mvc show pdf in div : How to add text fields in a pdf SDK software service wpf winforms azure dnn 5G7BGE3Z6KNWFOHBFCWN29-part1365

CHAPTER 6 · RELATIONSHIP MARKETING USING THE INTERNET
262
E-CRM or electronic customer relationship management involves creating strategies and
plans for how digital technology and digital data can support CRM. Some specialists in
e-commerce teams have this as their job title or in their job description.
But what is e-CRM? This is what Smith and Chaffey (2005) say:
What is e-CRM? Customer Relations Management with an ‘e’? Ultimately, E-CRM cannot
be separated from CRM, it needs to be integrated and seamlessly. However, many organi-
sations do have specific E-CRM initiatives or staff responsible for E-CRM. Both CRM and
E-CRM are not just about technology and databases, it’s not just a process or a way of
doing things, it requires, in fact, a complete customer culture.
More specifically, we can say that important e-CRM challenges and activities which
require management are:
Using the web site for customer development from generating leads through to conversion to
an online or offline sale using e-mail and web-based information to encourage purchase;
An approach to reconciling customer satisfaction, loyalty, value and potential is to use a value-based seg-
mentation. This modeling approach is often used by car manufacturers and other companies who are
assessing strategies to enhance the future value of their customer segments. This approach involves creat-
ing a segmentation model combining real data for each customer about their current value and satisfaction
and modeled values for future loyalty and value. Each customer is scored according to these four variables:
Current satisfaction
 
Current value
 
Repurchase loyalty
 
Future potential.
Mini Case Study 6.1
How car manufacturers use loyalty-based
segmentation
Table 6.2 Loyalty-based segmentation for car manufacturer 
SLVP score
Nature of customer
Segment strategy
Moderate 
An owner of average loyalty who replaces their car
Not a key segment to influence.
satisfaction and 
every three to four years and has a tendency to
But should encourage to
loyalty. Moderate  repurchase from brand.
subscribe to e-newsletter club
current and future 
and deliver targeted messages
potential value.
around time of renewal.
High satisfaction,  A satisfied owner but tends to buy second-hand
Engage in dialogue via e-mail
moderate loyalty.  and keeps cars until they have a high mileage.
newsletter and use this to
Low future and 
encourage advocacy and make
potential value.
aware of benefits of buying new.
Low satisfaction  A dissatisfied owner of luxury cars who is at risk of
A key target segment who
and loyalty. High  switching.
needs to be contacted to
current and future 
understand issues and reassure
potential value.
about quality and performance.
Key concepts of electronic customer relationship management 
(e-CRM)
Electronic customer
relationship
management
Using digital
communications
technologies to
maximise sales to
existing customers
and encourage
continued usage of
online services.
How to add text fields in a pdf - insert text into PDF content in C#.net, ASP.NET, MVC, Ajax, WinForms, WPF
XDoc.PDF for .NET, providing C# demo code for inserting text to PDF file
how to add text fields to a pdf; adding text fields to pdf acrobat
How to add text fields in a pdf - VB.NET PDF insert text library: insert text into PDF content in vb.net, ASP.NET, MVC, Ajax, WinForms, WPF
Providing Demo Code for Adding and Inserting Text to PDF File Page in VB.NET Program
how to enter text into a pdf form; how to add text to a pdf in acrobat
Managing e-mail list quality (coverage of e-mail addresses and integration of customer
profile information from other databases to enable targeting);
Applying e-mail marketing to support upsell and cross-sell;
Data mining to improve targeting;
Providing online personalisation or mass customisation facilities to automatically rec-
ommend the ‘next-best product’;
Providing online customer service facilities (such as frequently asked questions, callback
and chat support);
Managing online service quality to ensure that first-time buyers have a great customer
experience that encourages them to buy again;
Managing the multi-channel customer experience as they use different media as part of
the buying process and customer lifecycle.
Benefits of e-CRM
Using the Internet for relationship marketing involves integrating the customer database
with web sites to make the relationship targeted and personalised. Through doing this
marketing can be improved as follows.
Targeting more cost-effectively. Traditional targeting, for direct mail for instance, is often
based on mailing lists compiled according to criteria that mean that not everyone
contacted is in the target market. For example, a company wishing to acquire new
affluent consumers may use postcodes to target areas with appropriate demographics,
but within the postal district the population may be heterogeneous. The result of
poor targeting will be low response rates, perhaps less than 1 per cent. The Internet
has the benefit that the list of contacts is self-selecting or pre-qualified. A company will
only aim to build relationships with those who have visited a web site and expressed
an interest in its products by registering their name and address. The mere act of visit-
ing the web site and browsing indicates a target customer. Thus the approach to
acquiring new customers with whom to build relationships is fundamentally differ-
ent, as it involves attracting the customers to the web site, where the company
provides an offer to make them register. 
Achieve mass customisation of the marketing messages (and possibly the product). This
tailoring process is described in a subsequent section. Technology makes it possible to
send tailored e-mails at much lower costs than is possible with direct mail and also to
provide tailored web pages to smaller groups of customers (micro-segments).
Increase depth and breadth and improve the nature of relationship. The nature of the
Internet medium enables more information to be supplied to customers as required.
For example, special pages such as Dell’s Premier can be set up to provide customers
with specific information. The nature of the relationship can be changed in that con-
tact with a customer can be made more frequently. The frequency of contact with the
customer can be determined by customers – whenever they have the need to visit
their personalised pages – or they can be contacted by e-mail by the company.
A learning relationship can be achieved using different tools throughout the customer lifecycle.
For example: tools summarise products purchased on-site and the searching behaviour
that occurred before these products were bought; online feedback forms about the site
or products are completed when a customer requests free information; questions asked
through forms or e-mails to the online customer service facilities; online question-
naires asking about product category interests and opinions on competitors; new
product development evaluation – commenting on prototypes of new products.
Lower cost. Contacting customers by e-mail or through their viewing web pages costs
less than using physical mail, but perhaps more importantly, information only needs
to be sent to those customers who have expressed a preference for it, resulting in
fewer mail-outs. Once personalisation technology has been purchased, much of the
targeting and communications can be implemented automatically.
KEY CONCEPTS OF E LECTRONIC CUSTOM ER RE LATIONSHIP MANAGEMENT (E-CRM)
263
VB.NET PDF Form Data Read library: extract form data from PDF in
featured PDF software, it should have functions for processing text, image as Add necessary references Demo Code to Retrieve All Form Fields from a PDF File in
add text to pdf document online; adding text to a pdf document acrobat
C# PDF Form Data Read Library: extract form data from PDF in C#.
Able to retrieve all form fields from adobe PDF file in C# featured PDF software, it should have functions for processing text, image as Add necessary references
how to insert text into a pdf; how to insert text in pdf using preview
Marketing applications of CRM
A CRM system supports the following marketing applications:
1 Sales force automation (SFA). Sales representatives are supported in their account man-
agement through tools to arrange and record customer visits.
2 Customer service management. Representatives in contact centres respond to customer
requests for information by using an intranet to access databases containing informa-
tion on the customer, products and previous queries. It is more efficient and may
increase customer convenience if customers are given the option of web self-service,
i.e. accessing support data through a web interface.
3 Managing the sales process. This can be achieved through e-commerce sites, or in a B2B
context by supporting sales representatives by recording the sales process (SFA).
4 Campaign management. Managing advertising, direct mail, e-mail and other campaigns.
5 Analysis. Through technologies such as data warehouses and approaches such as data
mining, which are explained further later in the chapter, customers’ characteristics,
their purchase behaviour and campaigns can be analysed in order to optimise the
marketing mix.
CRM technologies and data
Database technology is at the heart of delivering these CRM applications. Often the
database is accessible through an intranet web site accessed by employees or an extranet
accessed by customers or partners provides an interface onto the entire customer rela-
tionship management system. E-mail is used to manage many of the inbound, outbound
and internal communications managed by the CRM system. A workflow system is often
used for automating CRM processes. For example, a workflow system can remind sales
representatives about customer contacts or can be used to manage service delivery such
as the many stages of arranging a mortgage. The three main types of customer data held
as tables in customer databases for CRM are typically:
1 Personal and profile data. These include contact details and characteristics for profiling
customers such as age and sex (B2C), and business size, industry sector and individ-
ual’s role in the buying decision (B2B).
2 Transaction data. A record of each purchase transaction including specific product pur-
chased, quantities, category, location, date and time and channel where purchased.
3 Communications data. A record of which customers have been targeted by campaigns,
and their response to them (outbound communications). Also includes a record of
inbound enquiries and sales representative visits and reports (B2B).
The behavioural data available through 2 and 3 are very important for targeting cus-
tomers to more closely meet their needs.
Research completed by Stone et al. (2001) illustrates how customer data collected
through CRM applications can be used for marketing. The types of data that are held,
together with the frequency of their usage, are:
basic customer information (75%);
 
campaign history (62.5%);
 
purchase patterns (sales histories) (50%);
 
market information (42.5%);
 
competitor information (42.5%);
 
forecasts (25%).
CHAPTER 6 · RELATIONSHIP MARKETING USING THE INTERNET
264
Web self-service
Customers perform
information requests
and transactions
through a web interface
rather than by contact
with customer support
staff.
VB.NET PDF Convert to Text SDK: Convert PDF to txt files in vb.net
Convert PDF to text in .NET WinForms and ASP.NET project. Text in any PDF fields can be copied and pasted to .txt files by keeping original layout.
how to enter text in a pdf document; adding text to a pdf in reader
C# PDF insert image Library: insert images into PDF in C#.net, ASP
C#.NET PDF SDK - Add Image to PDF Page in C#.NET. How to Insert & Add Image, Picture or Logo on PDF Page Using C#.NET. Add Image to PDF Page Using C#.NET.
adding text to pdf in preview; how to enter text into a pdf
The data within CRM systems were reported to be used for marketing applications
as follows:
 
targeted marketing, 80%;
 
segmentation, 65%;
 
keeping the right customers, 47.5%;
 
trend analysis, 45%;
 
increased loyalty, 42.5%;
 
customised offers, 32.5%;
 
increase share of customer, 27.5%.
Despite these benefits, it should be noted that in 2000, it was reported that around
75% of CRM projects failed in terms of delivering a return on investment or completion
on time. This is not necessarily indicative of weaknesses in the CRM concept, rather it
indicates the difficulty of implementing a complex information system that requires
substantial changes to organisations’ processes and major impacts on the staff that con-
duct them. Such failure rates occur in many other information systems projects.
Read Mini Case Study 6.2 ‘Customer data management at Deutsche Bank’ for an
example of the practical realities of managing customer data in a large organisation.
KEY CONCEPTS OF E LECTRONIC CUSTOM ER RE LATIONSHIP MANAGEMENT (E-CRM)
265
Deutsche Bank is one of the largest financial institutions in Europe, with assets under management worth
100 billion euros (£60 billion). It operates in seven different countries under different names, although the
company is considering consolidating into a single brand operating as a pan-European bank.
In 1999 its chairman, Dr Walther, said the company had to improve its cost-to-revenue ratio to 70 per
cent from 90 per cent and add 10 million customers over the next four to eight years. That would be
achieved by increasing revenues through growing customer value by cross- and up-selling, reducing
costs through more targeted communications, and by getting more new customers based on meaningful
data analysis.
Central to this programme has been the introduction of an enterprise-wide database, analysis and
campaign management system called DataSmart. This has brought significant changes to its marketing
processes and effectiveness. Achieving this new IT infrastructure has been no mean feat – Deutsche Bank
has 73 million customers, of which 800,000 are on-line and 190,000 use its online brokerage service, it
has 19,300 employees, 1250 branches and 250 financial centres, plus three call centres supporting
Deutsche Bank 24, its telebanking service. It also has e-commerce alliances with Yahoo!, e-Bay and AOL.
‘DataSmart works on four levels – providing a technical infrastructure across the enterprise, consoli-
dating data, allowing effective data analyses and segmentations, and managing multi-channel marketing
campaigns’, says Jens Fruehling, head of the marketing database automation project, Deutsche Bank 24.
The new database runs on the largest Sun server in Europe with 20 processors, 10 Gb of RAM and 5 ter-
abytes of data storage. It is also mirrored. The software used comprises Oracle for the database, Prime
Response for campaign management, SAS for data mining, Cognos for OLAP reporting, plus a data
extraction, transformation, modelling and loading tool.
‘Before DataSmart, we had a problem of how to get data from our operating systems where it was
held in a variety of different ways and was designed only for use as transactional data. There are 400 mil-
lion data sets created every month. We had a data warehouse which was good, but was not right for
campaign management or data mining’, says Fruehling.
Mini Case Study 6.2
Customer data management at Deutsche Bank
VB.NET PDF Text Extract Library: extract text content from PDF
With this advanced PDF Add-On, developers are able to extract target text content from source PDF document and save extracted text to other file formats
how to add text to pdf file; add text pdf file acrobat
VB.NET PDF insert image library: insert images into PDF in vb.net
try with this sample VB.NET code to add an image As String = Program.RootPath + "\\" 1.pdf" Dim doc New PDFDocument(inputFilePath) ' Get a text manager from
adding text fields to pdf; how to add text to a pdf file
CHAPTER 6 · RELATIONSHIP MARKETING USING THE INTERNET
266
The new data environment was developed to facilitate all of those things. It also brings in external
data such as Experian’s Mosaic. ‘We have less information on new prospects, so we bought third party
data on every household – the type of house, the number of householders, status, risk, lifestyle data,
financial status, age, plus GIS coding’, he says.
For every customer, over 1000 fields of data are now held. These allow the bank to understand cus-
tomers’ product needs, profile, risk, loyalty, revenue and lifetime value. That required a very sophisticated
system. For every customer, there is also a whole bundle of statistical models, such as affinity for a prod-
uct and channel, profitability overall and by type of product.
‘These are calculated monthly so we can perform time-series analyses, so if their profitability is falling,
we can target a mailing to them’, says Fruehling. DataSmart has allowed Deutsche Bank to makes some
important changes in its marketing process, allowing it to operate more quickly and effectively.
‘We have a sales support system called BTV in our branches to communicate with each bank man-
ager. They can see the customer data and are able to add information, such as lists of customers who
should be part of a branch campaign, who to include or exclude, and response analyses’, he says.
Previously, typical marketing support activity involved segmenting and selecting customers, sending
these lists through BTV for veto by branch managers, making the final selection, then sending those lists
to BTV and the lettershop for production. ‘There were many disconnects in that process – we had no
campaign history, nothing was automated. Our programmers had to write SAS code for every selection,
which is not the best way to work. We had no event-driven campaigns’, says Fruehling.
An interface has been developed between PrimeVantage, BTV and each system supporting the seven key
channels to market. Now the database marketing unit simply selects a template for one of its output chan-
nels. This has allowed Deutsche Bank to become more targeted in its marketing activities, and also faster.
‘Regular selections are very important because local branches do our campaigns. We may have up
to 20  separate  mailings per week  for different channels.  That  is now  much  more profitable’, says
Fruehling. Customer surveys are a central part of the bank’s measurement culture and these have also
become much easier to run.
‘Every month we run a customer opinion poll on a sample of 10,000. Every customer is surveyed twice in
a year. That takes half a day to run, whereas previously it took one week and 30 people using SAS. If a cus-
tomer responds, their name is then suppressed, if they do not, they are called by the call centre’, he says.
The bank’s customer acquisition programme, called AKM, now uses up to 30 mailings per year with
as many as 12 different target groups and very complex selection criteria. ‘We flag customers using SAS
and PrimeVantage recognises those flags’, he says. ‘We are now looking to move to a higher communi-
cations frequency so every customer gets a relevant offer.’
Source: European Centre for Customer Strategies case study (www
.eccs.uk.com
), 2001
Question
Summarise the data types that Deutsche Bank collects and how they are used for customer relation-
ship management.
VB.NET PDF Password Library: add, remove, edit PDF file password
VB: Add Password to PDF with Permission Settings Applied. This VB.NET example shows how to add PDF file password with access permission setting.
add text pdf file; how to add text fields to pdf
C# PDF Text Extract Library: extract text content from PDF file in
How to C#: Extract Text Content from PDF File. Add necessary references: RasterEdge.Imaging.Basic.dll. RasterEdge.Imaging.Basic.Codec.dll.
adding text to a pdf; how to input text in a pdf
As was explained in Chapter 4 in the section on target marketing strategy and through
Mini Case Study 4.2 on Euroffice, assessing and understanding the position of the cus-
tomer in their relationship with an organisation is key to online marketing strategy. In
this section we review methods of assessing the position of customers in the lifecycle
and the use of ‘sense and respond’ communications to build customer loyalty at each
stage of the customer lifecycle. 
A high-level view of the classic customer lifecycle of select, acquire, retain, extend is
shown in Figure 6.3. 
Customer selectionmeans defining the types of customers that a company will market
to. It means identifying different groups of customers for which to develop offerings
and to target during acquisition, retention and extension. Different ways of segmenting
customers by value and by their detailed lifecycle with the company are reviewed.
2 Customer acquisition refers to marketing activities to form relationships with new cus-
tomers while minimising acquisition costs and targeting high value customers.
Service quality and selecting the right channels for different customers are important
at this stage and throughout the lifecycle.
Customer retentionrefers to the marketing activities taken by an organisation to keep its
existing customers. Identifying relevant offerings based on their individual needs and
detailed position in the customer lifecycle (e.g. number and value of purchases) is key.
4 Customer extension refers to increasing the depth or range of products that a cus-
tomer purchases from a company. This is often referred to as ‘customer development’.
There are a range of customer extension techniques that are particularly important to
online retailers:
(a) Re-sell. Selling similar products to existing customers – particularly important in
some B2B contexts as rebuys or modified rebuys.
(b) Cross-sell. Selling additional products which may be closely related to the original
purchase, but not necessarily so.
(c) Up-sell. A subset of cross-selling, but in this case, selling more expensive products.
(d) Reactivation. Customers who have not purchased for some time, or have lapsed can
be encouraged to purchase again.
(e) Referrals. Generating sales from recommendations from existing customers. For
example, member-get-member deals.
CUSTOMER LIFECYCLE MANAGEME NT
267
Customer lifecycle management
Customer lifecycle
The stages each
customer will pass
through in a long-term
relationship through
acquisition, retention
and extension. 
Figure 6.3 The four classic marketing activities of customer relationship management
Customers
Customer extension
• ëSense and Respond’
• Cross-selling and up-selling
• Optimise service quality
• Use the right channels
Customer retention
• Understand individual needs
• Relevant offers for continued
usage of online services
• Maximise service quality
• Use the right channels
Customer selection
•  Who do we target?
•  What is their value?
•  What is their lifecycle?
•  Where do we reach them?
Customer acquisition
•  Target the right segments
•  Minimise acquisition cost
•  Optimise service quality
•  Use the right channels
R
e
t
a
i
n
E
x
t
e
n
d
S
e
l
e
c
t
A
c
q
u
i
r
e
Customer selection
Identifying key
customer segments
and targeting them for
relationship building.
Customer
acquisition
Strategies and
techniques used to gain
new customers.
Customer retention
Techniques to maintain
relationships with
existing customers.
Customer extension
Techniques to
encourage customers
to increase their
involvement with an
organisation.
C# PDF Password Library: add, remove, edit PDF file password in C#
C# Sample Code: Add Password to PDF with Permission Settings Applied in C#.NET. This example shows how to add PDF file password with access permission setting.
adding text to pdf in reader; add text pdf reader
VB.NET PDF Text Add Library: add, delete, edit PDF text in vb.net
Extract; C# Write: Insert text into PDF; C# Write: Add Image to PDF; C# Protect: Add Password to PDF; C# Form: extract value from fields; C# Annotate: PDF Markup
adding text to pdf; how to add text to a pdf in reader
You can see that this framework distinguishes between customer retention and cus-
tomer extension. Retention involves keeping the most valuable customers by selecting
relevant customers for retention, understanding their loyalty factors that keep them
buying and then developing strategies that encourage loyalty and cement the relation-
ship. Customer extension is about developing customers to try a broader range of
products to convert the most growable customers into the most valuable customers. You
will also see that there are common features to each area – balancing cost and quality of
service through the channels used according to the anticipated value of customers.
Peppers and Rogers (1997) recommend the following stages to achieve these goals,
which they popularise as the 5 Is (as distinct from the 4 Ps):
Identification. It is necessary to learn the characteristics of customers in as much detail
as possible to be able to conduct the dialogue. In a business-to-business context, this
means understanding those involved in the buying decision.
 
Individualisation. Individualising means tailoring the company’s approach to each cus-
tomer, offering a benefit to the customer based on the identification of customer
needs. The effort expended on each customer should be consistent with the value of
that customer to the organisation.
 
Interaction. Continued dialogue is necessary to understand both the customer’s needs
and the customer’s strategic value. The interactions need to be recorded to facilitate
the learning relationship.
 
Integration. Integration of the relationship and knowledge of the customer must
extend throughout all parts of the company.
 
Integrity. Since all relationships are built on trust it is essential not to lose the trust of
the customer. Efforts to learn from the customer should not be seen as intrusive,
and privacy should be maintained. (See Chapter 3 for coverage of privacy issues
related to e-CRM.)
Permission marketing
Permission marketing is a significant concept that underpins online CRM throughout
management of the customer lifecycle. ‘Permission marketing’ is a term coined by Seth
Godin. It is best characterised with just three (or four) words:
Permission marketing is … 
anticipated, relevant and personal [and timely].
Godin (1999) notes that while research used to show we were bombarded by 500 mar-
keting messages a day, with the advent of the web and digital TV this has now increased
to over 3000 a day! From the marketing organisation’s viewpoint, this leads to a dilution
in the effectiveness of the messages – how can the communications of any one company
stand out? From the customer’s viewpoint, time is seemingly in ever-shorter supply, cus-
tomers are losing patience and expect reward for their attention, time and information.
Godin refers to the traditional approach as ‘interruption marketing’. Permission market-
ing is about seeking the customer’s permission before engaging them in a relationship
and providing something in exchange. The classic exchange is based on information or
entertainment – a B2B site can offer a free report in exchange for a customer sharing
their e-mail address which will be used to maintain a dialogue; a B2C site can offer a
screensaver in exchange.
From a practical e-commerce perspective, we can think of a customer agreeing to
engage in a relationship when they check a box on a web form to indicate that they agree
CHAPTER 6 · RELATIONSHIP MARKETING USING THE INTERNET
268
Permission
marketing
Customers agree (opt-
in) to be involved in an
organisation’s
marketing activities,
usually as a result of an
incentive.
Interruption
marketing
Marketing
communications that
disrupt customers’
activities.
to receive further communications from a company (see Figure 3.3 for further examples).
This approach is referred to as ‘opt-in’. This is preferable to opt-out, the situation where a
customer has to consciously agree not to receive further information.
The importance of incentivisation in permission marketing has also been emphasised
by Seth Godin who likens the process of acquisition and retention to dating someone.
Likening customer relationship building to social behaviour is not new, as O’Malley and
Tynan (2001) note; the analogy of marriage has been used since the 1980s at least. They
also report on consumer research that indicates that while marriage may be analogous to
business relationships, it is less appropriate for B2C relationships. Moller and Halinen
(2000) have also suggested that due to the complexity of the exchange, longer-term rela-
tionships are more readily formed for interorganisational exchanges. So, the description
of the approaches that follow are perhaps more appropriate for B2B applications.
Godin (1999) suggests that dating the customer involves:
1 offering the prospect an incentive to volunteer;
2 using the attention offered by the prospect, offering a curriculum over time, teaching
the consumer about your product or service;
3 reinforcing the incentive to guarantee that the prospect maintains the permission;
4 offering additional incentives to get even more permission from the consumer;
5 over time, using the permission to change consumer behaviour towards profits.
Notice the importance of incentives at each stage. The use of incentives at the start of
the relationship and throughout it are key to successful relationships. As we shall see in
a later section, e-mail is very important in permission marketing to maintain the dia-
logue between company and customer.
Writing for What’s  New in  Marketing e-newsletter,  Chaffey  (2004) has extended
Godin’s principles to e-CRM with his ‘e-permission marketing principles’: 
Principle 1. ‘Consider selective opt-in to communications.’ In other words, offer choice in
communications preferences to the customer to ensure more relevant communications.
Some customers may not want a weekly e-newsletter, rather they may only want to
hear about new product releases. Remember opt-in is a legal requirement in many
countries. Four key communications preferences options, selected by tick box are:
– Content – news, products, offers, events
– Frequency – weekly, monthly, quarterly, or alerts
– Channel – e-mail, direct mail, phone or SMS
– Format – text vs HTML.
Make sure though that through providing choice you do not overstretch your resources,
or on the other hand limit your capabilities to market to customers (for example if cus-
tomers only opt in to an annual communication such as a catalogue update) you still
need to find a way to control the frequency and type of communications.
Principle 2. Create a ‘common customer profile’. A structured approach to customer
data capture is needed otherwise some data will be missed, as is the case with the util-
ity company that collected 80,000 e-mail addresses, but forgot to ask for the postcode
for geo-targeting! This can be achieved through a common customer profile – a defi-
nition  of  all  the  database  fields  that  are  relevant  to  the  marketer  in  order  to
understand and target the customer with a relevant offering. The customer profile can
have different levels to set targets for data quality (Level 1 is contact details and key
profile fields only, Level 2 includes preferences and Level 3 includes full purchase and
response behaviour).
CUSTOMER LIFECYCLE MANAGEME NT
269
Opt-in
A customer proactively
agrees to receive
further information.
Opt-out
A customer declines
the offer to receive
further information.
Principle 3. Offer a range of opt-in incentives. Many web sites now have ‘free-win-save’
incentives to encourage opt-in, but often it is one incentive fits all visitors. Different
incentives for different audiences will generate a higher volume of permission, partic-
ularly for business-to-business web sites. We can also gauge the characteristics of the
respondent by the type of incentives or communications they have requested, with-
out the need to ask them. 
Principle 4. ‘Don’t make opt-out too easy.’ Often marketers make it too easy to unsub-
scribe. Although offering some form of opt-out is now a legal requirement in many
countries due to privacy laws, a single click to unsubscribe is making it too easy.
Instead, wise e-permission marketers such as Amazon use the concept of ‘My Profile’
or a ‘selective opt-out’. Instead of unsubscribe, they offer a link to a ‘communications
preferences’ web form to update a profile, which includes the options to reduce com-
munications which may be the option taken rather than unsubscribing completely. 
Principle 5. ‘Watch, don’t ask.’ The need to ask interruptive questions can be reduced
through the use of monitoring clicks to better understand customer needs and to trig-
ger follow-up communications. Some examples:
– Monitoring clickthrough to different types of content or offer. 
– Monitoring the engagement of individual customers with e-mail communications. 
– Follow-up reminder to those who don’t open the e-mail first time. 
Principle 6. Create an outbound contact strategy. Online permission marketers need a
plan for the number, frequency and type of online and offline communications and
offers. This is a contact or touch strategy which is particularly important for large organ-
isations with several marketers responsible for e-mail communications. The contact
strategy should indicate the following. (1) Frequency (e.g. minimum once per quarter
and maximum once per month). (2) Interval (e.g. there must be a gap of at least one
week or one month between communications). (3) Content and offers (we may want to
limit or achieve a certain number of prize draws or information-led offers). (4) Links
between online communications and offline communications. (5) A control strategy (a
mechanism to make sure these guidelines are adhered to, for example using a single
‘focal point’ for checking all communications before creation dispatch).
Examples of contact strategies for Euroffice and Tesco.com were discussed in Chapter 4.
Personalisation and mass customisation
The potential power of personalisation is suggested by these quotes from Evans et al.
(2000) that show the negative effects of lack of targeting of traditional direct mail:
‘Don’t like unsolicited mail … haven’t asked for it and I’m not interested.’ 
(Female, 25–34)
‘Most isn’t wanted, it’s not relevant and just clutters up the table … you have to sort
through it to get to the “real mail”.’ 
(Male, 45–54)
‘It’s annoying to be sent things that you are not interested in. Even more annoying when
they phone you up. ... If you wanted something you would go and find out about it.’ 
(Female, 45–54)
Personalisation and mass customisation can be used to tailor information content on
a web site and opt-in e-mail can be used to deliver it to add value and at the same time
remind the customer about a product. ‘Personalisation’ and ‘mass customisation’ are
terms that are often used interchangeably. In the strict sense, personalisation refers to
CHAPTER 6 · RELATIONSHIP MARKETING USING THE INTERNET
270
Contact or touch
strategy
Definition of the
sequence and type of
outbound
communications
required at different
points in the customer
lifecycle.
Personalisation
Web-based
personalisation
involves delivering
customised content for
the individual, through
web pages, e-mail or
push technology.
Mass customisation
Mass customisation is
the creation of tailored
marketing messages or
products for individual
customers or groups of
customers typically
using technology to
retain the economies of
scale and the capacity
of mass marketing or
production.
customisation of information requested by a site customer at an individual level. Mass
customisation involves providing tailored content to a group or individual with similar
interests. It uses technology to achieve this on an economical basis. An example of mass
customisation is when Amazon recommends similar books according to what others in a
segment have offered, or if it sent a similar e-mail to customers who had an interest in a
particular topic such as e-commerce.
Other methods of profiling customers include collaborative filtering and monitoring
the content they view. With collaborative filtering, customers are openly asked what
their interests are, typically by checking boxes that correspond to their interests. A data-
base then compares the customer’s preferences with those of other customers in its
database, and then makes recommendations or delivers information accordingly. The
more information a database contains about an individual customer, the more useful its
recommendations can be. The best-known example of this technology in action can be
found on the Amazon web site (www
.amazon.com
), where the database reveals that cus-
tomers who bought book ‘x’ also bought books ‘y’ and ‘z’.
Figure 6.4 summarises the options available to organisations wishing to use the Internet
for mass customisation or personalisation. If there is little information available about the
customer and it is not integrated with the web site then no mass customisation is possible
(A). To achieve mass customisation or personalisation, the organisation must have suffi-
cient information about the customer. For limited tailoring to groups of customers (B), it is
necessary to have basic profiling information such as age, sex, social group, product cate-
gory interest or, for B2B, role in the buying unit. This information must be contained in a
database system that is directly linked to the system used to display web site content. For
personalisation on a one-to-one level (C) more detailed information about specific inter-
ests, perhaps available from a purchase history, should be available.
An organisation can use Figure 6.4 to plan their relationship marketing strategy. The
symbols X
1
to X
3
show a typical path for an organisation. At X
1
information collected
about customers is limited. At X
2
detailed information is available about customers, but
it is in discrete databases that are not integrated with the web site. At X
3
the strategy is
to provide mass customisation of information and offers to major segments, since it is
felt that the expense of full personalisation is not warranted.
CUSTOMER LIFECYCLE MANAGEME NT
271
Collaborative
filtering
Profiling of customer
interest coupled with
delivery of specific
information and offers,
often based on the
interests of similar
customers.
Figure 6.4 Options for mass customisation and personalisation using the Internet
L
i
m
i
t
e
d
Mass customisation
E
x
t
e
n
s
i
v
e
Low
High
Site or e-mail personalisation
X
2
X
3
X
1
C.
One-to-one
personalisation
B.
Tailor content
to key segments
A.
Whole market
broadcast
Documents you may be interested
Documents you may be interested