mvc show pdf in div : How to enter text in pdf form control Library system azure asp.net web page console 5G7BGE3Z6KNWFOHBFCWN23-part1359

CHAPTER 4 · INTERNET M ARKETING STRATEGY
202
Links with other organisations
Gulati and Garino (2000) identify a continuum of approaches from integration to separa-
tion for delivering e-marketing through working with outside partners. The choices are:
1 In-house division (integration). Example: RS Components Internet Trading Channel
(www
.rswww
.com
).
2 Joint venture (mixed). The company creates an online presence in association with
another player.
3 Strategic partnership (mixed). This may also be achieved through purchase of existing
dot-coms, for example, in the UK Great Universal Stores acquired e-tailer Jungle.com
for its strength in selling technology products and strong brand while John Lewis pur-
chased Buy.com’s UK operations.
4 Spin-off (separation). Example: Egg bank is a spin-off from Prudential Financial Services
Company.
Figure 4.24 Options for location of control of e-commerce
Source: E-consultancy (2005)
Senior
management
IT
Direction?
Direction?
SC
Corp
Comms or
Marketing
SC
EC
Business
or Brand
1..n*
SC
Finance
(a) Separate e-commerce team
Ops/
Direct
Channel
SC
Senior
management
IT
Direction?
Direction?
SC
Corp
Comms or
Marketing
SC
Business
or Brand
1..n*
SC
Finance
(b) E-commerce part of direct channel/operations
Ops/
Direct
Channel
EC
Key
IT
Direction?
Direction?
Direction?
SC
Corp
Comms or
Marketing
EC
Business
or Brand
1..n*
SC
Finance
(c) E-commerce part of marketing
Ops/
Direct
Channel
SC
IT
Organisational unit involved with EC
EC
Main e-commerce competence
* Business or brand, 1..n is for several separate businesses including country businesses
SC Secondary e-commerce competence
Alternative locations for strategic direction or steering of e-commerce
Senior
management
Senior
management
IT
Direction?
Direction?
EC
Corp
Comms or
Marketing
SC
Business
or Brand
1..n*
SC
Finance
(d) E-commerce part of IT
Ops/
Direct
Channel
SC
How to enter text in pdf form - insert text into PDF content in C#.net, ASP.NET, MVC, Ajax, WinForms, WPF
XDoc.PDF for .NET, providing C# demo code for inserting text to PDF file
how to input text in a pdf; add text pdf acrobat
How to enter text in pdf form - VB.NET PDF insert text library: insert text into PDF content in vb.net, ASP.NET, MVC, Ajax, WinForms, WPF
Providing Demo Code for Adding and Inserting Text to PDF File Page in VB.NET Program
add text boxes to a pdf; adding text to a pdf in acrobat
Skills
There is a wide range of new skills required for e-commerce. Figure 4.25 gives an indication
of typical roles within an e-commerce team, placed within a customer-lifecyle-based struc-
ture. Each grouping of roles is placed in a dotted box which indicates the other teams this
group needs to work with, or potentially where in the organisation or outside this work is
completed. For example, e-CRM activities such as e-mail marketing could be potentially
undertaken in a particular business unit or country. Similarly, many activities of develop-
ment planning and implementation can be completed within IT or a specialist agency.
203
STRATEGY FORMULATION
Figure 4.25 Typical structure and responsibilities for a large e-commerce team 
Source: E-consultancy (2005)
PPC search 
specialist 
Acquisition 
(E-marketing 
Manager) 
Direct
Acquisition
SEO search 
specialist 
Interactive ad 
specialist 
Creative 
developer 
Affiliate
specialist
Partner
Acquisition
Sponsorship 
specialist 
Online PR 
specialist 
Development and
change manager
Conversion/ 
Proposition 
Development 
Development 
planning 
Requirements 
analyst 
Web/Information
architect
Usability 
analyst 
Web 
designer 
Development: 
implementation 
Web developer 
(or programmer) 
Webmaster 
Creative designer 
or consultant 
Content creator 
or editor 
Content 
management 
Business,
Country
marketing
Copywriter
Translator 
Sales 
analyst 
Retention 
E-commerce/
Direct Sales
Manager
E-CRM 
Manager 
Promotions 
Exec 
E-mail marketing
messaging
E-CRM 
Executive 
Customer
service also
within retention
Telesales/ 
customer support 
Operations 
Customer 
service 
Agency,
Business,
Country
marketing
IT or 
Agency 
E-CRM 
Manager 
Operations 
Contact 
Centre 
Online
Support agent
Web analytics 
Analysis & 
Reporting 
Commercial 
anaylst 
Services
level manager
Infrastructure 
Finance,
Business,
Reporting
IT or hosting 
company 
C#: XDoc.HTML5 Viewer for .NET Online Help Manual
Enter the URL to view the online document. Office 2003 and 2007, PDF, DICOM, Gif, Png, Jpeg, Bmp Click to OCR edited file (one for each) to plain text which can
adding text to pdf form; adding text to pdf online
C# HTML5 Viewer: Deployment on DotNetNuke Site
Open Web Matrix, click “New” and select “App Gallery”. Select “DNN Platform” in App Frameworks, and enter a Site Name. RasterEdge.XDoc.PDF.dll.
add editable text box to pdf; adding text to pdf in acrobat
CHAPTER 4 · INTERNET M ARKETING STRATEGY
204
For the skills indicated in Figure 4.25 it may be more efficient to outsource some skills.
These are some of the main options for external suppliers for these Internet marketing skills:
1 Full-service digital agency.
2 Specialist digital agency.
3 Traditional agency.
4 In-house resource.
When deciding on supplier or resource, suppliers need to consider the level and type
of marketing activities they will be covering.
The level typically ranges through:
1 Strategy
2 Analysis and creative concepts
3 Creative or content development
4 Executing campaign, including reporting analysis and adjustment
5 Infrastructure (e.g. web hosting, ad-serving, e-mail broadcasting, evaluation).
Options for outsourcing different e-marketing activities are reviewed in Activity 7.1.
This forms the topic for subsequent chapters in this book:
Chapter 5 – options for varying the marketing mix in the Internet environment;
Chapter 6 – implementing customer relationship management;
Chapter 7 – delivering online services via a web site;
Chapter 8 – interactive marketing communications;
Chapter 9 – monitoring and maintaining the online presence.
In each of these areas such as CRM or development of web site functionality, it
is  common  that  different  initiatives  will  compete  for  budget.  The  next  section
reviews techniques for prioritising these projects and deciding on the best portfolio of
e-commerce applications.
Assessing different Internet projects
A further organisational capability issue is the decision about different information sys-
tems marketing  applications. Typically,  there  will be a  range  of different Internet
marketing alternatives to be evaluated. Limited resources will dictate that only some
applications are practical. 
Portfolio analysis can be used to select the most suitable projects. For example, Daniel et
al. (2001) suggest that potential e-commerce opportunities should be assessed for the value
of the opportunity to the company against its ability to deliver. Typical opportunities for
Internet marketing strategy for an organisation which has a brochureware site might be:
online catalogue facility;
e-CRM system – lead generation system;
e-CRM system – customer service management;
e-CRM system – personalisation of content for users;
partner relationship management extranet for distributors or agents;
transactional e-commerce facility.
Portfolio analysis
Identification,
evaluation and
selection of desirable
marketing applications.
Strategy implementation
VB.NET Image: Image Rotator SDK; .NET Document Image Rotation
allows VB.NET developers to enter the rotating Public Partial Class Form1 Inherits Form Public Sub powerful & profession imaging controls, PDF document, tiff
how to add text to a pdf in acrobat; add text pdf professional
VB.NET TWAIN: TWAIN Image Scanning in Console Application
WriteLine("---Ending Scan---" & vbLf & " Press Enter To Quit & automatic scanning and stamp string text on captured to scan multiple pages to one PDF or TIFF
how to insert pdf into email text; add text pdf reader
205
Such alternatives can then be evaluated in terms of their risk against reward. Figure 4.26
shows a possible evaluation of strategic options. It is apparent that with limited resources,
the e-CRM lead generation, partner extranet and customer services options offer the best
mix of risk and reward.
For information systems investments, the model of McFarlan (1984) has been used
extensively to assess the future strategic importance applications in a portfolio. This
model has been applied to the e-commerce applications by Daniel et al. (2001) and
Chaffey (2006). Potential e-commerce applications can be assessed as:
1 Key operational – essential to remain competitive. Example: partner relationship man-
agement extranet for distributors or agents;
2 Support – deliver improved performance, but not critical to strategy. Example: e-CRM
system – personalisation of content for users;
3 High-potential – may be important to achieving future success. Example: e-CRM
system – customer service management;
4 Strategic – critical to future business strategy. Example: e-CRM system – lead genera-
tion system is vital to developing new business.
A further portfolio analysis suggested by McDonald and Wilson (2002) is a matrix of
attractiveness to customer against attractiveness to company, which will give a similar
result to the risk–reward matrix. Finally, Tjan (2001) has suggested a matrix approach of
viability (return on investment) against fit (with the organisation’s capabilities) for
Internet applications. He presents five metrics for assessing each of viability and fit.
The online lifecycle management grid
Earlier in the chapter, in the section on objective setting, we reviewed different frame-
works for identifying objectives and metrics to assess whether they are achieved. We
consider the online lifecycle management grid at this point since Table 4.7 acts as a good
summary that integrates objectives, strategies and tactics.
The columns isolate the key performance areas of site visitor acquisition, conversion
to opportunity, conversion to sale and retention. The rows isolate more detailed metrics
such as the tracking metrics and performance drivers from higher-level metrics such as
the customer-centric key performance indicators (KPIs) and business-value KPIs. In the
STRATEGY IMPLEMENTATION
Figure 4.26 Example of risk–reward analysis
Transactional
e-commerce
E-CRM
Personalisation
Online
catalogue
E-CRM
Customer service
E-CRM
Lead generation
Partner
extranet
H
i
g
h
L
o
w
R
i
s
k
High
Low
Reward
VB.NET TIFF: .NET TIFF Splitting Control to Split & Disassemble
Developers can enter the page range value in this VB Imports System.Drawing Imports System.Text Imports System TIFDecoder()) 'use TIFDecoder open a pdf file Dim
how to enter text into a pdf; adding text fields to pdf acrobat
C# TWAIN - Scan Multi-pages into One PDF Document
imaging DLLs used for scanning multiple pages into one PDF/TIFF document true; device.Acquire(); Console.Out.WriteLine("---Ending Scan---\n Press Enter To Quit
add text to pdf document online; how to add text box to pdf
bottom two rows we have also added in typical strategies and tactics used to achieve
objectives which show the relationship between objectives and strategy. Note, though,
that this framework mainly creates a focus on efficiency of conversion, although there
are some effectiveness measures also. 
These are some of the generic Internet marketing main strategies to achieve the objec-
tives in the grid which apply to a range of organisations:
Online value proposition strategy – defining the value proposition for acquisition and
retention to engage with customers online. Includes informational and promotional
incentives used to encourage trial. Also defines programme of value creation through
time – e.g. business white papers published on partner sites.
Online targeted reach strategy – the aim is to communicate with relevant audiences
online  to achieve communications objectives. The  communications  commonly
include campaign communications such as online advertising, PR, e-mail, viral cam-
paigns  and  continuous  communications  such  as  search  engine  marketing  or
sponsorship or partnership arrangements. The strategy may involve (1) driving new,
potential customers to the company site, (2) migrating existing customers to online
CHAPTER 4 · INTERNET M ARKETING STRATEGY
206
Table 4.7 Online performance management grid for an e-retailer 
Metric
Visitor 
Conversion to 
Conversion
Customer retention
acquisition
opportunity
to sale
and growth
Tracking metrics
Unique visitors
Opportunity volume
Sales volume
E-mail list quality
New visitors
E-mail response 
quality
Transactions
Performance drivers
Bounce rate
Macro-conversion 
Conversion rate to 
Active customers % 
(diagnostics)
Conversion rate: 
rate to opportunity 
sale
(site and e-mail 
new visit to start 
and 
E-mail conversion 
active)
quote
micro-conversion 
rate
Repeat conversion 
efficiency
rate for different 
purchases
Customer centric
Cost per click and 
Cost per opportunity
Cost per sale
Lifetime value
KPIs
per sale 
Customer 
Customer 
Customer loyalty 
Brand awareness
satisfaction
satisfaction
index
Average order 
Products per 
value (AOV)
customer
Business value KPIs
Audience share
Online product 
Online originated 
Retained sales 
requests (n, £, % 
sales (n, £, % 
growth and volume
of total)
of total)
Strategy
Online targeted 
Lead generation 
Online sales 
Retention and 
reach strategy
strategy
generation strategy
customer growth 
Offline targeted 
Offline sales impact 
strategy
reach strategy
strategy
Tactics
Continuous 
Usability
Usability
Database / list 
communications mix
Personalisation
Personalisation
quality
Campaign 
Inbound contact 
Inbound contact 
Targeting
communications mix
strategy (customer 
strategy (customer 
Outbound contact 
Online value 
service)
service)
strategy (e-mail)
proposition
Merchandising
Personalisation
Triggered e-mails
Source: adapted from Neil Mason’s Applied Insights (www
.applied-insights.co.uk
) Acquisition, Conversion, Retention approach
VB.NET Image: VB.NET Planet Barcode Generator for Image, Picture &
REFile.SaveDocumentFile(doc, "c:/planet.pdf", New PDFEncoder()). type barcode.Data = "01234567890" 'enter a 11 Color.Black 'Human-readable text-related settings
how to add text field to pdf form; how to add text to a pdf file in reader
channels or (3) achieving reach to enhance brand awareness, favourability and pur-
chase intent through ads and sponsorships on third-party sites. Building brand
awareness, favourability and purchase intent on third-party sites may be a more effec-
tive strategy for low-involvement FMCG brands where it will be difficult to encourage
visitors to the site.
Offline targeted reach strategy – the objective is to encourage potential customers to use
online channels, i.e. visit web site and transact where relevant. The strategy is to com-
municate with selected customer segments offline through direct mail, media buys,
PR and sponsorship. 
Online sales efficiency strategy – the objective is to convert site visitors to engage and
become leads (for example, through registering for an e-newsletter or placing the first
item in the shopping basket) to convert them to buy products and maximise the pur-
chase transaction value.
Offline sales impact strategy – the aim is to achieve sales offline from new or existing
customers. Strategy defines how online communications through the web site and
e-mail can influence sales offline, i.e. by phone, mail-order or in-store.
CASE STUDY  4
Tesco.com uses the Internet to support its 
diversification strategy
Case Study 4
Context
Tesco, well known as Britain’s leading food retail group
with a presence also in Europe and Asia has also been a
pioneer online. By September 2005 online sales in the first
half of the year were £401 million, a 31% year-on-year
increase,  and  profit  increased  by  37%  to  £21 million.
Tesco.com now receives 170,000 orders each week. Soon
it should  reach an  annual  turnover of £1 billion  online
and  is  generally  recognised  as  the  world’s  largest
online grocer.
Product ranges
The Tesco.com site acts as a portal to most of Tesco’s
products, including various non-food ranges (for example,
books,  DVDs  and  electrical  items  under  the  ‘Extra’
banner), Tesco Personal Finance and the telecoms busi-
nesses, as  well as services offered  in partnership with
specialist companies, such as dieting clubs, flights and
holidays,  music  downloads,  gas,  electricity  and  DVD
rentals. It does not currently sell clothing online but in May
2005  it  introduced  a  clothing  web  site  (www
.clothing
attesco.com
), initially to showcase Tesco’s clothing brands
and link customers to their nearest store with this range.
Competitors
Tesco currently leads the UK’s other leading grocery retail-
ers  in terms  of market  share.  This  pattern  is repeated
online. The compilation below is from Hitwise (2005) and
the figures in brackets show market share for traditional
offline retail formats from the Taylor Nelson Softres Super
Panel (see http://superpanel.tns-global.com
):
1 Tesco Superstore, 27.28% (29% of retail trade)
2 ASDA, 13.36%
3 ASDA @t Home, 10.13% (17.1%)
4 Sainsbury’s, 8.42%
5 Tesco Wine Warehouse, 8.19%
6 Sainsbury’s to You, 5.86% (15.9%)
7 Waitrose.com, 3.42% (3.6%)
8 Ocado, 3.32% (owned by Waitrose, 3.6%)
9 Lidl, 2.49% (1.8%)
10 ALDI – UK, 2.10% (2.3%)
Some companies are repeated since their main site and
the  online  shopping  site  are  reported  on  separately.
Asda.com now seems  to be  performing in a consistent
manner online to its offline presence. However, Sainsbury’s
online performance seems to be significantly lower com-
pared to its offline performance. Some providers such as
Ocado which originally just operated within the London
area have a strong local performance.
Notably, some of Tesco.com’s competitors are absent
from the Hitwise listing since their strategy has been to
focus on retail formats. These are Morrisons (12.5% retail
share), Somerfield (5.5%) and Co-op (5.0%).
Promotion of service
As with other online retailers, Tesco.com relies on in-store
advertising and marketing to the supermarket’s Clubcard
loyalty scheme’s customer base to persuade customers
to shop online. New Media Age (2005) quotes Nigel Dodd,
marketing director at Tesco.com, as saying: ‘These are
invaluable sources as we have such a strong customer
base’.  However,  for  non-food  goods  the  supermarket
does advertise online using keyword targeted ads.
CHAPTER 4 · INTERNET M ARKETING STRATEGY
208
For existing customers, e-mail marketing and direct
mail marketing to provide special offers and promotions to
customers is important. 
According  to  Humby  and  Hunt  (2003),  e-retailer
Tesco.com uses what he describes as a ‘commitment-
based segmentation’ or ‘loyalty ladder’ which is based on
recency of purchase, frequency of purchase and value
which is used to identify six lifecycle categories which are
then further divided to target communications:
‘Logged-on’
‘Cautionary’
‘Developing’
‘Established’
‘Dedicated’
‘Logged-off’ (the aim here is to win back).
Tesco then uses automated event-triggered messaging
which can be created to encourage continued purchase.
For  example,  Tesco.com  has  a  touch  strategy  which
includes a sequence of follow-up communications triggered
after different events in the customer lifecycle. In the exam-
ple given below, communications after event 1 are intended
to achieve the objective of converting a web site visitor to
action; communications after event 2 are intended to move
the customer from a first-time purchaser to a regular pur-
chaser and for event 3 to reactivate lapsed purchasers.
Trigger event 1: Customer first registers on site (but does
not buy)
Auto-response (AR) 1: Two days after registration e-mail
sent offering phone assistance and £5 discount off first
purchase to encourage trial.
Trigger event 2: Customer first purchases online
AR1: Immediate order confirmation.
AR2:  Five days after  purchase  e-mail sent  with link to
online customer satisfaction survey asking about quality
of service from driver and picker (e.g. item quality and
substitutions).
AR3: Two weeks after first purchase – direct mail offering
tips on how to use service and £5 discount on next pur-
chases intended to encourage re-use of online services.
AR4: Generic monthly e-newsletter with online exclusive
offers encouraging cross-selling.
AR5: Bi-weekly alert with personalised offers for customer.
AR6: After two months – £5 discount for next shop.
AR7: Quarterly mailing of coupons encouraging repeat
sales and cross-sales.
Trigger  event  3:  Customer  does  not  purchase  for  an
extended period
AR1: Dormancy detected – reactivation e-mail with survey
of how the customer is finding the service (to identify any
problems) and a £5 incentive.
AR2:  A  further  discount  incentive  is  used  in  order  to
encourage continued usage to shop after the first shop
after a break.
Tesco’s online product strategy
NMA  (2005)  ran  a profile  of  Laura  Wade-Gery,  CEO  of
Tesco.com since January 2004, which provides an interest-
ing insight into how the business has run. In her first year,
total sales were increased 24% to £719 million. Laura is 40
years old, a keen athlete and has followed a varied career
developing  from a MA  in  History  at Magdalen  College,
Oxford,  an  MBA  from  Insead;  manager  and  partner  in
Kleinwort Benson; manager and senior consultant, Gemini
Consulting; targeted marketing director (Tesco Clubcard),
and group strategy director, Tesco Stores.
The growth overseen by Wade-Gery has been achieved
through a combination of initiatives. Product range devel-
opment is one key area. In early 2005, Tesco.com fulfilled
150,000 grocery orders a week but now also offers more
intangible offerings, such as e-diets and music downloads.
Laura has  also focused  on  improving the  customer
experience online – the time it takes for a new customer to
complete their first order has been decreased from over
an hour to 35 minutes through usability work culminating
in a major site revision.
To support the business as it diversifies into new areas,
Wade-Gery’s strategy was ‘to make home delivery part of
the DNA of Tesco’ according to NMA (2005). She contin-
ues: ‘What we offer is delivery to your home of a Tesco
service – it’s an obvious extension of the home-delivered
groceries concept.’ By May 2005, Tesco.com had 30,000
customers  signed  up  for  DVD  rental,  through  partner
Video Island (which runs the rival Screenselect service).
Over the next year, her target is to treble this total, while
also extending home-delivery services to the likes of bulk
wine and white goods.
Wade-Gery  looks  to  achieve  synergy  between  the
range of services  offered. For example, its partnership
with eDiets can be promoted through the Tesco Clubcard
loyalty scheme, with mailings to 10m customers a year. In
July  2004,  Tesco.com  Limited  paid  £2  million  for  the
exclusive  licence to eDiets.com in the  UK  and  Ireland
under the URLs www
.eDietsUK.com
and www
.eDiets.ie
.
Through promoting these services through these URLs,
Tesco can use the dieting business to grow use of the
Tesco.com service and in-store sales. 
To help keep focus on home retail-delivery, Wade-Gery
sold women’s portal iVillage (www
.ivillage.co.uk
) back to
its US owners for an undisclosed sum in March 2004. She
explained to NMA: 
It’s a very different sort of product to the other services
that we’re embarking on. In my mind, we stand for provid-
ing services and products that you buy, which is slightly
different to the world of providing information.
209
The implication is that there was insufficient revenue from
ad sales on iVillage and insufficient opportunities to pro-
mote  Tesco.com sales.  However,  iVillage  was  a useful
learning experience in that there are some parallels with
iVillage, such as message boards and community advisers. 
Wade-Gery is also director of Tesco Mobile, the joint
‘pay-as-you-go’ venture with O
2
which is mainly serviced
online, although promoted in-store and via direct mail.
Tesco also offers broadband and dial-up ISP services, but
believe  the  market  for  Internet  telephony  (provided
through Skype and Vonage, for example) is not sufficiently
developed. Tesco.com has concentrated on more tradi-
tional  services  which  have  the  demand,  for  example,
Tesco Telecom fixed-line services attracted over a million
customers in their first year. 
However,  this  is  not to  say  that  Tesco.com  will  not
invest in relatively new services. In November 2004, Tesco
introduced a music download service and just six months
later, Wade-Gery estimates they have around 10% market
share – one of the benefits of launching relatively early.
Again, there is synergy, this time with hardware sales. NMA
(2005)  reported  that  as  MP3  players  were  unwrapped,
sales went up – even on Christmas Day! She says: 
The exciting thing about digital is where you can take it
in the future. As the technology grows, we’ll be able to
turn  Tesco.com  into  a  digital  download  store  of  all
sorts, rather than just music. Clearly, film [through video
on demand] would be next.
But it  has to  be  based firmly on  analysis of customer
demand. She says: 
The number one thing for us is whether the product is
something that customers are saying they want, has it
reached  a  point  where  mass-market  customers  are
interested?
There also has to be scope for simplification. NMA (2005)
notes that Tesco is built on a core premise of convenience
and value and Wade-Gery believes what it’s already done
with mobile tariffs, broadband packages and music down-
loads  are  good  examples  of  the  retailer’s  knack  for
streamlining propositions. She says: 
‘We’ve actually managed to get people joining broad-
band who have never even had a dial-up service’.
Sources: Humby and Hunt (2003), NMA (2005), Hitwise (2005), Wikipedia
(2005)
Question
Based on the case study and your own research on
competitors, summarise the strategic approaches
which have helped Tesco.com achieve success online.
SUMMA RY
Summary
1
The development of the online presence follows stage models from basic static
‘brochureware’ sites through simple interactive sites with query facilities to dynamic
sites offering personalisation of services for customers.
2
The Internet marketing strategy should follow a similar form to a traditional strategic
marketing planning process and should include:
goal setting;
situation review;
strategy formulation;
resource allocation and monitoring.
A feedback loop should be established to ensure the site is monitored and modifica-
tions are fed back into the strategy development.
3
Strategic goal setting should involve:
setting business objectives that the Internet can help achieve;
assessing and stating the contribution that the Internet will make to the business
in the future, both as a proportion of revenue and in terms of whether the Internet
will complement or replace other media;
stating the full range of business benefits that are sought, such as improved corpo-
rate image, cost reduction, more leads and sales, and improved customer service.
CHAPTER 4 · INTERNET M ARKETING STRATEGY
210
4
The situation review will include assessing internal resources and assets, including the
services available through the existing web site. External analysis will involve customer
demand analysis, competitor benchmarking and review of the macro-environment
SLEPT factors.
5
Strategy formulation will involve defining a company’s commitment to the Internet;
setting an appropriate value proposition for customers of the web site; and identify-
ing the role of the Internet in exploiting new markets, marketplaces and distribution
channels and in delivering new products and services. In summary:
Decision 1: Market and product development strategies
Decision 2: Business and revenue models strategies
Decision 3: Target market strategy
Decision 4: Positioning and differentiation strategy (including the marketing mix)
Decision 5: Multi-channel distribution strategy
Decision 6: Multi-channel communications strategy
Decision 7: Online communications mix and budget
Decision 8: Organisational capabilities (7S)
Self-assessment exercises
1
Draw a diagram that summarises the stages through which a company’s web site may evolve.
2
What is meant by the ‘Internet contribution’, and what is its relevance to strategy?
3
What is the role of monitoring in the strategic planning process?
4
Summarise the main tangible and intangible business benefits of the Internet to a company.
5
What is the purpose of an Internet marketing audit? What should it involve?
6
What does a company need in order to be able to state clearly in the mission statement its
strategic position relative to the Internet?
7
What are the market and product positioning opportunities offered by the Internet?
8
What are the distribution channel options for a manufacturing company?
Essay and discussion questions
1
Discuss the frequency with which an Internet marketing strategy should be updated for a
company to remain competitive.
2
‘Setting long-term strategic objectives for a web site is unrealistic since the rate of change in
the marketplace is so rapid.’ Discuss.
3
Explain the essential elements of an Internet marketing strategy.
4
Summarise the role of strategy tools and models in formulating a company’s strategic
approach to the Internet.
Exercises
211
Examination questions
1
When evaluating the business benefits of a web site, which factors are likely to be common to
most companies?
2
Use Porter’s five forces model to discuss the competitive threats presented to a company by
other web sites.
3
Which factors will affect whether the Internet has primarily a complementary effect or a
replacement effect on a company?
4
Describe different stages in the sophistication of development of a web site, giving examples
of the services provided at each stage.
5
Briefly explain the purpose and activities involved in an external audit conducted as part of the
development of an Internet marketing strategy.
6
What is the importance of measurement within the Internet marketing process?
7
Which factors would a retail company consider when assessing the suitability of its product for
Internet sales?
8
Explain what is meant by the online value proposition, and give two examples of the value
proposition for web sites with which you are familiar.
References
Aaker, D. and Joachimsthaler, E. (2000) Brand Leadership. Free Press, New York.
Agrawal, V., Arjona, V. and Lemmens, R. (2001) E-performance: the path to rational exuber-
ance, McKinsey Quarterly, No. 1, 31–43.
Bazett, M., Bowden, I., Love, J., Street,  R. and Wilson, H. (2005) Measuring multichannel
effectiveness using the balanced scorecard. Interactive Marketing, 6(3) (January–March),
224–31.
Chaffey, D. (2007) E-Business and E-Commerce Management, 3rd edn. Financial Times/Prentice
Hall, Harlow. 
Chaston, I. (2000) E-Marketing Strategy. McGraw-Hill, Maidenhead.
Daniel, E., Wilson, H., McDonald, M. and Ward, J. (2001) Marketing Strategy in the Digital Age.
Financial Times/Prentice Hall, Harlow.
Daniel, E., Wilson, H., Ward, J. and McDonald, M. (2002) Innovation @nd integration: devel-
oping  an  integrated  e-enabled  business  strategy.  Preliminary  findings  from  an
industry-sponsored research project for the Information Systems Research Centre and the
Centre for E-marketing. Cranfield University School of Management, January.
Deise, M., Nowikow, C., King, P. and Wright, A. (2000) Executive’s Guide to E-Business. From
Tactics to Strategy. Wiley, New York.
de Kare-Silver, M. (2000) EShock 2000. The Electronic Shopping Revolution: Strategies for Retailers
and Manufacturers. Macmillan, London.
Der Zee, J. and De Jong, B. (1999) Alignment is not enough: integrating business and informa-
tion technology management with the balanced business scorecard, Journal of Management
Information Systems, 16(2), 137–57.
Dibb, S., Simkin, S., Pride, W. and Ferrell, O. (2001) Marketing. Concepts and  Strategies, 4th
European edn. Houghton Mifflin, New York.
Durlacher  (2000)  Trends  in  the  UK  new  economy,  Durlacher  Quarterly  Internet  Report,
November, 1–12.
E-consultancy (2005) Managing an E-commerce team. Integrating digital marketing into your
organisation. 60-page report. Author: Dave Chaffey. Available from www
.e-consultancy
.com
Forrester Research (2005) Press release: Forrester research US eCommerce Forecast: online
retail sales to reach $329 billion by 2010. Cambridge, MA, 19 September.
REFERENCES
Documents you may be interested
Documents you may be interested