mvc show pdf in div : Add text to pdf document online SDK software service wpf .net asp.net dnn 5G7BGE3Z6KNWFOHBFCWN21-part1357

customers that are brand-loyal – services to appeal to brand loyalists can be provided to
support  them  in  their  role  as  advocates  of  a  brand,  as  suggested  by  Aaker  and
Joachimsthaler (2000);
customers that are not brand-loyal – conversely, incentives, promotion and a good level
of service quality could be provided by the web site to try and retain such customers.
Such groupings can  be targeted online by using  navigation options to  different con-
tent groupings such that visitors self-identify. This is the approach used as the main basis
for navigation on the Dell site (Figure  4.13) and  has  potential for subsidiary navigation
on other sites. Dell targets by geography and then tailors the types of consumers or busi-
nesses according to country, the US Dell site having the most options. Other alternatives
are to set up separate sites for different audiences – for example, Dell Premier is targeted
at purchasing  and  IT staff  in larger  organisations.  Once customers are  registered on a
site, profiling information in a database can be used to send tailored e-mail messages to
different segments, as we explain in the Euroffice example in Mini Case Study 4.2 below.
The most sophisticated segmentation and targeting schemes are often used by e-retailers,
which have detailed customer profiling information and purchase history data and seek to
increase customer  lifetime value through encouraging increased use of online  services
through  time. However, the general  principles of this approach can also  be used by other
types of companies online. The segmentation and targeting approach used by e-retailers is
based on five main elements which in effect are layered on top of each other. The number
of options used, and so the sophistication of the approach  will  depend on resources avail-
able, technology capabilities and opportunities afforded by the list:
CHAPTER 4 ·  IN TERNET  M ARKET IN G  STRAT EGY
182
Figure 4.13 Dell Singapore site segmentation
Source: http://www.ap.dell.com/content/default.aspx?c=sg&1=en&s=gen
Add text to pdf document online - insert text into PDF content in C#.net, ASP.NET, MVC, Ajax, WinForms, WPF
XDoc.PDF for .NET, providing C# demo code for inserting text to PDF file
adding a text field to a pdf; how to add text to pdf file with reader
Add text to pdf document online - VB.NET PDF insert text library: insert text into PDF content in vb.net, ASP.NET, MVC, Ajax, WinForms, WPF
Providing Demo Code for Adding and Inserting Text to PDF File Page in VB.NET Program
how to add text to a pdf document using reader; adding text to a pdf
1 Identify customer lifecycle groups
Figure 4.14 illustrates this approach. As visitors use online services they can potentially pass
through seven or more stages. Once companies  have defined these groups and set up the
customer relationship management infrastructure to categorise customers in this way, they
can then deliver  targeted messages, either by personalised on-site messaging or through e-
mails that are triggered automatically by different rules. First-time visitors can be identified
by whether they have a cookie placed on their PC. Once visitors have registered, they can
be tracked through the remaining stages. Two particularly important groups are customers
that have purchased one or more times.  For many e-retailers, encouraging  customers to
move from the first purchase to the second purchase and then on to the third purchase is a
key challenge. Specific promotions can be used to encourage further purchases. Similarly,
once customers become inactive, i.e. they have not purchased for a defined period such as 3
months, they become inactive and further follow-ups are required. 
2 Identify customer profile characteristics
This is a traditional segmentation based on the type of customer. For B2C e-retailers this
will include age, sex and geography. For B2B companies, it will include size of company
and the industry sector or application they operate in.
3 Identify behaviour in response and purchase
As customers progress through the lifecycle shown in Figure 4.14, by analysis of their data-
base, the marketer will be able to build up a detailed response and purchase history which
considers the details of recency,  frequency, monetary  value and category of products pur-
chased. This approach, which is known as RFM or FRAC analysis, is reviewed in more detail
in Chapter 6. See Tesco.com Case Study 4 for how Tesco targets its online customers. 
4 Identify multi-channel behaviour (channel preference)
Regardless  of the  enthusiasm of  the company  for  online channels, some customers  will
prefer  using online channels and others will  prefer traditional  channels. This will, to an
extent  be indicated  by  RFM and response  analysis since  customers with a  preference  for
STRAT EGY  FORMULAT ION
183
Figure 4.14 Customer lifecycle segmentation
Purchased active: e-responsive
7
Purchased inactive
6
Purchased once or n times
5
Registered visitor
4
Newly registered visitor
3
Return visitor
2
First-time visitor
1
C# HTML5 PDF Viewer SDK to view PDF document online in C#.NET
Protect. Password: Set File Permissions. Password: Open Document. Edit Digital Highlight Text. Add Text. Add Text Box. Drawing Markups. PDF Print. Work with
adding text pdf; add text to pdf document in preview
VB.NET PDF insert image library: insert images into PDF in vb.net
try with this sample VB.NET code to add an image As String = Program.RootPath + "\\" 1.pdf" Dim doc New PDFDocument(inputFilePath) ' Get a text manager from
how to add text fields to a pdf document; how to enter text into a pdf form
online channels will be more responsive and will make more purchases online. Drawing a
channel chain (Figure 2.10) for different customers is useful to help understand this. It is
also useful to have a  flag within the database which indicates the customers’ channel
preference and, by implication, the best channel to target them by. Customers that prefer
online channels can be targeted mainly by online communications such as e-mail, while
customers that prefer traditional channels can be targeted by traditional communications
such as direct mail or phone. 
5 Tone and style preference
In a  similar manner to  channel preference, customers  will  respond  differently to differ-
ent types of message. Some  may  like  a more rational appeal, in  which case a  detailed
e-mail explaining  the  benefits of the offer may work best. Others will  prefer an emo-
tional  appeal  based  on  images  and  with  warmer,  less  formal  copy.  Sophisticated
companies will test for this  in customers or infer it using profile  characteristics and
response  behaviour  and  then  develop  different  creative  treatments  accordingly.
Companies  that  use polls can potentially use this to  infer  style  preferences. To  sum-
marise this  section,  read the Mini Case  Study 4.2  which illustrates the  combination  of
these different forms of communication.
CHAPTER 4 ·  IN TERNET  M ARKET IN G  STRAT EGY
184
Euroffice (www
.eur
of
fice.co.uk
) targets small and mid-sized companies. According to George Karibian,
CEO, ‘getting the message across effectively required segmentation’ to engage different people in differ-
ent ways. The office sector is fiercely competitive, with relatively little loyalty since company purchasers
will often simply buy on price. However, targeted incentives can be used to reward or encourage buyers’
loyalty.  Rather than  manually  developing campaigns for  each segment  which  is  time-consuming,
Euroffice mainly uses an automated event-based targeting approach based on the system identifying the
stage at which a consumer is in the lifecycle, i.e. how many products they have purchased and the types
of product within their purchase history. Karibian calls this a ‘touch marketing funnel’ approach, i.e. the
touch strategy is determined by customer segmentation and response. Three main groups of customers
are identified in the lifecycle and these are broken down further according to purchase category. Also lay-
ered on this segmentation is breakdown into buyer type – are they a small home-user, an operations
manager at a mid-size company or a purchasing manager at a larger company? Each will respond to dif-
ferent promotions.
The first group, at the top of the funnel and the largest, are ‘Group 1. Trial customers’ who have made
one or two purchases. For the first group, Euroffice believes that creating impulse buying through price
promotions is most important. These will be based on categories purchased in the past. The second
group, ‘Group 2. The nursery’, have made three to eight purchases. A particular issue, as with many e-
retailers is encouraging customers from the third to fourth purchase – there is a more significant drop-out
at this point which the company uses marketing to control. Karibian says: ‘When they get to group two,
it’s about creating frequency of purchase to ensure they don’t forget you’. Euroffice sends a printed cata-
logue to Group 2 separately from their merchandise as a reminder about the company. The final group,
‘Group 3. Key accounts or ‘Crown Jewels’, have made nine or more orders. They also tend to have a
higher basket value. These people are ‘the Crown Jewels’ and will spend an average of £135 per order
compared to an average of £55 for trial customers. They have a 90% probability of re-ordering within a
six-month period. For this group, tools have been developed on the site to make it easier for them to
shop. The intention is that these customers find these tools help them in making their orders and they
become reliant on them, so achieving ‘soft lock-in’.
Mini Case Study 4.2
Euroffice segment office supplies purchasers using
‘touch marketing funnel’ approach
DocImage SDK for .NET: Web Document Image Viewer Online Demo
on the client side without additional add-ins and Microsoft PowerPoint: PPTX, PPS, PPSX; PDF: Portable Document HTML5 Document Viewer Developer Guide. To see
how to insert text box in pdf; adding text to pdf in preview
VB.NET PDF- View PDF Online with VB.NET HTML5 PDF Viewer
Protect. Password: Set File Permissions. Password: Open Document. Edit Digital Highlight Text. Add Text. Add Text Box. Drawing Markups. PDF Print. Work with
add text to a pdf document; add text box to pdf file
Decision 4: Positioning and differentiation strategy (including 
the marketing mix)
Stage 3 in Figure 4.12 is positioning. Deise et al. (2000) suggest that in an online context,
companies can position their products relative to competitor offerings according to four
main  variables: product quality, service quality, price  and fulfilment time. They suggest
it  is useful to  review these  through an  equation  of how they combine to influence cus-
tomer perceptions of value or brand:
Product quality × Service quality
Customer value (brand perception) = ––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––
Price × Fulfilment time
Strategies should review  the extent to  which increases in product and service quality
can be balanced against variations in price and fulfilment time. Chaston (2000) argues that
there are four options for strategic focus to position a company in the online marketplace.
STRAT EGY  FORMULAT ION
185
Figure 4.15 Euroffice e-mail (www
.eur
offic
e.c
o.uk
Source: Adapted from the company web site press releases and Revolution (2005a)
Positioning
Customers’ perception
of the product offer
relative to those of
competitors.
VB.NET PDF Password Library: add, remove, edit PDF file password
allowed. passwordSetting.IsCopy = True ' Allow to assemble document. passwordSetting.IsAssemble = True ' Add password to PDF file.
add text pdf file acrobat; add text pdf acrobat professional
C# HTML5 PDF Viewer SDK to annotate PDF document online in C#.NET
versions. Users can add sticky note to PDF document. Able to Highlight PDF text. Able to underline PDF text with straight line. Support
how to insert a text box in pdf; adding text to pdf reader
It is evident that these are related to the different elements of Deise et al. (2000). He says
that online these should build on existing  strengths, and can use the  online facilities  to
enhance the positioning as follows:
Product performance excellence. Enhance by providing online product customisation.
Price performance excellence. Use the facilities of the Internet to offer favourable pricing
to loyal  customers or  to reduce prices  where demand is low (for example, British
Midland Airlines uses auctions to sell underused capacity on flights).
Transactional excellence. A site such as that of software and hardware e-tailer dabs.com
offers transactional excellence through combining pricing information with dynamic
availability  information on  products,  listing number  in  stock,  number on  order  and
when they are expected.
Relationship excellence – personalisation features to enable customers to review sales order
history and place repeat orders. An example is RS Components (www
.rswww
.com
).
These  positioning  options  have much  in  common with Porter’s generic competitive
strategies of cost leadership or differentiation in a broad market and a market segmenta-
tion approach focusing  on a more  limited target market  (Porter,  1980). Porter has been
criticised since many commentators believe that to remain competitive it is necessary to
combine excellence in all of these areas. It can be suggested that the same is true for sell-
side e-commerce. These  are not  mutually  exclusive strategic options, rather  they are
prerequisites for success. Customers will be unlikely to judge on a single criterion, but on
the balance of multiple criteria. This is the view of Kim et al. (2004) who concluded that
for online businesses, ‘integrated strategies that  combine elements of cost  leadership and dif-
ferentiation will outperform cost leadership  or differentiation  strategies’. It  can be  seen that
Porter’s original criteria are similar to the strategic positioning options of Chaston (2000)
and Deise et al. (2000). Figure 4.16 summarises the positioning options described in this
section,  showing the  emphasis on  the three  main variables  for online differentiation –
price, product and relationship-building services. The diagram  can  be used to show the
mix  of the three elements  of  positionings. EasyJet has an  emphasis on  price perform-
ance, but with a component of product innovation. Amazon is  not positioned  on price
performance, but rather on relationship building and product innovation. We will see in
Chapter 5, in  the section on price,  that  although it would be  expected that pricing is a
key aspect determining online retail  sales,  there  are other factors about a retail  brand
such as familiarity, trust and service which are also important. 
CHAPTER 4 ·  IN TERNET  M ARKET IN G  STRAT EGY
186
Figure 4.16 Alternative positionings for online services
100%
Pricing
innovation
100%
Product
innovation
Relationship building or
service quality
innovation
100%
Dabs
Smile
Amazon
Cisco
easyJet
RS Components
VB.NET PDF Text Extract Library: extract text content from PDF
NET programming language, you may use this PDF Document Add-On for With this advanced PDF Add-On, developers are able to extract target text content from
add text to pdf acrobat; how to insert text in pdf file
C# PDF Text Extract Library: extract text content from PDF file in
How to C#: Extract Text Content from PDF File. Add necessary references: RasterEdge.Imaging.Basic.dll. RasterEdge.Imaging.Basic.Codec.dll.
how to add a text box in a pdf file; add text to pdf in acrobat
An alternative  perspective on positioning strategies has been suggested by Picardi
(2000). The three main approaches suggested are generic:
1 Attack e-tailing. As suggested by the name, this is an aggressive competitive approach
that involves frequent comparison with competitors’ prices and then matching or bet-
tering them. This approach is important on the Internet because of the transparency of
pricing and  availability of information made  possible  through  shopping comparison
sites such as PriceRunner (www
.pricer
unner
.com
) and Kelkoo (www
.kelkoo.com
). 
2 Defend e-tailing.  This  is a  strategic  approach that traditional companies  can use  in
response to  ‘attack e-tailing’. It involves differentiation based  on  other aspects of
brand  beyond  price.  It  will  often  be  used  by  multi-channel  e-retailers  such  as
Debenhams  (www
.debenhams.com
 and  John  Lewis  (www
.johnlewis.com
).  Such
retailers may  not  want to eat into sales  from their high-street stores, or  may believe
that the strength of their  brands  is  such that they do not need to offer differential
online prices. They may use a mixed approach with some ‘attack e-tailing’ approaches
such as competitive pricing on the most popular items or special promotions.
3 E2E (end-to-end)  integration. This is  an efficiency strategy that  uses the  Internet  to
decrease costs  and increase product quality and  shorten  delivery  times.  This strategy
is achieved by moving towards an automated supply chain and internal value  chain.
This  approach  is  used  by  e-retailiers such  as dabs.com  (www
.dabs.com
) and  E-buyer
(www
.ebuyer
.com
). 
The online value proposition
The aim of positioning is to develop a differential advantage over rivals’ products as per-
ceived by the customer.  Many examples of  differentiated online offerings are  based on
the lower costs in acquiring and retaining online customers which are then passed on to
customers – to do this requires creation of a different profit centre for e-commerce opera-
tions. Examples include:
Retailers offering lower prices online.  Examples:  Tesco.com (price promotions on
selected products), Comet (discounts relative to in-store on some products);
Airlines offering lower-cost flights for online bookings. Examples: easyJet, Ryanair, BA;
Financial services companies offering higher  interest rates on  savings products  and
lower  interest  rates  on credit products such as credit  cards  and loans. Examples:
Nationwide, Alliance and Leicester;
Mobile phone network providers or utilities  offering lower-cost tariffs  or discounts for
customers  accounts who are managed  online without paper billing. Examples: O
2
,
British Gas.
Other options for differentiation are available online for companies where their prod-
ucts are not appropriate for sale online such as high-value or complex products or FMCG
(fast-moving consumer goods) brands sold through  retailers. These  companies  can use
online services to add value to the brand or product through providing different services
or experiences from those available elsewhere.
In an e-marketing context the differential advantage and positioning can be clarified
and communicated by developing  an  online value proposition (OVP). Developing an
OVP, involves:
Developing messages which:
reinforce core brand proposition and credibility,
communicate what a visitor can get from an online brand that …
– they can’t get from the brand offline;
– they can’t get from competitors or intermediaries.
STRAT EGY  FORMULAT ION
187
Differential
advantage
A desirable attribute of
a product offering that
is not currently
matched by competitor
offerings.
Online value
proposition (OVP)
A statement of the
benefits of online
services reinforces the
core proposition and
differentiates from an
organisation’s offline
offering and those of
competitors.
C# PDF insert image Library: insert images into PDF in C#.net, ASP
freeware download and online C#.NET class source code. How to insert and add image, picture, digital photo, scanned signature or logo into PDF document page in
how to enter text in a pdf document; add text box in pdf document
C# PDF Password Library: add, remove, edit PDF file password in C#
in C#.NET framework. Support to add password to PDF document online or in C#.NET WinForms for PDF file protection. Able to create a
how to insert text box on pdf; adding text pdf file
Communicating these messages to all appropriate online and offline customers touch
points in different levels of detail from straplines to more detailed content on the web
site or in print.
Communicating the OVP on the site can help create a customer-centric web site. Look
at how Autotrader does this for different types of visitors and services in Figure 4.17.
Virgin Wines uses an OVP to communicate its service promise as follows: 
And what if ... You are out during the day? We promise: our drivers will find a safe place
to leave your wine; but if it does get stolen, we just replace it;
You find it cheaper elsewhere? We will refund the difference if you are lucky enough to
find a wine cheaper elsewhere;
You  live  somewhere  obscure?  We  deliver anywhere  in  the  UK,  including  Northern
Ireland, the Highlands and Islands, and the Scilly Isles, for £5.99;
You are in a hurry? We deliver within 7 days, or your delivery is free.
Mini Case Study 4.3 ‘BA asks “Have you clicked yet?”’ gives an example of an ad cam-
paign  to communicate  an OVP. This is a  good example since it explains the benefits of
online services and e-mail communications and also positions these benefits within the
customer buying process.
Varianini and Vaturi (2000) conducted a review of failures in B2C dot-com companies
in order to highlight lessons that  can be learned. They believe that  many of the  prob-
lems have resulted from a failure to apply established marketing orientation approaches.
CHAPTER 4 ·  IN TERNET  M ARKET IN G  STRAT EGY
188
Figure 4.17 Autotrader site (www
.aut
otr
ader
.c
o.uk
) clearly communicates its 
proposition
They summarise their guidelines as follows:
First identify customer  needs and define a distinctive value proposition  that will meet
them, at a profit. The value proposition must then be delivered through the right product
and service and the right channels  and it must be communicated consistently. The ulti-
mate  aim is to  build a strong, long-lasting brand  that  delivers  value  to  the company
marketing it.
Likewise, Agrawal et al. (2001) suggest that the success of leading e-commerce companies
is often due to matching value propositions to segments successfully. 
McDonald and Wilson (2002) suggest that to determine a value proposition marketers
should first assess changes in an industry’s structure (see Chapter 2) since channel innovations
STRAT EGY  FORMULAT ION
189
In 2004, British Airways launched online services which allowed customers to take control of the booking
process, so combining new services with reduced costs. BA decided to develop a specific online ad
campaign to create awareness and encourage usage of its Online Value Proposition. BA’s UK marketing
manager said about the objective: 
Mini Case Study 4.3
BA asks ‘Have you clicked yet?’
Figure 4.18 BA ‘Have you clicked yet?’ campaign web site
will influence which proposition is possible. They then suggest sub-processes of first setting
objectives for market share, volume or value by each segment and then defining the value to
be delivered to the customer in terms of the marketing mix. They suggest starting with defin-
ing the price and value proposition using the 4 Cs and then defining marketing strategies
using the 4 Ps (see Chapter 5). 
Having a clear online value proposition has several benefits:
it helps distinguish an e-commerce site from its competitors (this should be a web site
design objective);
it helps provide a focus to marketing efforts so that company staff are clear about the
purpose of the site;
if the proposition is clear it can be used for PR, and word-of-mouth recommendations
may be  made  about the  company. For example, the  clear proposition of Amazon on
its site is that prices are reduced by up to 40% and that a wide range of 3 million titles
are available;
it can be linked to the normal product propositions of a company or its product.
We look further into options for varying the proposition and marketing mix in Chapter 5.
CHAPTER 4 ·  IN TERNET  M ARKET IN G  STRAT EGY
190
Activity 4.4
Online value proposition
Visit the web sites of the following companies and, in one or two sentences each, 
summarise their Internet value proposition. You should also explain how they use 
the content of the web site to indicate their value proposition to customers.
1 Tektronix (www
.tektr
onix.com
).
2 Handbag.com (www
.handbag.com
).
3 Harrods (www
.har
r
ods.com
).
4 Guinness (www
.guinness.com
).
visit the
w.w.w.
British Airways is leading the way in innovating technology to simplify our customer’s journey through
the airport. The role of this campaign was to give a strong message about what is now available online,
over and above booking tickets.
The aim was to develop a campaign that educated and changed the way in which BA’s customers
behave before, during and after their travel. The campaign focused on the key benefits of the new online
services – speed, ease and convenience – and promoted the ability to check in online and print out a
boarding pass. The two main target audiences were quite different, early-adopters and those who use
the web occasionally but don’t rely on it. Early-adopters were targeted on sites such as T3.co.uk,
Newscientist.com and DigitalHomeMag.com. Occasional users were reached through ads on sites such
as JazzFM.com, Vogue.com and Menshealth.com.
Traditional media used to deliver the ‘Have you clicked yet?’ message included print, TV and outdoor
media. The print ad copy, which details the OVP was:
Your computer is now the airport. Check in online, print your own boarding pass, choose your seat,
change your booking card and even find hire cars and hotels. Simple.
A range of digital media were used, including ATMs, outdoor LCD transvision screens such as those in
London rail stations which included Blue-casting where commuters could receive a video on their Bluetooth
enabled mobile phone, digital escalator panels. More than 650,000 consumers interacted with the ATM
screen creative. Online ads included overlays and skyscrapers which showed a consumer at his computer,
printing out a ticket and walking across the screen to the airport. Such rich-media campaigns generated 17
per cent clickthrough and 15% interaction. The web site used in the campaign is shown in Figure 4.18. 
Source: Revolution (2005b)
191
Decision 5: Multi-channel distribution strategy
Decisions 5 and 6 relate to multi-channel prioritisation which assesses the strategic signif-
icance  of  the  Internet  relative  to  other  communications  channels.  In  making  this
prioritisation it is helpful to distinguish between customer communications channels and
distribution channels. Customer communications channels, which we review as decision
6, refer to how an organisation influences its customers to select products and suppliers
through the different stages of the buying process through inbound and outbound com-
munications. For a retailer, it refers to selection of the mix of channels such as in-store,
inbound contact-centre, web and outbound direct messaging used to communicate with
prospects and customers.
‘Distribution channels’  refers to  flow of  products from a manufacturer  or  service
provider to the end customer. These may be direct to consumer channels or, more often,
intermediaries such as retailers are involved. Internet distribution channel priorities have
been summarised by Gulati and Garino  (2000)  as ‘getting the right mix of bricks and
clicks’.  This expression has  been used to refer to traditional ‘bricks and mortar ‘ enter-
prises with a physical presence, but limited Internet presence. In the UK, an example of a
‘bricks and mortar’ store would be the bookseller  Waterstones (www
.waterstones.co.uk
),
which when it ventured online became ‘clicks and mortar’. It initially followed a strategy
of  creating its own online presence, but now delivers its online channel through a part-
nering arrangement based on the Amazon.com infrastructure which is an example of the
partnering strategy suggested by Gulati and Garino  (2000).  Internet pureplays or  ‘e-busi-
nesses’ such as dabs.com  which operate  solely through their online representation  are
relatively rare. Dabs.com, which is featured in  Case Study 7, uses its web site  and e-mail
marketing as the primary interactions with the customers. Other e-retailers such as Virgin
Wines.com make more use of phone contact and physical  mail with customers. Even
dabs.com uses these channels where appropriate – for large-volume business customers.
STRAT EGY  FORMULAT ION
Multi-channel
prioritisation
Assesses the strategic
significance of the
Internet relative to
other communications
channels and then
deploys resources to
integrate with
marketing channels.
Customer
communications
channels
The range of media
used to communicate
directly with a
customer.
Distribution
channels
The mechanism by
which products are
directed to customers
either through
intermediaries or
directly.
Bricks and mortar
A traditional
organisation with
limited online
presence.
Clicks and mortar
A business combining
an online and offline
presence.
Clicks-only or
Internet pureplay
An organisation with
principally an online
presence. It does not
operate a mail-order
operation or promote
inbound phone orders.
Figure 4.19 Strategic options for a company in relation to the importance of the Internet
as a channel
L
i
m
i
t
e
d
R
a
d
i
c
a
l
C
h
a
n
g
e
r
e
q
u
i
r
e
d
High
Low
Medium
% Online revenue contribution

Information only
Digital channels
complementary
Digital
channels
replace

Mix of on- and offline
transactions and
customer service

All transactions and
customer service online
Documents you may be interested
Documents you may be interested