mvc show pdf in div : Add text to pdf file control Library system azure asp.net web page console 5G7BGE3Z6KNWFOHBFCWN24-part1360

Friedlein,  A.  (2002)  Maintaining  and  Evolving  Successful  Commercial  Web  Sites.  Morgan
Kaufmann, San Francisco.
Friedman, L. and Furey, T. (1999) The Channel Advantage. Butterworth Heinemann, Oxford.
Gulati, R. and Garino, J. (2000) Getting the right mix of bricks and clicks for your company,
Harvard Business Review, May–June, 107–14.
Hasan, H. and Tibbits, H. (2000) Strategic management of electronic commerce: an adapta-
tion of the balanced scorecard, Internet Research, 10(5), 439–50.
Hitwise (2005) Press release: The top UK Grocery and Alcohol websites week ending October
1st, ranked by market share of web site visits, from Hitwise.co.uk. Press release available at
www
.hitwise.co.uk
.
Humby, C. and Hunt, T. (2003) Scoring points. How Tesco Is Winning Customer Loyalty. Kogan
Page, London.
Kalakota, R. and Robinson, M. (2000) E-Business. Roadmap for Success. Addison-Wesley,
Reading, MA.
Kaplan, R.S. and Norton, D.P. (1993) Putting the balanced scorecard to work, Harvard Business
Review, September–October, 134–42.
Kim, E., Nam, D. and Stimpert, D. (2004) The applicability of Porter’s generic strategies in the
digital age: assumptions, conjectures and suggestions, Journal of Management, 30(5).
Kumar, N. (1999) Internet distribution strategies: dilemmas for the incumbent, Financial
Times, Special Issue on Mastering Information Management, no 7. Electronic Commerce
(www
.ftmastering.com
).
Levy, M. and Powell, P. (2003) Exploring SME Internet adoption: towards a contingent model,
Electronic Markets, 13 (2), 173–81. www
.electr
onicmarkets.or
g
.
Lynch, R. (2000) Corporate Strategy. Financial Times/Prentice Hall, Harlow.
McDonald, M. (2003) Marketing Plans. How to  Prepare them, how  to Use  them,  5th edn.
Butterworth Heinemann, Oxford.
McDonald, M. and Wilson, H. (2002) New Marketing: Transforming the Corporate Future.
Butterworth Heinemann, Oxford.
McFarlan, F.W. (1984) Information technology changes the way you compete, Harvard
Business Review, May–June, 54–61.
Mintzberg, H. and Quinn, J.B. (1991) The Strategy Process, 2nd edn. Prentice Hall, Upper
Saddle River, NJ.
Myers, J., Pickersgill, A, and Van Metre, E. (2004) Steering customers to the right channels,
McKinsey Quarterly, No. 4.
New Media Age (2005) Delivering the goods, New Media Age, Article by Nic Howell, 5 May.
Parsons, A., Zeisser, M. and Waitman, R. (1996) Organizing for digital marketing, McKinsey
Quarterly, No. 4, 183–92.
Picardi, R. (2000) EBusiness Speed: Six Strategies for ECommerce Intelligence. IDC Research Report.
IDC, Framlington, MA.
Poon, S. and Joseph, M. (2000) A preliminary study of product nature and electronic com-
merce, Marketing Intelligence and Planning, 19(7), 493–9.
Porter, M. (1980) Competitive Strategy. Free Press, New York.
Porter, M. (2001) Strategy and the Internet, Harvard Business Review, March, 62–78.
Quelch, J. and Klein, L. (1996) The Internet and international marketing, Sloan Management
Review, Spring, 61–75.
Revolution (2005a) E-mail marketing report, by Justin Pugsley. Revolution, September, 58–60.
Revolution (2005b) Campaign of the month, by Emma Rigby, Revolution, October, p. 69.
Smith, P.R. and Chaffey, D. (2005) EMarketing Excellence: at the Heart of EBusiness, 2nd edn.
Butterworth Heinemann, Oxford.
Thomas, J. and Sullivan, U. (2005) Managing marketing communications with multichannel
customers, Journal of Marketing, 69 (October), 239–51.
Tjan, A. (2001) Finally, a way to put your Internet portfolio in order, Harvard Business Review,
February, 78–85.
Varianini, V. and Vaturi, D. (2000) Marketing lessons from e-failures, McKinsey Quarterly, No.
4, 86–97.
Waterman, R.H., Peters, T.J. and Phillips, J.R. (1980) Structure is not organisation, McKinsey
Quarterly, Summer, 2–21.
Wikipedia (2005). Tesco, Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia. http://en.wikipedia.or
g/wiki/T
esco
.
CHAPTER 4 · INTERNET MARKETING STRATEGY
212
Add text to pdf file - insert text into PDF content in C#.net, ASP.NET, MVC, Ajax, WinForms, WPF
XDoc.PDF for .NET, providing C# demo code for inserting text to PDF file
how to add text to a pdf in reader; add text field pdf
Add text to pdf file - VB.NET PDF insert text library: insert text into PDF content in vb.net, ASP.NET, MVC, Ajax, WinForms, WPF
Providing Demo Code for Adding and Inserting Text to PDF File Page in VB.NET Program
how to enter text in pdf; add text fields to pdf
Further reading
Brassington, F. and Petitt, S. (2000) Principles of Marketing, 2nd edn. Financial Times/Prentice
Hall, Harlow. See companion Prentice Hall web site (www
.booksites.net/brassington2
).
Chapters 10 and 11 describe pricing issues in much more detail than that given in this
chapter. Chapters 20, Strategic management, and 21, Marketing planning, management
and control, describe the integration of marketing strategy with business strategy.
Daniel, E., Wilson, H., McDonald, M. and Ward, J. (2001) Marketing Strategy in the Digital Age.
Financial Times/Prentice Hall, Harlow. Clear guidelines on strategy development based on
and including industry case studies.
Deise, M., Nowikow, C., King, P. and Wright, A. (2000) Executive’s Guide to E-Business. From
Tactics to Strategy. Wiley, New York. An excellent practitioners’ guide.
Friedlein,  A.  (2002)  Maintaining  and  Evolving  Successful  Commercial Web  Sites. Morgan
Kaufmann, San Francisco. An excellent book for professionals covering managing change,
content, customer relationships and site measurement.
Ghosh, S. (1998) Making business sense of the Internet, Harvard Business Review, March–April,
127–35. This paper gives many examples of how US companies have adapted to the
Internet and asks key questions that should govern the strategy adopted. It is an excellent
introduction to strategic approaches.
Gulati, R. and Garino, J. (2000) Getting the right mix of bricks and clicks for your company,
Harvard Business Review, May–June, 107–14. A different perspective on the six strategy deci-
sions given in the strategic definition section with a roadmap through the decision process.
Hackbarth, G. and Kettinger, W. (2000) Building an e-business strategy, Information Systems
Management, Summer, 78–93. An information systems perspective to e-business strategy.
Willcocks, L. and Sauer, C. (2000) Moving to e-business: an introduction. In L. Willcocks and
C. Sauer (eds) Moving to E-Business, pp. 1–18. Random House, London. Combines tradi-
tional IS-strategy-based approaches with up-to-date case studies.
Web links
BRINT.com (www
.brint.com
). A Business Researcher’s Interests. Extensive portal with arti-
cles on e-business, e-commerce and knowledge management.
CIO Magazine E-commerce resource centre (www
.cio.com/for
ums/ec
). One of the best
online magazines from business technical perspective – see other research centres also, e.g.
intranets, knowledge management.
DaveChaffey.com (www
.davechaf
fey
.com
). Updates about all aspects of digital marketing
including strategy.
E-commerce innovation centre (www
.ecommer
ce.ac.uk
) at Cardiff University. Interesting
case studies for SMEs and basic explanations of concepts and terms.
E-commerce Times (www
.ecommer
cetimes.com
). An online newspaper specific to e-com-
merce developments.
E-consultancy.com (www
.e-consultancy
.com
). A good compilation of reports and white
papers many of which are strategy-related.
Financial Times Digital Business (http://news.ft.com/r
epor
ts/digitalbusiness
). Excellent
monthly articles based on case studies. 
Mohansawney.com (www
.mohansawney
.com
). Case studies and white papers from one of
the leading IS authorities on e-commerce.
US center for e-business (www
.ebusiness.mit.edu
). Useful collection of articles.
213
WEB LINKS
VB.NET PDF Password Library: add, remove, edit PDF file password
This VB.NET example shows how to add PDF file password with access permission setting. passwordSetting.IsAssemble = True ' Add password to PDF file.
adding text field to pdf; adding text fields to a pdf
C# PDF Password Library: add, remove, edit PDF file password in C#
This example shows how to add PDF file password with access permission setting. passwordSetting.IsAssemble = true; // Add password to PDF file.
how to add a text box to a pdf; how to insert text box in pdf document
CHAPTER 5 · THE INTERNET AND THE MARKETING MIX
214
Learning objectives
After reading this chapter, the reader should be able to:
Apply the elements of the marketing mix in an online context
Evaluate the opportunities that the Internet makes available for
varying the marketing mix
Define the characteristics of an online brand
Questions for marketers
Key questions for marketing managers related to this chapter are:
How are the elements of the marketing mix varied online?
What are the implications of the Internet for brand development?
Can the product component of the mix be varied online?
How are companies developing online pricing strategies?
Does ‘place’ have relevance online?
Links to other chapters
This chapter is related to other chapters as follows:
Chapter 2 introduces the impact of the Internet on market structure
and distribution channels
Chapter 4 describes how Internet marketing strategies can be
developed
 Chapters 6 and 7 explain the service elements of the mix in more
detail
Chapter 8 explains the promotion elements of the mix in more detail
5
Main topics
Product 217
Price 231
Place 237
Promotion 243
People, process and physical
evidence 245
Case study 5
The re-launched Napster changes
the music marketing mix 248
Chapter at a glance
The Internet and the 
marketing mix
C# PDF File & Page Process Library SDK for C#.net, ASP.NET, MVC
Read: PDF Text Extract; C# Read: PDF Image Extract; C# Write: Insert text into PDF; C# Write: Add Image to PDF; C# Protect: Add Password
how to enter text in pdf file; how to add text field to pdf
VB.NET PDF Text Extract Library: extract text content from PDF
this advanced PDF Add-On, developers are able to extract target text content from source PDF document and save extracted text to other file formats through VB
how to enter text in pdf form; add text boxes to pdf document
This chapter shows how the well-established strategic framework of the marketing mix
can be applied by marketers to inform their Internet marketing strategy. It explores this
key issue of Internet marketing strategy in more detail than was possible in Chapter 4. As
well as the marketing mix, another major topic is covered in Chapter 5, online branding.
As part of our discussion of product we will review how the Internet can be used to sup-
port and impact the way brands are developed.
The marketing mix – widely referred to as the 4 Ps of Product, Price, Place and
Promotion – was originally proposed by Jerome McCarthy (1960) and is still used as an
essential part of formulating and implementing marketing strategy by many practition-
ers. The 4 Ps have since been extended to the 7 Ps, which include three further elements
that better reflect service delivery: People, Process and Physical evidence (Booms and
Bitner, 1981), although others argue that these are subsumed within the 4 Ps. Figure 5.1
summarises the different sub-elements of the 7 Ps.
The marketing mix is applied frequently in discussion of marketing strategy since it
provides a simple strategic framework for varying different elements of an organisation’s
product offering to influence the demand for products within target markets. For exam-
ple, if the aim is to increase sales of a product, options include decreasing the price and
changing the amount or type of promotion, or some combination of these elements. 
E-commerce provides many new opportunities for the marketer to vary the marketing
mix, as suggested by Figure 5.1 and Activity 5.1. E-commerce also has far-reaching impli-
cations for the relative importance of different elements of the mix for many markets
regardless of whether an organisation is involved directly in e-commerce. Consequently,
the marketing mix is a useful framework to inform strategy development. First, it gives a
framework for comparing an organisation’s existing services with competitors’ in and
out of sector as part of the benchmarking process described in Chapter 1. As well as a
tool for benchmarking, it can also be used as a mechanism for generating alternative
strategic approaches. 
Given the potential implications of the Internet on the marketing mix, a whole chap-
ter is devoted to examining its impact and strategies companies can develop to best
manage this situation.
INTRODUCTION
215
Introduction
Marketing mix
The series of seven key
variables – Product,
Price, Place,
Promotion, People,
Process and Physical
evidence – that are
varied by marketers as
part of the customer
offering.
Online branding
How online channels
are used to support
brands that, in essence,
are the sum of the
characteristics of a
product or service as
perceived by a user.
Figure 5.1 The elements of the marketing mix
Using the Internet to vary the marketing mix
Product
•Quality
•Image
•Branding
•Features
•Variants
•Mix
•Support
•Customer
service
•Use
occasion
•Availability
•Warranties
Promotion
•Marketing
communications
•Personal
promotion
•Sales
promotion
•PR
•Branding
•Direct
marketing
Price
•Positioning
•List
•Discounts
•Credit
•Payment
methods
•Free or
value-
added
elements
Place
•Trade
channels
•Sales
support
•Channel
number
•Segmented
channels
People
•Individuals
on marketing
activities
•Individuals
on customer
contact
•Recruitment
•Culture/
image
•Training
and skills
•Remuneration
Process
•Customer
focus
•Business-led
•IT-supported
•Design
features
•Research
and
development
Physical evidence
•Sales/staff
contact
experience
of brand
•Product
packaging
•Online
experience
C# PDF Text Extract Library: extract text content from PDF file in
How to C#: Extract Text Content from PDF File. Add necessary references: RasterEdge.Imaging.Basic.dll. RasterEdge.Imaging.Basic.Codec.dll.
add text fields to pdf; how to insert text box on pdf
C# PDF insert image Library: insert images into PDF in C#.net, ASP
using RasterEdge.Imaging.Basic; using RasterEdge.XDoc.PDF; Have a try with this sample C#.NET code to add an image to the first page of PDF file.
adding text box to pdf; adding text to pdf in preview
The key issues related to different elements of the marketing mix that are discussed in
this chapter are:
Product – are there opportunities for modifying the core or extended product online?
Price – the implications of the Internet for pricing and the adoption of new pricing
models or strategies.
Place – the implications for distribution.
Promotion (what new promotional tools can be applied) – this is only discussed briefly
in this chapter since it is described in more detail in Chapter 8.
People, process and physical evidence – these are not discussed in detail in this chapter
since their online application is covered in more detail in Chapters 6, 7 and 9 in con-
nection with customer relationship management and managing and maintaining the
online presence.
Before embarking on a review of the role of the Internet on each of the 7 Ps, it is worth
briefly restating some of the well-known criticisms of applying the marketing mix as a
solitary tool for marketing strategy. First and perhaps most importantly, the marketing
mix, because of its origins in the 1960s, is symptomatic of a push approach to marketing
and does not explicitly acknowledge the needs of customers. As a consequence, the mar-
keting mix tends to lead to a product orientation rather than customer orientation – a key
concept of market orientation and indeed a key Internet marketing concept (see Chapter
8, for example). To mitigate this effect, Lautenborn (1990) suggested the 4 Cs framework
which considers the 4 Ps from a customer perspective. In brief, the 4 Cs are:
customer needs and wants (from the product);
cost to the customer (price);
convenience (relative to place);
communication (promotion).
This customer-centric approach also lends itself well online, since the customer is often
in an active comparison mode rather than a passive media consumption mode.
It follows that the selection of the marketing mix is based on detailed knowledge of
buyer behaviour collected through market research. Furthermore, it should be remem-
bered that the mix is often adjusted according to different target markets or segments to
better meet the needs of these customer groupings.
Although it is useful to apply existing frameworks to new channels, the emphasis of
the importance of different parts of a framework may vary. As you read this chapter, you
should consider which are the key elements of the mix which can be varied online for
CHAPTER 5 · THE INTERNET AND THE MARKETING MIX
216
Activity 5.1
How can the Internet be used to vary the marketing mix?
Purpose
An introductory activity which highlights the vast number of areas which the Internet impacts.
Activity
Review Figure 5.1 and select the two most important ways in which the Internet gives new
potential for varying the marketing mix for each of product, price, promotion, place, people
and processes. State:
new opportunities for varying the mix;
examples of companies that have achieved this;
possible negative implications (threats) for each opportunity.
VB.NET PDF File Compress Library: Compress reduce PDF size in vb.
Also able to uncompress PDF file in VB.NET programs. Offer flexible and royalty-free developing library license for VB.NET programmers to compress PDF file.
how to insert text in pdf using preview; how to add text to a pdf document
VB.NET PDF insert image library: insert images into PDF in vb.net
try with this sample VB.NET code to add an image As String = Program.RootPath + "\\" 1.pdf" Dim doc New PDFDocument(inputFilePath) ' Get a text manager from
add text to pdf using preview; how to enter text in pdf file
the different types of online presence introduced in Chapter 1, i.e. transactional e-com-
merce,  relationship-building,  brand-building  and  media  owner  portal.  Allen  and
Fjermestad (2001) and Harridge-March (2004) have reviewed how the Internet has
impacted the main elements of the marketing mix. There is no denying that all of the
elements are still important, but Smith and Chaffey (2005) have said that, online,
Partnerships is the eighth P since this is so important in achieving reach and affiliation.
In this text, though, Partnerships will be considered as part of Place and Promotion.
The product element of the marketing mix refers to characteristics of a product, service
or brand. Product decisions are informed by market research where customers’ needs are
assessed and the feedback is used to modify existing products or develop new products.
There are many alternatives for varying the product in the online context when a com-
pany is developing its online strategy. Internet-related product decisions can be usefully
divided into decisions affecting the core product and the extended product. The core
product refers to the main product purchased by the consumer to fulfil their needs,
while the extended or augmented product refers to additional services and benefits that
are built around the core of the product.
The main implications of the Internet for the product aspect of the mix, which we
will review in this section, are:
1 options for varying the core product;
2 options for changing the extended product;
3 conducting research online;
4 velocity of new product development;
5 velocity of new product diffusion.
There is also a subsection which looks at the implications for migrating a brand online.
1 Options for varying the core product
For some companies, there may be options for new digital products which will typically
be information products that can be delivered over the web. Ghosh (1998) talks about
developing new products or adding ‘digital value’ to customers. The questions he posed
still prove useful today:
1 Can I offer additional information or transaction services to my existing customer base? [For
example, for a bookseller, providing reviews of customer books, previews of books or
selling books online. For a travel company, providing video tours of resorts and
accommodation.]
2 Can I address the needs of new customer segments by repackaging my current information
assets or by creating new business propositions using the Internet? [For an online book-
seller,  creating an electronic  book service,  or  a DVD rental  service as has been
achieved by Amazon.]
3 Can I use my ability to attract customers to generate new sources of revenue such as advertis-
ing or sales of complementary products? [Lastminute.com which sells travel-related
services has a significant advertising revenue; it can also sell non-travel services.]
4 Will my current business be significantly harmed by other companies providing some of the
value I currently offer? [Considers the consequences if other companies use some of the
product strategies described above.]
PRODUCT
217
Product
Product variable
The element of the
marketing mix that
involves researching
customers’ needs and
developing appropriate
products.
Core product
The fundamental
features of the product
that meet the user’s
needs.
Extended product
Additional features and
benefits beyond the
core product.
C# PDF File Split Library: Split, seperate PDF into multiple files
page of your defined page number which starts from 0. For example, your original PDF file contains 4 pages. C# DLLs: Split PDF Document. Add necessary references
adding text to pdf online; how to input text in a pdf
VB.NET PDF File Merge Library: Merge, append PDF files in vb.net
by directly tagging the second PDF file to the target one, this PDF file merge function VB.NET Project: DLLs for Merging PDF Documents. Add necessary references
adding text to pdf; how to enter text into a pdf form
Of course, the markets transformed most by the Internet are those where products
themselves can be transformed into digital services. Such products include music (down-
load or streaming of digital tracks – see the Napster case study at the end of the chapter),
books (electronic books), newspaper and magazine publishing (online access to articles)
and software (digital downloads and online subscription services).
Rayport and Sviokla (1994) describe transactions where the actual product has been
replaced by information about the product, for example a company providing oil drilling
equipment focusing instead on analysis and dissemination of information about drilling.
The Internet also introduces options for mass customisation of products. Levi’s pro-
vide a truly personal service that dates back to 1994, when Levi Strauss initiated its
‘Personal Pair’ programme. Women who were prepared to pay up to $15 more than the
standard price and wait for delivery could go to Levi’s Stores and have themselves digi-
tised – that is, have their measurements taken and a pair of custom jeans made and then
have their measurements stored on a database for future purchases.
The programme achieved a repeat purchase rate significantly higher than the usual
10–12 per cent rate, and by 1997 accounted for a quarter of women’s jeans sales at Levi’s
Stores. In 1998 the programme was expanded to include men’s jeans and the number of
styles for each was doubled – to 1500 styles. This service has now migrated to the web
and is branded as Original Spin.
Mass customisation or personalisation of products in which a customer takes a more
active role in product design is part of the move to the prosumer. An example is pro-
vided in Figure 5.2. Further details are given in the box.
CHAPTER 5 · THE INTERNET AND THE MARKETING MIX
218
Mass customisation
Using economies of
scale enabled by
technology to offer
tailored versions of
products to individual
customers or groups of
customers.
Prosumer
‘Producer + consumer’.
The customer is closely
involved in specifying
their requirements in a
product.
Figure 5.2 Customising maps according to customers’ preferences 
Source: Ordnance Survey OS Select (www
.osselect.co.uk
)
Companies can also consider how the Internet can be used to change the range or
combination of products offered. Some companies only offer a subset of products online
– for example, WH Smith launched an interactive TV service which offered bestsellers
only at a discount. Alternatively, a company may have a fuller catalogue available online
than is available through offline brochures. Bundling is a further alternative. For exam-
ple, easyJet has developed a range of complementary travel-related services including
flights, packages and car hire. McDonald and Wilson (2002) note how the potential for
substituted or reconfigured products should be assessed for each marketplace.
Finally, it should also be noted that information about the core features of the prod-
uct becomes more readily available online, as pointed out by Allen and Fjermestad
(2001). However, this has the greatest implications for price (downwards pressure caused
by price transparency) and place and promotion (marketers must ensure they are repre-
sented favourably on the portal intermediaries) where the products will be compared
with others in terms of core features, extended features and price.
2 Options for changing the extended product
When a customer buys a new computer, it consists not only of the tangible computer,
monitor and cables, but also the information provided by the computer salesperson, the
instruction manual, the packaging, the warranty and the follow-up technical service.
These are elements of the extended product. Smith and Chaffey (2005) suggest these
examples of how the Internet can be used to vary the extended product:
endorsements
awards
testimonies
PRODUCT
219
The prosumer
The prosumer concept was introduced in 1980 by futurist Alvin Toffler in his book The Third
Wave. According to Toffler, the future would once again combine production with consump-
tion. In The Third Wave, Toffler saw a world where interconnected users would collaboratively
‘create’ products. Note that he foresaw this over 10 years before the web was invented!
Alternative notions of the prosumer, all of which are applicable to e-marketing, are catalogued
at Logophilia WordSpy (www
.wor
dspy
.com
):
1 A consumer who is an amateur in a particular field, but who is knowledgeable enough to
require equipment that has some professional features:
(‘professional’ + ‘consumer’).
2 A person who helps to design or customise the products they purchase:
(‘producer’ + ‘consumer’).
3 A person who creates goods for their own use and also possibly to sell:
(‘producing’ + ‘consumer’).
4 A person who takes steps to correct difficulties with consumer companies or markets and
to anticipate future problems:
(‘proactive’ + ‘consumer’).
An example of the application of the prosumer is provided by BMW who used an interactive web
site prior to launch of their Z3 roadster where users could design their own preferred features.
The information collected was linked to a database and as BMW had previously collected data
on its most loyal customers, the database could give a very accurate indication of which combi-
nations of features were the most sought after and should therefore be put into production.
Bundling
Offering
complementary
services.
customer lists
customer comments
warranties
guarantees
money-back offers
customer service (see people, process and physical evidence)
incorporating tools to help users during their selection and use of the product. 
Figure 5.3 shows a site developed by Fisher-Price, which rather than just being a toy cat-
alogue, instead shows how children develop through play and how their carers can assist
in this.
The digital value referred to by Ghosh (1998) will often be free, in which case it will
be part of the extended product. He suggests that companies should provide free digital
value to help build an audience which can then be converted into customers. He refers
to this process as ‘building a customer magnet’; today this would be known as a ‘portal’
or ‘community’. There is good potential for customer magnets in specialised vertical
markets served by business-to-business companies where there is a need for industry-
specific information to assist individuals in their day-to-day work. For example, a
customer magnet could be developed for the construction industry, agrochemicals,
biotechnology or independent financial advisers. Examples include resource centres at
Siebel (www
.siebel.com
) and DoubleClick (www
.doubleclick.com
). Alternatively the
portal could be branded as an ‘extranet’ that is only available to key accounts to help
differentiate the service. Dell Premier is an example of such an extranet.
CHAPTER 5 · THE INTERNET AND THE MARKETING MIX
220
Figure 5.3 Play Laugh Grow (www
.fisher-pric
e.c
om/uk/myfp/age.asp?age=2month
)
child development resource site from Fisher-Price
Extended product is not necessarily provided free of charge. In other cases a premium
may be charged. Amazon (www
.amazon.com
), for instance, charges for its wrapping service.
3 Conducting research online
The Internet provides many options for learning about products. It can be used as a rela-
tively low-cost method of collecting marketing research, particularly about customer
perceptions of products and services. Typically these will complement rather than
replace offline research. Options include:
Online focus group. A moderated focus group can be conducted to compare customers’
experience of product use.
Online questionnaire survey. These typically focus on the site visitors’ experience, but
can also include questions relating to products.
Customer feedback or support forums. Comments posted to the site or independent sites
may give information on future product innovation.
Web logs. A wealth of marketing research information is also available from the web
site itself, since every time a user clicks on a link this is recorded in a transaction log
file summarising what information on the site the customer is interested in. Such
information can be used to indirectly assess customers’ product preferences.
Approaches for undertaking these types of research are briefly reviewed in Chapter 9.
4 Velocity of new product development
Quelch and Klein (1996) note that the Internet can also be used to accelerate new prod-
uct development since different product options can be tested online more rapidly as
part of market research. Companies can use their own panels of consumers to test opin-
ion more rapidly and often at lower costs than for traditional market research. In
Chapter 1, Figure 1.7, we saw how the Dubit Informer is used by brands to research the
opinions of the youth market. 
Another aspect of the velocity of new product development is that the network effect
of the Internet enables companies to form partnerships more readily to launch new
products. The subsection on virtual organisations in the section on ‘Place’ below dis-
cusses this in a little more detail. 
5 Velocity of new product diffusion
Quelch and Klein (1996) also noted that the implication of the Internet and concomi-
tant globalisation is that to remain competitive, organisations will have to roll out new
products more rapidly to international markets. More recently, Malcolm Gladwell in his
book The Tipping Point (2000) has shown how word-of-mouth communication has a
tremendous impact on the rate of adoption of new products and we can suggest this
effect is often enhanced or facilitated through the Internet. In Chapter 8, we will see
how marketers seek to influence this effect through what is known as ‘viral marketing’.
Marsden (2004) provides a good summary of the implications of the tipping point for
marketers. He says that ‘using the science of social epidemics, The Tipping Point explains
the three simple principles that underpin the rapid spread of ideas, products and behav-
iours through a population’. He advises how marketers should help create a ‘tipping
point’ for a new product or service, the moment when a domino effect is triggered and
an epidemic of demand sweeps through a population like a highly contagious virus. 
There are three main laws that are relevant from The Tipping Point:
PRODUCT
221
Tipping point
Using the science of
social epidemics
explains principles that
underpin the rapid
spread of ideas,
products and
behaviours through a
population.
Documents you may be interested
Documents you may be interested