mvc show pdf in div : How to input text in a pdf Library application component .net azure wpf mvc 5G7BGE3Z6KNWFOHBFCWN3-part1366

How to input text in a pdf - insert text into PDF content in C#.net, ASP.NET, MVC, Ajax, WinForms, WPF
XDoc.PDF for .NET, providing C# demo code for inserting text to PDF file
adding a text field to a pdf; how to insert text in pdf file
How to input text in a pdf - VB.NET PDF insert text library: insert text into PDF content in vb.net, ASP.NET, MVC, Ajax, WinForms, WPF
Providing Demo Code for Adding and Inserting Text to PDF File Page in VB.NET Program
how to add text to a pdf document; adding text to a pdf form
Learning objectives
After reading this chapter, the reader should be able to:
Evaluate the relevance of the Internet to the customer-centric,
multi-channel marketing concept
Distinguish between Internet marketing, e-marketing, digital
marketing, e-commerce and e-business
Identify the key differences between Internet marketing and
traditional marketing
Assess how the Internet can be used in different marketing
functions
Questions for marketers
Key questions for marketing managers related to this chapter are:
How significant is the Internet as a marketing tool?
How does Internet marketing relate to e-marketing, e-commerce
and e-business?
What are the key benefits of Internet marketing?
What differences does the Internet introduce in relation to existing
marketing communications models?
Links to other chapters
This chapter provides an introduction to Internet marketing, and the
concepts introduced are covered in more detail later in the book, as
follows:
Chapters 2 and 3 explain how situation analysis for Internet
marketing planning can be conducted 
Chapters 4, 5 and 6 in Part 2 describe how Internet marketing
strategy can be developed
Chapters 7, 8 and 9 in Part 3 describe strategy implementation
 Chapters 10 and 11 in Part 3 describe B2C and B2B applications
1
Main topics
Introduction – how significant
is the Internet for marketing?
4
What is Internet marketing? 8
What benefits does the Internet
provide for the marketer?  14
A strategic approach to
Internet marketing  18
How do Internet marketing
communications differ from
traditional marketing 
communications?  20
A short introduction to Internet
technology  26
Case study 1
eBay thrives in the global
marketplace  33
Chapter at a glance
An introduction to
Internet marketing
VB.NET PDF Password Library: add, remove, edit PDF file password
Dim intputFilePath As String = Program.RootPath + "\\" 1.pdf" ' Input password. Dim userPassword As String = "you" ' Open an encrypted PDF document.
add text block to pdf; adding text field to pdf
C# PDF Password Library: add, remove, edit PDF file password in C#
String intputFilePath = Program.RootPath + "\\" 1.pdf"; // Input password. String userPassword = @"you"; // Open an encrypted PDF document.
how to add text to a pdf file in preview; add text to pdf in preview
How significant is Internet marketing to businesses today? The answer as always, is ‘it
depends’. The relative importance of the Internet for marketing for an organisation still
largely depends on the nature of its products and services and the buyer behaviour of its
target audience. For companies such as easyJet (www
.easyjet.com
), the low-cost European
airline, the Internet is very significant for marketing its products – the Internet is now a vital
part of the customer journey as consumers select the best supplier and make their purchase.
EasyJet now achieves over 95% of its ticket sales online and aims to fulfil the majority of its
customer service requests via the Internet (Figure 1.1). The figure shows how it has used the
Internet to support its growth into many new markets. When returning to the site on subse-
quent visits, the relevant home page for that country is automatically displayed. For
organisations whose products are not generally appropriate for sale online, such as energy
company BP (www
.bp.com
) or consumer brands such as Unilever (www
.unilever
.com
), the
Internet is less significant, but is still rapidly growing in importance. We will see that a dra-
matic change in media consumption over the last 10 years towards digital media means that
the Internet is becoming important for all product categories. Although the Internet is less
commonly used for sale of products by such organisations, it is still important in increasing
awareness of their products and brand values through online advertising on third-party sites.
Once awareness is raised amongst different customer types, content and offers such as those
in Figure 1.2 can be used to encourage them to start an online dialogue. The cover theme of
this new edition of Internet Marketing alludes to customer journeys as we go about our daily
lives. It also suggests the potential the web has for collaboration in communities and the
sharing of information and experiences.
CHAPTER 1 · AN INTRODUCTION TO INTERNET MARKETING
4
Introduction – how significant is the Internet for marketing?
Customer journey
A description of
modern multi-channel
buyer behaviour as
consumers use
different media to
select suppliers, make
purchases and gain
customer support.
Figure 1.1 easyJet web site (www
.easyjet.c
om
C# PDF Page Delete Library: remove PDF pages in C#.net, ASP.NET
Description: Delete specified page from the input PDF file. Description: Delete consecutive pages from the input PDF file starting at specified position.
how to insert text box on pdf; how to add text fields in a pdf
C# PDF Page Rotate Library: rotate PDF page permanently in C#.net
inputFilePath, Input file path, Valid pdf file path. pageIndex, The page index of the page that will be rotated. inputFilePath, Input file path, Valid pdf file path
add text to pdf acrobat; how to add text box in pdf file
This book explains how organisations can develop plans to manage all the different
ways in which the Internet can be applied to support the marketing process. We take a
customer-centric approach to Internet marketing (although many would regard this as a
tautology since the modern-marketing concept places the customer at the heart of all
marketing activity). By ‘customer-centric’ we mean the capability digital media give mar-
keters to better understand and tailor propositions to individual customers, which is one
of its greatest appeals and a common theme in each chapter.
As customers follow their journeys as they select products and interact with brands,
they do not use the Internet in isolation – they consume other media such as print, TV,
direct mail and outdoor. These media are still very important for marketers to communi-
cate with customers who still spend the majority of their waking hours in the real world
rather than the virtual world. It follows that an effective approach to using the Internet
is as part of a multi-channel marketing strategy. This defines how different marketing
channels should integrate and support each other in terms of their proposition develop-
ment and communications based on their relative merits for the customer and the
company. The multi-channel approach is also a common theme throughout this book.
In this introductory chapter we review different applications of Internet marketing
and consider the impact of the Internet on marketing. We also explain the basic con-
cepts of Internet marketing, placing it in the context of e-commerce and e-business and
the technologies involved.
Marketing applications of Internet marketing
Internet-based media offer a range of opportunities for marketing products and services
across the purchase cycle. Companies such as easyJet and BP illustrate the applications
of Internet marketing since they show how organisations can use online communica-
tions such as their web site, third-party web sites and e-mail marketing as:
An advertising medium. For example, BP plc and its subsidiary companies, such as
Castrol Limited, uses large-format display or interactive ads on media sites to create
awareness of brands and products such as fuels and lubricants.
 
Adirect-response medium. For example, easyJet uses sponsored links when a user is
researching a flight using a search engine to prompt them to directly visit the easyJet
site by clicking through to it. Similarly the easyJet e-mail newsletter sent to customers
can encourage them to click through to a web site to generate sales. 
 
Aplatform for sales transactions. For example, easyJet sells flights online to both con-
sumers and business travellers.
 
Alead-generation method. For example, when BP offers content to business car man-
agers about selecting the best fuel for company cars in order to identify interest from
a car fleet manager.
 
Adistribution channel. For example, for distributing digital products. This is often spe-
cific to companies with digital products to sell such as online music resellers such as
Napster (www
.napster
.com
) and Apple iTunes (www
.itunes.com
) or publishers of writ-
ten or video content.
 
A customer service mechanism. For example, customers serve themselves on easyJet.com
by reviewing frequently asked questions.
 
A relationship-building medium where a company can interact with its customers to
better understand their needs and offer them relevant products and offers. For exam-
ple, easyJet uses its e-mail newsletter and tailored alerts about special deals to help
keep its customers and engage them in a dialogue to understand their needs through
completing surveys and polls.
INTRODUCTION – HOW SIGNIFICANT IS THE INTERNET FOR MARKETING?
5
Customer-centric
marketing
An approach to
marketing based on
detailed knowledge of
customer behaviour
within the target
audience which seeks
to fulfil the individual
needs and wants of
customers.
Multi-channel
marketing strategy
Defines how different
marketing channels
should integrate and
support each other in
terms of their
proposition
development and
communications based
on their relative merits
for the customer and
the company.
VB.NET PDF Form Data fill-in library: auto fill-in PDF form data
rotate PDF pages, C#.NET search text in PDF As String = Program.RootPath + "\\" output.pdf" Dim fields As field, set state to ON Dim input As AFCheckBoxInput
how to add text box to pdf document; add text to pdf file reader
C# PDF Form Data fill-in Library: auto fill-in PDF form data in C#
input = new AFCheckBoxInput(true); PDFFormHandler.FillFormField(inputFilePath, "AF_RadioButton_01", input, outputFilePath + "1.pdf"); } { fill a RadioButton
adding text to a pdf file; add text to pdf without acrobat
Our changing media consumption
Although the importance of the Internet varies for different organisations, what all share
is changing behaviour in their stakeholder audiences whether they be prospects, cus-
tomers, media, shareholders or other partners. Each of these audiences is increasing its
consumption of Internet media (Figure 1.3) and there is a corresponding change in
buyer behaviour. Figure 1.3 shows that in the UK, the Internet is the third most con-
sumed medium following TV and radio (this figure excludes e-mail usage). During the
business day, the web is the most frequently consumed medium.
CHAPTER 1 · AN INTRODUCTION TO INTERNET MARKETING
6
Figure 1.2 An extract from the Castrol.com web site, reproduced by permission of
Castrol Limited. Any unauthorised reproduction is strictly prohibited
Figure 1.3 Variation in UK media consumption in hours (bars) compared to percentage
media expenditure (diamonds)
Source: Compiled from EIAA (2005) and IAB (2005)
M
e
d
i
a
c
o
n
s
u
m
p
t
i
o
n
(
h
o
u
r
s
)
Communications media
Internet
11.27
5.80%
TV
19.19
23.60%
Radio
15.74
3.60%
Press
8.6
41.20%
Direct Mail
0
13.50%
Directories
0
6.50%
Outdoor
0
5.10%
%
o
f
c
o
m
m
u
n
i
c
a
t
i
o
n
s
s
p
e
n
d
0
50%
40%
30%
20%
10%
0%
5
10
15
20
25
C# Image Convert: How to Convert Adobe PDF to Jpeg, Png, Bmp, &
This demo code just converts first page to jpeg image. String inputFilePath = @"C:\input.pdf"; String outputFilePath = @"C:\output.jpg"; // Convert PDF to jpg.
how to add text to pdf; add text in pdf file online
C# PDF Convert: How to Convert Jpeg, Png, Bmp, & Gif Raster Images
Console.WriteLine("Fail: can not convert to PDF, file type unsupport"); break; case ConvertResult.FILE_TYPE_UNMATCH: Console.WriteLine("Fail: input file is not
how to add text fields to a pdf document; adding text fields to a pdf
But has this change in media consumption been reflected in changes in advertising
expenditure using different media? Figure 1.3 also shows that advertising expenditure
for the Internet medium lags a long way behind expenditure on TV and press advertis-
ing (newspapers and magazines) although it has now overtaken radio and outdoor ad
spend. This disconnect or mismatch between medium consumption and TV/press adver-
tising expenditure illustrates the core challenge of Internet marketing – it is how
organisations reallocate their resources to best maximise their returns from the Internet.
Our changing buyer behaviour
Figure 1.4 shows there is a dramatic difference in online consumer behaviour in differ-
ent markets. For the majority of products such as travel and cinema and theatre tickets,
people are researching and then buying online, while for some bigger purchases such as
cars and properties, people use the internet mainly as a research tool. 
INTRODUCTION – HOW SIGNIFICANT IS THE INTERNET FOR MARKETING?
7
Figure 1.4 Percentage of Internet users in the EU and Norway browsing (dark bar) and
buying (light bar). Conversion percentages (shown in brackets) are the proportions of all
who research the product online who buy online 
Source: EIAA (2005)
Mobile phone content
15 7
(44)
Car hire
13 7
(51)
Food/grocery shopping
11
6
(48)
Toiletries/Cosmetics
9
5
(53)
Financial products
17 7
(38)
Computer games
18
8
(45)
Sports equipment
19
8
(42)
Insurance
23
9
(41)
Home furnishings
25
8
(32)
DVDs
27
15
(57)
Properties
28
3
(9)
Mobile phones
29
8
(27)
Clothes
31
19
(62)
Cars
31
4
(14)
Music downloads
33
13
(39)
CDs
36
19
(52)
Concert/Festival tickets
37
23
(61)
Theatre/cinema tickets
40
24
(60)
Electrical goods
42
21
(50)
Books
45
28
(61)
Travel tickets
66
39
(59)
Holidays
69
27
(40)
Car accessories
15
5
(37)
How to C#: Cleanup Images
body of the image, the Shear method can adjust the text body of RasterImage img = new RasterImage(@"F:\input.png"); ImageProcess process = new ImageProcess(img
add text to pdf file online; how to insert text in pdf reader
C# PDF File Split Library: Split, seperate PDF into multiple files
Program.RootPath+ @"\part_1.pdf"; String secondFile = SplitDocument + @"\part_2. pdf"; String thirdFile = SplitDocument + @"\part_3.pdf"; //Split input file to
adding text to pdf reader; how to insert text box in pdf file
The figure suggests that the way companies should use digital technologies for mar-
keting their products will vary markedly according to product type. In some, such as cars
and complex financial products such as mortgages, the main role of online marketing
will be to support research, while for standardised products like books and CDs there
will be a dual role for the web in supporting research and enabling purchase.
The use of the Internet and other digital media to support marketing has been granted a
bewildering range of labels by both academics and professionals. In this section we review
some of the different definitions to help explain the scope and applications of this new
form of marketing. Before we start by defining these terms, complete Activity 1.1 which
considers the relative popularity of these terms.
What, then, is Internet marketing? Internet marketing can be simply defined as:
Achieving marketing objectives through applying digital technologies.
This succinct definition helps remind us that it is the results delivered by technology
that should determine investment in Internet marketing, not the adoption of the tech-
nology! These digital technologies include Internet media such as web sites and e-mail as
CHAPTER 1 · AN INTRODUCTION TO INTERNET MARKETING
8
What is Internet marketing?
Activity 1.1
What’s in a term – what do we call this ‘e-thing’?
Purpose
To illustrate how different marketers perceive Internet marketing.
Question
There are a range of terms used to describe Internet marketing – it is called different things by
different people. It is important that within companies and between agency and client there is
clarity on the scope of Internet marketing, so the next few sections explore alternative
definitions.
One crude, but revealing method of assessing how commonly these terms are used, is to use
the Google syntax which returns the number of pages which contain a particular phrase in
their body or title.
Type into Google the following phrases in double quotes or use intitle: “phrase” for these
phrases and note the number of pages (at the top right hand of results page):
Phrase
“Internet marketing”
“E-marketing”
“Digital marketing”
“E-business”
“E-commerce”
Internet marketing
The application of the
Internet and related
digital technologies in
conjunction with
traditional
communications to
achieve marketing
objectives.
visit the
w.w.w.
well as other digital media such as wireless or mobile and media for delivering digital
television such as cable and satellite.
In practice, Internet marketing will include the use of a company web site in conjunc-
tion with online promotional techniques described in Chapter 8 such as search engine
marketing, interactive advertising, e-mail marketing and partnership arrangements with
other web sites. These techniques are used to support objectives of acquiring new cus-
tomers and providing services to existing customers that help develop the customer
relationship. However, for Internet marketing to be successful there is still a necessity for
integration of these techniques with traditional media such as print, TV and direct mail.
E-marketing defined
The term ‘Internet marketing’ tends to refer to an external perspective of how the
Internet can be used in conjunction with traditional media to acquire and deliver serv-
ices to customers. An alternative term is e-marketing or electronic marketing (see for
example McDonald and Wilson, 1999 and Smith and Chaffey, 2005) which can be con-
sidered to have a broader scope since it refers to digital media such as web, e-mail and
wireless media, but also includes management of digital customer data and electronic
customer relationship management systems (e-CRM systems).
The role of e-marketing in supporting marketing is suggested by applying the defini-
tion of marketing by the Chartered Institute of Marketing (www
.cim.co.uk
):
Marketing is the management process responsible for identifying, anticipating and satisfy-
ing customer requirements profitably.
This definition emphasises the focus of marketing on the customer, while at the same
time implying a need to link to other business operations to achieve this profitability. Smith
and Chaffey (2005) note that e-marketing can be used to support these aims as follows:
Identifying – the Internet can be used for marketing research to find out customers’
needs and wants (Chapters 7 and 9).
 
Anticipating – the Internet provides an additional channel by which customers can
access information and make purchases – understanding this demand is key to gov-
erning resource allocation to e-marketing as explained in Chapters 2 and 4.
 
Satisfying – a key success factor in e-marketing is achieving customer satisfaction
through the electronic channel, which raises issues such as: is the site easy to use,
does it perform adequately, what is the standard of associated customer service and
how are physical products dispatched? These issues of customer relationship manage-
ment are discussed further in Chapters 6 and 7.
A broader definition of marketing has been developed by Dibb, Simkin, Pride and
Ferrell (Dibb et al., 2001):
Marketing consists of individual and organisational activities that facilitate and expedite
satisfying exchange relationships in a dynamic environment through the creation, distribu-
tion, promotion and pricing of goods, services and ideas.
This definition is useful since it highlights different marketing activities necessary to
achieve the ‘exchange relationship’, namely product development, pricing, promotion
and distribution. We will review the way in which the Internet affects these elements of
the marketing mix in Chapter 5.
WHAT IS INTERNET MARKETING?
9
E-marketing
Achieving marketing
objectives through use
of electronic
communications
technology.
Digital marketing defined
Digital marketing is yet another term similar to Internet marketing. We use it here,
because it is a term increasingly used by specialist e-marketing agencies and the new
media trade publications such as New Media Age (www
.nma.co.uk
) and Revolution
(www
.r
evolutionmagazine.com
). The Institute of Direct Marketing (IDM) has also
adopted the term to refer to its specialist professional qualifications. 
To help explain the scope and approaches used for digital marketing the IDM has
developed a more detailed explanation of digital marketing:
Digital marketing involves:
Applying these technologies which form online channels to market:
–Web, e-mail, databases, plus mobile/wireless and digital TV.
To achieve these objectives:
–Support marketing activities aimed at achieving profitable acquisition and retention of
customers ... within a multi-channel buying process and customer lifecycle.
Through using these marketing tactics:
–Recognising the strategic importance of digital technologies and developing a planned
approach to reach and migrate customers to online services through e-communications
and traditional communications. Retention is achieved through improving our customer
knowledge (of their profiles, behaviour, value and loyalty drivers), then delivering inte-
grated, targeted communications and online services that match their individual needs.
Let’s now look at each part of this description in more detail. The first part of the
description illustrates the range of access platforms and communications tools that form
the online channels which e-marketers use to build and develop relationships with cus-
tomers. The access platforms or hardware include PCs, PDAs, mobile phones and
interactive digital TV and these deliver content and enable interaction through different
online communication tools such as organisation web sites, portals, search engines,
blogs (see Chapter 8), e-mail, instant messaging and text messaging. Some also include
traditional voice telephony as part of digital marketing. 
For example, an online bank uses many of these technologies to communicate with
its customers according to the customers’ preferences – some prefer to use the web,
others wireless or interactive TV and others traditional channels. Svennevig (2004) sum-
marises the growth in the usage of these digital technologies. 
The second part of the description shows that it should not be the technology that
drives digital marketing, but the business returns from gaining new customers and
maintaining relationships with existing customers. It also emphasises how digital mar-
keting does not occur in isolation, but is most effective when it is integrated with other
communications channels such as phone, direct mail or face-to-face. As we have said,
the role of the Internet in supporting multi-channel marketing is another recurring
theme in this book and Chapters 5 and 6 in particular explain its role in supporting dif-
ferent customer communications channels and distribution channels. Online channels
should also be used to support the whole buying process from pre-sale to sale to post-
sale and further development of customer relationships. 
The final part of the description summarises approaches to customer-centric e-market-
ing. It shows how success online requires a planned approach to migrate existing
customers to online channels and acquire new customers by selecting the appropriate mix
of e-communications and traditional communications. Retention of online customers
CHAPTER 1 · AN INTRODUCTION TO INTERNET MARKETING
10
Digital marketing
This has a similar
meaning to ‘electronic
marketing’ – both
describe the
management and
execution of marketing
using electronic media
such as the web, 
e-mail, interactive TV
and wireless media in
conjunction with digital
data about customers’
characterstics and
behaviour.
Blogs
Personal online diary,
journal or news source
compiled by one person
or several people.
Multi-channel
marketing
Customer
communications and
product distribution are
supported by a
combination of digital
and traditional
channels at different
points in the buying
cycle.
needs to be based on developing customer insight by researching their characteristics,
behaviour, what they value and what keeps them loyal, and then delivering tailored, rele-
vant web and e-mail communications. 
E-commerce and e-business defined
The terms ‘e-commerce’ and ‘e-business’ are often used in a similar context to ‘Internet
marketing’ but their scope is different. It is important for those managing digital tech-
nologies within any organisations to achieve clarity on the meaning of e-marketing,
e-commerce and e-business to help define the scope of what they are trying to achieve!
Electronic commerce (e-commerce) is often thought to simply refer to buying and selling
using the Internet; people immediately think of consumer retail purchases from compa-
nies such as Amazon. However, e-commerce refers to both financial and informational
electronically mediated transactions between an organisation and any third party it
deals with (Chaffey, 2006). It follows that non-financial transactions such as inbound
customer e-mail enquiries and outbound e-mail broadcasts to prospects and customers
are also aspects of e-commerce that need management.
When evaluating the impact of e-commerce on an organisation’s marketing, it is
instructive to identify the role of buy-side and sell-side e-commerce transactions as
depicted in Figure 1.5. Sell-side e-commerce refers to transactions involved with selling
products to an organisation’s customers. Internet marketing is used directly to support
sell-side e-commerce. Buy-side e-commerce refers to business-to-business transactions to
procure resources needed by an organisation from its suppliers. This is typically the
responsibility of those in the operational and procurement functions of an organisation.
Remember, though, that each e-commerce transaction can be considered from two per-
spectives: sell-side from the perspective of the selling organisation and buy-side from the
perspective of the buying organisation. So in organisational marketing we need to
understand the drivers and barriers to buy-side e-commerce in order to accommodate
the needs of organisational buyers. For example, marketers from RS Components
(www
.rswww
.com
) promote its sell-side e-commerce service by hosting seminars for
buyers within the purchasing department of its customers that explain the cost savings
available through e-commerce.
E-business defined
Given that Figure 1.5 depicts different types of e-commerce, how does this relate to
e-business? IBM (www
.ibm.com/e-business
), one of the first suppliers to coin the term
explains it as follows:
e-business (e’ biz’ nis): The transformation of key business processes through the use of
Internet technologies.
Referring back to Figure 1.5, the key business processes in the IBM definition are the
organisational processes or units in the centre of the figure. They include research and
development, marketing, manufacturing and inbound and outbound logistics. The buy-
side e-commerce processes with suppliers and the sell-side e-commerce processes
involving exchanges with distributors and customers can also be considered to be key
business processes. So e-commerce can best be conceived of as a subset of e-business, and
this is the perspective we will use in this book.
WHAT IS INTERNET MARKETING?
11
Customer insight
Knowledge about
customers’ needs,
characteristics,
preferences and
behaviours based on
analysis of qualitative
and quantitative data.
Specific insights can be
used to inform
marketing tactics
directed at groups of
customers with shared
characteristics.
Electronic
commerce 
(e-commerce)
All financial and
informational
electronically mediated
exchanges between an
organisation and its
external stakeholders.
Sell-side 
e-commerce
E-commerce
transactions between a
supplier organisation
and its customers.
Buy-side 
e-commerce
E-commerce
transactions between a
purchasing
organisation and its
suppliers.
Electronic business 
(e-business)
All electronically
mediated information
exchanges, both within
an organisation and
with external
stakeholders,
supporting the range of
business processes.
Documents you may be interested
Documents you may be interested