mvc show pdf in div : Adding text to pdf Library application component .net azure wpf mvc 5G7BGE3Z6KNWFOHBFCWN30-part1367

Online and multi-channel service quality
In the last part of Chapter 7, we review how the online presence can be managed in
order to achieve online service quality which is also a key element leading to customer
satisfaction and loyalty (Figure 6.16).
E-CRM uses common approaches or processes to achieve online customer acquisition
and retention. Refer to Figure 6.5 for a summary of a common, effective process for
online relationship building to achieve the different stages of the customer lifecycle.
In the following sections we proceed through the different stages in more detail.
CHAPTER 6 · RELATIONSHIP MARKETING USING THE INTERNET
272
Approaches to implementing e-CRM
Figure 6.5 A summary of an effective process of permission-based online relationship building
Direct mail
Customer
database
O
n
l
i
n
e
m
e
d
i
a
O
f
f
l
i
n
e
m
e
d
i
a
1Drive traffic
1Drive traffic
2a Incentivise & 2b profile
4Speak again
4a Convert to action
3a Convert to action
3Speak
Adding text to pdf - insert text into PDF content in C#.net, ASP.NET, MVC, Ajax, WinForms, WPF
XDoc.PDF for .NET, providing C# demo code for inserting text to PDF file
adding text to a pdf in acrobat; add text field to pdf acrobat
Adding text to pdf - VB.NET PDF insert text library: insert text into PDF content in vb.net, ASP.NET, MVC, Ajax, WinForms, WPF
Providing Demo Code for Adding and Inserting Text to PDF File Page in VB.NET Program
adding text pdf files; add text to pdf
Stage 1: Attract new and existing customers to site
For new customers, the goal is to attract quality visitors who are likely to convert to the
site using all the online and offline methods of site promotion described in Chapter 8,
such as search engines, portals and banner advertisements. These promotion methods
should aim to highlight the value proposition of the site and it is important to commu-
nicate a range of incentives such as free information or competitions (and others shown
in top left box of Figure 6.7). To encourage new users to use the one-to-one facilities of
the web site, information about the web site or incentives to visit it can be built into
existing direct marketing campaigns such as catalogue mailshots.
Stage 2a: Incentivise visitors to action
The first time a visitor arrives at a site is the most important since if he or she does not
find the desired information or experience, they may not return. We need to move from
using the customer using the Internet in pull mode, to the marketer using the Internet
in push mode through e-mail and traditional direct mail communications (Chapter 8).
The quality and credibility of the site must be sufficient to retain the visitor’s interest so
that he or she stays on the site. To initiate one-to-one, offers or incentives must be
prominent, ideally on the home page. It can be argued that converting unprofiled visi-
tors to profiled visitors is a major design objective of a web site. Two types of incentives
can be identified: lead generation offers and sales generation offers.
Types of offers marketers can devise include information value, entertainment value,
monetary value and privileged access to information (such as that only available on
an extranet).
Stage 2b: Capture customer information to maintain relationship
Capturing profile information is commonly achieved through an online form such as
Figure 6.6 which the customer must complete to receive the offer. It is important to
design these forms to maximise their completion. Factors which are important are:
Branding to reassure the customer;
 
Key profile fields to capture the most important information to segment the customer
for future communications, in this case, postcode, airport and preferred activities (not
too many questions must be asked);
 
Mandatory fields – mark fields which must be completed, or as in this case, only
include mandatory figures;
 
Privacy – ‘we will not share’ is the magic phrase to counter the customer’s main fear of
their details being passed on. A full privacy statement should be available for those
who need it;
 
KISS – ‘Keep It Simple, Stupid’ is a well-known American phrase;
 
WIFM – ‘What’s in it for me?’ Explain why the customer’s data is being captured –
which benefits it will give them;
 
Validate e-mail, postcode – check data as far as possible to make it accurate.
APPROACHES TO IMPLEMENTING E-CRM
273
Lead generation
offers
Offered in return for
customers providing
their contact details
and characteristics.
Commonly used in B2B
marketing where free
information such as a
report or a seminar will
be offered.
Sales generation
offers
Offers that encourage
product trial. A coupon
redeemed against a
purchase is a classic
example.
VB.NET PDF Text Box Edit Library: add, delete, update PDF text box
Provide VB.NET Users with Solution of Adding Text Box to PDF Page in VB.NET Project. Adding text box is another way to add text to PDF page.
how to add text to a pdf file in reader; how to enter text in pdf
C# PDF Text Box Edit Library: add, delete, update PDF text box in
Provide .NET SDK library for adding text box to PDF document in .NET WinForms application. Adding text box is another way to add text to PDF page.
how to add text field to pdf; add text boxes to a pdf
CHAPTER 6 · RELATIONSHIP MARKETING USING THE INTERNET
274
Figure 6.6 Opt-in customer profiling form
VB.NET PDF Page Insert Library: insert pages into PDF file in vb.
Support adding PDF page number. Offer PDF page break inserting function. DLLs for Adding Page into PDF Document in VB.NET Class. Add necessary references:
how to insert a text box in pdf; adding text pdf
VB.NET PDF Library SDK to view, edit, convert, process PDF file
Support adding protection features to PDF file by adding password, digital signatures and redaction feature. Various of PDF text and images processing features
how to enter text in pdf file; add text boxes to pdf document
As well as online data capture, it is important to use all customer touchpoints to cap-
ture information and keep it up-to-date since this affects our capabilities to target
customers accurately. Figure 6.7 provides a good way for a company to review all the
possible methods of capturing e-mail addresses and other profile information:
Apart from the contact information, the other important information to collect is a
method of profiling the customer so that appropriate information can be delivered to
them. For example, B2B company RS Components asks for:
 
industry sector;
 
purchasing influence;
 
specific areas of product interest;
 
how many people you manage;
 
total number of employees in company.
Stage 3: Maintain dialogue using online communication
To build the relationship between company and customer there are three main Internet-
based methods of physically making the communication. These are:
1 Send e-mail to customer.
2 Display specific information on web site when the customer logs in. This is referred to
as ‘personalisation’.
3 Use push technology to deliver information to the individual.
APPROACHES TO IMPLEMENTING E-CRM
275
Figure 6.7 Matrix of customer touchpoints for collecting and updating customer 
e-mail contact and other profile information
O
f
f
l
i
n
e
t
o
u
c
h
p
o
i
n
t
s
Existing customers
• Capture e-mail when customer first
registers or purchases online
• E-newsletter and other methods given
on left
Online incentive such as prize-draw
(B2C) or white paper download (B2B)
Viral marketing
E-newsletter opt-in on site
Registration to view content or submit
content to a community forum
Renting list, co-branded e-mail or
advertising in third party e-newsletter to
encourage opt-in
Co-registration with third party sites
• Paper order form, customer
registration/product warranty form
• Sales reps – face-to-face
• Contact centre – by phone
• Point of sale for retailers
Direct mail offer perhaps driving visitors
to web
Trade shows or conference
Paper response to traditional direct
mail communication
Phone response to direct mail or ad
New customers
O
n
l
i
n
e
t
o
u
c
h
p
o
i
n
t
s
Customer profiling
Using the web site to
find out customers’
specific interests and
characteristics.
VB.NET PDF Text Add Library: add, delete, edit PDF text in vb.net
VB.NET PDF - Annotate Text on PDF Page in VB.NET. Professional VB.NET Solution for Adding Text Annotation to PDF Page in VB.NET. Add
how to add text to a pdf document using reader; how to insert text into a pdf using reader
C# PDF Annotate Library: Draw, edit PDF annotation, markups in C#.
Provide users with examples for adding text box to PDF and edit font size and color in text box field in C#.NET program. C#.NET: Draw Markups on PDF File.
add text to pdf online; adding text to pdf form
Dialogue will also be supplemented by other tools such as mailshots, phone calls or
personal visits, depending on the context. For example, after a customer registers on the
RS Components web site, the company sends out a letter to the customer with promo-
tional offers and a credit-card-sized reminder of the user name and password to use to
log in to the site.
As well as these physical methods of maintaining contact with customers, many other
marketing devices can be used to encourage users to return to a site (see also Chapter 8).
These include:
 
loyalty schemes – customers will return to the site to see how many loyalty points
they have collected, or convert them into offers. An airline such as American Airlines,
with its Advantage Club, is a good example of this;
 
news about a particular industry (for a business-to-business site);
 
new product information and price promotions;
 
industry-specific information to help the customer do his or her job; 
 
personal reminders – the US company 1-800-Flowers has reminder programmes that
automatically remind customers of important occasions and dates;
 
customer support – Cisco’s customers log on to the site over one million times a
month to receive technical assistance, check orders or download software. The online
service is so well received that nearly 70 per cent of all customer enquiries are han-
dled online.
While adding value for their customers by means of these various mechanisms, com-
panies will be looking to use the opportunity to make sales to customers by, for example,
cross- or up-selling.
Stage 4: Maintain dialogue using offline communication
Here, direct mail or e-mail is the most effective form of communication since this can be
tailored to be consistent with the user’s preference. The aim here may be to drive traffic
to the web site as follows:
 
online competition;
 
online web seminar (webinar);
 
sales promotion.
When e-mail addresses are captured offline a common problem is the level of errors
in the address – this can often reach a double-figure percentage. Plan for this also – staff
should be trained in the importance of getting the e-mail address correct and how to
check for an invalid address format. Some call centres have even incentivised staff
according to the number of valid e-mail addresses they collect. When collecting
addresses on paper, some practical steps can help, such as allowing sufficient space for
the e-mail address and asking for it to be written in CAPS.
A further objective in stage 3 and 4 is to improve customer information quality. In
particular, e-mails may bounce – in which case offline touchpoints as indicated in Figure
6.7 need to be planned to collect these e-mail addresses.
The balance between online communications (stage 3) and offline communications
(stage 4) should be determined by how responsive customers are to different communi-
cations channels since stage 3 is a lower-cost route.
CHAPTER 6 · RELATIONSHIP MARKETING USING THE INTERNET
276
C# PDF insert image Library: insert images into PDF in C#.net, ASP
application? To help you solve this technical problem, we provide this C#.NET PDF image adding control, XDoc.PDF for .NET. Similar
add text to pdf reader; add text pdf acrobat
C# PDF Page Insert Library: insert pages into PDF file in C#.net
By using reliable APIs, C# programmers are capable of adding and inserting (empty) PDF page or pages from various file formats, such as PDF, Tiff, Word, Excel
add text pdf professional; how to insert pdf into email text
The IDIC approach to relationship building
An alternative process for building customer relationships online has been suggested by
Peppers and Rogers (1998) and Peppers et al. (1999). They suggest the IDIC approach as
a framework for customer relationship management and using the web effectively to
form and build relationships (Figure 6.8). Examples of the application of IDIC include:
1 Customer identification. This stresses the need to identify each customer on their first
visit and subsequent visits. Common methods for identification are use of cookies or
asking a customer to log on to a site. In subsequent customer contacts, additional cus-
tomer information should be obtained using a process known as ‘drip irrigation’.
Since information will become out-of-date through time, it is important to verify,
update and delete customer information.
2 Customer differentiation. This refers to building a profile to help segment customers.
Appropriate services are then developed for each customer. Activities suggested are
identifying the top customers, non-profitable customers, large customers that have
ordered less in recent years and customers that buy more products from competitors.
3 Customer interaction. These are interactions provided on-site such as customer service
questions or creating a tailored product. More generally, companies should listen to
the needs and experiences of major customers. Interactions should be in the cus-
tomer-preferred channel, for example e-mail, phone or post.
4 Customer communication. This refers to dynamic personalisation or mass customisa-
tion of content or e-mails according to the segmentation achieved at the acquisition
stage. This stage also involves further market research to find out if products can be
further tailored to meet customers’ needs.
APPROACHES TO IMPLEMENTING E-CRM
277
Drip irrigation
Collecting information
about customer needs
through their lifetime.
Figure 6.8 The elements of the IDIC framework
Communicate
Identify
Differentiate
Interact
• Incentivise visitors in order
to be able to profile them and
recognise them on repeat visits.
Place customers in segments and
develop differentiated content,
offers and possibly products for each
group.
Communicate differentiated
proposition.
Learn more about customer needs
through continuous dialogue,
incentivised where necessary.
Techniques for managing customer activity and value
Within the online customer base of an organisation, there will be customers that have dif-
ferent levels of activity in usage of online services or in sales. A good example is a bank –
some customers may use the online account once a week, others much less frequently and
some not at all. Figure 6.9 illustrates the different levels of activity. A key part of e-CRM
strategy is to define measures which indicate activity levels and then develop tactics to
increase activity levels through more frequent use. An online magazine could segment its
customers in this way, also based on returning visitors. Even for companies without trans-
actional service a similar concept can apply if they use e-mail marketing – some customers
will regularly read and interact with the e-mail and others will not. 
Objectives and corresponding tactics can be set for:
Increasing number of new users per month and annually (separate objectives will be
set for existing bank customers and new bank customers) through promoting online
services to drive visitors to the web site.
 
Increasing percentage of active users (an appropriate threshold can be used – for some
other organisations could be set at 7, 30 or 90 days). Using direct communications
such as e-mail, personalised web site messages, direct mail and phone communications
to new, dormant and inactive users increases the percentage of active users.
 
Decreasing percentage of dormant users (were once new or active – could be sub-
categories), but have not used the service or responded to communications within a
defined time period such as three months.
 
Decreasing percentage of inactive users (or non-activated) users. These are those who
signed up for a service such as online banking and had a username issued, but they
have not used the service.
You can see that corresponding strategies can be developed for each of these objectives.
Another key metric, in fact the key retention metric for e-commerce sites, refers to
repeat business. The importance of retention rate metrics was highlighted by Agrawal et
al. (2001). The main retention metrics they mention which influence profitability are:
 
Repeat-customer base – the proportion of the customer base that has made repeat pur-
chases;
 
Number of transactions per repeat customer – this indicates the stage of development of
the customer in the relationship (another similar measure is number of product cate-
gories purchased);
 
Revenue per transaction of repeat customer – this is a proxy for lifetime value since it
gives average order value.
Lifetime value modelling
An appreciation of lifetime value (LTV) is key to the theory and practice of customer rela-
tionship management. However, while the term is often used, calculation of LTV is not
straightforward, so many organisations do not calculate it. Lifetime value is defined as
the total net benefit that a customer, or group of customers, will provide a company
over their total relationship with the company. Modelling is based on estimating the
income and costs associated with each customer over a period of time and then calculat-
ing the net present value in current monetary terms using a discount rate value applied
over the period.
CHAPTER 6 · RELATIONSHIP MARKETING USING THE INTERNET
278
Lifetime value (LTV)
Lifetime value is the
total net benefit that a
customer or group of
customers will provide
a company over their
total relationship with a
company.
There are different degrees of sophistication in calculating LTV. These are indicated in
Figure 6.10. Option 1 is a practical way or approximate proxy for future LTV, but the true
LTV is the future value of the customer at an individual level.
APPROACHES TO IMPLEMENTING E-CRM
279
Figure 6.9 Activity segmentation of a site requiring registration
New user (registered within last 60 days)
(a)
Month 1 Month 2 Month 3 Month 4 Month 5 Month 6
3
V
i
s
i
t
o
r
s
e
s
s
i
o
n
s
2
1
0
Active user (has used within last 60 days)
(b)
Month 1 Month 2 Month 3 Month 4 Month 5 Month 6
6
V
i
s
i
t
o
r
s
e
s
s
i
o
n
s
4
2
0
Dormant user (has not used within last 60 days)
(c)
Month 1 Month 2 Month 3 Month 4 Month 5 Month 6
3
V
i
s
i
t
o
r
s
e
s
s
i
o
n
s
2
1
0
Inactive user (registered, but not used)
(d)
Month 1 Month 2 Month 3 Month 4 Month 5 Month 6
1
V
i
s
i
t
o
r
s
e
s
s
i
o
n
s
0.5
0
Figure 6.10 Different representations of lifetime value calculation
F
u
t
u
r
e
Segment
1
Individual
H
i
s
t
o
r
i
c
2
3
4
Lifetime value modelling at a segment level (4) is vital within marketing since it
answers the question:
How much can I afford to invest in acquiring a new customer?
If online marketers try to answer this from a short-term perspective, as is often the case,
i.e. by judging it based on the profit from a single sale on an e-commerce site, there are
two problems:
1 We become very focused on short-term return on investment (ROI) and so may not
invest sufficiently to grow our business.
2 We assume that each new customer is worth precisely the same to us and we ignore
differentials in loyalty and profitability between differing types of customer. 
Lifetime value analysis enables marketers to:
Plan and measure investment in customer acquisition programmes;
 
Identify and compare critical target segments;
 
Measure the effectiveness of alternative customer retention strategies;
 
Establish the true value of a company’s customer base;
 
Make decisions about products and offers;
 
Make decisions about the value of introducing new e-CRM technologies.
Figure 6.11 gives an example of how LTV can be used to develop a CRM strategy for
different customer groups. Four main types of customers are indicated by their current
and future value as bronze, silver, gold and platinum. Distinct customer groupings (cir-
cles) are identified according to their current value (as indicated by current profitability)
and future value as indicated by lifetime value calculations. Each of these groups will
have a customer profile signature based on their demographics, so this can be used for
customer selection. Different strategies are developed for different customer groups
within the four main value groupings. Some bronze customers such as groups A and B
realistically do not have development potential and are typically unprofitable, so the
CHAPTER 6 · RELATIONSHIP MARKETING USING THE INTERNET
280
Figure 6.11 An example of an LTV-based segmentation plan
Retain
and Extend
Gold
Retain
Reduce
costs
Extend
Platinum
Bronze
Silver
1
2
3
F
Y
X
A
B
C
G
H
High
High
Low
Low
C
u
r
r
e
n
t
v
a
l
u
e
Future potential value
aim is to reduce costs in communications and if they do not remain as customers this is
acceptable. Some bronze customers such as group C may have potential for growth so
for these the strategy is to extend their purchases. Silver customers are targeted with cus-
tomer extension offers and gold customers are extended where possible although they
have relatively little growth potential. Platinum customers are the best customers, so it is
important to understand the communication preferences of these customers and to not
over-communicate unless there is evidence that they may defect.
To illustrate another application of LTV and how it is calculated, take a look at the last
example in Activity 6.1.
APPROACHES TO IMPLEMENTING E-CRM
281
Activity 6.1
Charity uses lifetime value modelling to assess returns from new
e-CRM system
A charity is considering implementing a new e-mail marketing system to increase donations from
its donors. The charity’s main role is as a relief agency which aims to reduce poverty through
providing aid, particularly to the regions that need it most. Currently, its only e-mail activity is a
monthly e-newsletter received by its 200,000 subscribers which features its current campaigns
and appeals. It hopes to increase donations by using a more targeted approach to increase
donations based on previous customer behaviour. The e-mail system will integrate with the
donor database which contains information on customer profiles and previous donations. 
The company is considering three solutions which will cost between £50,000 and £100,000 in
the first year. In the charity, all such investments are assessed using lifetime value modelling.
Table 6.3 is a lifetime value model showing customer value derived from using the current
system and marketing activities.
A Donors – this is the number of initial donors. It declines each year dependent on the
retention rate (row B).
B Retention rate – in lifetime value modelling it is usually found to increase year-on-year, since
customers who stay loyal are more likely to remain loyal.
C Donations per annum – likewise, the charity finds that the average contributions per year
increase through time within this group of customers.
D Total donations– calculated through multiplying rows B and C.
E Net profit (at 20% margin) – LTV modelling is based on profit contributed by this group of
customers, row D is multiplied by 0.2.
Table 6.3 Lifetime value model for customer base for current system
Year 1
Year 2
Year 3
Year 4
Year 5
A Donors
100,000
50,000
27,500
16,500
10,725
B Retention
50%
55%
60%
65%
70%
C Donations 
£100
£120
£140
£160
£180
per annum
D Total donations
£10,000,000
£6,000,000
£3,850,000
£2,640,000
£1,930,500
E Net profit
£2,000,000.0 £1,200,000.0
£770,000.0
£528,000.0
£386,100.0
(at 20% margin)
F Discount rate
1
0.86
0.7396
0.636
0.547
G NPV contribution
£2,000,000.0 £1,032,000.0
£569,492.0
£335,808.0
£211,196.7
H Cumulative NPV  £2,000,000.0 £3,032,000.0 £3,601,492.0 £3,937,300.0 £4,148,496.7
contribution
I Lifetime value at 
£20.0
£30.3
£36.0
£39.4
£41.5
net present value
Documents you may be interested
Documents you may be interested