mvc show pdf in div : How to add text to a pdf file in preview Library application class asp.net html winforms ajax 5G7BGE3Z6KNWFOHBFCWN22-part1358

CHAPTER 4 · INTERNET M ARKETING STRATEGY
192
The general options for the mix of ‘bricks and clicks’ are shown in Figure 4.19. The
online revenue contribution estimate is informed by the customer demand analysis of
propensity to purchase a particular type of product. A similar diagram was produced by
de Kare-Silver (2000) who suggested that strategic e-commerce alternatives for companies
should be selected according to the percentage of the target market using the channel
and the commitment of the company. The idea is that the commitment should mirror
the readiness of consumers to use the new medium. If the objective is to achieve a high
online revenue contribution of greater than 70% then this will require fundamental
change for the company to transform to a ‘bricks and clicks’ or ‘clicks-only’ company.
Kumar (1999) suggests that a company should decide whether the Internet will pri-
marily complement the company’s other channels or primarily replace other channels.
Clearly, if it is believed that the Internet will primarily replace other channels, then it is
important to invest in the promotion and infrastructure to achieve this. This is a key
decision as the company is essentially deciding whether the Internet is ‘just another
communications and/or sales channel’ or whether it will fundamentally change the way
it communicates and sells to its customers.
Figure 4.20 summarises the main decisions on which a company should base its com-
mitment to the Internet. Kumar (1999) suggests that replacement is most likely to
happen when:
customer access to the Internet is high;
the Internet can offer a better value proposition than other media;
the product can be delivered over the Internet (it can be argued that this condition is
not essential for replacement, so it is not shown in the figure);
the product can be standardised (the user does not usually need to view to purchase).
Only if all four conditions are met will there be primarily a replacement effect. The fewer
the conditions met, the more likely is it that there will be a complementary effect.
Figure 4.20 Flow chart for deciding on the significance of the Internet to a business
Source: After Kumar (1999)
Low
High
Yes
No
Start
Customer
access to
Internet?
Primarily
complementary
effect
Internet
value proposition
similar?
Can product
be standardised?
Primarily
complementary
effect
No
Yes
Primarily
complementary
effect
Primarily
replacement
effect
How to add text to a pdf file in preview - insert text into PDF content in C#.net, ASP.NET, MVC, Ajax, WinForms, WPF
XDoc.PDF for .NET, providing C# demo code for inserting text to PDF file
how to add text to pdf document; add text to pdf
How to add text to a pdf file in preview - VB.NET PDF insert text library: insert text into PDF content in vb.net, ASP.NET, MVC, Ajax, WinForms, WPF
Providing Demo Code for Adding and Inserting Text to PDF File Page in VB.NET Program
add text to pdf without acrobat; how to add text to a pdf file in preview
193
From an analysis such as that in Figure 4.20 it should be possible to state whether the
company strategy should be directed as a complementary or as a replacement scenario. As
mentioned in relation to the question of the contribution of the Internet to its business,
the company should repeat the analysis for different product segments and different mar-
kets. It will then be possible to state the company’s overall commitment to the Internet. If
the future strategic importance of the Internet is high, with replacement likely, then a sig-
nificant investment needs to be made in the Internet, and a company’s mission needs to
be directed towards replacement. If the future strategic importance of the Internet is low
then this still needs to be recognised, and appropriate investment made.
Poon and Joseph (2000) have suggested that frameworks assessing the suitability of
the Internet for sales, based solely on product characteristics are likely to be misleading.
They surveyed Australian firms to assess the importance of product characteristics in
determining online sales. They found that there was not a significant difference between
physical goods and standardised digital goods such as software.
They conclude:
Although it is logical to believe that firms who are selling search goods of low tangibility
have a natural advantage in Internet commerce, it is important to understand that all prod-
ucts have some degree of tangibility and a mixture of search and experience components.
The only difference is the relative ratio of such characteristics. For example, a pair of jeans
is an experience good with high tangibility, but the size and fit can be easily described
using standard descriptions. Similarly, a piece of software is a search good with low tangi-
bility, but the functionality of a software package cannot be fully appreciated without
‘test-driving’ a beta release.
Changes to marketplace structure
Strategies to take advantage of changes in marketplace structure should also be developed.
These options are created through disintermediation and reintermediation (Chapter 2)
within a marketplace. The strategic options for the sell-side downstream channels which
have been discussed in Chapter 2 are:
disintermediation (sell direct);
create new online intermediary (countermediation);
partner with new online or existing intermediaries;
do nothing!
Prioritising strategic partnerships as part of the move from a value chain to a value
network should also occur as part of this decision. For all options tactics will be needed
to manage the channel conflicts that may occur as a result of restructuring.
Technological integration
To achieve strategic Internet marketing goals, B2B organisations will have to plan for
integration with customers’ and suppliers’ systems. Chaffey (2006) describes how a sup-
plier may have to support technical integration with a range of customer e-procurement
needs, for example:
1 Links with single customers. Organisations will decide whether a single customer is large
enough to enforce such linkage. For example, supermarkets often insist that their sup-
pliers trade with them electronically. However, the supplier may be faced with the cost
of setting up different types of links with different supermarket customers.
2 Links with intermediaries. Organisations have to assess which are the dominant interme-
diaries such as B2B marketplaces or exchanges and then evaluate whether the trade
resulting from the intermediary is sufficient to set up links with this intermediary.
STRATEGY FORMULATION
C# WinForms Viewer: Load, View, Convert, Annotate and Edit PDF
Add text to PDF document in preview. • Add text box to PDF file in preview. • Draw PDF markups. PDF Protection. • Sign PDF document with signature.
add text boxes to pdf; how to add text to a pdf document using acrobat
C# WinForms Viewer: Load, View, Convert, Annotate and Edit
Convert CSV file to PDF (.pdf). Add, remove and save annotations to CSV file. Protection. Miscellaneous. • Select text on OpenOffice.
how to insert text into a pdf using reader; add text field to pdf
CHAPTER 4 · INTERNET M ARKETING STRATEGY
194
Decision 6: Multi-channel communications strategy 
As part of creating an Internet marketing strategy, it is vital to define how the Internet
integrates with other inbound communications channels used to process customer
enquiries and orders and outbound channels which use direct marketing to encourage
retention and growth or deliver customer service messages. For a retailer, these channels
include in-store, contact-centre, web and outbound direct messaging used to communi-
cate with prospects and customers. Some of these channels may be broken down further
into different media – for example, the contact-centre may involve inbound phone
enquiries, e-mail enquiries or real-time chat. Outbound direct messaging may involve
direct mail, e-mail media or web-based personalisation. Mini Case Study 2.2 ‘Lexus
assesses multi-channel experience consistency’ in Chapter 2 shows the importance of
the quality of multiple channels in influencing customer experiences.
The multi-channel communications strategy must review different types of customer con-
tact with the company and then determine how online channels will best support these
channels. The main types of customer contact and corresponding strategies will typically be:
Inbound sales-related enquiries (customer acquisition or conversion strategy);
Inbound customer-support enquiries (customer service strategy);
Outbound contact strategy (customer retention and development strategy).
For each of these strategies, the most efficient mix and sequence of media to support
the business objectives must be determined. Typically the short-term objective will be
conversion to outcome such as sale or satisfactorily resolved service enquiry in the short-
est possible time with the minimum cost. However, longer-term objectives of customer
loyalty and growth also need to be considered. If the initial experience is efficient, but
unsatisfactory to the customer, then they may not remain a customer!
The multi-channel communications strategy must assess the balance between:
customer channel preferences – some customers will prefer online channels for product
selection or making enquiries while others will prefer traditional channels;
organisation channel preferences – traditional channels tend to be more expensive to
service than digital channels for the company; however, they may not be as effective
in converting the customer to sale (for example, a customer who responds to a TV ad
to buy car insurance may be more likely to purchase if they enquire by phone in com-
parison to  web enquiry) or in developing customer loyalty (the personal touch
available through face-to-face or phone contact may result in a better experience for
some customers which engenders loyalty).
Myers et al. (2004) say:
customers may always be right, but allowing them to follow their own preferences often
increases a company’s costs while leaving untapped opportunities to boost revenues.
Instead customers [segments with different characteristics and value] must be guided to
the right mix of channels for each product or service. 
They suggest companies need to use data to assess a mismatch between the company’s
actual customer channel preferences and those  of the market at large. Thomas and
Sullivan (2005) give the example of a US multi-channel retailer that used cross-channel
tracking of purchases through assigning each customer a unique identifier to calculate
channel preferences  as  follow:  63%  bricks-and-mortar store-only  customers,  12.4%
Internet-only customers, 11.9% catalogue-only customers, 11.9% dual-channel customers
and 1% three-channel customers. This analysis shows the potential for multi-channel sales
since Myers et al. (2004) state that these multi-channel customers spend 20 to 30% more.
VB.NET PDF File Compress Library: Compress reduce PDF size in vb.
Also a preview component enables compressing and decompressing in preview in ASP.NET class. Also able to uncompress PDF file in VB.NET programs.
add text in pdf file online; how to insert text into a pdf with acrobat
How to C#: Preview Document Content Using XDoc.Word
With the SDK, you can preview the document content according to the preview thumbnail by the ways as following. C# DLLs for Word File Preview. Add references:
adding text to a pdf document; adding text pdf files
So, the multi-channel communications strategy needs to specify the extent of commu-
nications choices made available to customers and the degree to which a company
persuades customers to use particular channels. Deciding on the best combination of
channels is a complex challenge for organisations. Consider your mobile phone com-
pany.  When  purchasing  you may make your decision about handset and  network
supplier in-store, on the web or through phoning the contact centre. Any of these contact
points may either be direct with the network provider or through a retail intermediary.
After purchase, if you have support questions about billing, handset upgrades or new tar-
iffs you may again use any of these touchpoints to resolve your questions. Managing this
multi-channel challenge is vital for the phone company for two reasons, both concerned
with customer retention. First, the experience delivered through these channels is vital to
the decision whether to remain with the network supplier when their contract expires –
price is not the only consideration. Second, outbound communications delivered via web
site, e-mail, direct mail and phone are critical to getting the customer to stay with the
company by recommending the most appropriate tariff and handset with appropriate
promotions, but which is the most appropriate mix of channels for the company (each
channel has a different level of cost-effectiveness for customers which contributes differ-
ent  levels  of  value to the customer) and the customer (each  customer will have a
preference for the combinations of channels they will use for different decisions)?
McDonald and Wilson (2002) suggest evaluating different distribution channels using
the channel curve which is a similar tool to the electronic shopping test of de Kare-Silver
(2000) described in Chapter 2. For a particular product category they suggest evaluating the
customer’s preference for each channel against store, mail and phone ordering channels
and in terms of cost, convenience, added-value, viewing and accessibility for the customer.
To review strategic options for the role of the Internet in multi-channel marketing the
channel coverage map (Figure 4.21), popularised by Friedman and Furey (1999), is a
useful tool. This model is best applied to a business-to-business context. Considering an
organisation such as Dell, customers will vary by value within and between segments.
Low-value segments will be smaller businesses and consumers while large organisations
placing many purchases will be higher-value. For consumers, Dell’s preferred channel
preference will be the low-cost online channel. For medium-sized companies, the prefer-
ence will be a combination of desk-based sales agents in a call centre supported by the
web. Through using phone contact, Dell can better explain the options available for
multiple purchases. For the highest-value, large companies, the most important effective
195
STRATEGY FORMULATION
Figure 4.21 Channel coverage map showing the company’s preferred strategy for com-
munications with different customer segments with different value
Contact-centre
Web supported
Web
Sales force
Customer extranet
Product sales complexity
C
u
s
t
o
m
e
r
v
a
l
u
e
How to C#: Preview Document Content Using XDoc.PowerPoint
bitmap of the first page in the PowerPoint document file. C# DLLs: Preview PowerPoint Document. Add necessary XDoc.PowerPoint DLL libraries into your created C#
add text to pdf using preview; add text to pdf reader
C# PDF insert image Library: insert images into PDF in C#.net, ASP
position and save existing PDF file or output a new PDF file. Insert images into PDF form field. How to insert and add image, picture, digital photo, scanned
adding text fields to pdf; adding text to a pdf file
CHAPTER 4 · INTERNET M ARKETING STRATEGY
196
approach will be through field staff such as account managers. Specific web applications
such as the Dell Premier extranets will form part of the strategy to support these cus-
tomers. The model considers the different type of products a company  sells from
lower-cost standardised products through to higher-cost customised products and serv-
ices such as network management.
We will return to this key decision about implementing customer contact strategies in
later chapters in the book.
Decision 7: Online communications mix and budget
The decision on the amount of spending on online communications and the mix
between the different communications techniques such as search engine marketing, e-
mail marketing and online advertising is closely related to the previous one.
Varianini and Vaturi (2000) suggest that many e-commerce failures have resulted
from poor control of media spending. They suggest that many companies spend too
much on poorly targeted communications. They suggest the communications mix
should be optimised to minimise the cost of acquisition of customers. It can also be sug-
gested that optimisation of the conversion to action on site is important to the success
of marketing. The strategy will fail if the site design, quality of service and marketing
communications are not effective in converting visitors to prospects or buyers.
A further strategic decision is the balance of investment between customer acquisi-
tion  and  retention.  Many  start-up  companies  will  invest  primarily  on  customer
acquisition. This can be a strategic error since customer retention through repeat pur-
chases will be vital to the success of the online service. For existing companies, there is a
decision on whether to focus expenditure on customer acquisition or on customer reten-
tion or to use a balanced approach.
Agrawal et al. (2001) suggest that the success of e-commerce sites can be modelled
and controlled based on the customer lifecycle of customer relationship management
(Chapter  6).  They  suggest  using  a  scorecard,  assessed  using  a  longitudinal  study
analysing hundreds of e-commerce sites in the USA and Europe. The scorecard is based
on the performance drivers or critical success factors for e-commerce such as the costs
for acquisition and retention, conversion rates of visitors to buyers to repeat buyers,
together with churn rates. Note that to maximise retention and minimise churn (cus-
tomers who don’t continue to use the service) there will need to be measures that assess
the quality of service including customer satisfaction ratings. These are discussed in
Chapter 7. There are three main parts to their scorecard:
1 Attraction. Size of visitor base, visitor acquisition cost and visitor advertising revenue
(e.g. media sites).
2 Conversion. Customer base, customer acquisition costs, customer conversion rate,
number of transactions per customer, revenue per transaction, revenue per customer,
customer gross income, customer maintenance cost, customer operating income, cus-
tomer churn rate, customer operating income before marketing spending.
3 Retention. This uses similar measures to those for conversion customers.
The survey performed by Agrawal et al. (2001) shows that:
companies were successful at luring visitors to their sites, but not at getting these visitors
to buy or at turning occasional buyers into frequent ones.
In the same study they performed a further analysis where they modelled the theoret-
ical change in net present value contributed by an e-commerce site in response to a 10%
Performance
drivers
Critical success factors
that determine whether
business and
marketing objectives
are met.
VB.NET PDF insert image library: insert images into PDF in vb.net
try with this sample VB.NET code to add an image As String = Program.RootPath + "\\" 1.pdf" Dim doc New PDFDocument(inputFilePath) ' Get a text manager from
how to insert text in pdf reader; adding text to pdf file
C# PDF File Split Library: Split, seperate PDF into multiple files
page of your defined page number which starts from 0. For example, your original PDF file contains 4 pages. C# DLLs: Split PDF Document. Add necessary references
add text block to pdf; how to add text fields to a pdf
change in these performance drivers. This shows the relative importance of these drivers
or ‘levers’, as they refer to them:
1 Attraction
Visitor acquisition cost: 0.74% change in NPV
Visitor growth: 3.09% change in NPV.
2 Conversion
Customer conversion rate: 0.84% change in NPV
Revenue per customer: 2.32% change in NPV.
3 Retention
Cost of repeat customer: 0.69% change in NPV
Revenue per repeat customer: 5.78% change in NPV
Repeat customer churn rate: 6.65% change in NPV
Repeat customer conversion rate: 9.49% change in NPV.
This modelling highlights the importance of on-site marketing communications and
the quality of service delivery in converting browsers to buyers and buyers into repeat
buyers. It is apparent that marketing spend is large relative to turnover initially, to
achieve customer growth, but is then carefully controlled to achieve profitability.
We will return to this topic in Chapter 8, where we will review the balance between
campaign-based e-communications which are often tied into a particular event such as
the launch or re-launch of a web site or a product. For example, an interactive (banner)
advert campaign may last for a period of 2 months following a site re-launch or for a
5-month period around a new product launch. 
In addition to campaign-based e-communications we also need continuous e-communi-
cations. Organisations need to ensure that there is sufficient investment in continuous
online marketing activities such as search marketing, affiliate marketing and sponsorship. 
We observe that there is a significant change in mindset required to change budget
allocations from a traditional campaign-based approach to an increased proportion of
expenditure on continuous communications.
Decision 8: Organisational capabilities (7S)
A useful framework for reviewing an organisation’s capabilities to implement Internet
marketing strategy is shown in Table 4.5 applied to Internet marketing. This 7S frame-
work  was  developed  by  McKinsey  consultants  in  the  1980s  and  summarised  by
Waterman et al. (1980). 
Which are the main challenges in implementing strategy? E-consultancy (2005) sur-
veyed  UK  e-commerce  managers  to  assess  their  views  on  the  main  challenges  of
managing e-commerce within an organisation. Their responses are summarised in Figure
4.22. In the context of the 7Ss, we can summarise the main challenges as follows:
Strategy – limited capabilities to integrate into Internet strategy within core marketing
and business strategy as discussed earlier in this chapter is indicated by frustration on
gaining appropriate budgets;
Structure – structural and process issues are indicated by the challenges of gaining
resource and buy-in from traditional marketing and IT functions;
Skills and staff – these issues were indicated by difficulties in finding specialist staff or
agencies. 
197
STRATEGY FORMULATION
Campaign-based 
e-communications
E-marketing
communications that
are executed to support
a specific marketing
campaign such as a
product launch, price
promotion or a web site
launch.
Continuous 
e-communications
Long-term use of 
e-marketing
communications for
customer acquisition
(such as, search engine
and affiliate marketing)
and retention (for
example, e-newsletter
marketing).
VB.NET PDF File Split Library: Split, seperate PDF into multiple
page PDF document file to one-page PDF files or they can separate source PDF file to smaller VB.NET PDF Splitting & Disassembling DLLs. Add necessary references
how to add text box to pdf document; how to insert text in pdf using preview
CHAPTER 4 · INTERNET M ARKETING STRATEGY
198
Table 4.5 The 7S strategic framework and its application to digital marketing 
management
Element of 7S model Relevance to Internet 
Key issues 
marketing capability
Strategy
The contribution of digital marketing
Gaining appropriate budgets and 
in influencing and supporting 
demonstrating or delivering value 
organisations’ strategy
and return on investment from 
budgets. Annual planning approach
Techniques for using Internet 
marketing to impact organisation 
strategy
Techniques for aligning Internet
marketing strategy with 
organisational and marketing
strategy
Structure
The modification of organisational 
Integration of team with other 
structure to support Internet 
management, marketing 
marketing
(corporate communications, brand 
marketing, direct marketing) and 
IT staff
Use of cross-functional teams and
steering groups
Insourcing vs outsourcing
Systems
The development of specific 
Campaign planning 
processes, procedures or 
approach-integration
information systems to support 
Managing/sharing customer 
Internet marketing
information
Managing content quality
Unified reporting of digital 
marketing effectiveness
In-house vs external best-of-breed
vs external integrated technology
solutions
Staff
The breakdown of staff in terms of 
Insourcing vs outsourcing
their background, age and sex and 
Achieving senior management 
characteristics such as IT vs 
buy-in/involvement with digital 
marketing
marketing
Use of contractors/consultants
Staff recruitment and retention 
Virtual working
Staff development and training
Style
Includes both the way in which key 
Relates to role of the Internet 
managers behave in achieving the 
marketing team in influencing 
organisation’s goals and the cultural 
strategy – is it dynamic and 
style of the organisation as a whole
influential or conservative and
looking for a voice?
Skills
Distinctive capabilities of key staff, 
Staff skills in specific areas: 
but can be interpreted as specific 
supplier selection, project 
skill-sets of team members
management, content 
management, specific e-marketing
approaches (search engine 
marketing, affiliate marketing, 
e-mail marketing, online advertising)
Superordinate goals
The guiding concepts of the Internet 
Improving the perception of the 
marketing organisation which are 
importance and effectiveness of 
also part of shared values and 
the digital marketing team 
culture. The internal and external 
amongst senior managers and 
perception of these goals may vary
staff it works with (marketing 
generalists and IT)
199
Organisational structure decisions form two main questions. The first is ‘How should
internal structures be changed to deliver e-marketing?’ and the second ‘How should the
structure of links with partner organisations be changed to achieve e-marketing objec-
tives?’. Once structural decisions have been made attention should be focused on
effective change management. Many e-commerce initiatives fail, not in their conceptual-
isation, but in their implementation. Chaffey (2007) describes approaches to change
management and risk management in Chapter 10.
Internal structures
There are several alternative options for restructuring within a business such as the creation
of an in-house digital marketing or e-commerce group. This issue has been considered by
Parsons et al. (1996) from a sell-side e-commerce perspective. They recognise four stages in
the growth of what they refer to as ‘the digital marketing organisation’ which are still
useful for benchmarking digital marketing capabilities. A more sophisticated e-commerce
capability assessment was presented earlier in this chapter in the section on situation
review (Table 4.1). The stages are:
STRATEGY FORMULATION
Figure 4.22 The main challenges of e-marketing (n = 84) 
Source: E-consultancy (2005)
1 Gaining senior
management buy-
in/resource
Strongly
agree [1]
32.14%
(27)
1
2
3
4
5
6
Partially
agree [2]
35.71%
(30)
Neither agree
nor disagree [3]
11.9%
(10)
Partially
disagree [4]
8.33%
(7)
Disagree [5]
11.9%
(10)
2 Gaining buy-
in/resource from
traditional marketing
functions/brands
15.48%
(13)
39.29%
(33)
23.81%
(20)
10.71%
(9)
10.71%
(9)
3 Gaining IT
resource/technical
support
32.14%
(27)
36.9%
(31)
10.71%
(9)
11.9%
(10)
8.33%
(7)
4 Finding suitable
staff
15.66%
(13)
44.58%
(37)
22.89%
(19)
13.25%
(11)
3.61%
(3)
5 Finding suitable
digital media
agencies
9.52%
(8)
26.19%
(22)
35.71%
(30)
15.48%
(13)
13.1%
(11)
6 Other (please
enter challenge)
36.84%
(7)
15.79%
(3)
31.58%
(6)
10.53%
(2)
5.26%
(1)
25 
50 
75 
100 
Change
management
Controls to minimise
the risks of project-
based and
organisational change.
1 Ad-hoc activity. At this stage there is no formal organisation related to e-commerce and
the skills are dispersed around the organisation. It is likely that there is poor integra-
tion between online and offline marketing communications. The web site may not
reflect the offline brand, and the web site services may not be featured in the offline
marketing communications. A further problem with ad-hoc activity is that the main-
tenance of the web site will be informal and errors may occur as information becomes
out-of-date.
2 Focusing the effort. At this stage, efforts are made to introduce a controlling mecha-
nism for Internet marketing. Parsons et al. (1996) suggest that this is often achieved
through a senior executive setting up a steering group which may include interested
parties from marketing and IT and legal experts. At this stage the efforts to control the
site will be experimental, with different approaches being tried to build, promote and
manage the site.
3 Formalisation. At this stage the authors suggest that Internet marketing will have
reached a critical mass and there will be a defined group or separate business unit
within the company that will manage all digital marketing.
4 Institutionalising capability. This stage also involves a formal grouping within the
organisation, but is distinguished from the previous stage in that there are formal
links created between digital marketing and the company’s core activities. 
Although this is presented as a stage model with evolution implying all companies
will move from one stage to the next, many companies will find that true formalisation
with the creation of a separate e-commerce or e-business department is unnecessary. For
small and medium companies with a marketing department numbering a few people
and an IT department perhaps consisting of two people, it will not be practical to have a
separate group. Even large companies may find it is sufficient to have a single person or
small team responsible for e-commerce with their role being to coordinate the different
activities within the company using a matrix management approach. 
Activity 4.5 reviews different types of organisational structures for e-commerce. Table 4.6
reviews some of the advantages and disadvantages of each.
CHAPTER 4 · INTERNET M ARKETING STRATEGY
200
Table 4.6 Advantages and disadvantages of the organisational structures shown in Figure 4.23
Organisational 
Circumstances
Advantages
Disadvantages
structure
(a) No formal structure
Initial response to 
Can achieve rapid response  Poor-quality site in terms of 
for e-commerce
e-commerce or poor 
to e-commerce
content quality and 
leadership with no 
customer service responses 
identification of need for 
(e-mail, phone). Priorities not 
change
decided logically. Insufficient
resources
(b) A separate committee
Identification of problem and  Coordination and budgeting  May be difficult to get different 
or department manages response in (a)
and resource allocation 
departments to deliver their 
and coordinates
possible
input because of other 
e-commerce
commitments
(c) A separate business
Internet contribution 
As for (b), but can set own 
Has to respond to corporate 
unit with independent
(Chapter 6) is sizeable 
targets and not be 
strategy. Conflict of interests 
budgets
(>20%)
constrained by resources. 
between department and 
Lower-risk option than (d)
traditional business
(d) A separate operating
Major revenue potential or 
As for (c), but can set 
High risk if market potential is 
company
flotation. Need to 
strategy independently. Can  overestimated due to start-up 
differentiate from parent
maximise market potential
costs
201
Where the main e-commerce function is internal, the E-consultancy (2005) research
suggested that it was typically located in one of four areas (see Figure 4.24) in approxi-
mate decreasing order of frequency:
(a) Main e-commerce function in separate team.
(b) Main e-commerce function part of operations or direct channel.
(c) Main e-commerce function part of marketing, corporate communications or other
central marketing function.
(d) Main e-commerce function part of information technology (IT).
There is also often one or several secondary areas of e-commerce competence and
resource. For example, IT may have a role in applications development and site build and
each business, brand or country may have one or more e-commerce specialists responsi-
ble for managing e-commerce in their unit. Which was appropriate depended strongly on
the market(s) the company operated in and their existing channel structures.
STRATEGY FORMULATION
Activity 4.5
Which is the best organisation structure for e-commerce?
Purpose
To review alternative organisational structures for e-commerce.
Activity
1 Match the four types of companies and situations to the structures (a) to (d) in Figure 4.23.
A separate operating company. Example: Prudential and Egg (www
.egg.com
).
A separate business unit with independent budgets. Example: RS Components Internet
Trading Channel (www
.rswww
.com
).
A separate committee or department manages and coordinates e-commerce. Example:
Derbyshire Building Society (www
.derbyshir
e.co.uk
).
No formal structure for e-commerce. Examples: many small businesses.
2 Under which circumstances would each structure be appropriate?
3 Summarise the advantages and disadvantages of each approach.
Figure 4.23 Summary of alternative organisational structures for e-commerce sug-
gested in Parsons et al. (1996)
(a)Distributed
(b) Matrix control
(c)New division
(d)Autonomous company
Documents you may be interested
Documents you may be interested