mvc show pdf in div : Add text to pdf reader software control dll winforms web page windows web forms 5G7BGE3Z6KNWFOHBFCWN20-part1356

With SMART objectives everyone is sure exactly what the target is and progresses towards
it and, if appropriate, action can be taken to put the company back on target. Typical exam-
ples of SMART objectives to support goal-setting for Internet marketing strategy include:
achieve 10 per cent online revenue contribution within 2 years;
migrate 40% of customers to online services and e-mail communications within
3 years;
achieve first or second position in category penetration in the countries within which
the company operates (this is effectively online audience or market share and can be
measured through visitor rankings such as Hitwise or Netratings (Chapter 2) or,
better, by online revenue share);
achieve a cost reduction of 10 per cent in marketing communications within 2 years;
increase retention of online customers by 10 per cent;
increase by 20 per cent within one year the number of sales arising from a certain
target market, e.g. 18–25-year-olds;
create value-added customer services not currently available;
improve customer service by providing a response to a query within 2 hours, 24 hours
per day, 7 days a week.
Specific digital communications objectives are also described in Chapter 8.
Frameworks for objective setting
A significant challenge of objective setting for Internet marketing is that there will
potentially be many different measures such as those in the list above and these will
have be to grouped to be meaningful. Categorisation of objectives into groups is also
useful since it can be used to identify suitable objectives. In this chapter, we have already
seen two methods of categorising objectives. First, objectives can be set at the level of
business effectiveness, marketing effectiveness and Internet marketing effectiveness as
explained in the section on internal auditing as part of situation analysis. Second, the 5S
framework of Sell, Speak, Serve, Save and Sizzle provides a simple framework for objec-
tive setting. A further five-part framework is presented in Chapter 9.
The balanced scorecard
Some larger companies will identify objectives for Internet marketing which are consis-
tent with existing business measurement frameworks. Since the balanced business
scorecard is a well-known and widely used framework it can be helpful to define objec-
tives for Internet marketing in these categories.
The balanced scorecard, popularised in a Harvard Business Review article by Kaplan and
Norton (1993) can be used to translate vision and strategy into objectives and, then,
through measurement assessing whether the strategy and its implementation are suc-
cessful. In part, it was a response to over-reliance on financial metrics such as turnover
and profitability and a tendency for these measures to be retrospective rather than look-
ing at future potential as indicated by innovation, customer satisfaction and employee
development. In addition to financial data the balanced scorecard uses operational
measures such as customer satisfaction, efficiency of internal processes and also the
organisation’s innovation and improvement activities including staff development. It
has since been applied to IT (Der Zee and De Jong, 1999), e-commerce (Hasan and
Tibbits, 2000) and multi-channel marketing (Bazett et al., 2005).
CHAPTER 4 · INTERNET MARKETING STRATEGY
172
Balanced scorecard
A framework for setting
and monitoring
business performance.
Metrics are structured
according to customer
issues, internal
efficiency measures,
financial measures and
innovation.
Add text to pdf reader - insert text into PDF content in C#.net, ASP.NET, MVC, Ajax, WinForms, WPF
XDoc.PDF for .NET, providing C# demo code for inserting text to PDF file
add text pdf; adding text to pdf in reader
Add text to pdf reader - VB.NET PDF insert text library: insert text into PDF content in vb.net, ASP.NET, MVC, Ajax, WinForms, WPF
Providing Demo Code for Adding and Inserting Text to PDF File Page in VB.NET Program
adding text to a pdf form; adding text to pdf document
Table 4.4 illustrates specific Internet marketing measures within the four main areas of
organisational performance managed through the balanced scorecard. In our presenta-
tion we have placed objectives within the areas of efficiency (‘doing the thing right’) and
effectiveness (‘doing the right thing’). For example, efficiency involves increasing conver-
sion rates and reducing costs of acquisition. Effectiveness involves supporting broader
marketing objectives and often indicates the contribution of the online channel. It is
useful to identify efficiency and effectiveness measures separately, since often online mar-
keting and web analytics tend to focus on efficiency. Hasan and Tibbits (2000) note that
the internal process measures in particular are concerned with the efficiency and the cus-
tomer  and  business  value  perspectives  are  indicated  with  effectiveness,  but  these
measures can be applied across all four areas as we have shown.
Performance drivers
Specific performance metrics are used to evaluate and improve the efficiency and effec-
tiveness of a process. Key performance indicators (KPIs) are a special type of performance
metric which indicate the overall performance of a process or its sub-processes. An exam-
ple of KPIs for an online electrical goods retailer is shown in Figure 4.9. Improving the
results from the e-commerce site involves using the techniques on the left of the diagram
to improve the performance drivers and so the KPI. The KPI is the total online sales
figure. For a traditional retailer, this could be compared as a percentage to other retail
channels such as mail order or retail stores. It can be seen that this KPI is dependent on
performance drivers such as number of site visits or average order value which combine
to govern this KPI. Note that the definition of KPI is arbitrary and is dependent on scope.
So, overall conversion rate could be a KPI and this is then supported by other perform-
ance drivers such as engagement rate, conversion to opportunity and conversion to sale. 
A further objective-setting or metrics framework, the online lifecycle management
grid, is presented at the end of the chapter as a summary since this integrates objectives,
strategies and tactics.
STRATEGIC GOAL SETTING
173
Efficiency
Minimising resources
or time needed to
complete a process.
‘Doing the thing right’.
Effectiveness
Meeting process
objectives, delivering
the required outputs
and outcomes. ‘Doing
the right thing’.
Table 4.4 Example allocation of Internet marketing objectives within the balanced
scorecard framework for a transactional e-commerce site
Balanced scorecard sector Efficiency
Effectiveness
Financial results
Channel costs
Online contribution (direct)
(Business value)
Channel profitability
Online contribution (indirect)
Profit contributed
Customer value
Online reach (unique visitors 
Sales and sales per customer
as % of potential visitors)
New customers
Cost of acquisition or cost 
Online market share
per sale (CPA / CPS)
Customer satisfaction ratings
Customer propensity to 
Customer loyalty index
defect
Operational processes
Conversion rates
Fulfilment times
Average order value
Support response times
List size and quality
E-mail active %
Innovation and learning
Novel approaches tested
Novel approaches deployed
(people and knowledge)
Internal e-marketing 
Performance appraisal review
education
Internal satisfaction ratings
Performance
metrics
Measures that are used
to evaluate and improve
the efficiency and
effectiveness of
business processes.
Key performance
indicators (KPIs)
Metrics used to assess
the performance of a
process and/or
whether goals set are
achieved.
C# PDF insert image Library: insert images into PDF in C#.net, ASP
inserting image to PDF in preview without adobe PDF reader installed. Insert images into PDF form field. How to insert and add image, picture, digital photo
how to add text to a pdf in preview; add text to pdf file reader
VB.NET PDF insert image library: insert images into PDF in vb.net
try with this sample VB.NET code to add an image As String = Program.RootPath + "\\" 1.pdf" Dim doc New PDFDocument(inputFilePath) ' Get a text manager from
add text box to pdf; add text pdf file
Strategy formulation involves the identification of alternative strategies, a review of their
merits and then selection of the best candidate strategies. Since the Internet is a rela-
tively new medium, and many companies are developing a strategy for the first time, a
range of strategic factors must be considered in order to make the best use of it. In this
section we shall cover the main strategic options by defining eight key decisions. 
Although at the height of the dot-com bubble it was suggested by some commenta-
tors that companies should entirely re-invent themselves, for most companies Internet
marketing strategy formulation typically involves making adjustments to marketing strat-
egy to take advantage of the benefits of online channels rather than wholescale changes.
Michael Porter (2001) attacks those who have suggested that the Internet invalidates
well-known approaches to strategy. He says:
CHAPTER 4 · INTERNET MARKETING STRATEGY
174
Figure 4.9 An example of a performance measurement system for an e-commerce electrical goods retailer
Source: Friedlein (2002) 
• Strength of proposition
• Marketing
• Increased acceptance of online shopping
Customer
acquisition
• Competitive differentiation
• Customer service
• Customer relationship management
• Content freshness
• Seducible moments
• Loyalty
Frequency
of visits
• Ease of use
• Speed of site
• Security/trust
Abandoned
purchases
• Relevance
• Value
Promotions
• Navigation
• Browsing behaviour
• Service
Customer
journey
• Reward schemes
Up-selling
• Product grouping
• Bundling incentive
Cross-
selling
Conversion
rate = 5%
Average
order value
= £160
Average
order value
= £8
Number of
visits = 10m
Total
online sales
£80 million
Performance
drivers
KPI
Customer
retention
Success factors
Strategy formulation
Strategy
formulation
Generation, review and
selection of strategies
to achieve strategic
objectives.
VB.NET PDF Password Library: add, remove, edit PDF file password
VB: Add Password to PDF with Permission Settings Applied. This VB.NET example shows how to add PDF file password with access permission setting.
adding text to a pdf in preview; how to insert text into a pdf file
VB.NET PDF Text Extract Library: extract text content from PDF
With this advanced PDF Add-On, developers are able to extract target text content from source PDF document and save extracted text to other file formats
how to insert text box in pdf file; how to insert text into a pdf
Many have assumed that the Internet changes everything, rendering all the old rules about
companies and competition obsolete. That may be a natural reaction, but it is a dangerous
one . . . [resulting in] decisions that have eroded the attractiveness of their industries and
undermined their own competitive advantages.
The key strategic decisions for e-marketing are the same as strategic decisions for tra-
ditional marketing. They involve selecting target customer groups and specifying how to
deliver value to these groups. Segmentation, targeting, differentiation and positioning
are all key to effective digital marketing.
The main thrust of Internet marketing strategy is taking decisions on the selective tar-
geting of customer groups and different forms of value delivery for online channels.
Rather than selective targeting, another strategic option is to replicate existing offline
segmentation, targeting, differentiation and positioning in the online channels. While
this is relatively easy to implement, the company is likely to lose market share relative to
more nimble competitors that modify their approach for online channels. An example
of where companies have followed a ‘do-nothing strategy’ is grocery shopping where
some have not rolled out home shopping to all parts of the country or do not offer the
service at all. These supermarkets will lose customers to the most enthusiastic adopters
of online channels such as Tesco.com and Sainsbury which will be difficult to win back
in the future (see Case Study 4 for examples).
As mentioned at the start of the chapter, we should remember that Internet market-
ing strategy is a channel marketing strategy and it needs to operate in the context of
multi-channel marketing. It follows that it is important that the Internet marketing
strategy should:
Be based on objectives for online contribution of leads and sales for this channel;
Be consistent with the types of customers that use and can be effectively reached
through the channel;
Support the customer journey as they select and purchase products using this channel
in combination with other channels;
Define a unique, differential proposition for the channel; 
Specify how we communicate this proposition to persuade customers to use online
services in conjunction with other channels;
Manage the online customer lifecycle through the stages of attracting visitors to the
web site, converting them to customers and retention and growth.
This said, many of the decisions related to Internet marketing strategy development
involve reappraising a company’s approach to strategy based on familiar elements of
marketing strategy. We will review these decisions:
Decision 1: Market and product development strategies
Decision 2: Business and revenue models strategies
Decision 3: Target marketing strategy
Decision 4: Positioning and differentiation strategy (including the marketing mix)
Decision 5: Multi-channel distribution strategy
Decision 6: Multi-channel communications strategy
Decision 7: Online communications mix and budget
Decision 8: Organisational capabilities (7S).
The first four decisions are concerned with fundamental questions of how an organi-
sation delivers value to customers online and which products are offered to which
markets online. The next four decisions are more concerned with the mix of marketing
communications used to communicate with customers across multiple channels.
STRATEGY FORMULATION
175
C# PDF Password Library: add, remove, edit PDF file password in C#
C# Sample Code: Add Password to PDF with Permission Settings Applied in C#.NET. This example shows how to add PDF file password with access permission setting.
add text to pdf file online; add text to pdf file
C# PDF Text Extract Library: extract text content from PDF file in
How to C#: Extract Text Content from PDF File. Add necessary references: RasterEdge.Imaging.Basic.dll. RasterEdge.Imaging.Basic.Codec.dll.
adding text to a pdf document acrobat; how to add text to pdf file
Decision 1: Market and product development strategies
In Chapter 1, we introduced the Ansoff matrix as a useful analytic tool for assessing
online strategies for manufacturers and retailers. This tool is also fundamental to mar-
keting planning and it should be the first decision point since it can help companies
think about how online channels can support their marketing objectives, but also sug-
gest innovative use of these channels to deliver new products and more markets (the
boxes help stimulate ‘out-of-box’ thinking which is often missing with Internet market-
ing strategy). Fundamentally, the market and product development matrix (Figure 4.10)
can help identify strategies to grow sales volume through varying what is sold (the prod-
uct dimension on the horizontal axis of Figure 4.10) and who it is sold to (the market
dimension on the y axis). Specific objectives need to be set for sales generated via these
strategies, so this decision relates closely to that of objective setting. Let us now review
these strategies in more detail.
1 Market penetration
This strategy involves using digital channels to sell more existing products into existing
markets. The Internet has great potential for achieving sales growth or maintaining sales
by the market penetration strategy. As a starting point, many companies will use the
Internet to help sell existing products into existing markets, although they may miss
opportunities indicated by the strategies in other parts of the matrix. Figure 4.10 indi-
cates some of the main ways in which the Internet can be used for market penetration:
CHAPTER 4 · INTERNET MARKETING STRATEGY
176
Figure 4.10 Using the Internet to support different growth strategies
N
e
w
m
a
r
k
e
t
s
M
a
r
k
e
t
g
r
o
w
t
h
E
x
i
s
t
i
n
g
m
a
r
k
e
t
s
Market development strategies
Existing products
New products
Product growth
Diversification strategies
Using the Internet to support:
Diversification into related businesses
Diversification into unrelated businesses
Upstream integration (with suppliers)
Downstream integration
(with intermediaries)
Market penetration strategies
Use Internet for
Market share growth – compete
more effectively online
Customer loyalty improvement – migrate
existing customers online and add value
to existing products, services and brand
Customer value improvement – increase
customer profitability by decreasing
cost to serve and increase purchase or
usage frequency and quantity
Product development strategies
Use Internet for:
Adding value to existing products
Developing digital products
(new delivery/usage models)
Changing payment models
(Subscription, per use, bundling)
Increasing product range
(Especially e-retailers)
Use Internet for targeting:
New geographic markets
New customer segments
VB.NET PDF Text Add Library: add, delete, edit PDF text in vb.net
Read: PDF Image Extract; VB.NET Write: Insert text into PDF; Add Image to PDF; VB.NET Protect: Add Password to VB.NET Annotate: PDF Markup & Drawing. XDoc.Word
how to add text to pdf; how to add text to a pdf file in acrobat
C# PDF Sticky Note Library: add, delete, update PDF note in C#.net
Evaluation library and components enable users to annotate PDF without adobe PDF reader control installed. Able to add notes to PDF using C# source code in
add text field to pdf acrobat; how to add text to a pdf document
Market share growth – companies can compete more effectively online if they have web
sites that are efficient at converting visitors to sale as explained in Chapter 7 and mas-
tery of the online marketing communications techniques reviewed in Chapter 8 such
as search engine marketing, affiliate marketing and online advertising.
Customer loyalty improvement – companies can increase their value to customers and so
increase loyalty by migrating existing customers online (see the mini case study on
BA later in the chapter) by adding value to existing products, services and brand by
developing their online value proposition (see Decision 4).
Customer value improvement – the value delivered by customers to the company can be
increased by increasing customer profitability by decreasing cost to serve (and so price
to customers) and at the same time increasing purchase or usage frequency and quan-
tity. These combined effects should drive up sales.
2 Market development
Here online channels are used to sell into new markets, taking advantage of the low cost
of advertising internationally without the necessity for a supporting sales infrastructure
in the customer’s country. The Internet has helped low-cost airlines such as easyJet and
Ryanair to enter new markets served by their routes cost-effectively. This is a relatively
conservative use of the Internet, but is a great opportunity for SMEs to increase exports
at a low cost, though it does require overcoming the barriers to exporting. 
Existing products can also be sold to new market segments or different types of cus-
tomers. This may happen simply as a by-product of having a web site. For example, RS
Components (www
.rswww
.com
), a supplier of a range of MRO (maintenance, repair and
operations) items, found that 10% of the web-based sales were to individual consumers
rather than traditional business customers. The UK retailer Argos found the opposite was
true with 10% of web site sales being from businesses, when their traditional market was
consumer-based. EasyJet also has a section of its web site to serve business customers.
The Internet may offer further opportunities for selling to market sub-segments that
have not been previously targeted. For example, a product sold to large businesses may
also appeal to SMEs that they have previously been unable to serve because of the cost of
sales via a specialist sales force. Alternatively a product targeted at young people could
also appeal to some members of an older audience and vice versa. Many companies have
found that the audience and customers of their web site are quite different from their
traditional audience.
3 Product development
The web can be used to add value to or extend existing products for many companies.
For example, a car manufacturer can potentially provide car performance and service
information via a web site. But truly new products or services that can be delivered by
the Internet only apply for some types of products. These are typically digital media or
information products, for example, online trade magazine Construction Weekly has diver-
sified to a B2B portal Construction Plus (www
.constr
uctionplus.com
) which has new
revenue streams. Similarly, music and book publishing companies have found new ways
to deliver products through the new development and usage model such as subscription
and pay-per-use as explained in Chapter 5 in the section on the product element of the
marketing mix. Retailers can extend their product range and provide new bundling
options online also.
STRATEGY FORMULATION
177
C# PDF Text Add Library: add, delete, edit PDF text in C#.net, ASP
Read: PDF Image Extract; VB.NET Write: Insert text into PDF; Add Image to PDF; VB.NET Protect: Add Password to VB.NET Annotate: PDF Markup & Drawing. XDoc.Word
adding text to a pdf in reader; add text to pdf online
4 Diversification
In this  sector, new  products are developed which  are  sold into new  markets. The
Internet alone cannot facilitate these high-risk business strategies, but it can facilitate
them at lower costs than have previously been possible. The options include:
Diversification into related businesses (for example, a low-cost airline can use the web
site and customer e-mails to promote travel-related services such as hotel booking, car
rental or travel insurance at relatively low costs);
Diversification into unrelated businesses – again the web site can be used to promote
less-related products to customers, which is the approach used by the Virgin brand,
although it is relatively rare;
Upstream integration – with suppliers – achieved through data exchange between a
manufacturer or retailer and its suppliers to enable a company to take more control of
the supply chain;
Downstream integration – with intermediaries – again achieved through data exchange
with distributors such as online intermediaries.
The benefits and risks of market and product development are highlighted by the cre-
ation of smile (www
.smile.co.uk
), an Internet-specific bank set up by the Co-operative
Bank in the UK. smile opened for business in October 1999 and its first year added
200,000 customers at a rate of 20,000 per month. Significantly, 80% of these customers
were market development in the context of the parent, since they were not existing Co-
op Bank customers and typically belonged to a higher income segment. 
CHAPTER 4 · INTERNET MARKETING STRATEGY
178
Figure 4.11 Smile (www
.smil
e.c
o.uk
)
The risks of the new approach to banking were highlighted by the cost of innovation;
with it being estimated that in its first year, costs of creation and promotion of smile
increased overall costs at The Co-operative Bank by 5%. However, within five years,
smile was on target, profitable and growing strongly, and continues to do so today.  
Decision 2: Business and revenue models strategies
A further aspect of Internet strategy formulation closely related to product development
options is the review of opportunities from new business and revenue models, (first
introduced in Chapter 2 and discussed further in the next chapter in the sections on
product and price). Evaluating new models is important since if companies do not
review opportunities to innovate then competitors and new entrants certainly will.
Andy Grove of Intel famously said: ‘Only the paranoid will survive’, alluding to the need to
review new revenue opportunities and competitor innovations. A willingness to test and
experiment with new business models is also required. Dell is another example of a tech-
nology company that regularly reviews and modifies its business model as shown in
Mini Case Study 4.1 ‘Innovation in the Dell business model’. Companies at the bleeding
edge of technology such as Google and Yahoo! constantly innovate through acquiring
other  companies  and  internal  research  and  development  (Witness  Google  Labs
(http://labs.google.com
) and Yahoo! Research (http://r
esear
ch.google.com
)). The case
study on Tesco.com at the end of this chapter also highlights innovation in the Tesco
business model facilitated through online channels.
To sound a note of caution, flexibility in the business model should not be to the
company’s detriment through losing focus on the core business. A 2000 survey of CEOs
of leading UK Internet companies such as Autonomy, Freeserve, NetBenefit and QXL
(Durlacher, 2000) indicates that although flexibility is useful this may not apply to busi-
ness models. The report states:
STRATEGY FORMULATION
179
Business model
A summary of how a
company will generate
revenue, identifying its
product offering, value-
added services,
revenue sources and
target customers.
Revenue models
Describe methods of
generating income for
an organisation.
Early (first) mover
advantage
An early entrant into
the marketplace.
One example of how companies can review and revise their business model is provided by Dell
Computer. Dell gained early-moveradvantage in the mid-1990s when it became one of the first com-
panies to offer PCs for sale online. Its sales of PCs and peripherals grew from the mid-1990s with online
sales of $1 million per day to 2000 sales of $50 million per day. Based on this success it has looked at
new business models it can use in combination with its powerful brand to provide new services to its
existing customer base and also to generate revenue through new customers. In September 2000, Dell
announced plans to become a supplier of IT consulting services through linking with enterprise resource
planning specialists such as software suppliers, systems integrators and business consulting firms. This
venture will enable the facility of Dell’s PremierPages to be integrated into the procurement component
of ERP systems such as SAP and Baan, thus avoiding the need for rekeying and reducing costs.
In a separate initiative, Dell launched a B2B marketplace (formerly www
.dellmarketplace.com
) aimed
at discounted office goods and services procurements including PCs, peripherals, software, stationery
and travel. This strategic option did not prove sustainable.
Mini Case Study 4.1
Innovation in the Dell business model
A widely held belief in the new economy in the past, has been that change and flexibility is
good, but these interviews suggest that it is actually those companies who have stuck to a
single business model that have been to date more successful . . . CEOs were not moving
far from their starting vision, but that it was in the marketing, scope and partnerships
where new economy companies had to be flexible.
So with all strategy options, managers should also consider the ‘do-nothing option’.
Here, a company will not risk a new business model, but adopt a ‘wait-and-see’ or ‘fast-
follower’ approach to see how competitors perform and respond rapidly if the new
business model proves sustainable. 
Finally, we can note that companies can make less radical changes to their revenue
models through the Internet which are less far-reaching, but may nevertheless be worth-
while. For example:
Transactional e-commerce sites (e.g. Tesco.com and Lastminute.com) can sell advertis-
ing space or run co-branded promotions on site or through their e-mail newsletters or
lists to sell access to their audience to third parties.
Retailers or media owners can sell-on white-labelled services through their online
presence such as ISP, e-mail services or photo-sharing services.
Companies can gain commission through selling products which are complementary
(but  not competitive  to their  own). For example, a publisher can sell  its books
through an affiliate arrangement through an e-retailer.
Decision 3: Target marketing strategy
Deciding on which markets to target is a key strategic consideration for Internet market-
ing strategy in the same way it is key to marketing strategy. Target marketing strategy
involves the four stages shown in Figure 4.12, but the most important decisions are:
Segmentation/targeting strategy – a company’s online customers have different demo-
graphic characteristics, needs and behaviours from its offline customers. It follows
that different approaches to segmentation may be required and specific segments may
need to be selectively targeted.
Positioning/differentiation strategy – competitors’ product and service offerings will
often differ in the online environment. Developing an appropriate online value
proposition as described below is an important aspect of this strategy.
In an Internet context, organisations need to target those customer groupings with
the highest propensity to access, choose and buy online.
The first stage in Figure 4.12 is segmentation. Segmentation involves understanding
the groupings of customers in the target market in order to understand their needs and
potential as a revenue source so as to develop a strategy to satisfy these segments while
maximising revenue. Dibb et al. (2001) say that:
Market segmentation is the key of robust marketing strategy development . . . it involves
more than simply grouping customers into segments . . . identifying segments, targeting,
positioning and developing a differential advantage over rivals is the foundation of market-
ing strategy.
In an Internet marketing planning context, market segments will be analysed to assess:
1 their current market size or value, future projections of size and the organisation’s
current and future market share within the segment;
2 competitor market shares within segment;
CHAPTER 4 · INTERNET MARKETING STRATEGY
180
Target marketing
strategy
Evaluation and
selection of appropriate
segments and the
development of
appropriate offers.
Segmentation
Identification of
different groups within
a target market in
order to develop
different offerings for
each group.
3 needs of each segment, in particular, unmet needs;
4 organisation and competitor offers and proposition for each segment  across all
aspects of the buying process.
Stage 2 in Figure 4.12 is target marketing. Here we select segments for targeting online
that are most attractive in terms of growth and profitability. These may be similar or dif-
ferent compared with groups targeted offline. Some examples of customer segments that
are targeted online include:
the most profitable customers – using the Internet to provide tailored offers to the top
20 per cent of customers by profit may result in more repeat business and cross-sales;
larger companies (B2B) – an extranet could be produced to service these customers, and
increase their loyalty;
smaller companies (B2B) – large companies are traditionally serviced through sales repre-
sentatives and account managers, but smaller companies may not warrant the expense
of account managers. However, the Internet can be used to reach smaller companies
more cost-effectively. The number of smaller companies that can be reached in this
way may be significant, so although the individual revenue of each one is relatively
small, the collective revenue achieved through Internet servicing can be large;
particular members of the buying unit (B2B) – the site should provide detailed informa-
tion for different interests which supports the buying decision, for example technical
documentation for users of products, information on savings from e-procurement for
IS or purchasing managers, and information to establish the credibility of the com-
pany for decision makers;
customers that are difficult to reach using other media – an insurance company looking to
target younger drivers could use the web as a vehicle for this;
STRATEGY FORMULATION
181
Figure 4.12 Stages in target marketing strategy development
Informed by
Segmentation
Identify customer
needs and
segment market
Target marketing
Evaluate and select
target segments
Positioning
Identify proposition
for each segment
Planning
Deploy resources
to achieve plan
Market research
and analysis of
customer data
Demand analysis
Competitor analysis
Internal analysis
Evaluation of
resources
• Market segment definition
• Target segments
• Online revenue contribution
for each segment
• Online value proposition
• Online marketing mix
• Online marketing mix
• Restructuring
Stage of target marketing
Informs
Documents you may be interested
Documents you may be interested