mvc show pdf in div : Add text to pdf online Library application class asp.net html windows ajax 5G7BGE3Z6KNWFOHBFCWN17-part1352

The market for clothing in this area was viewed as very
large, so the thought was that capture of only a small part
of this market was required for Boo.com to be successful.
The view at this time on the scale of this market and the
basis for success is indicated by New Media Age (1999)
where it was described as 
The $60b USD industry is dominated by Gen X’ers who
are online and according to market research in need of
knowing what is in, what is not and a way to receive
such goods quickly. If boo.com becomes known as the
place to keep up with fashion and can supply the latest
trends then there is no doubt that there is a market, a
highly profitable one at that for profits to grow from.
The growth in market was also supported by retail ana-
lysts, with Verdict predicting online shopping in the United
Kingdom to grow from £600 million in 1999 to £12.5 billion
in 2005.
However,  New  Media  Age (1999)  does  note  some
reservations about this market, saying 
Clothes and trainers have a high rate of return in the
mail order/home shopping world. Twenty year olds may
be online and may have disposable income but they are
not the main market associated with mail order. To date
there is no one else doing anything similar to boo.com.
The Boo.com proposition
In their proposal to investors, the company stated that
‘their  business  idea  is  to  become  the  world-leading
Internet-based retailer of prestigious brand leisure and
sportswear names’. They listed brands such as Polo,
Ralph Lauren, Tommy Hilfiger, Nike, Fila, Lacoste and
Adidas.  The  proposition  involved  sports  and  fashion
goods alongside each other. The thinking was than sports
clothing has more standardised sizes with less need for a
precise fit than designer clothing.
The owners of Boo.com wanted to develop an easy to
use experience which re-created the offline shopping
experience as far as possible. As part of the branding
strategy, an idea was developed of a virtual salesperson,
initially named Jenny and later Miss Boo. She would guide
users through the site and give helpful tips. When select-
ing products, users could drag them on to models, zoom
in and rotate them in 3D to visualise them from different
angles. The technology to achieve this was built from
scratch along with the stock control and distribution soft-
ware. A large investment was required in technology with
several suppliers being replaced before launch, which was
6 months later than promised to investors, largely due to
problems with implementing the technology.
Clothing the mannequin and populating the catalogue
was also an expensive challenge. For 2000, about $6 mil-
lion  was  spent  on  content  about  spring/summer
fashionwear. It cost $200 to photograph each product,
representing a monthly cost of more than $500,000.
Although the user experience of Boo.com is often criti-
cised for its speed, it does seem to have had that wow
factor that influenced investors. Analyst Nik Margolis, writ-
ing in New Media Age (1999), illustrates this by saying: 
What I saw at boo.com is simply the most clever web
experience I have seen in quite a while. The presenta-
tion of products and content are both imaginative and
offer an experience. Sure everything loads up fast in an
office but I was assured by those at boo.com that they
will keep to a limit of 8 seconds for a page to down-
load. Eight seconds is not great but the question is will
it be worth waiting for?
Of course, today, the majority of European users have
broadband, but in the late 1990s the majority were on dial-
up and had to download the software to view products.
Communicating the Boo.com proposition
Early plans referred to extensive ‘high-impact’ marketing
campaigns on TV and in newspapers. Public relations
were important in leveraging the novelty of the concept
and human side of the business – Leander was previously
a professional model and had formerly been Malmsten’s
partner. This PR was initially focused within the fashion
and sportswear trade and then rolled out to publications
likely to be read by the target audience. The success of
this PR initiative can be judged by the 350,000 e-mail pre-
registrations who wanted to be notified of launch. For the
launch Malmsten et al. (2001) explains that ‘with a market-
ing and PR spend of only $22.4 million we had managed
to create a worldwide brand’. 
To help create the values of the Boo.com brand, Boom
a lavish online fashion magazine, was created, which
required substantial staff for different language versions.
The magazine wasn’t a catalogue which directly sup-
ported sales, rather it was a publishing venture competing
with established fashion titles. For existing customers the
Look  Book, a  44-page  print catalogue was  produced
which showcased different products each month.
The challenges of building a global brand in months
The challenges of creating a global brand in months are
illustrated well by Malmsten et al. (2001). After an initial
round of funding, including investment from JP Morgan,
LMVH Investment and the Benetton family, which gener-
ated around $9 million, the founders planned towards
launch by identifying thousands of individual tasks, many of
which needed to be completed by staff yet to be recruited.
These  tasks  were  divided  into  twenty-seven  areas  of
responsibility familiar to many organisations including office
infrastructure, logistics, product information, pricing, front-
CHAPTER 3 · THE INTERNET MACRO-ENVIRONMENT
142
Add text to pdf online - insert text into PDF content in C#.net, ASP.NET, MVC, Ajax, WinForms, WPF
XDoc.PDF for .NET, providing C# demo code for inserting text to PDF file
how to enter text in pdf file; adding text to pdf in acrobat
Add text to pdf online - VB.NET PDF insert text library: insert text into PDF content in vb.net, ASP.NET, MVC, Ajax, WinForms, WPF
Providing Demo Code for Adding and Inserting Text to PDF File Page in VB.NET Program
how to add text fields in a pdf; how to insert text box in pdf document
end  applications,  call  centres,  packaging,  suppliers,
designing logos, advertising/PR, legal issues, and recruit-
ment. At its zenith, Boo.com had 350 staff, with over one
hundred in London and new offices in Munich, New York,
Paris and Stockholm. Initially, Boo.com was available in UK
English, US English, German, Swedish, Danish and Finnish
with localised versions for France, Spain and Italy added
after launch. The web site was tailored for individual coun-
tries using the local language and currency and also local
prices. Orders were fulfilled and shipped out of one of two
warehouses: one in Louisville, Kentucky and the other in
Cologne, Germany. This side of the business was relatively
successful  with  on-time  delivery  rates  approaching
100% achieved.
Boo possessed classic channel conflicts. Initially, it was
difficult getting fashion and sports brands to offer their
products through Boo.com. Manufacturers already had a
well-established distribution network through large high-
street  sports  and  fashion  retailers  and  many  smaller
retailers. If clothing brands permitted Boo.com to sell their
clothes online at discounted prices, then this would conflict
with retailers’ interests and would also portray the brands in
a negative light if their goods were in an online ‘bargain
bucket’. A further pricing issue is where local or zone pric-
ing in different markets exists, for example lower prices
often exist in the US than Europe and there are variations in
different European countries.
Making the business case to investors
Today it seems incredible that investors were confident
enough to invest $130 million in the company and that at
the high point the company was valued at $390 million.
Yet much of this investment was based on the vision of
the founders to be a global brand and achieve ‘first-mover
advantage’. Although there were naturally revenue projec-
tions,  these  were  not  always  based  on  an  accurate
detailed analysis of market potential. Immediately before
launch, Malmsten et al. (2001) explains a meeting with
would-be investor Pequot Capital, represented by Larry
Lenihan who had made successful investments in AOL
and Yahoo! The Boo.com management team were able to
provide revenue forecasts, but were unable to answer fun-
damental questions for modelling the potential of the
business, such as ‘How many visitors are you aiming for?
What kind of conversion rate are you aiming for? How
much does each customer have to spend? What’s your
customer acquisition cost. And what’s your payback time
on customer acquisition cost?’ When these figures were
obtained, the analyst found them to be ‘far-fetched’ and
reputedly ended the meeting with the words, ‘I’m not
interested. Sorry for my bluntness, but I think you’re going
to be out of business by Christmas’.
When the site launched on 3 November 1999, around
50,000 unique visitors were achieved on the first day, but
only 4 in 1000 placed orders (a 0.25% conversion rate),
showing the importance of modelling conversion rate
accurately in modelling business potential. This low con-
version rate  was  also  symptomatic  of  problems  with
technology. It also gave rise to negative PR. One reviewer
explained how he waited: 
‘Eighty-one minutes to pay too much money for a pair
of shoes that I still have to wait a week to get?’ 
These rates did improve as problems were ironed out – by
the end of the week 228,848 visits had resulted in 609
orders with a value of $64,000. In the 6 weeks from launch,
sales of $353,000 were made and conversion rates had
more than doubled to 0.98% before Christmas. However, a
relaunch was required within 6 months to cut download
times and to introduce a ‘low-bandwidth version’ for users
using dial-up connections. This led to conversion rates of
nearly 3% on sales promotion. Sales results were disap-
pointing in some regions, with US sales accounting for
20% compared to the planned 40%.
The management team felt that further substantial
investment was required to grow the business from a
presence in 18 countries and 22 brands in November to
31 countries and 40 brands the following spring. Turnover
was forecast to rise from $100 million in 2000/01 to $1350
million by 2003/4, which would be driven by $102.3 million
in marketing in 2003/4. Profit was forecast to be $51.9
million by 2003/4.
The end of Boo.com 
The  end  of  Boo.com  came  on  18  May  2000,  when
investor funds could not be raised to meet the spiralling
marketing, technology and wage bills. 
Source: Prepared by Dave Chaffey from original sources including
Malmsten et al. (2001) and New Media Age (1999)
143
CASE STUDY 3
Questions
1
Which strategic marketing assumptions and deci-
sions arguably made Boo.com’s failure inevitable?
Contrast these with other dot-com era survivors
that are still in business, for example,
Lastminute.com, Egg.com and Firebox.com.
2
Using the framework of the marketing mix, appraise
the marketing tactics of Boo.com in the areas of
product, pricing, place, promotion, process, people
and physical evidence.
3
In many ways, the vision of Boo’s founders were
‘ideas before their time’. Give examples of e-retail
techniques used to create an engaging online cus-
tomer experience which Boo adopted that are now
becoming commonplace. 
VB.NET PDF insert image library: insert images into PDF in vb.net
try with this sample VB.NET code to add an image As String = Program.RootPath + "\\" 1.pdf" Dim doc New PDFDocument(inputFilePath) ' Get a text manager from
add text boxes to pdf document; adding text pdf file
VB.NET PDF Text Extract Library: extract text content from PDF
Online Visual Basic .NET class source code for quick evaluation. With this advanced PDF Add-On, developers are able to extract target text content from
how to insert text into a pdf with acrobat; add text to pdf document in preview
CHAPTER 3 · THE INTERNET MACRO-ENVIRONMENT
144
Summary
1
Environmental scanning and analysis of the macro-environment are necessary in
order that a company can respond to environmental changes and act on legal and
ethical constraints on its activities.
2
Social factors include variation in usage of the Internet while ethical issues include
the need to safeguard consumer privacy and security of details. Privacy issues include
collection and dissemination of customer information, cookies and the use of direct
e-mail. Marketers must act within current law, reassure customers about their privacy
and explain the benefits of collection of personal information.
3
Rapid variation in technology requires constant monitoring of adoption of the tech-
nology by customers and competitors and appropriate responses.
4
Economic factors considered in this chapter include the regional differences in the
use of the Internet for trade. Different economic conditions in different markets are
considered in developing e-commerce budgets.
5
Political factors involve the role of governments in promoting e-commerce, but also
in trying to restrict it.
6
Legal factors to be considered by e-commerce managers include taxation, domain
name registration, copyright and data protection.
Exercises
Self-assessment exercises
1
Summarise the key elements of the macro-environment that should be scanned by an 
e-commerce manager.
2
Give an example of how each of the macro-environment factors may directly drive the content
and services provided by a web site.
3
What actions should e-commerce managers take to safeguard consumer privacy and
security?
4
Give three examples of techniques web sites can use to protect the user’s privacy.
5
How do governments attempt to control the adoption of the Internet?
6
Suggest approaches to managing technological innovation.
Essay and discussion questions
1
You recently started a job as e-commerce manager for a bank. Produce a checklist of all the
different legal and ethical issues that you need to check for compliance on the existing web
site of the bank.
VB.NET PDF Password Library: add, remove, edit PDF file password
VB: Add Password to PDF with Permission Settings Applied. This VB.NET example shows how to add PDF file password with access permission setting.
how to insert text box on pdf; how to enter text into a pdf form
C# PDF Text Extract Library: extract text content from PDF file in
How to C#: Extract Text Content from PDF File. Add necessary references: RasterEdge.Imaging.Basic.dll. RasterEdge.Imaging.Basic.Codec.dll.
adding text to a pdf in reader; how to insert text into a pdf
2
How should the e-commerce manager monitor and respond to technological innovation?
3
Benchmark different approaches to achieving and reassuring customers about their
privacy and security using three or four examples for a retail sector such as travel, books, toys
or clothing.
4
Select a new Internet-access technology (such as phone, kiosks or TV) that has been
introduced in the last two years and assess whether it will become a significant method
of access.
Examination questions
1
Explain the different layers of governance of the Internet.
2
Summarise the macro-environment variables a company needs to monitor when operating an
e-commerce site.
3
Explain the purpose of environmental scanning in an e-commerce context.
4
Give three examples of how web sites can use techniques to protect the user’s privacy.
5
Explain the significance of the diffusion–adoption concept to the adoption of new
technologies to:
(a) consumers purchasing using technological innovations;
(b) businesses deploying technological innovations.
6
What action should an e-commerce manager take to ensure compliance with ethical and legal
standards of their site?
REFERENCES
145
References
ABC News (2000) Ecommerce Causes Tax Shortfall in US. News story on ABC.com. 27/07/00,
http://abcnews.go.com/sections/business/DailyNews/inter
nettaxes000725.html
.
Booz Allen Hamilton (2002) International E-Economy Benchmarking The World’s Most Effective
Policies for the E-Economy. Report published 19 November, London, www
.e-envoy
.gov
.uk/
assetRoot/04/00/08/19/04000819.pdf
.
Curry,  A.  (2001)  What’s  next  for  interactive  television?,  Interactive  Marketing,  3(2),
October/December, 114–28.
Dyson, E. (1998) Release 2.1. A Design for Living in the Digital Age. Penguin, London.
Fisher, A.  (2000)  Gap  widens  between  the  ‘haves’ and  ‘have-nots’, Financial  Times,  5
December.
Fletcher, K. (2001) Privacy: the Achilles heel of the new marketing, Interactive Marketing, 3(2),
October/December, 128–41.
Gartner (2005) Gartner’s Hype Cycle Special Report for 2005. Report summary available at
www.gartner.com: ID Number: G00130115.
Godin, S. (1999) Permission Marketing. Simon and Schuster, New York.
Guardian (2003a) Hijacked your bank balance, your identity, your life. The Guardian, Saturday,
25 October, www
.guar
dian.co.uk/weekend/stor
y/0,3605,1069646,00.html
.
Guardian
(2003b)  Will  Wi-Fi  fly?  Neil  McIntosh,  Thursday,  14  August.
www
.guar
dian.co.uk/online/stor
y/0,3605,1017664,00.html
.
Guardian (2005) Ethiopia’s digital dream. Michael Cross, Thursday, 4 August.
Hamill, J. and Gregory, K. (1997) Internet marketing in the internationalisation of UK SMEs,
Journal of Marketing Management, Special edition on internationalisation, J. Hamill (ed.), 
13 (1–3).
C# HTML5 PDF Viewer SDK to view PDF document online in C#.NET
Create PDF Online. Convert PDF Online. WPF PDF Viewer. View PDF in WPF. Annotate PDF in Highlight Text. Add Text. Add Text Box. Drawing Markups. PDF Print. Work
adding text to a pdf in preview; how to input text in a pdf
VB.NET PDF- View PDF Online with VB.NET HTML5 PDF Viewer
View PDF Online. Annotate PDF Online. Create PDF Online. Convert PDF Online. WPF PDF Highlight Text. Add Text. Add Text Box. Drawing Markups. PDF Print. Work
adding text fields to a pdf; add text to pdf acrobat
IT Week (2005)  Need for  speed leaves GSM in the  past, 1  August. IT Week, 8(30), 13,
www
.itweek.co.uk
Malmsten, E., Portanger, E. and Drazin, C. (2001) Boo Hoo. A Dot.com Story from Concept to
Catastrophe. Random House, London.
Mason, R. (1986) Four ethical issues of the information age, MIS Quarterly, March.
MobileCommerceWorld (2002) British SMS records smashed in December. 24 January, Press
release based on data from the mobile data association, www
.mobilecommer
ceworld.com
.
Mougayer, W. (1998) Opening Digital Markets – Battle Plans and Strategies for Internet Commerce,
2nd edn. CommerceNet Press, McGraw-Hill, New York.
National Statistics (2005) Individuals accessing the Internet – Report from the National
Statistics Omnibus Survey. Published October 2005.
New Media Age (1999) Will boo.com scare off the competition? Budd Margolis, 22 July.
Poon, S. and Jevons, C. (1997) Internet-enabled international marketing: a small business net-
work perspective, Journal of Marketing Management, 13, 29–41.
Pullen, M. and Robinson, J. (2001) The e-commerce directive and its impact on pan-European
interactive marketing, Interactive Marketing, 2(3), 272–5.
Quelch, J. and Klein, L. (1996) The Internet and international marketing, Sloan Management
Review, Spring, 61–75.
RedEye (2003) A study into the accuracy of IP and cookie-based online management informa-
tion, The RedEye Report, available online at www
.r
edeye.com
.
Rogers, E. (1983) Diffusion of Innovations, 3rd edn. Free Press, New York.
Roussel, A. (2000) Leaders and laggards in B2C commerce. Gartner Group report. 4 August.
SPA-11-5334, www
.gar
tner
.com
.
Sparrow, A. (2000) E-Commerce and the Law. The Legal Implications of Doing Business Online.
Financial Times Executive Briefings.
Svennevig, M. (2004) The interactive viewer: reality or myth? Interactive Marketing, 6(2),
151–64.
Trott, P. (1998) Innovation Management and New Product Development. Financial Times/Prentice
Hall, Harlow.
United Nations (1999) New technologies and the global race for knowledge. In Human
Development Report. United Nations, New York.
Ward, S., Bridges, K. and Chitty, B. (2005) Do incentives matter? An examination of on-line
privacy concerns and willingness to provide personal and financial information, Journal of
Marketing Communications, 11(1), 21–40.
Further reading
Dyson, E. (1998) Release 2.1. A Design for Living in the Digital Age. Penguin, London. Chapters
5 Governance, 8 Privacy, 9 Anonymity and 10 Security are of particular relevance.
Garfinkel, S. (2000) Database Nation. O’Reilly, Sebastopol, CA. This book is subtitled ‘the
death of privacy in the 21st century’ and this is the issue on which it focuses (includes
Internet- and non-Internet-related privacy).
Slevin, J. (2000) The Internet and Society. Polity Press, Cambridge. A book about the Internet
that combines social theory, communications analysis and case studies from both aca-
demic and applied perspectives.
Zugelder, M., Flaherty, T. and Johnson, J. (2000) Legal issues associated with international
Internet marketing, International Marketing Review, 17(3), 253–71. Gives a detailed review of
legal issues associated with Internet marketing including consumer rights, defamation and
disparagement, intellectual property protection, and jurisdiction.
CHAPTER 3 · THE INTERNET MACRO-ENVIRONMENT
146
C# PDF insert image Library: insert images into PDF in C#.net, ASP
Insert images into PDF form field. Access to freeware download and online C#.NET class source code. How to insert and add image, picture, digital photo, scanned
adding text to pdf reader; how to add text boxes to pdf
VB.NET PDF - Annotate PDF Online with VB.NET HTML5 PDF Viewer
PDF Online. This part will explain the usages of annotation tabs on RasterEdge VB.NET HTML5 PDF Viewer. Text Markup Tab. Item. Name. Description. 1. Add sticky
add text to pdf file; adding text to a pdf form
Web links
Mobile  Commerce  World (www
.mobilecommer
ceworld.com
).  Source  on  usage  of 
m-commerce.
MORI Technology Tracker (www
.mori.com/technology/techtracker
.shtml
). Provides a sum-
mary of access to new media platforms.
New Media Age (www
.newmediazer
o.com/nma
). A weekly magazine reporting on the UK
new media interest. Content now available online.
New Television Strategies (www
.newmediazer
o.com/ntvs
). Sister publication to New Media
Age.
Revolution magazine (www
.r
evolutionmagazine.com
). A weekly magazine available for
the UK, covering a range of new media platforms.
New law development
Two of the best legal sources to stay up-to-date are:
iCompli (www
.icompli.co.uk
). Portal and e-newsletter concentrating on e-commerce law.
Marketing Law (www
.marketinglaw
.co.uk
). Up-to-date source on all forms of law related to
marketing activities.
WEB LINKS
147
VB.NET PDF Text Add Library: add, delete, edit PDF text in vb.net
Viewer & Editors, C# ASP.NET Document Viewer, C# Online Dicom Viewer, C# Online Jpeg images Viewer, C# HTML Document How to VB.NET: Add Text to PDF Page.
adding text box to pdf; add text to pdf document online
C# HTML5 PDF Viewer SDK to annotate PDF document online in C#.NET
PDF Online. This part will explain the usages of annotation tabs on RasterEdge C#.NET HTML5 PDF Viewer. Text Markup Tab. Item. Name. Description. 1. Add sticky
adding text to pdf in reader; adding text to pdf
1
In Part 2 approaches for developing an Internet marketing strat-
egy  are explored.  These  combine traditional approaches to
strategic marketing  planning  with specific Internet-related
issues that need to be considered by Internet marketers. In
Chapter 4 a strategy framework is described, Chapter 5 dis-
cusses the opportunities for varying the marketing mix online
and Chapter 6 reviews strategies for online customer relation-
ship management.
Internet marketing strategy
p.151
An integrated Internet marketing strategy
A generic strategic approach
Situation review
Strategic goal setting
Strategy formulation
Strategy implementation
The Internet and the marketing mix
p.214
Product
Price
Place
Promotion
People, process and physical evidence
Relationship marketing using the Internet
p.256
Key concepts of relationship marketing
Key concepts of electronic customer relationship management 
(e-CRM)
Customer lifecycle management
Approaches to implementing e-CRM
4
5
6
INTERNET STRATEGY
DEVELOPMENT
Part 2
Learning objectives
After reading this chapter, the reader should be able to:
Relate Internet marketing strategy to marketing and business
strategy
Identify opportunities and threats arising from the Internet
Evaluate alternative strategic approaches to the Internet
Questions for marketers
Key questions for marketing managers related to this chapter are:
What approaches can be used to develop Internet marketing
strategy?
How does Internet marketing strategy relate to other strategy
development?
What are the key strategic options for Internet marketing?
Links to other chapters
This chapter is related to other chapters as follows:
It builds on the evaluation of the Internet environment from
Chapters 2 and 3
Chapter 5 describes the potential for varying different elements of
the marketing mix as part of Internet marketing strategy
Chapter 6 describes customer relationship management strategies
4
Main topics
An integrated Internet
marketing strategy 154
A generic strategic approach
157
Situation review w 160
Strategic goal setting g 168
Strategy formulation n 174
Strategy implementation n 204
Case study 4
Tesco.com uses the Internet to
support its diversification
strategy  207 
Chapter at a glance
Internet marketing
strategy
Documents you may be interested
Documents you may be interested