthe end of period t. The remainder
is instantaneously and costlessly transformed into the current period consumption good, and
it is taxed away by the government.
4
C# PDF Password Library: add, remove, edit PDF file password in C#
C# Sample Code: Add Password to PDF with Permission Settings Applied in C#.NET. This example shows how to add PDF file password with access permission setting.
add text to pdf using preview; adding text to pdf form
VB.NET PDF Text Add Library: add, delete, edit PDF text in vb.net
Extract; C# Write: Insert text into PDF; C# Write: Add Image to PDF; C# Protect: Add Password to PDF; C# Form: extract value from fields; C# Annotate: PDF Markup
add text boxes to pdf; how to insert text into a pdf using reader
2.3 Preferences
We assume that households derive utility from consumption, c
t
≥0, and from non-market
uses of their time, and that they care about the utilityof theirdescendentsas if it were their
own utility. Consequently, the households’ preferences can be described by the following
standard expected utility function:
E
t=0
β
t
u(c
t
,−h
t
)| s
0
,
(1)
where function u iscontinuousand strictlyconcave in botharguments; 0 < β < 1 isthe time-
discountfactor; istheendowmentofproductivetime;and0 ≤ h
t
≤islabor. Consequently,
−h
t
is the amount of time that the households allocate to non-market activities.
2.4 Production possibilities
We assume that aggregate output, Y
t
,depends on aggregate capital, K
t
, and on the ag-
gregate labor input, L
t
,through a constant returns to scale aggregate production function,
Y
t
= f (K
t
,L
t
). Aggregate capital is obtained adding the wealth of every household, and
the aggregate labor input is obtained adding the efficiency labor units supplied by every
household. We assume that capital depreciates geometrically at a constant rate, δ, and we
use r and w to denote the prices of capital and labor before all taxes.
2.5 The government sector
The government in our model economies taxes households’ capital income, labor income,
consumption and estates, and it uses the proceeds of taxation to make real transfers to
retired households and to finance an exogenously given level of government consumption.
Capital income taxes are described by function τ
k
(y
k
), where y
k
denotes capital income;
labor income taxes are described by function τ
l
(y
a
), where y
a
denotes the labor income tax
base; social security contributions paid by firms are described by function τ
sf
(y
l
), where
y
l
denotes labor income, and those paid by households are described by function τ
sh
(y
l
);
household income taxes are described by function τ
y
(y
b
), where y
b
denotes the household
income taxbase; consumptiontaxesare describedbyfunctionτ
c
(c); estatetaxesare described
byfunctionτ
e
(z);andpublictransfersaredescribed byfunctionω(s). Therefore, inourmodel
economies, a governmentpolicy rule is a specification of {τ
k
(y
k
), τ
l
(y
a
), τ
sf
(y
l
), τ
sh
(y
l
), τ
y
(y
b
),
τ
c
(c), τ
e
(z), ω(s)} and of a process on government consumption, {G
t
}. Since we also assume
5
that the government must balance its budget every period, these policies must satisfy the
following restriction:
G
t
+Z
t
=T
t
,
(2)
where Z
t
and T
t
denote aggregate transfers and aggregate tax revenues, respectively.
Social security in our model economy takes the form of transfers to retired households
financed with a payroll tax. The inclusion of a pay-as-you-go social security system of this
kindhasimportantimplicationsforthe questionthatwe askin thisarticle forseveral reasons.
First, itreducesthe steady state aggregate capital stock.
3
Second, it playsan importantrole
in helping us to replicate the large fraction of households who own zero or very few assets
in the United States.
4
Third, since public pensions are paid as life annuities, it insures
the households against the risk of living too long thereby reducing the reasons for saving.
Our calibrating procedure allows us to match the observed size of average retirement public
pensions ensuring that the motives for saving in our model economy are realistic.
However,inourmodeleconomypensionsare independentofcontributionsandthisfeature
qualifies the precision of our analysis in two ways: first, the overall amount of idiosyncratic
risk diminishes because the labor market history does not have implications for retirement
benefits; second, we abstract from a potentially important determinantof labor supply, since
increasing the hours worked entitles the households to larger pension benefits.
5
2.6 Market arrangements
We assume that there are no insurance markets for the household-specific shock.
6
Partly
to buffer their streams of consumption against the shocks, the households in our model
economy can accumulate wealth in the form of real capital, a
t
.We assume thatthese wealth
3
See Samuelson(1975).
4
See Hubbard, Skinner, andZeldes (1994).
5
We make this assumption for two technical reasons: first, discriminating between households according
to their past contributions to a social security system requires the inclusion of a second asset-type state
variable; andsecond, in a model with endogenouslaborsupply, linking pensionsto pastcontributionsmakes
the optimalityconditionforleisure an intertemporal decision. These twofacts resultin averylarge increase
in our computational costs. (See PartC ofthe Appendixfordetails on our computational algorithm).
6
This is a key feature of this class of model worlds. When insurance markets are allowed to operate,
our model economies collapse to a standard representative household model, as long as the right initial
conditionshold. Cole andKocherlakota(1997)studyeconomiesofthistypewiththe additionalcharacteristic
that private storage is unobservable. They conclude that the best achievable allocation is the equilibrium
allocation that obtains when households have access to the market structure assumed in this article. We
interpret this finding to imply that the market structure that we use here could arise endogenously from
certain unobservabilityfeatures ofthe environment—specifically, fromboththe realizationofthe shockand
the amount of wealth being unobservable.
6
holdings belong to a compact set A. The lower bound of this set can be interpreted as a
form of liquidity constraints or, alternatively, as a solvency requirement.
7
The existence of
an upper bound for the asset holdings is guaranteed as long as the after-tax rate of return
to savings is smaller than the households’ common rate of time preference. This condition
is always satisfied in equilibrium.
8
Finally, we assume that firms rent factors of production
from householdsin competitive spot markets. This assumption impliesthat factor prices are
given by the corresponding marginal productivities.
2.7 The households’ decision problem
The individual state variables are the shock realization s and the stock of assets a.
9
The
Bellman equation of the household decision problem is the following:
v(a,s) =
max
c≥0
z∈A
0≤h≤
u(c,−h) + β
s∈S
Γ
ss
v[a
(z),s
],
(3)
s.t.
c+z = y −τ +a,
(4)
y=ar+e(s)hw+ω(s),
(5)
τ= τ
k
(y
k
)+τ
l
(y
a
)+τ
sf
(y
l
)+τ
sh
(y
l
)+τ
y
(y
b
)+τ
c
(c),
(6)
a
(z)=
z−τ
e
(z) if s ∈ R and s
∈E,
zotherwise.
(7)
where function v is the households’ common value function. Notice that income, y, includes
three terms: capital income, y
k
=ar, that can be earned by every household; labor income,
y
l
= e(s)hw, that can be earned only by workers; and transfer income, ω(s), that can be
earned only by retirees. The household policy that solves this problem is a set of functions
that map the individual state into choices for consumption, end-of-period savings, and hours
worked. We denote this policy by {c(a,s), z(a,s), h(a,s)}.
2.8 Equilibrium
Each period the economy-wide state is a probability measure, x
t
,defined over B, an appro-
priate family of subsets of S×A that counts the householdsof each type. In the steady-state
7
Given that leisure is an argument in the households’ utility function, this borrowing constraint can be
interpreted asa solvency constraintthatpreventsthe households fromgoing bankrupt in every state of the
world.
8
Huggett (1993) and Marcet, Obiols-Homs, and Weil (2003) prove this proposition.
9
In our model economythere are no aggregate state variables because we abstractfrom aggregate uncer-
taintyand we restrict ouranalysis to the steadystates of the economies.
7
this measure is time invariant, even though the individual state variables and the decisions
of the individual households change from one period to the next.
10
Definition 1 A steady state equilibrium for this economy is a household value function,
v(a,s); a household policy, {c(a,s), z(a,s), h(a,s)}; a government policy, {τ
k
(y
k
),τ
l
(y
a
),
τ
sf
(y
l
),τ
sh
(y
l
),τ
y
(y
b
),τ
c
(c),τ
e
(z),ω(s),G}; a stationary probability measure of households, x;
factor prices, (r,w); and macroeconomic aggregates, {K,L,T,Z}, such that:
(i) When households take factor prices and the government policy as given, the household
value function and thehousehold policy solve the households’ decision problem described
in expression (3).
(ii) The firms in the economy behave as competitive maximizers. That is, their decisions
imply that factor prices are factor marginal productivities:
r= f
1
(K,L)−δ and w =f
2
(K,L).
(8)
where K and L denote the aggregate capital and aggregate labor inputs.
(iii) Factor inputs, tax revenues, and transfers are obtained aggregating over households:
K =
adx
(9)
L =
h(a,s) e(s)dx
(10)
T =
k
(y
k
)+τ
l
(y
a
)+τ
sf
(y
l
)+τ
sh
(y
l
)+τ
y
(y
b
)+τ
c
(c)]dx +
(11)
I
s∈R
γ
sE
τ
e
(z)z(a,s)dx
(12)
Z =
ω(s)dx.
(13)
where household income, y(a,s), is defined in expression (5); I denotes the indicator
function; γ
sE
s∈E
Γ
ss
;and, consequently, (I
s∈R
γ
sE
)is the probability that a retiree
of type s exits the economy. All integrals are defined over the state space S ×A.
(iv) The goods market clears:
[c(a,s)+z(a,s)] dx+G =f (K,L)+(1−δ)K.
(14)
10
See Hopenhayn and Prescott (1992) and Huggett (1993).
8
Documents you may be interested
Documents you may be interested